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GSFS0305A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
LNGT0305A-S18 *
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
CMP EUR
Holocaust/Exile in Translation
Please register via LNGT 0305A
The Holocaust and Exile in Translation
For decades, readers across the globe have learned about the atrocities of the Holocaust through translation. Translators have brought us testimonials, and accounts about imprisonment, life in concentration camps, exile, resistance, and survival during World War II in a wide variety of languages. In this course we will study how translators and publishers have shaped this vibrant literature according to the priorities of different cultural and linguistic communities. Combining theory and praxis, we will analyze the multilingual journeys of influential works such as The Diary of Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel’s Night through a translation studies lens. Students will also translate texts from various genres including autobiography, children’s and young adult literature, subtitle audiovisual testimonial footage and film and get a first exposure to simultaneous interpretation. (Advanced skills in one language in addition to English required). 3 hrs. lect.
Instructors:
Karin Hanta
Location:
Adirondack House CLT (ADK CLT)
Schedule:
3:00pm-4:15pm on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0314A-S18 *
Cross-Listed As:
SOAN0314A-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
NOR SOC
Sociology of Heterosexuality
Sociology of Heterosexuality
Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. 3 hrs. lect.
Instructors:
Laurie Essig
Location:
Ross Commons Dining 011 (RCD 011)
Schedule:
9:30am-10:45am on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0320A-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
CMP SOC
Feminist Theory
Feminist Theory
The course offers an overview of key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. We will examine foundational theoretical texts that have animated the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Working within a transnational perspective, the course encompasses texts which fall under the categories of critical race and critical sexuality studies. (GSFS 0200 or GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0289) 3 hr. lect.
Instructors:
Sujata Moorti
Location:
Munroe Hall 407 (MNR 407)
Schedule:
11:00am-12:15pm on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0325A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
AMST0325A-S18 *
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AMR HIS NOR
American Misogyny
Please register via AMST 0325A
American Misogyny
In this course we will explore the place of misogyny in U.S. media and politics. Early topics will include film noir, Cold War gender scapegoating, and lesbian pulp fiction. Subsequent topics will include the backlash against second-wave feminism, the rise of “post-feminism,” and the impact of reality TV and social media on feminist and antifeminist expression. We will conclude by examining how misogyny informs U.S. culture and politics in the Trump era. Throughout the course, we will consider how discourses of misogyny are inflected by white, cisgender, ableist, ageist, and class privilege. 3 hrs. lect.
Instructors:
Holly Allen
Location:
Library 201 (LIB 201)
Schedule:
12:15pm-1:30pm on Monday, Wednesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0328A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
ARBC0328A-S18 *
Type:
Seminar
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AAL CMP CW MDE SOC
Gender Politics in Arab World
Please Register Via ARBC 0328A
Gender Politics of the Arab World
The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. (Any one GSFS course or by approval) 3 hrs. Sem.
Instructors:
Dima Ayoub
Location:
Munroe Hall 320 (MNR 320)
Schedule:
1:30pm-4:15pm on Wednesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0329A-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AMR CMP NOR SOC
Politics of Reproduction
The Politics of Reproduction: Sex, Abortion, and Motherhood
In this course we will examine contemporary reproductive issues both in the United States and around the world. We will work to understand both how reproductive politics are informed by broader cultural ideas regarding gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, and geography and also how ideas about reproduction reinforce conceptions of these very identity markers and ways of experiencing the world. Because requirements for being considered a “good” woman are intimately tied to what it means to be a “good” mother, challenging dominant understandings of gender and sexuality requires critical engagement with ideas about reproduction. 3 hrs. lect. (Critical Race Feminisms, National/Transnational Feminisms)/
Instructors:
Carly Thomsen
Location:
Warner Hall 203 (WNS 203)
Schedule:
12:15pm-1:30pm on Monday, Wednesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0331A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
CHNS0331A-S18 *
CHNS0331B-S18 *
GSFS0331B-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AAL LIT NOA
Love & Sex in Trad Chinese Lit
Please register via CHNS 0331A
Clouds and Rain: Love and Sexuality in Traditional Chinese Literature (in translation)
This seminar explores a spectrum of traditional attitudes toward romantic love, sexualities, men and women seen through the prism of classical Chinese literature. Fiction and drama will be the main focus with due attention to poetry. Texts to be analyzed include, e.g., pre-6th-century B.C. and subsequent poems; 3rd and 4th-century and later stories of strange romances; the remarkable 7th-century tale of the Dwelling of Playful Goddesses and early 9th-century love story of “Yingying”; the marvelous late 16th-century romantic drama, the Peony Pavilion; the hilarious late 17th-century erotic novella, the Carnal Prayer Mat; and selected chapters from novelistic masterworks such as the late 16th-century and early 17th-century, Jin Ping Mei, and the 18th-century, The Story of the Stone (also known as Dream of the Red Chamber). 3 hrs. lect./disc.
Instructors:
Wei Xu
Location:
Sunderland Lanuage Ctr IL1 (SDL IL1)
Schedule:
7:30pm-8:45pm on Monday, Wednesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0331B-S18
Cross-Listed As:
CHNS0331A-S18 *
CHNS0331B-S18 *
GSFS0331A-S18
Type:
Lecture
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AAL CW LIT NOA
Love & Sex in Trad Chinese Lit
Please register via CHNS 0331B
Clouds and Rain: Love and Sexuality in Traditional Chinese Literature (in translation)
This seminar explores a spectrum of traditional attitudes toward romantic love, sexualities, men and women seen through the prism of classical Chinese literature. Fiction and drama will be the main focus with due attention to poetry. Texts to be analyzed include, e.g., pre-6th-century B.C. and subsequent poems; 3rd and 4th-century and later stories of strange romances; the remarkable 7th-century tale of the Dwelling of Playful Goddesses and early 9th-century love story of “Yingying”; the marvelous late 16th-century romantic drama, the Peony Pavilion; the hilarious late 17th-century erotic novella, the Carnal Prayer Mat; and selected chapters from novelistic masterworks such as the late 16th-century and early 17th-century, Jin Ping Mei, and the 18th-century, The Story of the Stone (also known as Dream of the Red Chamber). 3 hrs. lect./disc.
Instructors:
Wei Xu
Location:
Sunderland Lanuage Ctr IL1 (SDL IL1)
Schedule:
7:30pm-8:45pm on Monday, Wednesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0425A-S18
Type:
Seminar
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
AMR CW HIS NOR SOC
Men and Masculinities
Men and Masculinities
In this course we will consider the creation and performance of masculinities in the American context.  We will ask how men are made and how that making relies on class, race, sexuality, and nation. We will begin with early capitalism and the birth of the ideal man as “market man.”  We will then look at how ideal masculinity depends on the creation of “degenerate” men, like the myth of the hyper-masculinized Black male “beast” and the creation of the mythic mannish lesbian.  We will then trace these late 19th century men and masculinities into our current moment of political machismo, trolling misogyny, bromance, feminist men, hipster men, dandy bois, transmen, and more.  Readings will include: Michael Kimmel, Guyland; C.J. Pascoe and Tristan Bridges, Exploring Masculinities: Identity, Inequality, Continuity and Change; C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School; Judith Halberstam, Female Masculinity, and bell hooks, We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity.  (GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0200 or GSFS 0289) 3 hrs. sem. (Critical Race Feminisms)/
Instructors:
Laurie Essig
Location:
Ross Commons Dining 011 (RCD 011)
Schedule:
3:00pm-4:15pm on Tuesday, Thursday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
GSFS0434A-S18
Cross-Listed As:
PHIL0434A-S18 *
Type:
Seminar
Term:
Spring 2018
Department:
PrgGender/Sexuality/Fem. Study
Requirements Fulfilled:
CMP PHL
Feminist Epistemologies
Please register via PHIL 0434A
Feminist Epistemologies
In recent years, feminist epistemologies, such as feminist standpoint theories and feminist empiricisms, have been extremely influential in developing social theories of knowledge. They have also served as a crucial intellectual tool for feminist theorists trying to understand the connections between social relations of gender and the production of knowledge and ignorance. In this course we will investigate some of the major themes and challenges of feminist epistemologies and feminist philosophies of science: How is knowledge socially situated? What does it mean to look at knowledge through a gendered lens? How is objective knowledge possible according to feminist epistemologies? We will work to understand the influence of feminist epistemologies in contemporary philosophy. We will also consider how feminist epistemologies have guided research on gendered and raced relations. (Approval required; Open to philosophy and GSFS senior and junior majors. GSFS majors must have previously taken GSFS 0320, or permission.) 3 hrs. sem.
Instructors:
Heidi Grasswick
Location:
Twilight Hall 206 (AXT 206)
Schedule:
1:30pm-4:15pm on Tuesday (Feb 12, 2018 to May 14, 2018)
Availability:
View availability, prerequisites, and other requirements.
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