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GSFS0172A-S18 *
Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0172A-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
ART
Writing Gender & Sexuality
Writing Gender and Sexuality
In this course we will read, discuss, and write creative works that explore issues of gender and sexuality. Readings will include stories, poems, and essays by James Baldwin, Ana Castillo, Peggy Munson, Eli Claire, Junot Diaz, Audre Lorde, Michelle Tea, Alison Bechdel, and others. The course will include writing workshops with peers and individual meetings with the instructor. Every student will revise a range of pieces across genres and produce a final portfolio. We will do some contemplative work and will engage with choreographer Maree Remalia to explore movement in conversation with writing, gender, and sex. 3 hrs. lect.
Instructors:
Catharine Wright
Location:
Adirondack House CLT (ADK CLT)
Schedule:
11:00am-12:15pm on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0180A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
AMST0180A-S18 *
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AMR NOR SOC
Critical Studies of Sport
Please register via AMST 0180A
Critical Studies of Sport
Sports offer important contexts for the study of social relations, inequalities, and differences in North America. Sports exist as an important arena where ideas around class, gender, sexuality, race, ability, and status are embodied and performed. In this course we will discuss the significance of sports to ideas of the self as well as in broader cultural, social, economic, and political realms. We will analyze a variety of issues including the relationship of sports to media, celebrity, money, religion, and education. We will also investigate the significance of sports and athletes to contemporary processes of globalization. (Not open to students who have taken AMST 1003).
Instructors:
Rachael Joo
Location:
Axinn Center 219 (AXN 219)
Schedule:
3:00pm-4:15pm on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0205A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0205A-S18 *
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AMR CW NOR SOC
Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
Please register via WRPR 0205A
Race, Rhetoric, and Protest
In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect
Instructors:
James Sanchez
Location:
Atwater Dining 102 (ATD 102)
Schedule:
9:30am-10:45am on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0209A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
ENVS0209A-S18 *
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AAL CMP SAF SOC
Gender Health Environment
Please register via ENVS 0209A
Gender Health Environment
Growing concern for the protection of the environment and human health has led policy makers and scholars to consider ways in which gender, class, and race and other forms of identity mediate human-environment interactions. In this course we will explore how access to, control over, and distribution of resources influence environmental and health outcomes both in terms of social inequities and ecological decline. Specific issues we will cover include: ecofeminism, food security, population, gendered conservation, environmental toxins, climate change, food justice, and the green revolution. We will draw comparisons between different societies around the globe as well as look at dynamics between individuals within a society. The majority of case studies are drawn from Sub Saharan Africa and Asia, however some comparisons are also made with the United States. 3 hrs. lect.
Instructors:
Mez Baker-Medard
Location:
Hillcrest 103 (HLD 103)
Schedule:
2:50pm-4:05pm on Monday, Wednesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0211A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0211A-S18 *
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AMR CMP CW SOC
Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
Please register via WRPR 0211A
Trickery, Bodies, and Resistance: The Tradition(s) of Rhetoric
How do female-identifying subjects position themselves (and their bodies) rhetorically in a male-dominated society? How do Black and Latinx rhetorical traditions of call-and-response and code-switching connect with and resist classical traditions of oration and stylistics? In this course we will study the tradition(s) of rhetoric by moving from the trickery of sophists to budding works in feminist rhetorics and cultural rhetorics. Students in this class will learn to synthesize the various traditions of rhetoric in historical and contemporary terms and to critically understand cultural customs that exist outside the white, heteronormative Greco-Roman tradition. 3 hrs. lect.
Instructors:
James Sanchez
Location:
Le Chateau 107 (CHT 107)
Schedule:
12:15pm-1:30pm on Monday, Wednesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0223A-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
SOC
Intro to Gay/Lesbian Studies
Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Studies
This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gay and lesbian studies. We will explore three topics: queer theory, the construction and representation of homosexuality in history, and queer culture before and after Stonewall. Readings will include works by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, George Chauncey, John Boswell, Lillian Faderman, Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, Michael Cunningham, and Tony Kushner. 3 hrs. lect./3 screen
Instructors:
Kevin Moss
Location:
Freeman FR2 (FIC FR2)
Schedule:
1:30pm-2:45pm on Tuesday, Thursday at FIC FR2 (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
7:30pm-10:25pm on Wednesday at FIC FR2 (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0267A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
FMMC0267A-S18 *
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
SOC
Gender, Sexuality, and Media
Please register via FMMC 0267A
Gender and Sexuality in Media
In this course, we will explore the intersecting roles played by gender and sexuality in our media, focusing specifically on film, television, and digital culture. We will examine the multiple ways in which popular media texts construct and communicate gender and sexuality, and we will analyze the role of gender and sexuality in the processes of spectatorship and meaning-making. We will study a wide range of theories of gender and sexuality in media including feminist film theory, queer media theory, and literature on gender and sexuality in video game history and culture. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen.
Instructors:
Louisa Stein
Location:
Axinn Center 109 (AXN 109)
Schedule:
1:30pm-4:15pm on Tuesday at AXN 109 (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
7:30pm-10:25pm on Tuesday at AXN 232 (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0289A-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AMR CMP NOR SOC
Introduction to Queer Critique
Introduction to Queer Critique
In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
Instructors:
Carly Thomsen
Location:
Warner Hall 202 (WNS 202)
Schedule:
2:50pm-4:05pm on Monday, Wednesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0290A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
RELI0290A-S18 *
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
EUR HIS PHL
Women and the Sacred
Please register via RELI 0290A
Women and the Sacred in Late Antiquity and Byzantium
This course will explore the female religious experience in Greco-Roman antiquity and Early Christianity. We shall trace the transition from the mystery religions of Demeter and Isis in the Eastern Mediterranean to the cult of Mary the Mother of God (Theotokos) and the worship of female saints. Drawing on a wide range of sources (hymns, saints' Lives, Apocryphal Gospels, Patristic texts, and icons), we shall study the varieties of female devotion and examine the roles available to women in the early Church: deaconesses and desert mothers, monastics and martyrs, poets and rulers. Different theoretical approaches will enable us to ask a series of questions: were women in the early Church considered capable of holiness? To what extent did the female 'gifts of the spirit' challenge church authority? What is distinct about the feminine experience of the divine? Finally, we shall consider the vision and poetics of female spirituality in select modern poets. 3 hrs. lect.
Instructors:
Maria Hatjigeorgiou
Location:
Le Chateau 107 (CHT 107)
Schedule:
3:00pm-4:15pm on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0303A-S18 *
Cross-Listed As:
WRPR0303A-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
CMP CW LIT SOC
Outlaw Women
Outlaw Women
In this course we will read and discuss literary novels that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, “madwomen,” servants, revolutionaries. We will take a critical and transnational approach to issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and religion. Texts will include Toni Morrison’s Sula, Audre Lorde’s Zami, Marguerite Duras’ The Lover, Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy, Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda, and Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. Students will write formal literary analysis,and narrative criticism. Together we will engage in some contemplative practice and study selected films. (Any one GSFS Course) (Critical Race Feminisms; National/Transnational Feminisms)/
Instructors:
Catharine Wright
Location:
Axinn Center 104 (AXN 104)
Schedule:
1:30pm-2:45pm on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
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