Middlebury

Course Catalog - Middlebury College - Fall 2019, Spring 2020

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African American Studies Minor

Professors: William Nash (American studies and English and American literature) Ellen Oxfeld (sociology/anthropology), James Ralph (history); Associate Professors: William Hart (history); Jessyka Finley (American Studies); Program Coordinator: Diane Burnham

This program offers a minor in African American studies to students who complete the following requirements:
(1) The following core courses, designed to offer theoretical perspectives and broad background:
* HIST 0225 African American History
* AMST 0224 Race and Ethnicity in the US
 (2) Two of the following courses, which are more focused explorations of a part of the African American experience:
* AMST 0310 Livin for the City
* ENAM/AMST 0252 African American Literature
* HIST/AMST 0226 The Civil Rights Revolution
*AMST 0107 Intro to African American Culture
*AMST/GSFS 0204 Black Comic Cultures
*AMST/GSFS 0208 Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture
*AMST 0345 Black Lives Matter
*AMST/SOCI 0348 Black Ethnography
AMST 0259 Re-Presenting Slavery
(3) One advanced, relevant 0400 level course or an independent 0500-level project.
Other appropriate courses offered during the fall and spring semesters, or during the winter term, may be substituted for courses in category 2 at the discretion of the program director. The director or minor advisor will also approve courses to count in category 3.

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African Studies Minor

Professors: Armelle Crouzieres-Ingenthron (French), Jacob Tropp (history); Associate Professors: Nadia Horning (political science), Damascus Kafumbe (music), Michael Sheridan (sociology/anthropology); Assistant Professor: Obie Porteous (economics)

This program offers a minor in African Studies to students who complete the following requirements:

(1) Two of the following courses which focus primarily on Africa:

DANC 0163 From Africa to America: Moving from Our Core
ECON 0234 Economics of Africa
ECON 0327 Economic Development in Africa
FREN 0395 Women's Voices from the Francophone World
FREN 0396 (Re) Constructing Identities in Francophone Colonial and Postcolonial Fiction
FREN 0398 Children and Civil War in Francophone African Literature
FREN/PSCI 0399 Of Power & Pen: Francophone Africa
FREN 0492 Denunciation and Literature: The Awakening of the Maghreb
HIST 0113 History of Africa to 1800
HIST 0114 History of Modern Africa
HIST 0315 Health and Healing in African History
HIST 0317 South Africa in the World
HIST 0375 Struggles in Southern Africa
HIST 0441 Readings in African History: Environmental History of Africa
HIST 0442 Popular Culture and History in Africa
HIST/GSFS 0443 Readings in African History: Women and Gender in African History
INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Cultures
MUSC 0236 African Soundscapes
MUSC 0244 African Music and Dance Performance
IGST/PSCI0428 Dictators and Democrats
PSCI 0321 Anglophone Vs. Francophone Africa (CW)
PSCI 0202 African Politics
PSCI 0431 African Government
ANTH 0232 Anthropology of Continuity and Change in Sub-Saharan Africa

(2) Two additional courses, either chosen from group (1) above or from the following courses, which include significant materials on Africa and/or the African Diaspora. When given the option to pursue independent research projects in these courses, students are expected to choose Africa-related topics to contribute to their minor:

ANTH 0211 Human Ecology
ANTH 0468 Success and Failure in Global Health and Development Projects
ANTH 0340 The Anthropology of Human Rights
ANTH/RELI 0353 Islam in Practice: Anthropology of Muslim Cultures
ECON 0328 Economics of Global Health
ECON 0352 Structuralist Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy for Developing Countries
ECON 0415 Macroeconomics of Development
ECON 0466 Environment and Development
ECON 0425 Seminar on Economic Development
ECON 0465 Special Topics in Environmental Economics
FREN 0394 Black and Beur Expression
HIST 0105 The Atlantic World: 1492-1900
HIST 0109 History of Islam and the Middle East, Since 1453
HIST 0225 African American History
HIST 0263 Religion and Politics in Islamic History
HIST 0427 Diaspora and Exile
HIST/GSFS 0438 Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
INTD 0257 Global Health
MUSC 1066 The History of the American Negro Spiritual
PGSE 0330 Aesthetics of Urban Poverty in Literature, Film, and Music
PGSE 0375 Colonial Discourse and the "Lusophone World"
PSCI 0209 Local Green Politics
PSCI 0258 The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
PSCI 0330 Comparative Development Strategies
RELI 0150 The Islamic Tradition
RELI 0272 African American Religious History
RELI 0359 Issues in Islamic Law and Ethics: Questions of Life and Death

*Courses offered during the winter term may apply to the minor.

(3) One advanced seminar course (0300- or 0400-level, depending on the department), or a relevant, independent 0500-level project (at the discretion of the program director).
Other courses offered during the fall, winter, or spring terms, or at affiliated institutions abroad, may be substituted for the above listed courses at the discretion of the program director. As a general rule, no more than one course from a study abroad program will be counted towards the fulfillment of the minor.

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Program in American Studies

Requirements: A minimum of eleven courses including AMST 0209, AMST 0210, AMST 0400, three AMST electives, four courses in a concentration designed in consultation with a faculty advisor, and AMST 0701 or one additional elective numbered 0200 or higher.   
Electives: Three AMST electives, two of which must be numbered 0200 or higher.  These courses must be listed or cross-listed as AMST courses in the course catalog.  Courses may not count toward both the elective and concentration requirements.
Junior Seminar (AMST 0400): Students should normally take this seminar in the Fall of their Junior year.  Where compelling circumstances make doing this impossible, arrangements to take the course as a senior may be made with the director of the American Studies program.

Senior Project (AMST 0701):  AMST majors may enroll in AMST 0701, where they will complete a substantial research project in consultation with an AMST faculty adviser. Research projects are subject to approval by the AMST faculty, who will pair each approved project with an appropriate faculty adviser. Students who envision an AMST 701 project requiring collaboration must be granted departmental approval.  Normally, AMST senior projects will be completed in one semester. The senior project may take the form of a formal written document, a multi-media project such as a video, a web project, a creative activity such as a performance, or an installation project. An oral defense is part of senior work. Senior work is one of the requirements for departmental honors (see Honors section of AMST major requirements).

Honors:  Honors will be based on a student's cumulative AMST record and the quality of their AMST 0701 project.

Concentrations: Concentrations must bring together coherent clusters of four courses that address particular themes, periods, movements, or modes of thought and expression. In consultation with an advisor and with approval of the program, students will develop an interdisciplinary concentration in one of these areas: 
Popular Culture: Students will study popular cultural forms, their reception, and the history of their production in the United States.  Courses will especially focus on the conflicts between popular culture as a site of creativity and democratic empowerment on the one hand, and as a product of dominant commercialized cultural industries on the other.
Race and Ethnicity: Students will examine specific groups in depth and in comparison, exploring racial and ethnic history, political struggles, creative and cultural practices, and individual and collective modes of identity formation.  By studying how and why racial and ethnic identities have evolved in the United States, students will understand their central place in the formation of the American nation.
Artistic and Intellectual Traditions: Students will focus on literary, religious, philosophical, and social thought and its expression in the United States.  They will be encouraged to examine particular currents of thought (e. g. evangelicalism, liberalism, romanticism, modernism, progressivism) or modes of expression (e.g. literature, visual art, or film) that have been important to American culture. 
Space and Place: Students will explore the importance of landscape and place in American culture.  Course work may include the study of American regional geography, the historical and aesthetic dimensions of the built environment, the impacts of urban growth, suburbanization, or the imagining of utopian spaces. 
Cultural Politics: Students will explore the relationship between culture, ideology, and the political system.  People create meaning about their personal and public lives through cultural practices, but those practices take place within institutional and ideological structures.  Relevant courses might explore ethics and religion; political parties and social movements; feminism and gender studies; and representation and visual culture.
Self-Designed Concentration: Self-designed concentrations must be built in close consultation with a faculty advisor and should focus on a cultural theme or interdisciplinary area of inquiry.  Potential topics might include: Gender & American Culture; American Environmentalism; Visual Culture; Industrialization of America; and Immigration and Cultural Exchanges.
Joint Major Requirements: Students may major in AMST jointly with another discipline or program. Students must discuss their rationale for doing so with their advisor in AMST and joint majors must be approved by the faculty in AMST. Required courses for a joint major in AMST are: AMST 0209, AMST 0210, AMST 0400, and AMST 0701 and 2 AMST electives.
Minor Requirements: Students may complete a minor in American Studies by taking the following courses: AMST 0210, AMST 0209, AMST 0400, three AMST electives.
Study Abroad for American Studies Majors: The faculty members of the Program in American Studies recognize the benefits of cross-cultural learning and encourage majors to take advantage of study abroad opportunities. Often students returning from study abroad undertake senior work that responds to their cultural learning while abroad. We encourage students to take courses in their study abroad program that focus on the host culture and thereby allow the best opportunity for cultural comparison.
American Studies majors normally take AMST 0400, a required seminar, in the fall semester of their junior year. Under compelling circumstances that leave only the fall available as an option for study abroad, majors may be able to take AMST 0400 in the fall semester of their senior year. Such arrangements must be discussed in advance with, and approved by, the director of the American Studies program. The American Studies program enjoys being host to exchange students from the American studies programs at the Universities of East Anglia and Nottingham in Great Britain.

 

 

AMST 0101 Introduction to American Studies: American Holidays (Spring 2020)

In this course we will offer an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture and identity. Integrating a range of sources and methods, we will examine myths, symbols, values, and social changes that have been used to create and contest ideas of "Americanness." This year we will focus on holidays, both secular and religious, and how they have been celebrated or observed in the U.S., past and present, privately and publicly. With a multifaith and multiethnic scope, we will consider holidays such as Easter, Purim, Passover, Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr, Yom Kippur, and Diwali, as well as largely-secular holidays such as Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Halloween, and Thanksgiving. We will also compare and contrast a variety of New Year festivities as they are celebrated by immigrant and diasporic communities. Sources for the course will include greeting cards, advertisements, magazine illustrations, decorations, cookbooks and recipes, genre paintings, music, photographic documentation of parades and festivals, and objects related to the celebration and observation of religious holidays from a variety of faiths and traditions. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, NOR (E. Foutch)

AMST 0104 Television and American Culture (Fall 2019)

This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen AMR, NOR, SOC (J. Mittell)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0104 *

AMST 0175 Immigrant America (Spring 2020)

In this course we will trace American immigration history from the late 19th to the turn of the 21st century, and examine the essential place immigration has occupied in the making of modern America and American culture. The central themes of this course will be industrialization and labor migrations, aftermaths of wars and refugees, constructions of racial categories and ethnic community identities, legal defining of "aliens" and citizenship, and diversity in immigrant experiences. To explore these themes, we will engage a range of sources including memoirs, novels, oral histories, and films. AMR, CW (5 seats), HIS, NOR (R. Joo)

AMST 0203 Media, Sports, & Identity (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine the relationship between media, sports, and the formulation of one’s identity. We will examine issues pertaining to gender identification, violence, and hero worship. Reading critical essays on the subject, studying media coverage of sporting events, and writing short analytical essays will enable us to determine key elements concerning how sports are contextualized in American culture. Student essays will form the basis of a more in-depth inquiry that each student will then present, using media, at the end of the course. (Not open to students who have taken WRPR 1002) AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (H. Vila)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0203 *

AMST 0204 Black Comic Cultures (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore a range of black comic cultures, analyzing their emergence and transformation from the early 20th century to the present. Specifically, we will examine blackface minstrels of the early 20th century such as George Walker and Bert Williams, Bill Cosby’s performances in the 60s, and the ribald humor of LaWanda Page’s 1970s party records, before moving to the urban scene embodied in television shows such as Def Comedy Jam. We will also engage with theoretical materials that help us analyze black comedy as multidimensional, such as John Limon’s Stand-up Comedy in Theory, or, Abjection in America. (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC (J. Finley)

AMST 0206 Nineteenth-Century American Literature (Spring 2020)

This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR (D. Evans)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0206 *

AMST 0208 Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine representations of black womanhood in popular culture, analyzing the processes by which bodies and identities are constructed as dangerous, deviant, and unruly. For example, materials will include the work of bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins to analyze the imagery of black womanhood propagated by the television shows The Jerry Springer Show and Bad Girls Club. By contrast, we will also read Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection as a lens through which to view “bad” black womanhood as a radically stylized means of redress in the Blaxploitation-era film Foxy Brown. (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, NOR (J. Finley)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0208

AMST 0209 American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (Fall 2019)

A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. Required for all majors and minors.3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR (D. Evans)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0209

AMST 0210 Formation of Modern American Culture I: 1830-1919 (Spring 2020)

An introduction to the study of American culture from 1830 through World War I with an emphasis on the changing shape of popular, mass, and elite cultural forms. We will explore a widely-accepted scholarly notion that a new, distinctively national and modern culture emerged during this period and that particular ideas of social formation (race, class, gender, sexuality, etc.) came with it. We will practice the interdisciplinary interpretation of American culture by exploring a wide range of subjects and media: economic change, social class, biography and autobiography, politics, photo-journalism, novels, architecture, painting, and photography. Required of all American studies majors and minors. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, HIS, NOR (J. Finley)

AMST 0215 Football and Higher Education (Spring 2020)

Football originated on US campuses, and its 150-year history reflects the vibrant, uneasy relation between sports and higher education. The first "big time" college sport in the United States, football became a media spectacle in the 1890s, and since then critics have debated the game's violence, educational merits, commercial trappings, and bearing on college admissions policies. The course will move from the 19th century to the present, tracing the sport's cultural meanings, its relation to class identity and gender roles, and its educational mission, including the sport's regulation by the NCAA. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to these issues, and readings may include literary and secondary works by Steve Almond, Owen Johnson, Dave Meggyesy, and Michael Oriard. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (T. Spears)

AMST 0225 Gothic and Horror (Fall 2019)

This course examines the forms and meanings of the Gothic and horror over the last 250 years in the West. How have effects of fright, terror, or awe been achieved over this span and why do audiences find such effects attractive? Our purpose will be to understand the generic structures of horror and their evolution in tandem with broader cultural changes. Course materials will include fiction, film, readings in the theory of horror, architecture, visual arts, and electronic media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. 3 hrs lect. AMR, HIS, NOR (M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0225 ENAM 0225

AMST 0234 American Consumer Culture (Fall 2019)

For many Americans in the 20th century, consumer goods came to embody the promise of the "good life." Yet mass consumption also fostered economic, political, and social inequalities and engendered anti-consumerist activism. In this course we will pursue an interdisciplinary approach to American consumer culture, focusing on the rise of commercialized leisure and advertising; the role of radio, television, and film in shaping consumer practices; and the relationship of consumerism to social inequality and democratic citizenship. Readings will include works by Veblen, Marcuse, Bordieu, Marchand, Cohen, and Schor. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR (H. Allen)

AMST 0243 American Bodies (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine the material culture of the body and the body as material culture, analyzing the artifacts that humans have invented and constructed to assist, enhance, or otherwise shape their physical interactions with the material world. Themes to be explored include skin (tattoos, tanning, bleaching), muscle (exercise and “ideal” bodies, historical and contemporary), adornment (fashion, jewelry, body modification practices), health crazes, performance, medical imaging, and enhancement (fictional and technological cyborgs, plastic surgery). We will investigate practices that fragment the body and objects that were exchanged as tokens of affection, such as nineteenth-century hairwork and eye miniatures. Historical figures to be discussed include cosmetics magnate Madame C.J. Walker, health enthusiasts Sylvester Graham and the Kellogg brothers, bodybuilder and exercise entrepreneur Eugen Sandow, dancer Josephine Baker, efficiency expert Frederick Winslow Taylor, and P.T. Barnum’s collaborations with performers such as Tom Thumb and the conjoined twins Chang and Eng Bunker. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR (E. Foutch)

AMST 0252 African American Literature (Fall 2019)

This course surveys developments in African American fiction, drama, poetry, and essays during the 20th century. Reading texts in their social, historical, and cultural contexts—and often in conjunction with other African American art forms like music and visual art—we will explore the evolution and deployment of various visions of black being and black artistry, from the Harlem Renaissance through social realism and the Black Arts Movement, to the contemporary post-soul aesthetic. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and Octavia Butler. 3 hrs lect./disc. (Diversity)/ AMR, LIT, NOR (W. Nash)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0252

AMST 0253 Science Fiction (Fall 2019)

Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0253

AMST 0261 Podcasting the Past: Leisure and Middlebury College (Spring 2020)

This course explores aspects of American life through an analysis of a widely underutilized luxury: leisure time. Using the college archives, we will study the microcosm of the Middlebury campus and identify noteworthy leisure activities through out the College’s history (i.e., fraternity boat rides down Otter Creek in the late-19th century or the establishment of Middlebury’s Quidditch team in 2005). We will consider how these acts of leisure reflect the broader values of the era(s) in which they emerged. Ultimately students will share their findings in an original, sound-rich documentary podcast. By the end of this course, students will have developed basic recording and sound editing skills and have new tools for translating complicated scholarly ideas into a format appropriate for a lay audience. Previous experience with sound editing or familiarity with podcasting is not required. 3 hrs. lect. (E. Davis)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0261

AMST 0263 American Psycho: Disease, Doctors, and Discontents (Pre-1900 AL) (Spring 2020)

What constitutes a pathological response to the pressures of modernity? How do pathological protagonists drive readers toward the precariousness of their own physical and mental health? The readings for this class center on the provisional nature of sanity and the challenges to bodily health in a world of modern commerce, media, and medical diagnoses. We will begin with 19th century texts and their engagement with seemingly "diseased" responses to urbanization, new forms of work, and new structures of the family and end with contemporary fictional psychopaths engaged in attacks on the world of images we inhabit in the present. Nineteenth century texts will likely include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Later 20th-century works will likely include Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Thomas Harris, The Silence of the Lambs, Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted, and Bret Easton Ellis, American Psycho. AMR, LIT, NOR (M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0263 *

AMST 0281 Viewer Discretion Advised: Controversies in American Art & Museums, 1876-Present (Spring 2020)

What are the “culture wars,” and why do they matter? What ideas are considered too “obscene” for American audiences? In this course we will explore controversies and scandals sparked by public displays of art in the U.S. including: Eakins’s Gross Clinic (1876), seen as too “bloody” for an art exhibition; the U.S. Navy’s objections to Paul Cadmus’s painting of sailors (1934); censorship and NEA budget cuts (Mapplethorpe & Serrano, 1989); backlash to The West as America’s deconstruction of myths of the frontier (1991); tensions surrounding Colonial Williamsburg’s “slave auction” reenactment (1994); debates over the continued display (and occasional defacement) of Confederate monuments in the era of the Black Lives Matter Movement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, ART, HIS, NOR (E. Foutch)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0281

AMST 0282 Reconstructing Literature: Realism, Regionalism, and the American scene, 1870-1919 (Pre-1900 AL) (Fall 2019)

American literature evolved in the late 1800s as a new generation of writers portrayed a rapidly changing culture, transformed by urbanization, industrial growth, immigration, class tensions, new roles for women, shifting race relations, and demographic transformations that seemed to split the nation into city and country. While realism was an effort to describe “life as it is” and regionalism focused on the distinctive features of specific places, both modes of representation stemmed from historical forces that were reshaping the nation. Works to be covered may include fiction by William Dean Howells, Charles Chesnutt, Sarah Orne Jewett, Kate Chopin, and Theodore Dreiser. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, LIT, NOR (T. Spears)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0282 *

AMST 0304 The Graphic Novel (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study some of the most widely respected graphic novels produced in the last thirty years. Our purpose will be to understand how the form works and is structured by its dual, but sometimes competing, interests in the verbal and the visual, and to think about distinct styles of illustration. We will also think about how landmark examples have shaped the form. Working with software designed for the purpose, students will use photographs to produce short comics of their own. Possible texts include: Alan Moore, Watchmen; Art Spiegelman, Maus; Chris Ware, Jimmy Corrigan; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home.3 hrs. lect. AMR, LIT, NOR (M. Newbury)

AMST 0310 Livin' for the City (Spring 2020)

In this course we will engage the idea of the "ghetto" as constructed through literature, film, music, and television. Our exploration will relate this concept to geographic spaces and to a socially-constructed set of ideas about urban African American spaces and communities. We will combine critical textual analysis with fundamental concepts from human geography and social history to explore shifting conceptions of the “ghetto”, consider its impact on urban African American space, and examine how the responses of urban black American artists affect, resist, and change its imaginative geography. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC (W. Nash)
Cross-listed as: BLST 0310

AMST 0313 Vermont Incarcerated: A Digital History (Spring 2020)

Course participants will contribute to Vermont Incarcerated, a new digital history project that will curate the nineteenth- and twentieth-century history of Vermont state carceral institutions and the vulnerable persons compelled to live in them. We will use digital technologies to tell the human stories of the Vermont State Prison in Windsor, the State Hospital in Waterbury, the State Industrial School in Vergennes, and the State Training School in Brandon. In addition to digital project work, we will read scholarship on the digital humanities and on the histories of crime and punishment, mental illness, and intellectual disability in the United States. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR (H. Allen)

AMST 0325 American Misogyny (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore the place of misogyny in U.S. media and politics. Early topics will include film noir, Cold War gender scapegoating, and lesbian pulp fiction. Subsequent topics will include the backlash against second-wave feminism, the rise of “post-feminism,” and the impact of reality TV and social media on feminist and antifeminist expression. We will conclude by examining how misogyny informs U.S. culture and politics in the Trump era. Throughout the course, we will consider how discourses of misogyny are inflected by white, cisgender, ableist, ageist, and class privilege. 3 hrs. lect. (National/Transnational Feminisms) AMR, HIS, NOR (H. Allen)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0325

AMST 0355 Theories of Popular Culture (Fall 2019)

This writing-intensive course introduces a range of theoretical approaches to study American popular culture, exploring the intersection between everyday life, mass media, and identity and social power. We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying culture, including ideology and hegemony theory, audience studies, subcultural analysis, the politics of taste, and cultural representations of identity. Using these theoretical tools, we will examine a range of popular media and sites of cultural expression, from television to toys, films to music, to understand popular culture as a site of ongoing political and social struggle. (FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or AMST 0101 or instructor approval) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen. SOC (J. Mittell)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0355 *

AMST 0358 Reading, Slavery, and Abolition (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study both black and white writers' psychological responses to, and their verbal onslaughts on, the "peculiar institution" of chattel slavery. We will work chronologically and across genres to understand how and by whom the written word was deployed in pursuit of physical and mental freedom and racial and socioeconomic justice. As the course progresses, we will deepen our study of historical context drawing on the substantial resources of Middlebury's special collections, students will have the opportunity to engage in archival work if they wish. Authors will include Emerson, Douglass, Jacobs, Thoreau, Stowe, Walker, and Garrison. 3 hrs. sem. (Diversity)/ AMR, HIS, LIT, NOR (W. Nash)
Cross-listed as: BLST 0358

AMST 0400 Theory and Method in American Studies (Junior Year) (Fall 2019)

A reading of influential secondary texts that have defined the field of American Studies during the past fifty years. Particular attention will be paid to the methodologies adopted by American Studies scholars, and the relevance these approaches have for the writing of senior essays and theses. (Open to junior American studies majors only.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (R. Joo)

AMST 0478 Global Cities of the United States (Spring 2020)

In this seminar we will engage the study of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles as "global cities." We will explore each as a site of networks that link populations in the United States to people, things, media, money, and ideas beyond the borders of the nation-state. The principal themes and issues covered during the semester will include the formation of transnational
communities, flows of labor and capital cultural production, and religious responses to diaspora. Our interdisciplinary approach to these topics will require students to use methods and theories from both the social sciences and the humanities. 3 hrs. sem.
AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC (R. Joo)
Cross-listed as: IGST 0478 *

AMST 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST 0701 Senior Work (Fall 2019)

(Approval required)
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Department of Anthropology

Major Requirements: A minimum of ten courses will constitute the major; at least eight of these courses (and all the core courses listed in the tracks below) must be fall and spring courses taught at Middlebury (e.g., not winter term courses or transfer credits). For a degree in anthropology, the major must complete the following requirements:

1) Introduction and Exploration:

a. Any two (2) of the following introductory courses: ANTH 103, 107, 109,  and 159 (students may take the courses in any order or concurrently);

b. Any two (2) of the 200-level courses offered by the department;

2) Foundations:

a. History of Anthropological Thought: ANTH 306 (or SOCI 305 with approval from the Department Chair)

b. Any one (1) of the following Research Methods courses: ANTH 302, 396, and 392

3) Application and Synthesis

a. One 400-level seminar.

b. Three electives (no more than one at 100-level; anthropology courses from other departments can count as electives with approval from the Department Chair)

Optional Senior Project in Anthropology: To be eligible for departmental honors, students must complete an independent research project of at least one semester. This typically consists of either a one-semester senior project (ANTH 0700, one credit, usually 25-40 pages) or a two-semester senior project (ANTH 0710, two credits, usually 60-100 pages). Students who wish to work on a project for more than one semester must present their progress for review by two professors who will decide whether the project qualifies for extended study. A one-semester project can be either in the fall or spring semesters; a two- semester project is usually in the fall and winter semesters or in the winter and spring semesters. Variation from these patterns is possible by permission from the department. Senior project requirements for joint majors and other special circumstances will be approved in consultation with both departments.

An ANTH 0700 project requires a project advisor. If the advisor thinks that the project may deserve an A- or A, a second reader must evaluate the project. An ANTH 0710 project requires a committee including the project advisor and a second reader from within the Anthropology Department. It may also include an optional, third reader from another part of the College or the local community. Upon completion of the ANTH 0710 project, there will be an oral defense.

Departmental Honors: Students who earn an A- or higher on a 0700 or 0710 project and average an A- or higher in all Anthropology courses receive departmental honors.

Minor Requirements: Any 100-level course and four elective courses, no more than one of which can be at the 0100-level and no more than one of which can be a SOCI course. No courses may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., no winter term courses or transfer credits).

Joint Majors in Anthropology:  Joint majors consist of seven courses in Anthropology. Students must take one (1) course at the 100-level, two 200-level courses, 302 or 392 or 396, 306, one 400-level seminar, and one elective.

Joint Major in Anthropology and Sociology: The joint major in Anthropology and Sociology consists of twelve classes. The core courses are ANTH 103, SOCI 105, SOCI 301 or ANTH 302 or ANTH 396, and SOC 305 or ANTH 306. Students must also take one 400-level SOCI course, one 400-level ANTH course, and six electives. A 700-level course in ANTH or SOCI can replace one of the 400-level courses.

SOAN Requirements (applies only to SOAN majors who declared prior to Fall 2019)

Sociology and Anthropology once existed as a combined department.  They are now separate departments, but they have retained the same course numbers (e.g., SOAN 0103 is now ANTH 0103, whereas SOAN 0105 is now SOCI 0105).  Students who became SOAN majors or minors prior to Fall 2019 may follow the original requirements, reproduced below.  They may also apply current ANTH or SOCI courses to fulfill those requirements, in consultation with the chair(s) of Anthropology and/or Sociology.  The original major and minor descriptions are as follows:

Required for the Major in Sociology/Anthropology: A minimum of 10 courses will constitute the major; at least eight of these courses (and all the core courses listed in the tracks below) must be fall and spring courses taught at Middlebury (e.g., not winter term courses or transfer credits).  No more than two electives may be introductory 0100-level courses.

There are three tracks within the department a student may choose from:

Track 1: Sociology/Anthropology consists of SOAN 0103, SOAN 0105, SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302, and SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306. Students must also take a 0400-level seminar. In addition, each sociology/anthropology track major will take five electives in the department, of which at least one must be at the 0300-level. 

Track 2: Anthropology consists of SOAN 0103, either SOAN 0301 or 0302, SOAN 0306, a 300-level anthropology class, and a 0400-level anthropology seminar. In addition, anthropology track majors will take five electives, of which at least four must be anthropology, and of which at least one must be in archaeology or linguistic anthropology.

Track 3: Sociology consists of SOAN 0105, either SOAN 0301 or 0302, SOAN 0305, and a 0400-level sociology seminar. In addition, sociology track majors will take six electives, of which at least five must be sociology, and of which at least one must be a sociology course at the 300-level.

Joint Majors in Sociology/Anthropology
Joint majors can pursue a combined Sociology/Anthropology track, or they may specialize in the disciplines of Sociology or Anthropology. No more than one elective may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., as a winter term course or transfer credit). Any departures from this program must be approved by the department chair.

Joint track 1: Sociology/Anthropology consists of seven courses: SOAN 0103, SOAN 0105, SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302, SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306, a 400-level senior seminar, and two electives.

Joint track 2: Anthropology consists of seven courses: SOAN 0103, SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302, SOAN 0306, a 400-level senior seminar in Anthropology, and three electives, of which at least two must be in Anthropology.

Joint track 3: Sociology consists of seven courses: SOAN 0105, SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302, SOAN 0305, a 400-level senior seminar in Sociology, and three electives, of which at least two must be in Sociology.

Anthropology Minor: SOAN 0103 and four elective courses in SOAN, no more than one of which can be at the 0100-level and no more than one of which can be a sociology course. No courses may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., no winter term courses or transfer credits).

Sociology Minor: SOAN 0105 and four elective courses in SOAN, no more than one of which can be at the 0100-level and no more than one of which can be an anthropology course. No courses may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., no winter term courses or transfer credits).

Optional Senior Project in Sociology/Anthropology: To be eligible for departmental honors, students must complete an independent research project of at least one semester. This typically consists of either a one-semester senior project (SOAN 0700, one credit, usually 25-40 pages) or a two-semester senior project (SOAN 0710, two credits, usually 60-100 pages). Students who wish to work on a project for more than one semester must present their progress for review by two professors who will decide whether the project qualifies for extended study. A one-semester project can be either in the fall or spring semesters; a two-semester project is usually in the fall and winter semesters or in the winter and spring semesters. Variation from these patterns is possible by permission from the department. Senior project requirements for joint majors and other special circumstances will be approved in consultation with both departments.

A SOAN 0700 project requires a project advisor. If the advisor thinks that the project may deserve an A- or A, a second reader must evaluate the project. A SOAN 0710 project requires a committee including the project advisor and a second reader from within the Sociology/Anthropology department. It may also include an optional, third reader from another part of the College or the local community. Upon completion of the SOAN 0710 project, there will be an oral defense.

Departmental Honors: Students who earn an A- or higher on a 0700 or 0710 project and average an A- or higher in all Sociology/Anthropology courses receive departmental honors.

ANTH 0103 Diversity and Human Nature: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course introduces students to the varieties of human experience in social life and to the differing approaches and levels of analysis used by anthropologists to explain it. Topics include: culture and race, rituals and symbolism, kinship and gender roles, social evolution, political economy, and sociolinguistics. Ethnographic examples are drawn chiefly from non-Western societies, from simple bands to great agrarian states. The ultimate aim is to enable students to think critically about the bases of their own culture and about practices and beliefs previously unanalyzed and unexamined. (formerly SOAN 0103) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, SOC (Fall 2019: M. Sheridan; Spring 2020: K. Brudvik)

ANTH 0107 Introduction to Archaeology (Fall 2019)

Archaeology is the scientific analysis and interpretation of cultural remains. Archaeologists examine artifacts, architecture, and even human remains in order to answer questions about the growth and development of societies worldwide. In addressing these issues we not only illuminate the past but also explore patterns relevant to contemporary social concerns. From the tropical lowlands of Central America to the deserts of ancient Egypt, this course provides an introduction to world prehistory. We proceed from humanity's earliest beginnings to the development of complex societies worldwide and use case examples to explore the major topics, methods, and theories of contemporary archaeology. (formerly SOAN 0107) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. CMP, HIS, SOC (J. Fitzsimmons)

ANTH 0109 Language, Culture and Society (Fall 2019)

In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. (formerly SOAN 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC (M. Nevins)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0109

ANTH 0110 Current Social Issues in Japan (in English) (Spring 2020)

In this course we will use ethnography, fiction, and historical studies to examine some of the underlying themes of Japanese culture. Japan is a highly developed, post-industrial society renowned across the globe for economic success in the post-World War II period. What historical and social factors have shaped Japan’s contemporary culture, and how have interactions with other countries influenced Japanese society? We will study a number of different spheres of Japanese life including the family and the workplace to better understand contemporary society. We will pay special attention to Japan’s global position and its relationship to the United States. (formerly SOAN 0110) 3 hr. lect./disc. AAL, NOA, SOC (L. White)

ANTH 0211 Human Ecology (Spring 2020)

Environmental issues are also cultural and political conflicts, between competing social groups, economic interests and cultural paradigms. This course introduces students to human ecology, the study of how our adaptations to the environment are mediated by cultural differences and political economy. Topics include: how ecological anthropology has evolved as a subdiscipline, with a focus on systems theory and political ecology; how ritually regulated societies manage resources; how rural communities deal with environmental deterioration; and how contradictions between environmental protection, economic development, and cultural values complicate so many ecological issues. (SOAN 0103 or ANTH 0103 or SOAN 0105 or SOCI 0105 or ENVS 0112 or ENVS 0211 or ENVS 0215 or BIOL 0140, or instructor permission) (formerly SOAN 0211) 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (M. Sheridan)

ANTH 0223 Andean Civilizations (Fall 2019)

Stretching from present-day Ecuador to Chile and consisting of desert coasts, fertile valleys, soaring Andes, and tropical jungle, the Inca Empire was the largest state the Precolumbian Americas had ever seen. Although they claimed to have ‘civilized’ the Andes, the Inka were only the latest in a sequence of complex societies, all of which ultimately fell to the Spanish in the mid-1500s. In this course we will explore the growth and development of social complexity in the region, from the first human occupation of South America to the era of European contact. (formerly SOAN 0223) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, AMR, CMP, SOC (J. Fitzsimmons)

ANTH 0230 Rethinking the Body in Contemporary Japan (In English) (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine attitudes toward and tensions related to the human body in Japan. Looking at art, music, style, and social issues we will examine the symbolic as well as material concerns of bodies in contemporary Japan. Religious, historical, martial, and aesthetic understandings of bodies will be addressed. We will analyze Japan's current attitudes toward organ transplantation, treatment of the deceased, plastic surgery, surrogacy, sex change surgery and other embodied practices. Readings will include Twice Dead and Commodifying Bodies. (formerly SOAN 0230) 3 hrs. lect./ disc. AAL, NOA, SOC (L. White)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0230 *

ANTH 0231 Everyday Life in South Asia (Fall 2019)

This course offers an introduction to anthropological studies of South Asia. Relying on works of ethnography, journalism, memoir, and film, we examine people’s everyday lived experiences and mediations of globalization, religion, science, popular culture, gender, and the body in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan. In taking a close and intersectional look at situations across the region (e.g., new expressions of gender and capitalism in India, narratives of religious pluralism in Pakistan, enactments of media, modernity, and sexuality in Afghanistan), the course aims to give students the opportunity to sharpen their cultural analysis skills as they glean a more complex understanding of people’s ways of living across South Asia and the diaspora.3 hrs. lect. AAL, CMP, SOA, SOC (K. Bright)

ANTH 0232 Africa and Anthropology: Power, Continuity, and Change (Fall 2019)

Sub-Saharan Africa has long represented primitive mysteries for Europeans and North Americans, as a ‘Dark Continent’ full of exotic people and animals. Even now, many Americans learn little about Africa and Africans except for ‘thin’ media reports of political, economic, and ecological upheaval or persistent poverty, disease, and despair. This course provides a ‘thick’ description and analysis of contemporary African conditions using ethnographies and films. We will not be exploring ‘traditional African cultures’ outside of their historical contexts or generalizing about ‘what African culture really is.’ Rather, our focus will be on understanding social continuity and change alongside cultural diversity and commonality. Topics will include colonialism, critical kinship studies, African feminism, environmental management, witchcraft and religion. Throughout the course African ideas of power – what it is, who has it, and why –unify these diverse topics as social relations. (formerly SOAN 0232) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, SAF, SOC (M. Sheridan)

ANTH 0287 Medical Anthropology: Approaches to Affliction and Healing (Spring 2020)

In this course, an introduction to medical anthropology, we will explore cultural and political-economic perspectives on health, illness, and disease. Topics covered include: (1) biocultural approaches to understanding health; (2) medical systems, including biomedicine and others; (3) the effects of poverty and inequality on health outcomes; and (4) the social construction of health and illness. Students will apply these concepts in understanding an aspect of health, illness, or healing in their own research project with an ethnographic component. An introductory course in anthropology or familiarity with medical or public health issues is recommended. (formerly SOAN 0387) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC (K. Bright)

ANTH 0302 The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods (Fall 2019)

The aim of this course is to prepare the student to conduct research, to analyze and present research in a scholarly manner, and to evaluate critically the research of others. Practice and evaluation of such basic techniques as observation, participant-observation, structured and open-ended interviews, and use of documents. Introduction to various methodological and theoretical frameworks. Thesis or essay prospectus is the final product of this course. Strongly recommended for juniors. Three-hour research lab required. (SOAN 0103 or ANTH 0103 or SOAN 0105 or SOCI 0105) (formerly SOAN 0302) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. research lab CW, SOC (K. Bright)

ANTH 0306 Topics in Anthropological Theory (Spring 2020)

This course gives an introduction to some important themes in the development of anthropological thought, primarily in the past century in anglophone and francophone traditions. It emphasizes close comparative reading of selections from influential texts by authors who have shaped recent discourse within the social sciences. (SOAN 0103 or ANTH 0103 or SOAN 0105 or SOCI 0105) (formerly SOAN 0306) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (M. Sheridan)

ANTH 0308 Gender, Technology, and the Future (Spring 2020)

Can technology make the world more just and equitable? Scientific and technological inventions continually surprise us with visions of the future that promise an end to global inequality and injustice: cooking robots, microcredit apps, test–tube babies. We will center these powerful ideas to unpack how they galvanize raced and sexed bodies to articulate the future. Through an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies we will ask how technological imaginations and interventions invent new global futures, examine their impact and implications, and explore the possibilities for new technological horizons.3 hrs. sem. SOC
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0308 *

ANTH 0324 Ladies at Work: Global Politics of Care, Kinship, and Affect (Fall 2019)

Why are some forms of work valued more than others? When did people start believing entrepreneurs and innovators when they say, we should “Do What You Love”? Is work life separate from life at home and with friends? This class will journey across global care chains, drawing on feminist writings and ethnographic texts to examine conditions structuring middle class housework in the U.S., garment manufacturing in Sri Lankan factories, call center work in the Philippines, and elite startup innovations in India. Engaging questions of class, race, gender, and heterosexuality, we will learn about forms of feminized work and consider more just alternatives. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, SOA, SOC (H. Gupta)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0324 *

ANTH 0337 Love, Sex, and Marriage (Spring 2020)

What are the social terms for sexual agency in countries around the world? How is marriage understood through idealizations of romance as well as familial expectations of duty or status? In this course we consider how other cultures’ views on love, sex, and partnership are made legible and illegible within broader cultural, moral, and state interests. The course asks for in-depth participation, short weekly writings, and a longer final paper that each engage ethnographic works on a range of topics, from critical studies of love and globalization to queer kinmaking, rituals of the ‘lavish wedding,’ and everyday ways of hooking up and breaking up online. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (K. Bright)

ANTH 0355 Race and Ethnicity Across Cultures (Fall 2019)

Ethnicity and race are social phenomena that influence group relations, as well as personal identity, in many areas of the world. But what is "ethnicity" and what is "race"? In this course we will explore the varied approaches that have been utilized to understand race and ethnicity across diverse cultural settings. No single explanation of race and ethnicity is all encompassing, and so we will explore a number of different approaches. Among the issues we will examine are: alternative explanations of ethnic and racial identity formation; the causes and consequences of ethnic violence and competition; the connections among ethnicity, gender, and class; and the processes through which distinctions between self and other are created. (formerly SOAN 0355) 3 hrs. lect./disc CMP, SOC (E. Oxfeld)

ANTH 0395 Environmental Communication (Spring 2020)

Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. (formerly SOAN 0395) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC (M. Nevins)

ANTH 0396 Linguistic Anthropology Methods (Fall 2019)

In this course we will work with a method and theory known as the “ethnography of communication” to examine language use in socio-cultural context. Students will learn to form research questions and collect different kinds of data, including everyday spoken interactions, archival print sources, and social media. Students will learn how to document, annotate, and analyze their samples as speech events linked to broader discursive contexts and social relations. Students will also turn ethnography of communication upon social science research itself, examining interviews and surveys as communicative interactions. The course provides an empirical pathway to questions of cultural difference and social inequality. (formerly SOAN 0396) 3 hrs. sem. SOC (M. Nevins)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0396

ANTH 0492 Archaeological Method and Theory (Spring 2020)

Archaeology is more than just excavation. It is interpretation. As a discipline, archaeology relies upon different methods and theories in order to 'read' human prehistory from the remains of past societies. In this seminar we will survey archaeological methods and theories, with an emphasis on field techniques and the intellectual history of the discipline. We will explore the problems archaeologists face when confronted with incomplete data, the ways in which sites are researched and excavated, and the complex ethical issues that arise from simply asking the question, "who owns the past?" As a result, in this seminar we will look behind the intellectual curtain, where past societies are revealed, interpreted, and even contested. (formerly SOAN 0492) 3 hrs. sem. PHL, SOC (J. Fitzsimmons)

ANTH 0500 Advanced Individual Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Prior to registering for ANTH 0500, a student must enlist the support of a faculty advisor from the Department of Anthropology. (Open to Majors only) (Approval Required)

ANTH 0700 One-Semester Senior Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Under the guidance of a faculty member, a student will carry out an independent, one-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 25-40 pages, due the last day of classes.

ANTH 0710 Multi-Semester Senior Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Under the guidance of a faculty member, a senior will carry out an independent multi-semester research project, often based on original data. The student must also participate in a senior seminar that begins the first week of fall semester and meets as necessary during the rest of the year. The final product must be presented in a written report of 60-100 pages, due either at the end of the Winter Term or the Friday after spring break.
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Department of Arabic

The Arabic major requires four years of language study or their equivalent.  Majors must also choose one disciplinary concentration: Arabic literature, Arabic linguistics, or a well-defined course of study with a focus on the Arab world.  Each disciplinary concentration requires the completion of at least three content courses, including one introductory methods course specific to the chosen discipline. Majors  are also required to prepare a project or a thesis for their senior capstone experience.

Major in Arabic: (Minimum number of courses: 13, including required senior work)

Students majoring in Arabic must take:

1)      Arabic language through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent: ARBC 0101, ARBC 0102, ARBC 0103, ARBC 0201, ARBC 0202, ARBC 0301, ARBC 0302;

2)      Two courses taught in Arabic at the 0400-level, at least one of which is taken at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus. Arabic 0400-level courses taken at a Middlebury school abroad site require departmental approval of the syllabus and a dossier of all written work (normally consisting of at least two exams and eight typed pages of Arabic);

3)      One of the following:

a.       ENAM 0205, plus two additional courses with the ARBC prefix in Arabic literature taken at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus (for students pursuing senior work in literature);

or

b.      One of LNGT 0101, LNGT 0102 or  LNGT 0109, plus two additional courses with the ARBC prefix in Arabic linguistics taken at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus (for students pursuing senior work in linguistics);

or

c. Students may structure their own disciplinary focus within the Arabic major in consultation with their major advisor by providing a well-defined course of study that must include (i) one introductory methods course specific to the chosen discipline (in English); and (ii) two disciplinary electives bearing the ARBC prefix (in Arabic or English), taken at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus.

4)      Students must spend at least one semester at a Middlebury school abroad site. The Arabic Department strongly recommends that students spend a full year abroad. Students studying abroad for a full academic year may count at most one course taken abroad towards the disciplinary elective requirements, subject to prior approval of their major advisor and contingent upon submission of the syllabus and a dossier of all written work (normally consisting of at least two exams and six typed pages of Arabic).

A major may count 400-level courses towards the fulfillment of the disciplinary electives once the 400-level language course requirement in #2 is complete.

Senior Work: Majors  are required to prepare a one-term senior project (ARBC 0700), or a two-term thesis (ARBC 0700/0701, taken in Fall and Winter or Winter and Spring). Senior projects and theses may be written in English, but must demonstrate significant use of Arabic sources.  Senior theses will include a 2000-word summary in Arabic.

Departmental honors are determined by a combination of thesis grade and grade point average in courses taken at the Arabic Program at Middlebury College, the Middlebury summer Arabic School, and Middlebury College’s study abroad sites.

Joint Major: Joint majors with other departments must: 1) complete Arabic language coursework through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent prior to the commencement of senior work, 2) take, at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus, two courses with the ARBC prefix related to Arabic literature, Arabic linguistics, or another well-defined disciplinary focus in consultation with their Arabic advisor, and 3) complete a senior project that explicitly engages the scholarly methodologies of both departments.

Minors in Arabic: The Arabic Department offers two minors.

(a) The Arabic Minor requires 1) studying Arabic language through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent; and 2) taking two courses with the ARBC prefix related to Arab culture (cinema, literature, pop-culture, etc.) or Arabic linguistics. Only one of the two courses on Arab culture or Arabic linguistics may be taken abroad. (See above for guidelines regarding courses taken at schools abroad and at the summer Language Schools.)

(b) The Minor in Arabic Studies requires taking five courses with the ARBC prefix, excluding ARBC 0101, 0102, 0103, 0201, 0202, 0301, and 0302.

ARBC 0101 Beginning Arabic I (Fall 2019)

The goal of this course is to begin developing reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. This course stresses written and oral communication, using both formal Arabic and some Egyptian dialect. Emphasis is also placed on reading authentic texts from Arabic media sources, listening to and watching audio and video materials, and developing students' understanding of Arab culture. 6 hrs lect/disc. LNG (S. Liebhaber, U. Soltan, A. Nash)

ARBC 0103 Beginning Arabic III (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of ARBC 0102. 6 hrs. lect/disc (ARBC 0102 or equivalent) LNG (A. Nash, U. Soltan, D. Ayoub)

ARBC 0201 Intermediate Arabic I (Fall 2019)

This course is a continuation of ARBC 0103. Emphasis is placed on reading authentic materials from Arabic media, expanding students' vocabulary, listening to and watching audio and video materials, and developing students' understanding of Arab culture and communicative competence. (ARBC 0103 or equivalent) 6 hrs. lect/disc LNG (A. Nash)

ARBC 0202 Intermediate Arabic II (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of Arabic 0201. Fifth in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. This course stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. (ARBC 0201 or equivalent). 6 hrs. lect/disc LNG (S. Liebhaber)

ARBC 0221 Modern Arabic Literature (Spring 2020)

This course is a survey of the most important moments in the development of Modern Arabic Literature from the end of 19th century to the present. We will map the developments, achievements, and innovations by Arab writers against a double background of rising nationalism, decolonization, and wars on the one hand and the idea and experiences of modernity and the west on the other. We will examine works of fiction by both male and female writers including novels, short stories, and drama, as well as poetry representing several different Arab countries. Students are encouraged to read in advance Albert Hourani's A History of the Arab People. (Open to all, no previous knowledge of Arabic is required). 3 hrs. Sem AAL, LIT, MDE (S. Liebhaber)

ARBC 0235 Gender Politics of the Arab World (Fall 2019)

The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. Taught in English (formerly ARBC/GSFS 0328) 3 hrs. Sem. (National/Transnational Feminisms) AAL, CMP, CW, MDE, SOC (D. Ayoub)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0235

ARBC 0301 Advanced Arabic 1 (Fall 2019)

A continuation of Arabic 0202. This course aims to help students reach an intermediate-high level of proficiency in reading, speaking, writing, listening, and culture. Readings include articles on cultural, social, historical, political and literary topics. (ARBC 0202 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect/disc LNG (S. Liebhaber)

ARBC 0302 Advanced Arabic II (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of Arabic 0301. It aims to help students reach an advanced level of proficiency in reading, speaking, and writing Arabic, as well as to develop further an understanding of Arab culture. Readings include articles on cultural, social, historical, political, and literary topics. Course will be conducted entirely in Arabic. (ARBC 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect/disc. LNG (A. Nash)

ARBC 0412 Contemporary Arab Cinema (Spring 2020)

This course will present an overview of contemporary Arab cinema, exploring the way in which this cinema reflects the dynamics of political, economic, and social change in modern Arab societies. The course will be conducted exclusively in Arabic and will involve reading texts that present an overview of contemporary Arab cinema as well as texts analyzing notable and award-winning Arabic films. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, ART, LNG, MDE (D. Ayoub)

ARBC 0413 Advanced Readings: Arabic across History (Fall 2019)

In this course we will read a variety of Arabic texts representing different eras in the history of Arabic, from pre-Islamic times in the Arabian Peninsula until the modern era in the Arab world. Readings will be mostly drawn from Arabic poetry across its different eras, as well as from religious and historical texts. Other types of texts will be chosen in consultation between students and instructor. In addition to discussion of the linguistic features of texts, we will address their literary, historical, and cultural aspects. 3 hrs. sem. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) AAL, LIT, LNG, MDE (U. Soltan)

ARBC 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

ARBC 0600 Senior Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(S. Liebhaber)

ARBC 0700 Senior Thesis I (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Approval required.

ARBC 0701 Senior Thesis II (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Approval required.
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Department of Biology

Requirements for the Biology Major: Requirements for the biology major encourage both breadth across the subdisciplines of biology as well as depth in at least one subdiscipline. The introductory sequence includes two courses, BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution and BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics, both of which are designed for students in their first year at the college who are considering a major in the life sciences, or for whom an in-depth coverage of the life sciences is of interest.

Requirements for the twelve course biology major are as follows:

BIOL 0140 Ecology  and Evolution
BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Two organismal courses from among BIOL 0201 Invertebrate Biology, BIOL 0202 Comparative Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 0203 Biology of Plants, BIOL 0302 Vertebrate Natural History, and BIOL 0310 Microbiology.

A college-level chemistry course with laboratory [NOTE: AP credit in chemistry or a bypass examination cannot be used to satisfy this requirement].

Six biology electives from the 0200-0701 level, with the following restrictions: (a) at least two electives must include a laboratory section; and(b) no more than one semester of independent research (BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, or BIOL 0701) may count as elective credit toward the major.

Guidelines and Restrictions Relevant to the Selection of Courses for the Major:
It is expected that the core courses (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) will be completed by the end of the third semester. BIOL 0140 is not open to seniors & second semester juniors in the Fall.

Except for transfer students, BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 must be taken at Middlebury College.

The course in experimental design and data analysis (BIOL 0211) should be taken by the end of the sophomore year.

Departmental courses offered with laboratories must be taken with the laboratory to satisfy major or joint major requirements.

Electives may include only one semester of independent research (BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, or BIOL 0701), and two winter term courses designated for major credit (not including BIOL 0211).

A maximum of three courses taken off campus may be credited toward completion of the major or joint major. This includes courses taken at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole. No credit in Biology will be granted for independent study projects conducted during off-campus study programs.

Except for transfer students, off-campus biology courses must be beyond the introductory level.

When a course is offered at Middlebury with a lab or prerequisites, an equivalent off-campus course must also include a lab or prerequisites.

Requirements for a Minor in Biology: BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145, and three elective courses from 0200-, 0300-, and 0400-level courses in the department.  One of the electives must be an organismal course (BIOL 0201, 0202, 0203, 0302, or 0310), AND one of which must be at the 0300 or 0400 level.

Guidelines and Restrictions for the Minor:
Except for transfer students, BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 must be taken at Middlebury College.

The three electives need to be related thematically.

When a course is offered at Middlebury with a lab or prerequisites, an equivalent off-campus course must also include a lab or prerequisites.

Transfer credit for a course will be given only after the department chair reviews the course material upon a student's return to campus. (See guidelines for transfer credit.)

Joint Major: The Department of Biology does not offer a joint major other than the joint major in Biology and Environmental Studies described below.

Requirements for the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Major: See the listing for the Program in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry for a description of this major.

Requirements for the Neuroscience Major: See the listing for the Program in Neuroscience for a description of this major.

Requirements for the Joint Major with Environmental Studies: See the listing for the conservation biology focus under the Program in Environmental Studies.

Graduate or Professional Training: Students considering graduate or professional school in the life sciences should note that many programs require a year of introductory chemistry, a year of organic chemistry, a year of physics, and a year of calculus for admission. Students are therefore strongly encouraged to meet with their faculty advisors early in their undergraduate career so the advantages of taking additional courses in the natural sciences can be discussed.

Departmental Honors: Students with an average of 3.5 or higher in departmental courses other than BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, and BIOL 0701 are eligible for departmental honors, for which successful completion of BIOL 0701 is also required (see below). The Biology Department awards two levels of honors: honors and high honors.

Criteria for Honors: Students with an average of 3.5 or higher in departmental courses (other than BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, and BIOL 0701) and a grade of A- or above on their thesis will be awarded honors. 

Criteria for High Honors: High honors will be awarded to students who meet all of the criteria for honors and who, in addition, have completed theses of exceptionally high quality.  Determination of honors or high honors is based on a formal recommendation from the thesis committee, and requires the approval of the Biology Department faculty. 

The thesis process is described in detail in the “Student & Faculty Research” portion of the departmental website, and all students interested in conducting thesis research should read that section of the website in detail. Normally, research for thesis projects begins during the first term of a student's senior year (or during the preceding summer). Students interested in field research should talk with a faculty member by winter term of their junior year. All other prospective thesis students should consult with prospective advisors concerning possible thesis projects by spring term of their junior year. Thesis projects must be of at least two terms' duration (one term of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and one of BIOL 0701) and result in the production of a written thesis, a public presentation of the thesis research, and an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members, two of whom must be Biology faculty. With instructor approval, independent research conducted during the summer may be considered as a substitute for the first term of the project. In such cases, the off-campus work would satisfy the BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 prerequisite for enrollment in BIOL 0701, but would not itself be credit-bearing. The thesis grade reflects performance in all aspects of the thesis process.  Note that although completion of a thesis is one prerequisite for receiving honors, students may undertake a thesis regardless of whether they meet the other criteria for honors.

Advanced Placement Credit: Middlebury College grants one college credit for a score of 5 on the biology advanced placement exam. However, because the biology department does not offer any introductory course that is the equivalent of an AP biology course, advanced placement credit does not exempt a student from any of the published requirements for the major, minor, or joint majors, nor can it satisfy the college's distribution requirement.  

Off-Campus Study: Students interested in taking biology courses off campus are strongly encouraged to discuss their plans with their advisor early in their college careers. Students should see the "Guidelines and Restrictions" section under the requirements heading for the biology major to learn more about obtaining transfer credit. Students seeking approval for biology courses taken off campus should be prepared, upon their return, to document course content with syllabi and class notes.

BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (Fall 2019: D. Allen, E. Eggleston; Spring 2020: K. Coe, E. Moody)

BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. (For students matriculating in Fall 2019 or later: CHEM 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (Fall 2019: J. Ward; Spring 2020: G. Ernstrom)

BIOL 0202 Comparative Vertebrate Biology (Spring 2020)

This course will explore the evolution of the vertebrate classes and the adaptations that allow them to live in almost every habitat on Earth. We will study the phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of the major extinct and extant taxa of vertebrates and discuss how each group solves the problems of finding food, finding mates, and avoiding predators. Laboratory exercises will focus on the comparative anatomy of a cartilaginous fish (the dogfish shark) and a mammal (the cat). Students will learn to identify the anatomical structures of the vertebrate body and observe the evolutionary homologies. Occasional field trips will introduce the local vertebrate fauna in their natural habitat. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (M. Spritzer)

BIOL 0203 Biology of Plants (Fall 2019)

An introduction to plants, their life cycles, and their relationships to each other, as well as to the animals that pollinate them, disperse their fruits, and eat them. We will discuss morphology, physiology, evolution, and natural history of plants (mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, angiosperms). The laboratory will emphasize plant identification, various aspects of plant ecology and physiology, plant morphology, and plant use by humans. Students will complete a Community Service component, such as completing a forest inventory for a local forest, assisting with the campus tree map, or help with seed-saving measures at the College Organic Garden. Field trips will be the norm early in the semester. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (K. Coe)

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis (Fall 2019)

Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well. How do you randomize mice? How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated? If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer? In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology. We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results. Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145). DED (E. Moody)

BIOL 0230 Global Change Biology (Spring 2020)

We will examine the effects of global climate change on the earth system. Our emphasis will be on exploring what we know about the impacts of climate change on ecosystems, and how we know it: how do biologists study processes on a global scale? How accurately can we predict future changes in ecosystem distribution and function? We will also delve into how changing ecosystem processes are likely to affect humans, through impacts on ecosystem services, for example. The course will culminate with an examination of science communication, and students will engage in independent projects to practice the art of effective science communication. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (K. Coe)

BIOL 0304 Aquatic Ecology (Fall 2019)

This field course will introduce students to the freshwater aquatic ecosystems of the northeastern U.S., including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. We will explore the ecological processes that dominate these systems, the organisms that inhabit them, and the ecological techniques central to their study. Field exercises will include trips to many aquatic ecosystems in the region; experience with sampling techniques for measurement of physical, chemical, and biological features; and experimental design for answering questions about the relationships among species and between species and their environment. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. CW (5 seats), SCI (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology (Fall 2019)

Have you ever wondered how an embryo develops from a simple fertilized egg to a complex adult? This course explores this question, examining the preparation and initiation of development (gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavages, and gastrulation), the formation of embryonic structure (morphogenesis), the creation of embryonic pattern (pattern formation), and the control of gene expression during embryogenesis. In lab, students will design and carry out experiments at the cutting edge of developmental biology, incorporating modern cellular, molecular, and genetic techniques with classical embryological approaches. Fundamental mysteries of development will be investigated in model organisms that best illustrate each process. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab SCI (C. Combelles)

BIOL 0310 Microbiology (Fall 2019)

The microbiological principles emphasized in this class will provide students with a foundation for advanced study in many areas of contemporary biology. The course will integrate basic and applied aspects of microbiology into a study of the prokaryotic microorganisms. General principles of bacterial cell structure, function, and the role of microorganisms in industry, agriculture, biotechnology, and disease will be discussed. An independent laboratory project will stress basic microbiological techniques as applied to the isolation, characterization, and identification of microorganisms from the natural environment. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 and CHEM 0203) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab. CW (5 seats), SCI (G. Spatafora)

BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics (Spring 2020)

This course will focus on the structure and function of nucleic acids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lectures will center on molecular mechanisms of mutation, transposition, and recombination, the regulation of gene expression, and gene control in development, immune diversity and carcinogenesis. Readings from the primary literature will complement the textbook and classroom discussions. The laboratory will provide training in both classic and contemporary molecular-genetic techniques including nucleic acid isolation and purification, cloning, electroporation, nick-translation, Southern/Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, PCR and RT-PCR. (BIOL or MBBC majors, or by waiver. BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab. SCI (G. Spatafora)

BIOL 0323 Plant Community Ecology (Spring 2020)

This course will explore the structure and dynamics of plant communities, with a particular emphasis on temperate forest communities. We will investigate patterns in community diversity and structure, explore how plant populations and plant communities respond to environmental disturbances, and investigate the effects of anthropogenic influences (climate change, introduced species, habitat conversion) on plant communities. Labs will emphasize fieldwork at local research sites, and will provide exposure to techniques of experimental design in plant ecology and basic approaches to describing plant community structure and dynamics. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. CW (5 seats), SCI (D. Allen)

BIOL 0324 Genomics (Spring 2020)

Genomics is a quickly evolving field that analyzes and contextualizes genome sequencing data and high-throughput techniques. Genomics is the study of the nucleic acid content of organisms. In this course students will use national repositories of genomic information, databases, and open-source bioinformatics tools to visualize and manipulate genomic data. We will also explore genomics’ larger social context, particularly as it relates to the environment and medical informatics. In the laboratory we will explore and use the methodology used in genomics to develop and interpret large datasets (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107,and BIOL 0145 and BIOL0140, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (J. Ward)

BIOL 0350 Endocrinology (Spring 2020)

Endocrinology is a branch of animal physiology devoted to the study of hormones and the endocrine glands that produce them. Hormones are essential for maintaining homeostasis and coordinating biological functions such as growth, reproduction, metabolism, and reaction to stress. This course will cover the diverse mechanisms that hormones use to influence physiology and behavior. We will consider hormone function from comparative, clinical, and environmental perspectives with an emphasis on the behavioral response to hormones. Lectures will describe the cellular and molecular basis of endocrine regulation and consider the function of each of the major hormone groups produced by the body, such as hypothalamic, pituitary, adrenal, and sex steroids. Weekly journal article discussions will focus on current topics in endocrinology. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (M. Spritzer)

BIOL 0365 Molecular Microbial Ecology (Spring 2020)

Molecular microbial ecology (MME) uses leading-edge molecular tools to study the interactions and diversity of microorganisms in the natural environment. MME covers topics ranging from ancient polar microbes, the human microbiome, and possibly life beyond Earth. This course will discuss papers that highlight modern technical approaches and form the current theoretical framework in microbial ecology. The laboratory will examine the structure (who is there) and function (what are they doing) of microbial communities in environmental samples. We will cultivate novel microorganisms and analyze nucleic acids via community fingerprinting, functional gene analysis, and the computational exploration of metagenomic datasets.  (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145 and CHEM 0103 or 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (E. Eggleston)

BIOL 0370 Animal Physiology (Fall 2019)

This course examines the body functions of animals and humans using general physiological principles and a comparative approach. Lectures will cover the function of each of the major physiological systems (nervous, endocrine, muscular, etc.) and will describe how animal physiology has been shaped by evolution to allow animals to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. Lectures will focus mainly on physiological processes occurring at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Occasional journal article discussions will provide case studies of current topics in animal physiology. Laboratory exercises, reports and oral presentations emphasize experimental design, analysis and independent study using various methodological approaches including electrophysiology, neurotransmitter manipulations, nutritional analysis, and exercise physiology. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0216 and BIOL 0145). 3 hrs. lect/disc., 3 hrs. lab. CW (10 seats), SCI (M. Spritzer)

BIOL 0392 Conservation Biology (Spring 2020)

This course will focus on advanced topics in applied ecology and population genetics as they relate to the protection and restoration of biological integrity in the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on in-depth exploration of current issues, such as the design of nature reserves, genetic and demographic factors associated with population decline, metapopulation analysis, connectivity, and large-scale ecological processes. This course will involve reading from the primary literature, discussion, computer modeling, and writing assignments, and will build upon the information presented in the prerequisite courses. (BIOL 0140) SCI (K. Doyle)

BIOL 0396 Advanced Evolutionary Ecology (Spring 2020)

In 1965, the influential biologist G. Evelyn Hutchinson argued that ecological processes are like a theater in which evolutionary plays are performed. Implicit in his argument was the idea that ecological and evolutionary processes occur at distinct timescales, and can thus be easily separated. We will challenge this notion by studying phenotypic plasticity, ecological speciation, evo-eco dynamics, and other advanced topics through a hybrid of lecture, discussion, and a research experiment conducted as a class. Evaluation will be based on quizzes, discussions of the primary literature, several short written assignments, and the group research project. (BIOL 140 and 211 or waiver). 3 hrs. sem. SCI (E. Moody)

BIOL 0420 Neurogenetics (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine how genetic analysis can be used to probe the structure and function of nervous systems. Instead of focusing broadly across many fields in neuroscience, as a class we will select a few topics and delve deeply into understanding the controversies and technological advances associated with a particular topic in neurogenetics. We will examine the strengths and limitations of different types of genetic analyses as they are applied to studying neurobiology such as gene knock-outs, CRISPR genome editing, RNA interference, genetic mutant screens, and genome-wide association studies. Class time will primarily be spent discussing the primary literature. A final project will consist of research grant proposal similar to one that would be submitted to the National Institutes of Health or National Science Foundation by a professional scientist. (BIOL 0314 or waiver. Open to juniors and seniors only.) 3 hrs. lect./disc SCI (G. Ernstrom)
Cross-listed as: NSCI 0420

BIOL 0449 Extremophiles: conquering Earth’s Extreme Environments (Fall 2019)

Even the most extreme environments are teeming with microbial life. From highly acidic streams to hydrothermal vents with temperatures exceeding 120ºC, microorganisms manage to not only grow, but thrive. How? We will utilize biogeochemistry and cellular biology to characterize these unique microbial processes, and their impact on ecosystems, through critical reading and robust discussion of primary literature. Student-driven research will provide opportunities for advanced oral and written communication skill development. (Any 300-level BIOL course with lab, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. SCI (E. Eggleston)

BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine the fundamentals of human reproduction and modern reproductive intervention strategies. Rapid discoveries in medical technologies have allowed us to push the limits of the human body, and we will explore the scientific and medical challenges that surround the control of fertility and infertility, fetal life, birth, and the neonatal period. Through critical review of the primary literature, writing, and informed dialogues, students will gain an understanding of key topics in reproductive medicine. (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145, and one other 0200 or 0300-level biology course, or by waiver) SCI (C. Combelles)

BIOL 0490 Seminar in Plant Ecology (Spring 2020)

Global climate change has led to a huge effort to collect data on the state of the planet, including measurements of temperature, atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, and species distributions and phenologies. Ecologists have never had access to such quantities of data, and thus need new methods for their description and analysis. In this course we will explore how to use statistical models to make sense of these data: how to develop, choose, and fit the best model for a particular data set. The course will be project-based, culminate in an independent project, and use the statistical software, R. (BIOL 0140 and one statistics course required, no R experience required.) 3 hr. sem./3 hr. lab DED, SCI (D. Allen)

BIOL 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (BIOL 0211. Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

BIOL 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. (BIOL 0211. Approval required; open only to seniors) 3 hrs. disc.

BIOL 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Seniors majoring in Biology who have completed one or more semesters of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and who plan to complete a thesis should register for BIOL 0701. In this course students will produce a written thesis, deliver a public presentation of the research on which it is based, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. Open to Biology and joint Biology/Environmental Studies majors. (BIOL 0211 and BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 or waiver; instructor approval required for all students) 3 hrs. disc
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Program in Black Studies

The Black Studies Program allows students to explore a wide range of topics related to Black experiences across the African Diaspora. The Program's major and minor allows students to attain degress of mastery by concentrating on an interrelated set of topics within a geographic area or by comparing aspects of the topic(s) inter-regionally or globally. Three required core courses will provide the framework on which students will organize their own majors in consultation with the program's director. 

The Major

To complete the major a student must take eleven (11) courses:

Three (3) that acquaint students with Black studies as a recognized field of study

  1. BLST 0101: An introduction to the core themes, topics, and methods commonly recognized as belonging to Black Studies 
  2. BLST 0301: A junior seminar that provides guidance in identifying and using sources and methods for research in Black Studies. 
  3. BLST 0401: A senior seminar in which Black Studies majors conduct independent research -- while working collaboratively with other students and a faculty member.  

Five (5) that concentrate on a region or topic (either of which may be comparative)

  • Courses taken for the concentration and senior work allow students to go deeper into a topic and develop their skills in interpretation and constructive analysis. Students will work with the director of the program in selecting the courses that will fulfill their proposed concentration. Intensive listening, close reading, critical thinking, effective oral and written expression and collaborative interaction with colleagues will be among the skills the concentration will address. 

Three (3) electives that allow for breadth of study. 

  • The electives allow students to get outside their area of concentration, either to explore totally different topics or to explore their area of concentration from a different perspective. With permission from the director of the program, one or more of these electives may be in a department not directly related to Black Studies but that introduces students to critical approaches that may be helpful to a student's advanced work on a topic. 
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Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

I. Majors: Students can elect to major in chemistry, biochemistry, environmental chemistry (joint major), or molecular biology and biochemistry.

II. Course Requirements:

   Chemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 0204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, and either CHEM 0351 or CHEM 0355, and two electives chosen, with an advisor’s approval, from 0200-, 0300- or 0400- courses the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department or GEOL 0323. Independent study courses (CHEM 0400, CHEM 0500, CHEM 0700, or CHEM 0701) cannot count as electives.
     Honors in Chemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, CHEM 0312, CHEM 0351, CHEM 0355, CHEM 0431, CHEM 0400, CHEM 0701.
     Biochemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111, CHEM 0103*,CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0313, CHEM 0322, and two electives chosen, with an advisor’s approval, from 0200-,0300- or 0400-level courses in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department or BIOL 0314. Independent study courses (CHEM 0400, CHEM 0500, CHEM 0700, or CHEM 0701) cannot count as electives.
     Honors in Biochemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, CHEM 0313, CHEM 0322, CHEM 0355, CHEM 0425, CHEM 0400, CHEM 0701.
     Environmental Chemistry: See the listing for the Environmental Chemistry focus under the Program in Environmental Studies. http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/es/requirements

     Molecular Biology and Biochemistry: See Program in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/mbb

     *Students may receive credit for courses indicated by an asterisk with a satisfactory score on the advanced placement examination for that subject. Students who have scored a 4 or 5 on the advanced placement examination in chemistry are awarded a course credit for CHEM 0103 and may enroll in CHEM 0107 (strongly encouraged) or CHEM 0104. Students who do not have an AP score of 4 or 5, but have a strong background in chemistry should take the department’s online placement examination to determine if they are prepared for CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107. Those students who achieve a satisfactory score on the placement examination will be encouraged to register for CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, but will not receive credit for CHEM 0103.

III. Independent Research and Senior Thesis Program: Many students participate in independent research (CHEM 0500 or CHEM 0700) or complete senior thesis projects (CHEM 0400 and CHEM 0701). Students who are interested in completing a senior thesis project should meet with their academic advisor for guidance in seeking a research advisor no later than winter term of their junior year. Although required for departmental honors, students may also participate the senior thesis program without pursuing honors and the associated coursework.

IV. Eligibility for Honors in Chemistry or Biochemistry: Students who successfully complete the honors coursework—including the senior thesis program—with a minimum grade point average of 3.20 are awarded departmental honors.  High Honors may be awarded at the discretion of the department and the thesis committee to students who demonstrate exceptional achievement in both the thesis program and departmental course work.

V. Recommended Programs of Study: Several coursework options for students considering chemistry or biochemistry as a major are shown below. Although students may deviate from these guides, it is strongly recommended that all prospective majors complete CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 by the end of their first year and the calculus (MATH 0121 and 0122) and physics (PHYS 0109 and 0110 or 0111) courses by the end of their second year. Completing CHEM 0203 as early as possible provides the maximum flexibility both within the major and for other academic interests, including study abroad.

Chemistry 
  First Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
  Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122 
  OR
  Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
  Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

  Sophomore Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
  Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111

  Junior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351*
  Spring: *(OR CHEM 0355)

  Senior Year:
  Fall: elective
  Spring: elective

Biochemistry 
  First Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
  Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122
  OR
  Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
  Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

Sophomore Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
  Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111

  Junior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0322
  Spring: CHEM 0313

  Senior Year:
  Fall: elective
  Spring: elective

Chemistry with honors 
  First Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
  Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122
  OR
  Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
  Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

  Sophomore Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
  Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111

  Junior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351
  Spring: CHEM 0312, CHEM 0355

  Senior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0400, CHEM 0431
  Spring: CHEM 0701

  Biochemistry with honors
  First Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
  Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122
  OR
  Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
  Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

  Sophomore Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
  Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111

  Junior Year: 
  Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0322
  Spring: CHEM 0313, CHEM 0355

  Senior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0400, CHEM 0425
  Spring: CHEM 0701

CHEM 0103 General Chemistry I (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Major topics will include atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; introduction to chemical thermodynamics. States of matter; solutions and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work deals with testing of theories by various quantitative methods. Students with strong secondary school preparation are encouraged to consult the department chair for permission to elect CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 in place of this course. CHEM 0103 is also an appropriate course for a student with little or no prior preparation in chemistry who would like to learn about basic chemical principles while fulfilling the SCI or DED distribution requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc. DED, SCI (Fall 2019: J. Larrabee; Spring 2020: S. Choi)

CHEM 0104 General Chemistry II (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc. DED, SCI (Fall 2019: L. Giddings; Spring 2020: J. Larrabee)

CHEM 0107 Advanced General Chemistry (Fall 2019)

This course is a one-semester alternative to one year of general chemistry (CHEM 0103 and CHEM 0104). It is open to all students who have received a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement test in Chemistry. Students who have two or more years of high school chemistry without AP credit may enroll with permission of the instructor. Topics will be drawn from the traditional general chemistry curriculum, but discussed in greater detail with a more thorough mathematical treatment. Special emphasis will be placed on chemical bonding, coordination chemistry, and real world research in chemistry. (AP Chemistry or equivalent.) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr dis. DED, SCI (A. Vasiliou)

CHEM 0203 Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course will provide students with an introduction to the structure and reactivity of organic molecules sufficient to continue directly to study of biochemistry (CHEM 0322). Topics covered will include models of chemical bonding, acid-base relationships, three-dimensional molecular structure (conformations and stereochemistry), reaction mechanisms and energy diagrams, substitution and elimination reactions, carbonyl reactions (additions, reductions, interconversions, and alpha-reactivity), and the fundamentals of biological molecules (carbohydrates, DNA, and RNA). Laboratory experiments will include purification techniques (recrystallization, distillation, extraction, and chromatography) as well as microscale organic reactions that complement the lecture portion of the course. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. prelab. SCI (Fall 2019: L. Repka; Spring 2020: R. Bunt)

CHEM 0204 Organic Chemistry II: Synthesis and Spectroscopy (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore the ways that organic molecules are made and their structures identified. The study of organic reactions will continue from CHEM 0203 with radical reactions, alkene and alkyne additions, aromatic reactions, oxidations and reductions, and additional carbonyl reactions. Emphasis in this course will be placed on using reactions in sequences to synthesize larger and more complex molecules. The theory and practice of mass spectrometry and UV-Vis, IR, and NMR spectroscopy will be studied as a means to elucidate the exact structures of organic molecules. Laboratory experiments will focus on synthetic techniques that complement the lecture portion of the course and the identification of complex unknowns via GC-MS, IR, and NMR. (CHEM 0203) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. prelab. (L. Repka)

CHEM 0230 Bioinorganic Chemistry (Spring 2020)

Life depends on the proper functioning of proteins and nucleic acids that are often metalated. In this course we will study the structure and function of metalloproteins and other metallobiomolecules. We will begin with an overview of bioinorganic chemistry. Next, we will look at two classic questions in bioinorganic chemistry. (1) How does hemoglobin cooperatively bind dioxygen? and (2) Why is cis-platin an anti-cancer drug whereas trans-platin is not? We will then spend the rest of the first half of the course learning the inorganic chemistry that will allow us to answer these questions and many others: simple bonding, symmetry, transition metal chemistry, and ligand field theory. In the second half of the course, we will start with some biochemistry fundamentals and then move on to case studies of zinc, iron, copper proteins, and metals in medicine. The textbooks will be Inorganic Chemistry by Miessler, Fisher, and Tarr, and Biological Inorganic Chemistry by Crichton, both available on-line for free. (CHEM0104 or CHEM0107) 3hrs lect/disc SCI (J. Larrabee)

CHEM 0303 Chemical Biology (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore scientific advances propelled by research at the interface of organic chemistry and molecular biology. The field of chemical biology involves the manipulation of biological macromolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates) using synthetic organic chemistry. These organic transformations are not used by nature and thus permit site-specific modifications that enable study or alteration of macromolecule function. Examples include antibody-drug conjugates for targeted chemotherapy and fluorescent probes of macromolecule interactions. Guided by the primary literature, we will explore developments that span a variety of applications and explore potential new directions, culminating in a final project. Fundamentals of molecular biology will be discussed as they pertain to our exploration of chemical biology. (CHEM 0203) 3 hrs. lect. (L. Repka)

CHEM 0311 Instrumental Analysis (Fall 2019)

This course introduces fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and scientific writing. Lecture topics include experimental design and quality control; sample collection and preparation; calibration, error, and data analysis; statistics; and the theory and operation of chemical instrumentation. Multi-week laboratory projects provide hands-on experience in qualitative and quantitative analysis using a variety of research-quality instrumentation (e.g., graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectrometry, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, high pressure liquid chromatography). Writing workshops promote professional scientific writing skills through guided practice in writing analysis, peer review, and revision. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242) 3 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW (R. Bunt, M. Costanza-Robinson)

CHEM 0312 Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Spring 2020)

In this course students will carry out experiments in the field of inorganic and physical chemistry and write journal-style reports based on their results. In the first half of the semester students will conduct a multi-step synthesis and characterization of a Mo-Mo complex with a quadruple bond. Students will learn inert atmosphere synthetic techniques and how to use a glove box. The synthesized Mo-Mo complex will be characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry. In the second half of the semester students will conduct two physical chemistry experiments. First students will carry out a kinetic study of the isomerization of the Mo-Mo (alpha to beta or beta to alpha) complex by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Finally, students will obtain the high-resolution IR spectra of acetylene and deuterated acetylene and analyze the rotation-vibration spectra using statistical and quantum mechanics to obtain structural data and interpret the peak intensities. In addition to the laboratory activities, there will be lectures on metal quadruple bonds, principles of UV-Vis , IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and statistical mechanics. (CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351, and CHEM 0355. CHEM 0355 can be taken concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab (A. Vasiliou)

CHEM 0313 Biochemistry Laboratory (Spring 2020)

Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW (L. Giddings)

CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is an introduction to biochemistry that focuses on the chemical and physical properties of amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Specific topics include the structure and function of proteins, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, how carbohydrates and lipids contribute to vital cellular and organismal functions, and informational biochemistry (DNA, RNA, and specific enzymes and processes leading to the production of regulatory RNA and proteins). Specific topics from the primary literature will be explored to illustrate how particular techniques and experimental approaches are used to gain a new understanding of biochemistry and molecular biology. (CHEM 0203 or CHEM 0242) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (R. Cluss)

CHEM 0351 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy (Fall 2019)

Quantum theory is developed and applied to atomic structure and molecular bonding. Spectroscopy is examined as an application of quantum theory. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0241, MATH 0122 and PHYS 0110, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. (A. Vasiliou)

CHEM 0355 Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Chemical and Biological Sciences (Spring 2020)

In this course students will learn the central ideas that frame thermodynamics and kinetics. The application of these ideas to chemical, biological, and the environmental processes will be covered using examples such as refrigerators, heat pumps, fuel cells, bioenergetics, lipid membranes, and catalysts (including enzymes). (PHYS 0109 or PHYS 0110 and MATH 0122 and CHEM 0204) 3 hrs lect., 1 hr disc. (A. Vasiliou)

CHEM 0400 Seminar in Chemical Research (Fall 2019)

This seminar provides students with experiences to support the preparation of a senior thesis. As the course involves participation in a mentored laboratory project and the intent to complete a senior thesis, students must make arrangements to work with a faculty advisor prior to gaining approval for course registration. The classroom portion of this seminar focuses on reading the scientific literature, giving effective oral presentations, and writing the thesis introduction. Particular emphasis will be given to computer and technology issues related to oral and written presentations. Participation will normally be followed by registration for CHEM 0500 or CHEM 0700 (winter term and spring). (Senior standing; Approval only) 2 hrs. sem., 12 hrs. lab. (R. Cluss)

CHEM 0425 Biochemistry of Metabolism (Fall 2019)

A living organism requires thousands of coordinated individual chemical reactions for life. In this course we will survey the major integrated metabolic pathways of living cells and whole organisms, with particular attention to enzyme mechanisms, as well as the regulation, and integration of metabolism from the molecular to the whole organism level. The synthesis and degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides are investigated, along with the mechanisms of energy flow and cell-to-cell communication. While common metabolic processes are emphasized, unique aspects of metabolism that permit cells to function in unusual niches will also be considered. Mechanistic and regulatory aspects of metabolic processes will be reinforced through an investigation of inborn errors and organic defects that lead to disease. (CHEM 0322) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (L. Giddings)

CHEM 0431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (Fall 2019)

Atomic structure, bonding theories, and properties applicable to inorganic and organometallic compounds will be developed in depth. Specific topics will include valence bond theory, molecular orbital theory, ligand field theory, applications of group theory, and reaction mechanisms. (CHEM 0351) 3 hrs. lect. (J. Larrabee)

CHEM 0500 Independent Study Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Individual study for qualified students. (Approval required)

CHEM 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory research on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for CHEM 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a faculty member in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (Approval required; open only to seniors)

CHEM 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Students who have initiated research projects in CHEM 0400 and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for CHEM 0701. Students are required to write a thesis, give a public presentation, and defend their thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. The final grade will be determined by the department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (CHEM 0400; approval required)
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Greenberg-Starr Department of Chinese Language & Literature

Full Major:
I. Required Courses:

  • CHNS 0101 through CHNS 0302 (or equivalent)
  • Four additional courses from among: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS/GSFS 0240, CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS/LNGT 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS/GSFS 0331, CHNS 0340, CHNS 0350, CHNS 0370 (At least one of the four must be in pre-modern literature and at least one must be in modern literature or culture).
  • CHNS 0411 (The equivalent may be taken during study abroad)
  • CHNS 0425, CHNS 0426, or CHNS 0412 (the equivalent to CHNS 0412 may be taken at the Middlebury Chinese School, or during study abroad)
  • CHNS 0475
  • Either CHNS 0700 or CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702

II. Senior Work:
Full majors in Chinese are required to complete either CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 (Senior Honors Thesis) or CHNS 0700 (Senior Essay or Translation Project). CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 is a one-semester plus J-term sequence that should normally be taken during the fall and J-term. CHNS 0700 is a one-semester course that may be taken during the fall or winter. The Chinese department discourages students from postponing completion of senior work until the final semester of full-time study.
     Joint majors in Chinese are encouraged but not required to do a senior thesis (CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702) or project (CHNS 0700). A joint thesis or project should, when feasible, combine the two fields of study of the joint major.
     All senior work, whether CHNS 0700 or CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702, must include a major focus on work with primary sources in Chinese. All senior work should focus on Chinese literature; qualified students may petition the Chair for permission to do senior work on other aspects of Chinese culture (e.g., film or linguistics).
     Senior Honors Thesis: To be eligible for the CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 Senior Honors Thesis, students majoring in Chinese (full, double or joint) must have completed language study through at least CHNS 0302 (or equivalent), taken at least two Chinese literature/culture courses, and maintained an average of B+ or better in Chinese department courses. Complete guidelines for the completion of the CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 thesis (and the CHNS 0700 project) are available from the Chinese Department.
     Departmental Honors: Both full and joint majors may qualify for honors. Eligibility for departmental honors in Chinese requires completion of a senior honors thesis graded B+ or better and a grade point average of B+ (3.35) or higher in all courses taken that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major as listed above (full) and below (joint), including courses taken in the summer in the Chinese School and/or during study abroad. Only courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy major requirements count toward honors (i.e., courses taken abroad that do not fall into this category do not count) and all such courses count (e.g., if more than four courses toward major requirement {b} are taken, all count). The department may award honors for completion of an exceptionally impressive senior essay or translation project that is graded A if the student has an average of B+ or higher in all qualifying courses (as defined above). High honors will be awarded for a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in all qualifying courses (as define above) and a senior thesis of A- or better. Highest honors are reserved for students who earn a grade of A on the senior thesis and who have an average of 3.75 or higher in all qualifying courses (as defined above).

Joint Major:
I. Required Courses:

  • CHNS 0101 through CHNS 0302 (or equivalent);
  • Either CHNS 0411 (the equivalent may be taken in the summer at the Middlebury Chinese School or, with prior approval, during study abroad) or CHNS 0425;
  • Four additional courses from among the following, with at least one from each category: (A) CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS/GSFS 0240, CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS/LNGT 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS/GSFS 0331, CHNS 0340, CHNS 0350, CHNS 0370; (B) CHNS 0411, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0425, CHNS 0426, CHNS 0475.

Minor:
I. Required Courses:

  • Four courses from among CHNS 0101 or CHNS 0102 (not both), CHNS 0103, CHNS 0201, CHNS 0202, CHNS 0301, CHNS 0302, CHNS 0400, CHNS 0411, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0425, CHNS 0426, and CHNS 0475 (in this way, all students increase their language proficiency, regardless of the level at which they start their study).
  • Plus three courses from among CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS 0250, CHNS 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0331 (formally CHNS 0330), CHNS 0340, CHNS 0350, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0411, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0425, CHNS 0426, and CHNS 0475. One course must be in literature in either Chinese or English (the following are literature courses: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0331 (formally CHNS 0330), CHNS 0340, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0412, and CHNS 0475).
  • A single course may be counted toward only one category.
  • The equivalent of CHNS 0411 and/or CHNS 0412 may be taken abroad. A "one-on-one" course in literature or culture taken abroad may count toward the second category if approved by the Department Chair before study abroad. No other courses taken abroad may be counted toward the second category.

International and Global Studies Major with Chinese Language: Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies major section, the Chinese language component of an IGS major requires completion of the following: 1) completion of CHNS 0202 or the equivalent (students are strongly encouraged to complete CHNS 0302 or the equivalent before study abroad, preferably in the summer Chinese School); 2) one semester at one of the three C.V. Starr-Middlebury College Schools in China; 3) upon return from China, any one, preferably two, of the following: CHNS 0411, 0412, 0425, 0426, or 0475.

CHNS 0101 Beginning Chinese (Fall 2019)

This course is an introduction to Mandarin (guoyu or putonghua). The course begins with simple words and phrases, the pronunciation and cadences of Mandarin, romanization, Chinese characters, and simple vocabulary items, all taught in the context of practical communication. Sentence patterns and other fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing will be taught, including both traditional characters (used everywhere before the 1950s and still used in Taiwan and Hong Kong) and simplified characters (used in China). Students should have achieved active command of more than 600 Chinese characters and more than 800 compounds by the end of the sequence CHNS 0101, CHNS 0102, and CHNS 0103. 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill LNG (H. Du, K. Wang)

CHNS 0103 Beginning Chinese (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with accelerated introduction of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence patterns designed to facilitate speaking and reading. Toward the end of this semester students will read Huarshang de meiren (Lady in the Painting), a short book written entirely in Chinese. (CHNS 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill LNG (H. Du, K. Wang)

CHNS 0201 Intermediate Chinese (Fall 2019)

This course is designed to enable the student to converse in everyday Chinese and to read simple texts in Chinese (both traditional and simplified characters). Discussion of assigned readings will be conducted primarily in Chinese. Familiarity with the vocabulary and grammar introduced in CHNS 0101, CHNS 0102, and CHNS 0103 is assumed. Grammatical explanations, written exercises, dictation quizzes, sentence patterns, oral drill, and CD's will accompany assignments. By the completion of CHNS 0202, which follows CHNS 0201 directly, students should be able to read and write approximately 1,200 characters. (CHNS 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill LNG (T. Moran, Y. Zhang)

CHNS 0202 Intermediate Chinese (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of the first term's work, with the class conducted primarily in Chinese. (CHNS 0201) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill LNG (T. Moran, Y. Zhang)

CHNS 0219 The Chinese Literary Tradition (in translation) (Spring 2020)

This course, an introduction to the works of literature that formed the basis of traditional Chinese culture, is a discussion-based seminar. It focuses first on texts written in classical Chinese from the earliest times up through the Song dynasty, including selections from early poetry and history, Daoist classics, stories of the strange, and Tang Dynasty poetry by Wang Wei, Li Bai and Du Fu. These texts shaped the traditional Chinese understanding of the world, and provided models of what was perceived to be powerful, beautiful language. In the second part of the course we will explore narratives written in the vernacular language, focusing on the literary significance and aesthetic value of drama, stories and novels long treasured by the Chinese. Students will gain a better understanding of traditional Chinese literary values, as well as Chinese society and worldviews. This class is not intended for native Chinese students who have studied Chinese literature in high school classes in China. (No background in Chinese culture or language needed.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CW (4 seats), LIT, NOA (W. Xu)

CHNS 0220 Modern China through Literature (in translation) (Fall 2019)

This course, taught in English, is a discussion-based seminar on some of the most significant works of short fiction, novellas, and novels that tell the story of China and the Chinese from the end of the Qing dynasty to the present. Students will gain a better understanding of the history of modern China by studying the works of literature that inspired readers and provoked debate during one hundred years of social reform, revolution, war, civil war, reconstruction, cultural revolution, cultural revival, and economic growth. Our reading will include work by authors such as Lu Xun (Diary of a Madman, 1918), Zhang Ailing (Love in a Fallen City, 1944), Ah Cheng (The Chess King, 1984), Yu Hua (To Live, 1993), and, from Taiwan, Zhu Tianwen (Notes of a Desolate Man, 1999). We will consider the mainstream (socially engaged realism), the avant-garde (varieties of modernism), and popular genres (romance and martial arts), and we will look for answers to the following questions: what has been the place of fiction in China in the modern era and what vision of modern China do we find in its fiction? (No prerequisites) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CW (16 seats), LIT, NOA (T. Moran)

CHNS 0250 Chinese Cinema (Spring 2020)

This course, taught in English, surveys the history of movies in China since the 1930s and also offers an in-depth look at the work of: China's fifth-generation directors of the 1980s and their successors up to the present; Taiwan's new wave; and Hong Kong popular cinema, including martial arts film. Our focus is the screening and discussion of films such as The Goddess (a 1934 silent classic), Stage Sisters (1965; directed by the influential Xie Jin), the controversial Yellow Earth (1984), In the Heat of the Sun (a 1994 break with the conventional representation of the Cultural Revolution), Yang Dechang's masterpiece A One and a Two (2000), and Still Life (Jia Zhangke's 2006 meditation on displacement near the Three Gorges Dam). The course is designed to help students understand the place of cinema in Chinese culture and develop the analytical tools necessary for the informed viewing and study of Chinese film. We will look at everything from art film, to underground film, to recent box office hits. (No prerequisites) One evening film screening per week. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, ART, CW (5 seats), NOA (T. Moran)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0250

CHNS 0270 Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English) (Spring 2020)

Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver) AAL, NOA, SOC (H. Du)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0270

CHNS 0301 Advanced Chinese (Modern Chinese) (Fall 2019)

This course aims at further development of overall language proficiency through extensive reading of selected texts representing a wide variety of subjects and styles. Classes will be conducted entirely in Chinese except for occasional recourse to English by the instructor to provide a quick solution to problems of definition. The main text will be All Things Considered with supplementary readings selected to help students both continue to work toward competence in conversational Chinese and also begin to master a more sophisticated register of language. 4 hrs. lect. LNG (K. Wang, Y. Zhang)

CHNS 0302 Advanced Chinese (Modern Chinese) (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of CHNS 0301 with continued practice in conversational Chinese and a greater emphasis on reading works of a literary nature. (CHNS 0301 or equivalent) 4 hrs. lect. LNG (K. Wang)

CHNS 0370 Traditional Chinese Novels (in translation) (Fall 2019)

This seminar focuses on pre-modern Chinese full-length novels, which rose and matured during the Ming-Qing period. Students will read the "masterworks" of this genre, including Three Kingdoms (the epic deeds of heroes of the Chinese civil war of the second and third centuries), Outlaws of the Marsh (picaresque tales of Chinese Robin Hoods, as it were), The Journey to the West (a comic Buddhist-Daoist allegory better known in English as Monkey), The Plum in the Golden Vase (an erotic novel of manners), The Scholars (a social satire), and The Story of the Stone-The Dream of the Red Chamber (widely recognized as a masterpiece of world literature); all are beloved and long treasured by the Chinese. We will not only trace the evolution of classical Chinese novels and consider their literary significance and artistic value; the course will also aim to provide a richer and deeper understanding of traditional China, her history, society, culture, worldviews, beliefs, sense of humor, etc. (CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, or CHNS 0250, or two Middlebury literature courses, or by approval of the instructor. CHNS 0219 strongly recommended.) AAL, CW (4 seats), LIT, NOA (W. Xu)

CHNS 0411 Classical Chinese I (in Chinese) (Fall 2019)

This course is an introduction to wenyan, the written language of traditional China. In this course we will emphasize comprehension of the literal and metaphorical meanings of short wenyan texts. Our approach will include grammatical analysis and baihua translation (i.e., from the Classical Chinese into modern Chinese); discussion will be conducted entirely in baihua. This course begins the two-semester sequence of Classical Chinese, which not only introduces students to wenyan but also provides a vital learning experience for any student seeking to attain a high level of linguistic and cultural proficiency in Chinese, including modern written discourse. (CHNS 0302 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. LNG (W. Xu)

CHNS 0412 Classical Chinese II (in Chinese) (Spring 2020)

A continuation of CHNS 0411. In this course students will read a wide selection of wenyan texts that sample the classics of ancient Chinese thought, including Confucius' Analects, the Daoist texts Laozi and Zhuangzi, Mohist arguments against war, Sunzi's The Art of War, and Legalist writings on law. Students will also learn to punctuate wenyan texts (which were originally unpunctuated) and compose sentences or short paragraphs in wenyan. All class discussion will be conducted in modern Chinese. (CHNS 0411 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. LNG (Y. Zhang)

CHNS 0425 Contemporary Social Issues in China: Advanced Readings (in Chinese) (Fall 2019)

A survey of materials written in modern expository Chinese (academic, journalistic and polemical) that focus on the cultural, political, economic, and social issues of contemporary China. This advanced readings course is designed primarily for seniors who have already spent a semester or more studying and living in China or Taiwan. Emphasis will be given to further developing students' ability to read, analyze, and discuss complex issues in Mandarin while also advancing proficiency in writing and in oral comprehension. Oral reports and written compositions will be integral to the course's requirements. (Approval Required) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LNG, NOA (H. Du)

CHNS 0426 Politics and Business in China: Advanced Readings and Discussion (in Chinese) (Spring 2020)

The capstone course for those students who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. The goal of this course is to help students improve their ability to read, write, and talk about politics and business in China. Most of this course will focus on recent and current debate and discussion in China over domestic political programs and policies, international relations, and business trends. Discussion will also touch upon the political and economic history of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. We will read articles intended for popular audiences in the Chinese-speaking world. 3 hrs. lect. (CHNS 0425 or CHNS 0411 or study abroad in China) AAL, LNG, NOA (Y. Zhang)

CHNS 0475 Senior Seminar on Modern Chinese Literature (in Chinese) (Spring 2020)

A capstone course for all Chinese majors and for others who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. Students will read and critique works by major Chinese fiction writers (and sometimes playwrights) and may also see and discuss a film or films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and/or Taiwan. All reading, discussion, and critical writing will be in Chinese. (CHNS 0412 or CHNS 0425) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT, LNG, NOA (W. Xu)

CHNS 0500 Senior Essay (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

CHNS 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval required)

CHNS 0701 Senior Thesis Proposal (Fall 2019)

(Approval Required)
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Eve Adler Department of Classics and Program in Classical Studies

Required for the major in Classics:
A. Ten courses in two languages: Greek and Latin (normally six in one language and four in the other) including one senior seminar (CLAS 0420). 
B. CLAS 0150 Ancient Epic Poetry
C. Two additional courses in classics in translation, one from each of the following categories:
1. CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece or CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature or CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates
2. CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome or CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome or CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic or CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy
D. CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature: General Examination for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
Optional: CLAS 0700 Senior Essay (fall/winter or winter/spring), CLAS 0505 Independent Senior Project (fall or spring). (Note: Students who wish to do an optional senior essay or independent senior project must secure the sponsorship of a member of the classics department in the semester before the essay or project is to be undertaken.)
Honors: B+ average or better in courses taken for the major (excluding senior work). B+ or better in the General Examination (CLAS 0701) and in the Senior Seminar (CLAS 0420). (Note: A student who does an optional senior essay or independent senior project may arrange with the chair, in the semester prior to undertaking the project, to offer that grade in lieu of the grade for CLAS 0420 for the calculation of departmental honors.)
Joint Major: Students interested in a joint major in Classics and another discipline should consult the chair. The joint major in Classics typically requires ten courses in Greek and Latin (normally six in one language and four in the other); CLAS 0701, and senior work that combines Classics with the other major.

Required for the Minor in Classics: The minor in classics may be configured in one of the following four ways:
1. Latin CLLA: Five courses in Latin
2. Greek CLGR: Five courses in Greek
3. Classical Civilization CLCC: Five courses, as follows: three or more courses chosen from    CLAS/HIST 0131, CLAS/HIST 0132, CLAS 0140, CLAS 0143, CLAS 0144, CLAS 0149, CLAS0150, CLAS 0151, CLAS 0152, CLAS 0190, CLAS/LITP 0230, INTD 0250, CLAS/RELI 0262, CLAS/PHIL 0275, CLAS/PHIL 0276, CLAS/HIST 0331, CLAS/HIST 0332, or CLAS/HIST 0337; and CLAS 0420 or CLAS 0450 (or both).
4. Classical Language and Civilization CLCL: Five courses, as follows: two or more courses in Latin or Greek; one or more courses chosen from CLAS/HIST 0131, CLAS/HIST 0132, CLAS 0140, CLAS 0143, CLAS 0144, CLAS 0149, CLAS/CMLT 0150, CLAS 0151, CLAS 0152, CLAS/CMLT 0190, CLAS/LITP 0230, CLAS/RELI 0262, INTD 0250, CLAS/PHIL 0275 or CLAS 0276; and one or more courses chosen from CLAS/HIST 0331, CLAS/HIST 0332, CLAS/HIST 0337, CLAS 0420, or CLAS/CMLT 0450.
AP credit policy: One course credit toward graduation, not toward the major or minor, will be granted for one AP exam in Latin under the following conditions: a) The student has received a grade of 4 or 5 on the AP exam, and b) The student has completed an advanced course (LATN 0201 or above) in Latin at Middlebury with a grade of B+ or above. (Note: No more than one course credit will be granted, whether the student presents one or two AP exams.)
Study Abroad Guidelines: Study abroad in the Mediterranean can enrich our majors' experience of the ancient world, because it affords them the opportunity to see the places that they have been learning about in the classroom. Students also find it stimulating to be surrounded by people with similar interests from other institutions. Thus, while our curriculum does not in any way necessitate study abroad, the faculty is happy to work with students who wish to pursue it as part of their Middlebury degree in classics or classical studies.
For those students who want to go abroad, we strongly recommend a semester rather than a year. The three programs we endorse are the ICCS (the Inter-Collegiate Consortium for Classical Studies in Rome), CYA (College Year in Athens), and Arcadia (also in Athens), all of which offer semester-long programs. Admission to the ICCS in particular, however, is highly competitive, and students may have a compelling academic rationale for studying elsewhere. Accordingly, we have also approved students who wished to study for a semester at foreign universities with strong classics departments. These have included Trinity College Dublin, the University of Edinburgh, Cambridge University, and the University of Vienna. For some students, a rewarding alternative to study abroad during the academic year has been participation in a summertime archaeological excavation.
We discourage students from going abroad before they have had at least three semesters of whichever ancient language(s) they are learning. As part of their program of study abroad, students normally take at least one course in each ancient language of study, and select additional courses that are appropriate substitutes for courses in the major. In order to be fully prepared for senior work, however, students will need to have completed a significant portion of the courses required for the major, in particular CLAS 0150, before going abroad.
Generally speaking, we are as flexible as we can be in helping majors to identify courses in programs abroad that allow them to stay in step with their cohort in Middlebury and to be prepared for senior work. Unless we are familiar with the institution, the instruction, and the content of the courses, we rarely grant credit to non-majors for classics courses taken away from Middlebury. In all cases (majors, non-majors, potential majors, and minors), students must consult with a member of the classics department before leaving Middlebury to plan and receive approval for work done at other institutions.

Required for the major in Classical Studies (CLST):

A. The following:

 1. CLAS/CMLT 0150 Ancient Epic Poetry

 2. CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece or CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature or CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy or CLAS/CMLT 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates

 3. CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome or CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome or CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic or CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy

 

B. Three additional courses in Classical Studies chosen from the following:

CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece

CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome

CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome

CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire

CLAS 0149 Rhetoric and Politics from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Present

CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature

CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy

CLAS/CMLT 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy

CLAS/LITP 0230 Myth and Contemporary Experience

CLAS/HARC 0234 Ancient Roman City: Pompeii and BeyondCLAS/HARC 0236 Cities of Vesuvius

CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates

CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy

CLAS/HIST 0331 Sparta and Athens

CLAS/HIST 0332 Roman Law

CLAS/HIST 0337 From Alexander to Rome

HARC 0213 Roman Art and Architecture

HARC 0221 Greek Art and Archaeology

HARC 0223 The Classical Tradition in Architecture: A History

HARC 0312 Of Gods, Mortals, and Myths: Greek and Roman Painting

HARC 0320 Hands-on Archaeology: Theory and Practice

CLAS/THEA 0250 Greek Drama in Performance

MATH 0261 History of Mathematics

PHIL 0201 Ancient Greek Philosophy

PHIL 0302 Philosophy of Plato

PHIL 0303 Philosophy of Aristotle

RELI 0381/CLAS 0308 Seminar in the New Testament

PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Science

PSCI 0317 Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy

PSCI 0409 Seminar in Political Philosophy

RELI/CLAS 0162 The Formation of Judaism in Antiquity

RELI 0287 Greco-Roman Religions

RELI 0387 Seminar on the Religions of Rome

 C. Four courses in Greek or four courses in Latin chosen from:

 GREK 0101 Beginning Greek I

GREK 0102 Beginning Greek II

GREK 0201 Intermediate Greek: Prose

GREK 0202 Intermediate Greek: Poetry

GREK 0301 Readings in Greek Literature I

GREK 0302 Readings in Greek Literature II

GREK 0401 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature I

GREK 0402 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature II

LATN 0101 Beginning Latin I

LATN 0102 Beginning Latin II

LATN 0110 Introduction to College Latin

LATN 0201 Intermediate Latin: Prose

LATN 0202 Intermediate Latin: Poetry

LATN 0301 Readings in Latin Literature I

LATN 0302 Readings in Latin Literature II

LATN 0401 Advanced Readings in Latin I

LATN 0402 Advanced Readings in Latin II

 D. CLAS 0420 Seminar in Classical Literature

 E. CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature: General Examination for Classics/Classical Studies Majors

 Optional: CLAS 0700 Senior Essay (fall/ winter/spring); CLAS 0500 Independent Senior Project (fall/winter/spring). (Note: Students who wish to do an optional senior essay or independent senior project must secure the sponsorship of a member of the classics department in the semester before the essay or project is to be undertaken.)

 For complete descriptions of the courses listed above, see listings under the appropriate departments.

 Honors: B+ average or better in courses taken for the major (excluding senior work). B+ or better in the General Examination (CLAS 0701) and in the Senior Seminar (CLAS 0420). (Note: A student who does an optional senior essay or independent senior project may arrange with the chair, in the semester prior to undertaking the project, to offer that grade in lieu of the grade for CLAS 0420 for the calculation of departmental honors.)

 Joint Major: Students interested in a joint major in Classical Studies and another discipline should consult the chair. The joint major in Classical Studies typically requires four semesters of either Greek or Latin; CLAS 0150; one course from section A2 and one course from A3 under the requirements for the major; CLAS 0701, and senior work that combines Classical Studies with the other major.

 

CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome (Spring 2020)

In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect. CW (8 seats), EUR, HIS, LIT (R. Ganiban)

CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire (Fall 2019)

In this course we will investigate the literature, culture, and history of the Roman Empire, focusing on how Romans sought, often at the cost of their own lives, to define the role and powers of the emperor and their place as subjects to this new, autocratic power. Texts we will read include: epic (Lucan), tragedy (Seneca), history (Tacitus), biography (Suetonius), prose fiction (Petronius), as well as early Christian literature. As we read we will seek to answer questions about the nature of freedom and empire, what is gained and lost by replacing a republican with an autocratic political system, and whether literature in this period can offer an accurate reflection of reality, function as an instrument of change and protest, or of fearful praise and flattery. 3 hrs lect. 1 hr. disc. CW (10 seats), EUR, HIS, LIT (C. Star)

CLAS 0150 Greek and Roman Epic Poetry (Fall 2019)

Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. CMP, EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Witkin)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0150

CLAS 0251 Greek Religion (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine the religious experience of the Greeks in all its complexity and variety. Drawing on literary sources (e.g. Homer, Hesiod, tragedy, and comedy, among others) and archaeological evidence, we will study the Greek views of the gods as these emerge from both mythical narratives and cult practice. We will explore the Greek ideas of personal salvation, but also the importance of religious festivals for the community of the polis. Finally, while looking at ancient philosophical critiques of the traditional gods, we will trace the transition to Christianity and we will compare the sacred in Greek culture with the place of religion in our own society. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS, PHL (P. Sfyroeras)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0251

CLAS 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates (Spring 2020)

Why did Socrates “call philosophy down from the heavens, set her in the cities of men and also their homes, and compel her to ask questions about life and morals and things good and evil”? Why was philosophy indifferent to man, then considered dangerous to men when it did pay attention? How was philosophy ultimately transformed by Plato and Aristotle as a consequence of the examination of human knowledge that Socrates made intrinsic to philosophy? In this course we will consider the central questions of ancient Greek philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle by focusing on what Nietzsche called "the Problem of Socrates": why Socrates abandoned "pre-Socratic" natural science in order to examine the opinions of his fellow Athenians, and why they put him to death for corruption and impiety. Texts will include selected fragments of the pre-Socratics and sophists, works of Aristophanes, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle , and Nietzsche. 3 hrs. lect disc. EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Witkin)
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0275

CLAS 0420 Seminar in Classical Lit: Medea: 2,500 Years of a Tragic Heroine (Spring 2020)

From Euripides’s play to the contemporary films of Pier Paolo Pasolini and Lars von Trier, Medea’s story has been retold for two and a half millennia. In this course we will investigate some of the avatars of Medea, from drama (Euripides and Seneca), to epic (Apollonius and Ovid), to philosophical discussions of her plight (Epictetus). We will also consider her role in early modern drama (Macbeth) and modern film. What does Medea represent? The overwhelming power of love and madness? The triumph of barbarism over civilization? A critique of cultural superiority and enlightenment? How can we explain her continued presence through the centuries? 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LIT (C. Star)

CLAS 0450 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2019)

A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701 below) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0450

CLAS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval required)

CLAS 0505 Ind Senior Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required) (M. Witkin, R. Ganiban, P. Sfyroeras, C. Star)

CLAS 0700 Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval required)

CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2019)

A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)

GREK 0102 Beginning Greek II (Spring 2020)

This course completes the introductory course offered in Winter Term and will conclude with a reading of Plato's dialogue, Ion. 6 hrs. lect. LNG (M. Witkin)

GREK 0301 Readings in Greek Literature I (Fall 2019)

Readings in major authors. Students should have had some formal study of Greek and should consult with the instructor during the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, LNG (P. Sfyroeras)

GREK 0302 Readings in Greek Literature II (Spring 2020)

Readings in major authors. Students should have had some formal study of Greek and should consult with the instructor during the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, LNG (P. Sfyroeras)

HEBR 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019)

Approval required.

LATN 0110 Introduction to College Latin (Fall 2019)

This course is designed for students with one to four years of high school Latin who are interested in continuing their study of the language. The course combines review of grammar and practice in translation; the aim is to improve reading skills and understanding of the language. Students may expect to join a 0200- or 0300-level Latin course the following spring. We will use both a textbook and readings from authors such as Cicero and Livy. (Prerequisites: Students should have had some formal study of Latin and should consult with the instructor during orientation week or the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level.) 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LNG (C. Star)

LATN 0201 Intermediate Latin: Prose (Fall 2019)

Readings in major authors. Students should have had some formal study of Latin and should consult with the instructor during the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LNG (R. Ganiban)

LATN 0202 Intermediate Latin: Poetry (Spring 2020)

Readings in major authors. Students should have had some formal study of Latin and should consult with the instructor during the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LNG (C. Star)

LATN 0401 Advanced Readings in Latin I (Fall 2019)

Readings in major authors. . Students should have had some formal study of Latin and should consult with the instructor during the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level. 3 hrs. lect. (I. Sutherland)

LATN 0402 Advanced Readings in Latin II (Spring 2020)

Readings in major authors. . Students should have had some formal study of Latin and should consult with the instructor during the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)

LATN 0501 Advanced Readings in Latin III (Fall 2019)

Readings in major authors. Students should have had some formal study of Latin and should consult with the instructor during the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level. 3 hrs lect. (I. Sutherland)
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Program in Comparative Literature

The Comparative Literature curriculum emphasizes language learning as the basis for the study of literary texts. During their course of study, students of Comparative Literature will also become familiar with current comparative methodologies as well as relevant cultural and critical theories. These methodological skills support students’ work as they pursue a flexible and individualized pathway through their program of study, which culminates in an article-length comparative essay. The program is designed to accommodate students at all levels of language proficiency.

Majors in Comparative Literature will develop a plan of study with the guidance of a faculty advisor with expertise in the students chosen primary language and literature, and the Director of the Comparative Literature Program.

The basic structure of the program is as follows:

1. One primary language of study AND

2. Four courses in a secondary language. Students’ first language cannot be their primary language, but it can be their secondary language.  For example, English cannot be the primary language of a student whose first language is English, but it can be the secondary language.

Requirements:

  1. CMLT 0101
  2. Three content courses in the primary language, including two literary classes and one cultural course (e.g. cinema, politics). The choice of particular classes requires the approval of the student’s primary language advisor and the Program Director. Students will also need approval for inclusion of study abroad classes in this category.  In the case of students whose primary language is Arabic, Chinese, Russian, or Japanese, some of these three content courses MAY be taught in English, depending on the availability of suitable courses in the language.
  3. Four courses in a secondary language. If the secondary language is English, at least one course must be pre 1800.
  4. One course in literary theory (suggested for sophomore year), for example ENAM/CMLT 205.
  5. Study abroad, in the primary language.  Exceptions may be made if you receive prior approval from your faculty advisor and the program director. A maximum of 4 courses in literature taken abroad may be used to satisfy other requirements in the major, subject to the pre-approval of the Director of the program. All students must take one class in their primary language after their return.
  6. Two electives explicitly comparative in nature. These literature courses may be taught in English. Examples: CLAS/CMLT 0150; CMLT/RELI 0238; CMLT/CLAS 0450; ENAM/CMLT 0305; GRMN/CMLT 0333; ITAL/CMLT 0299. Suitable classes will be cross-listed and bear the prefix CMLT.
  7. One senior/advanced seminar in literature taken at Middlebury College in the student’s primary or secondary language.
  8. Senior Work (CMLT 0700): During Fall and Winter Term, or Winter Term and Spring, students will write a 35-page (article length) comparative essay (advised independently). Students are responsible to identify and arrange to work with their advisor and the members of their committee no later than the last week of classes in the preceding term.

Honors: To be eligible for honors students must have a GPA in the major of 3.7 and a B+ or above on their essay. Students with eligible honors theses will also have a defense before the last day of exams.

CMLT 0101 Introduction to World Literature (Spring 2020)

This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, CW, LIT (R. Russi, S. Mula)

CMLT 0150 Greek and Roman Epic Poetry (Fall 2019)

Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. CMP, EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Witkin)
Cross-listed as: CLAS 0150 *

CMLT 0200 Once Upon A Time ... Folk Fairy Tales Of The World (Fall 2019)

Tell me a story! We will examine the complex, inter-connected fairy tale traditions found in every society. Comparing fairy tale variants from around the world-including Japan, China, India, Near East, Africa-we will explore their convoluted and fertile relationships as observed in the rise of fairy tale collections in 15th-century Europe, reaching a culmination in the Brothers Grimm collection, often synonymous with the fairy tale itself. To attain a more dispassionate critical perspective we will explore theoretical approaches to the fairy tales through authors such as Zipes, Bottigheimer, Tatar, and Rölleke, and conclude by examining modern variants in prose, poetry, and film. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, LIT (R. Russi)

CMLT 0201 The Fictions of Science and Science Fiction: Technological Fantasies in Global Context (Fall 2019)

In The Human Condition, Hannah Arendt refers to science fiction as “a vehicle for mass sentiments and mass desires” that bears witness to the fact that “science has realized and affirmed what men anticipated in dreams that were neither wild nor idle.” Drawing on a wide range of literary, cinematic, and philosophical texts from Europe, Russia, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, in this course we will examine how cultural specificity informs and responds to the demands of technological fantasy, and investigate the challenges and opportunities posed to the concept of “the human” in an age dominated by technology. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, LIT (T. Portice)

CMLT 0205 Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce multiple interpretations of a given literary work. The approaches covered may include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Race Theory and Multicultural Criticism, Feminism, Post-Colonial Criticism, Queer Studies, Eco-Criticism, Post-Structuralism, and others. These theories will be applied to various works of fiction, poetry, and drama. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc. EUR, LIT (Fall 2019: Y. Siddiqi; Spring 2020: A. Baldridge)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0205 *

CMLT 0221 Modern Arabic Literature (Spring 2020)

This course is a survey of the most important moments in the development of Modern Arabic Literature from the end of 19th century to the present. We will map the developments, achievements, and innovations by Arab writers against a double background of rising nationalism, decolonization, and wars on the one hand and the idea and experiences of modernity and the west on the other. We will examine works of fiction by both male and female writers including novels, short stories, and drama, as well as poetry representing several different Arab countries. Students are encouraged to read in advance Albert Hourani's A History of the Arab People. (Open to all, no previous knowledge of Arabic is required). 3 hrs. Sem AAL, LIT, MDE (S. Liebhaber)
Cross-listed as: ARBC 0221 *

CMLT 0285 Magical Realism(s) (Fall 2019)

Novels that juxtapose the marvelous with the everyday have shadowed (and mocked) mainstream realism for the better part of two centuries, and have proliferated in recent years to the point where they may constitute the predominant genre of our globalized culture. Why should such strange mélanges of the quotidian and the supernatural strike so many authors as the perfect vehicle to express 20th and 21st century anxieties and possibilities? We will explore examples of these boundary-defying fictions across several decades and various national literatures. Authors to be studied will include Woolf, Kafka, Calvino, Morrison, Pynchon, Rushdie, and Garcia-Marquez. CMP, LIT (A. Baldridge)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0285 *

CMLT 0299 Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English) (Fall 2019)

This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. EUR, LIT (S. Carletti)
Cross-listed as: ITAL 0299 *

CMLT 0311 God and Love in the Ancient World: India and Israel (Fall 2019)

Are loving god and loving a person the same thing? Do people use the same forms of expression for human and divine love? Lovers of all kinds have been asking these questions since the second millennium, BCE. In this course we will explore these questions and others by reading poetry, narrative, prayer, and epic from two ancient classical civilizations: Brahmanical India and Biblical Israel. We will read Indian texts of the Rg Veda, the Bhagavad Gita, and devotional hymns to the classical Hindu gods and goddesses. We will compare these texts with those from the Hebrew Bible, including well-known narratives of royalty, the psalms and the Song of Songs. (At least one RELI course required; courses in the study of literature preferred but not required). 3 hrs. sem. CMP, LIT, PHL, SOA (S. Goldman, L. Patton)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0311 *

CMLT 0317 Poetics of Translation (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore the philosophical and linguistic questions raised by translingual discourse [with an emphasis on poetic writing] by surveying the most important theoretical writings on translation as we compare selections of poetry in multiple translations. Selections will include both “classic” texts such as the Psalms, the Illiad, Catullus, Li Bo, Rumi, Clément Marot, and/ Eugene Onenin/ as well as new experimental translingual poetry. We will discuss such questions as: How does language shape thought? How does culture shape language? Is poetry “untranslatable” by definition? What are the challenges of translating sacred or “exotic” poetry? 3 hrs. lect/disc. AAL, CMP, LIT, NOA (T. Billings)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0317 *

CMLT 0373 The Novel and the City (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447) CMP, LIT, SOC (Y. Siddiqi)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0373 *

CMLT 0450 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2019)

A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)
Cross-listed as: CLAS 0450 *

CMLT 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Approval Required

CMLT 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

A senior thesis is normally completed over two semesters. During Fall and Winter terms, or Winter and Spring terms, students will write a 35-page (article length) comparative essay, firmly situated in literary analysis. Students are responsible for identifying and arranging to work with their primary language and secondary language readers, and consulting with the program director before completing the CMLT Thesis Declaration form. (Approval required.)
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Department of Computer Science

Computer Science is a rich and dynamic discipline that seeks to understand and use effectively the great potential of computing. The Department of Computer Science offers a wide variety of courses that integrate computer science into the liberal arts curriculum. The major can be completed through two tracks. The traditional track provides students with a solid background in algorithmic reasoning, problem solving, design and organization of modern computers and programming languages, and the ability to apply computational thinking to different applications and problem domains. The interdisciplinary track first provides a solid background in computer science including algorithms and data structures, and then allows students to apply this knowledge to specific problem domains in related disciplines and to forge interdisciplinary connections.

Required for the Major in Computer Science, traditional track (11 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level; CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202, CSCI 0301, CSCI 0302, four CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above, and CSCI 0701. One elective can be substituted with MATH 0200 or MATH 0228.

Required for the Major in Computer Science, interdisciplinary track (11 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level; CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202, CSCI 0302, CSCI 0701; and five electives, two or three of them from disciplines outside computer science. These interdisciplinary courses should be cohesive in theme and should have computational content and/or technical depth comparable to CSCI electives.  For double majors, these courses may not come from the other major. The remaining electives can be chosen from any CSCI courses at the 0300-level or above. In consultation with computer science faculty, students will develop a proposed set of courses to count towards the interdisciplinary major, and will submit their proposed list to the department chair by the end of their third semester for approval by the CS faculty.

Departmental Honors: Required for honors are: 1. A grade of "B" or higher in the senior seminar CSCI 701, which contains a significant independent project; 2. An extra CSCI course in addition to the 11 courses required for the major; 3. participation in department extra-curricular or service activities such as tutoring, grading, sys-admin work, student-faculty research, or programming competitions; and 4. a major GPA of at least 3.5 for honors, 3.7 for high honors, and 3.9 for highest honors. The required extra course can be any CSCI elective at the 0300-level or above for regular honors, while high and highest honors require the senior thesis CSCI 0702.

Required for the Minor in Computer Science (6 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level; CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202, and two CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above.

Joint Majors: The computer science component of a joint major requires: One CSCI course at the 0100-level, CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202; one course from CSCI 0301 and CSCI 0302; two CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above; and CSCI 0701.

Advanced Placement and Waivers: First-year students whose secondary preparation indicates they can bypass one or more beginning courses should speak to a faculty member to determine the appropriate first course. College credit is given to students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the AP computer science A exam. CSCI 0200 may be waived for students who have completed MATH 0310 or MATH 0318 or both MATH 0200 and MATH 0247, or in consultation with the department chair.

CSCI 0101 Introduction to Computing (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will provide a broad introductory overview of the discipline of computer science, with no prerequisites or assumed prior knowledge of computers or programming. A significant component of the course is an introduction to algorithmic concepts and to programming using Python; programming assignments will explore algorithmic strategies such as selection, iteration, divide-and-conquer, and recursion, as well as introducing the Python programming language. Additional topics will include: the structure and organization of computers, the Internet and World Wide Web, abstraction as a means of managing complexity, social and ethical computing issues, and the question "What is computation?" (Juniors and Seniors by waiver) 3 hr. lect./1 hr. lab DED (Fall 2019: A. Vaccari, P. Caplan; Spring 2020: C. Andrews, P. Hess)

CSCI 0150 Computing for the Sciences (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will provide an introduction to the field of computer science geared towards students interested in mathematics and the natural sciences. We will study problem-solving approaches and computational techniques utilized in a variety of domains including biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering. Students will learn how to program in Python and other languages, how to extract information from large data sets, and how to utilize a variety of tools employed in scientific computation. The course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior experience with programming or computer science. (Juniors and Seniors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2019: M. Linderman; Spring 2020: A. Briggs)

CSCI 0200 Mathematical Foundations of Computing (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will provide an introduction to the mathematical foundations of computer science, with an emphasis on formal reasoning. Topics will include propositional and predicate logic, sets, functions, and relations; basic number theory; mathematical induction and other proof methods; combinatorics, probability, and recurrence relations; graph theory; and models of computation. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level) (Juniors and Seniors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2019: S. Kimmel; Spring 2020: P. Caplan)

CSCI 0201 Data Structures (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will study the ideas and structures helpful in designing algorithms and writing programs for solving large, complex problems. The Java programming language and object-oriented paradigm are introduced in the context of important abstract data types (ADTs) such as stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. We will study efficient implementations of these ADTs, and learn classic algorithms to manipulate these structures for tasks such as sorting and searching. Prior programming experience is expected, but prior familiarity with the Java programming language is not assumed. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level) (Juniors and Seniors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2019: J. Grant; Spring 2020: A. Christman)

CSCI 0202 Computer Architecture (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

A detailed study of the hardware and software that make up a computer system. Topics include assembly language programming, digital logic design, microarchitecture, pipelines, caches, and RISC vs. CISC. The goal of the course is teach students how computers are built, how they work at the lowest level, and how this knowledge can be used to write better programs. (CSCI 0201) (Seniors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2019: P. Johnson; Spring 2020: A. Vaccari)

CSCI 0301 Theory of Computation (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course explores the nature of computation and what it means to compute. We study important models of computation (finite automata, push-down automata, and Turing machines) and investigate their fundamental computational power. We examine various problems and try to determine the computational power needed to solve them. Topics include deterministic versus non-deterministic computation, and a theoretical basis for the study of NP-completeness. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (M. Dickerson)

CSCI 0302 Algorithms and Complexity (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course focuses on the development of correct and efficient algorithmic solutions to computational problems, and on the underlying data structures to support these algorithms. Topics include computational complexity, analysis of algorithms, proof of algorithm correctness, advanced data structures such as balanced search trees, and also important algorithmic techniques including greedy and dynamic programming. The course complements the treatment of NP-completeness in CSCI 0301. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2019: A. Christman; Spring 2020: S. Kimmel)

CSCI 0311 Artificial Intelligence (Spring 2020)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the study of computational systems that exhibit rational behavior. Applications include strategic game playing, medical diagnosis, speech and handwriting recognition, Internet search, and robotics. Course topics include intelligent agent architectures, search, knowledge representation, logical reasoning, planning, reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, and perception and action. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (A. Christman)

CSCI 0312 Software Development (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course examines the process of developing larger-scale software systems. Laboratory assignments emphasize sound programming practices, tools that facilitate the development process, and teamwork. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./lab (Fall 2019: C. Andrews; Spring 2020: M. Linderman)

CSCI 0315 Systems Programming (Fall 2019)

Students will become intimately acquainted with the low-level software services that applications often take for granted. Through a broad, project-based survey of core system libraries and UNIX system calls, students will explore process management, memory management, linking and loading, threading, synchronization, filesystem operations, and inter-process communication (networking). In each area, students will build software using these building blocks, gaining an understanding of the behavior and efficiency of the tools at their disposal. Students will also gain experience building larger, more complex systems upon which applications can be built. This course is ideal for students who wish to understand and construct the software infrastructure upon which user-level software depends. (CSCI 0202) 3 hrs. lect DED (P. Johnson)

CSCI 0333 Quantum Computing (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore how quantum mechanics can be applied to problems in communications, algorithms, detection, and cryptography. We will learn how features such as entanglement, superposition, and no-cloning can sometimes give quantum systems an advantage over standard “classical” computers. We will also discuss the current situation and challenges facing experimental quantum computers, as well as the limits of quantum computing. No previous experience with quantum mechanics is required. (MATH 0200) 3 hrs lect./disc. DED (S. Kimmel)

CSCI 0416 Parallel Computing (Spring 2020)

Most modern computer architectures are parallel at multiple scales. In this course students will learn to develop programs that can efficiently use those parallel resources to improve performance and solve ever larger problems. Through a project-based survey students will be introduced to parallel hardware (multicore processors, clusters, GPUs), memory models (shared vs. non-shared), locality, synchronization, and different parallel programming models (threads, MapReduce, message-passing, SIMT, and more). Programming assignments will be implemented in multiple languages. (CSCI 202) 3hrs. lect./lab DED (M. Linderman)

CSCI 0431 Computer Networks (Spring 2020)

Computer networks have had a profound impact on modern society. This course will investigate how computer networks are designed and how they work. Examples from the Internet as well as our own campus network will be discussed. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0315) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (P. Johnson)

CSCI 0433 Compiler Design (Fall 2019)

An introduction to the design and construction of compilers and translators. Topics include context-free grammars, lexical analysis, symbol tables, top-down and bottom-up parsing, parser generators, error recovery, run-time organization, declaration processing, type checking, code generation, and optimization. Through the course of the semester students will implement a complete compiler for a simple programming language. (CSCI 0202 and CSCI 0301) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (M. Linderman)

CSCI 0435 Embedded Systems (Fall 2019)

In this course we will learn about microcontrollers (compact single-chip integrated circuits at the core of embedded systems), including their architecture and how they interface with the outside world. In laboratory assignments, we will experiment with different families of microcontrollers, analyze various types of interfaces, and learn how to connect with external sensors and devices. While gaining hands-on familiarity with the different aspects of embedded systems, teams of students will engage in a semester-long project to design and build their own embedded system. (CSCI 0202) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab. DED (A. Vaccari)

CSCI 0450 Fourier Analysis and Signal Processing (Spring 2020)

A wide range of computational applications involve oscillating signals in one or more dimensions. Fourier analysis techniques make it possible to analyze these signals in terms of the frequency components that make them up, forming the basis for technologies ranging from audio and video compression to sound and image processing to automatic speech and image recognition. In this course we will introduce the mathematics of Fourier series and transforms, their discretization through the Fast Fourier Transform, and associated topics such as convolutions, filters, and uncertainty relations. We will then apply these techniques to a variety of examples, including music, speech, and images. (MATH 0122 and MATH 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (N. Graham)

CSCI 0453 Computer Vision (Spring 2020)

The goal of computer vision is to extract information from digital images and movies. Topics covered in this course include algorithms for edge and motion detection, stereo vision, object recognition, and recovering structure from motion. A range of mathematical techniques will be used to model problems and algorithms. Students will implement, test, and evaluate several computer vision techniques, and will gain experience with analyzing real, noise-contaminated image data. (CSCI 0202 and MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (J. Grant)

CSCI 0466 Usable Interface Design for Mobile Applications (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore the fundamental concepts of human-computer interaction and interface design. We will focus on applying an iterative, human-centric design process to mobile development. Topics will include user interface design, user experience, usability, prototyping, user testing, and mobile development. A significant portion of the class will be spent developing a mobile app, walking it through the various prototyping and testing stages. (CSCI 0312) 3 hrs. lect./lab. DED (C. Andrews)

CSCI 0467 Generative Art (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore the field of generative art – the artistic practice based on the creation of processes that yield art and design as an output. Through projects, we will find new applications for computing techniques such as visualization, physical simulation, stochastic processes, agent-based modeling, iterated function systems, fractals, genetic algorithms and machine learning. A portion of the class will also be devoted to reading research literature and discussing the nature of computation creativity. A background in art is not required. (CSCI 0201) (not open to students who have taken CSCI 1003) 3 hrs. lect./lab. ART, DED (C. Andrews)

CSCI 0500 Advanced Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Individual study for qualified students in more advanced topics in computer science theory, systems, or application areas. Particularly suited for students who enter with advanced standing. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect.

CSCI 0701 Senior Seminar (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This senior seminar provides a capstone experience for computer science majors at Middlebury College. Through lectures, readings, and a series of two to three week individual and group assignments, we will introduce important concepts in research and experimental methods in computation. Examples will include: reading research papers; identifying research problems; dealing with big data; experimental design, testing and analysis; and technical writing in computer science. (Approval only). (J. Grant, P. Caplan)

CSCI 0702 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

The senior thesis is required for all CSCI majors who wish to be considered for high and highest departmental honors, and is recommended for students interested in pursuing graduate study in computer science. Students will spend the semester researching and writing, and developing and experimenting as appropriate for their topic. All students will be expected to report on their work in the form of a written thesis, a poster, and an oral presentation at the end of the semester. In addition, throughout the semester, students will meet as a group to discuss research and writing, and will be expected to attend talks in the Computer Science lecture series. Before approval to join the class is granted, students are expected to have chosen a thesis adviser from the CSCI faculty, and determined a thesis topic with the guidance and approval of that adviser. (CSCI 0701 and approval required) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (S. Kimmel)
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Program in Dance

Consistent with its liberal arts mission, the Dance Program offers a rich set of eight foundational courses required of all Dance majors.  Beyond these shared foundational courses, students take additional courses specific to one of three tracks: Choreography and Performance, Production and Technology, and Theory and Aesthetics.  The complete requirements for each track (foundational courses plus track-specific courses) are as follows:

Choreography & Performance Track
1.  0116 (Creative Process)
2.  0260 (Advanced Beginning Dance)                                
3.  0261 (Introduction to Improvisation)
4.  0284 (Dance History)
5.  0360 (Intermediate/Advanced Dance)
6.  0370 (Production Workshop) or 0361 (Movement and Media)
7.  0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology)                                                
8.  0460 (Advanced Dance)
9.  0500 (Production Seminar)
10.  0700 (Senior Work)
11.  Z-Lab (0470)

     This track represents the core curriculum of the dance program for students primarily focused on contemporary approaches to technique, composition and performance. The culminating senior work in this track will take the form a formal concert work and written thesis.

 Production & Technology Track
1.  0116 (Creative Process)
2.  0260 (Advanced Beginning Dance)
3.  0261 (Introduction to Improvisation)
4.  0284 (Dance History)
5.  0361 (Movement & Media)
6.  0370 (Production Workshop)
7.  0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology)                                                       
8.  0460 (Advanced Dance) - Design Focused
9.  0700 (Senior Work) - Design & Production
10. 2 other Elective Courses from the Following Disciplines: (by advisor approval)

  • Studio Art
  • Architecture Studies
  • Theatre
  • Film and Media Culture

     This track represents a directed course of study for students primarily focused on the skills and methods of dance production and media, digital representations of the body, and current innovations and aesthetic models presented by the confluence of dance and the digital age. The culminating senior work in this track will involve all elements of the production of a design-focused concert work and a written thesis.

Dance Studies Track (Theory & Aesthetics)
1.  0116 (Creative Process)
2.  0260 (Advanced Beginning Dance)                                         
3.  0261 (Introduction to Improvisation)
4.  0284 (Dance History)
5.  0360 (Intermediate/Advanced Dance)                                   
6.  0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology)
7.  0460 (Advanced Dance)
8.  0500 (Production Seminar)
9.  0700 (Senior Work)
10. 2 other elective courses from the following disciplines: (by advisor approval)

  • English and American Literature
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology/Anthropology

     This track represents a directed course of study for students interested in dance as a focus for scholarly work and theoretical inquiry by developing the ability to articulate the interdisciplinary and intercultural aspects of dance, as well as write about the potential of the moving body to both reflect and impact culture. The culminating senior work in this track will take the form a public lecture and written thesis.

Joint Major Requirements
1.  ARDV 0116 (Creative Process) 
2.  DANC 0284 (Dance History)                             
3.  DANC 0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology)  
4. Three semesters of technique and choreography at or above the 0200 level
5.  DANC 0700 (Senior Work)

Minor Requirements
1.  ARDV 0116 (Creative Process) 
2.  DANC 0284 (Dance History)                                 
3.  DANC 0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology) 
4.  Two semesters of technique and choreography at or above the 0200 level​

Honors-Dance: Honors, high honors, or highest honors are awarded to graduating seniors in the dance program based upon a grade point average of A- or better in department and cognate courses, a grade of A- or better on the DANC 0700 Senior Independent Project, and overall distinction in the program. Normally only full majors will be eligible for highest honors.

ARDV 0116 The Creative Process (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course, students will have the opportunity to dig deeply into their own creativity and explore the processes by which ideas emerge and are given shape in the arts. The experiential nature of this course integrates cognition and action, mind and body. Students will engage a range of modes of discovering, knowing, and communicating, which are designed to push them beyond their present state of awareness and level of confidence in their creative power. Practical work will be closely accompanied by readings and journaling, culminating with the creation and performance of a short project. (First- and second-year students only; Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1364) 3 hrs. lect. ART (Fall 2019: L. Winfield; Spring 2020: M. Biancosino, L. Jenkins)

DANC 0114 Community Dialogue Through the Arts (Fall 2019)

In this course students will learn both the theory and the practice of community dialogue through the arts. We will study the roles of community organizers, activists, artists, community members, performers, and scholars in the field of community engagement, such as The Liz Lerman Dance Exchange, Urban Bush Women, Crossroads Theatre, and Jan Cohen-Cruz of Imagining America. Students will collaborate to design, plan, implement, and document a community engagement project aimed at making tangible change that continues after the course is completed. Readings will be drawn from Radical Street Performance, Visions of Culture, and Imagining America Publications. This course counts as an elective towards the Dance major. 3 hrs. lect. ART, SOC (C. Brown)

DANC 0160 Introduction to Dance (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This entry-level dance course introduces movement techniques, improvisation/composition, performance, experiential anatomy, and history of 20th century American modern dance. Students develop flexibility, strength, coordination, rhythm, and vocabulary in the modern idiom. Concepts of time, space, energy, and choreographic form are presented through improvisation and become the basis for a final choreographic project. Readings, research, and reflective and critical writing about dance performance round out the experience. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (Fall 2019: C. Brown; Spring 2020: L. Winfield)

DANC 0244 African Music and Dance Performance (Fall 2019)

This course will introduce students to various techniques of performing East African (primarily Ugandan) musical and dance traditions through regular rehearsals, culminating in an end-of-semester concert. As an ensemble, we will learn and master how to play and sing/dance to bow-harps, thumb-pianos, xylophones, tube-fiddles, bowl-lyres, gourd shakers, struck gourds, reed-box rattles, ankle bells, leg rattles, and various types of drums. Some background in performing music is recommended, but prior knowledge of performing African music and dance is not required. 3 hrs. lect./lab AAL, ART (D. Kafumbe)
Cross-listed as: MUSC 0244 *

DANC 0260 Advanced Beginning Dance I (Spring 2020)

This is the first course in the studio sequence for students entering Middlebury with significant previous dance experience. It is also the course sequence for those continuing on from DANC 0160 or DANC 0161 and provides grounding in the craft of modern dance needed to proceed to more advanced levels. Modern dance movement techniques are strengthened to support an emerging individual vocabulary and facility with composition. Students regularly create and revise movement studies that focus on the basic elements of choreography and the relationship of music and dance. Readings, journals, and formal critiques of video and live performance contribute to the exploration of dance aesthetics and develop critical expertise. (DANC 0160 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (L. Jenkins)

DANC 0261 Improvisational Practices (Fall 2019)

In this course students will gain an embodied understanding of the practices and techniques needed to proceed to advanced improvisational work. Research into forms such as partnering, ensemble work, text, musical exercises, compositions, and scores/projects will focus on mapping the moving body in the moment. Readings, journals, and responses to video viewings and live performances contribute to the exploration of historical contexts, aesthetics, and cultural improvisations. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (L. Winfield)

DANC 0277 Body and Earth (Spring 2020)

This course has been designed for students with an interest in the dialogue between the science of body and the science of place. Its goals are to enhance movement efficiency through experiential anatomy and to heighten participants' sensitivity to natural processes and forms in the Vermont bioregion. Weekly movement sessions, essays by nature writers, and writing assignments about place encourage synthesis of personal experience with factual information. Beyond the exams and formal writing assignments, members of the class will present a final research project and maintain an exploratory journal. 3 hrs. lect. 1 hr. lab. AMR, ART, CW (5 seats), NOR, PE (L. Winfield)

DANC 0360 Intermediate/Advanced Dance I (Spring 2020)

This course involves concentrated intermediate-advanced level work in contemporary dance technique and choreography culminating in production. Theoretical issues of importance to the dancer/choreographer are addressed through readings, writings and practice. (DANC 0261 or by waiver; this course may be taken in any sequence with DANC 0361, DANC 0460, DANC 0461) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (C. Brown)

DANC 0361 Movement and Media (Fall 2019)

In this course we will take an interdisciplinary look at the dynamic relationship between the body and digital media. Students will develop skills in basic film editing, real-time software manipulation, open-source media research, project design, and collaboration. We will address design history and theories of modern media through readings and multimedia sources. Process and research papers and work-in-progress showings will document ongoing collaborations that will culminate in an informal showing at the end of the semester. This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds who are interested in significantly expanding their creative vocabularies and boundaries to include dance. (Approval required; DANC 0261 required for dance students) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. ART, PE (T. Lawrence)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0361

DANC 0370 Production Workshop (Fall 2019)

In preparing two fully produced dance productions for the stage, students will participate in and be exposed to professional production practices in all areas of dance technical design, including sets, costumes, props, lights, and sound. Students will be involved in planning, building, operating, lighting, documenting, striking, and publicizing fully produced dance program concerts. (6 hrs. lab) ART, PE (J. Ponder)

DANC 0376 Anatomy and Kinesiology (Fall 2019)

This course offers an in-depth experiential study of skeletal structure, and includes aspects of the muscular, organ, endocrine, nervous, and fluid systems of the human body. The goal is to enhance efficiency of movement and alignment through laboratory sessions, supported by assigned readings, exams, and written projects. (Not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. ART, PE (L. Jenkins)

DANC 0380 Dance Company of Middlebury (Fall 2019)

Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing dances created for performance and tour. Those receiving credit can expect four to six rehearsals weekly. Appropriate written work, concert and film viewing, and attendance in departmental technique classes are required. Auditions for company members are held in the fall semester for the year. One credit will be given for two terms of participation. Performances and tour are scheduled in January. (Limited to sophomores through seniors, by audition.) (DANC 0260; Approval required) 4 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab ART, PE (K. Borni)

DANC 0460 Intermediate/Advanced Dance III: The Place of Dance (Fall 2019)

In this course we will investigate three aspects of place in relation to dance: where we source movement, the relevance of dance in culture, and the effects of place on the moving dancing body. Material covered will include body systems dance technique at the intermediate/advanced level, improvisation and composition toward choreography and site specific work, readings and reflective writing, and performance viewing. The course culminates in formal and informal showings of performance work. The emergence of a personal philosophy and dance aesthetic will be engaged and formally articulated in writing. (DANC 0261; this course may be taken in any sequence with DANC 0360, DANC 0361, DANC 0461) 4.5 hrs. lect./2 hrs. lab. ART, PE (L. Jenkins)

DANC 0461 Intermediate/Advanced Dance IV: Advanced Dance Improvisation (Spring 2020)

Students will gain rigorous training in the simultaneous conception, composition, and performance of dance works. This will include units in techniques such as contact improvisation, performance improvisation, site specific work, musical collaboration, and elemental integration. The body will be developed as an articulate, responsive instrument while the mind is honed toward quick, clear perception of potential form with a willingness to act and react. Personal philosophy and dance aesthetics will be cultivated and formally articulated in writing. Musicians proficient with their instrument and interested in improvisation are strongly encouraged to seek admission. (Required for dancers: DANC 0261 or by waiver; this course may be taken in any sequence with DANC 0360, DANC 0361, DANC 0460) 6 hrs lect. ART, PE (T. Lawrence)

DANC 0470 Technique Workshop (Spring 2020)

This advanced physical and theoretical study of a variety of movement techniques will further prepare dance majors and minors for the rigors of performance, technical craft, and physical research. Exercises and discussions will revolve around increased subtlety, strength, flexibility, musicality, and dynamics with the goal of heightening the communicative range of the moving body. Rotating movement aesthetics taught by dance faculty. (Approval required) ART, PE (C. Brown, L. Jenkins, T. Lawrence, L. Winfield)

DANC 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

DANC 0700 Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required) (Fall 2019: G. Forestieri, C. Brown)
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Department of Economics

I. Required for the Major
The economics major consists of a minimum of 11 approved courses in four sequences.

Introductory Sequence: ECON 0150 and ECON 0155. Neither ECON 0150 nor ECON 0155 assumes any prior exposure to economics, but both courses presume a thorough working knowledge of algebra. Note: Students must pass ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 with at least a C- to be admitted into ECON 0250 and ECON 0255 respectively without a waiver.
Quantitative Sequence: The quantitative sequence in economics consists of two courses. The first course can be ECON 0210, MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201. (ECON 0210 may not be taken concurrently with MATH 0116, MATH 0310 or PSYC 0201. Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310 or PSYC 0201.) Students with strong mathematical background wanting to take MATH 0410 (Stochastic Processes) should take MATH 0310 rather than MATH 0116 or ECON 0210, since MATH 0310 is a prerequisite for MATH 0410. The second course in the sequence is ECON 0211. Students must pass ECON 0210 with at least a C- to be admitted into ECON 0211 without a waiver.
Intermediate Theory Sequence: ECON 0250; ECON 0255; and one of ECON 0212, ECON 0229, or ECON 0280.
Note: It is important, especially for those planning to study abroad for a full year that the above three sequences be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
Elective Sequence: Majors are required to take at least four electives, two of which must either be at the 0400-level or a combination of one 0400-level and the ECON 0701/0702 senior workshop sequence. The other two electives may be 0200-, 0300-, or 0400-level courses.
All majors must take at least six economics courses approved in the major at Middlebury, including two 400-level or one 0400-level and the 0701/0702 sequence. The 0400-level courses are seminars that typically enroll no more than 16 students, have intermediate theory as a prerequisite, and serve as a capstone experience for the major. Emphasis is placed on reading, writing, and discussion of economics at an advanced level. The 0701/0702 workshops are seminars that typically enroll eight students, have intermediate theory and a field course as a prerequisite, and involve writing an independent research paper. The difference between an ECON 0400-level seminar and an ECON 0701/0702 workshop is the degree of independence the student has and the level of sophistication expected in the paper. Courses that do not count towards the major: ECON 0240 does not count towards the major requirements. ECON 0500 does not count towards the major requirements. Economics electives taken during the winter term will count towards the major requirements only if so designated in the winter term catalog.
Honors: To be eligible for honors in economics, students must take the Senior Research sequence (ECON 0701 and ECON 0702) during their senior year. The purpose of this two-semester sequence is to foster independent student research, culminating in a research paper in the style of an economics journal article. Prior to enrolling in ECON 0701, students must have taken a minimum of six economics courses at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. Each course in the sequence will have no more than eight students who will work on their projects for two semesters (either fall/winter or winter/spring) and will include both individual meetings and group meetings to develop new techniques and present and discuss research. Students who have prearranged a research topic with the professor will be given priority in admission to the seminar. Also, because of limited resources for guiding senior work, students with a single major in economics will be given priority over double majors who will do senior work in other departments. Students interested in pursuing departmental honors must take the Senior Research Workshop sequence (ECON 0701 and ECON 0702) during their senior year. To receive departmental honors the student must receive a minimum grade of A- in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and have a 3.5 or higher GPA in all economics courses taken at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. For more detailed information on how the economics GPA is calculated, please contact the department coordinator. High Honors requires a minimum grade of A in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and a 3.75 or higher economics GPA. Highest Honors requires a minimum grade of A in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and a 3.9 or higher economics GPA.
Joint Majors: The Department of Economics does not offer a joint major.

International Politics and Economics Major: Please refer to the International Politics and Economics section of the catalog for details about the major or visit the International Politics & Economics website for the most current information.


International and Global Studies Major: Please refer to the International and Global Studies section of the catalog for details about the major or visit the International and Global Studies website for the most current information.

Major in Environmental Studies with a focus in Economics (ESEC): Please refer to the Environmental Studies Program section of the catalog (under Social Science foci) for details about the major or visit the Environmental Studies website for the most current information. Note that students are not allowed to double major in Economics (ECON) and Environmental Economics (ESEC).

Major in Environmental Studies with a focus in Policy (ESEP): Please refer to the Environmental Studies Program section (under Social Science foci) for details about the major or visit the Environmental Studies website for the most current information. It is possible to double major in Economics (ECON) and Environmental Policy (ESEP), however, double counting of Economics courses towards each major is not allowed, except in cases where a specific course is listed as required by both majors. 

AP Credit Policy: To obtain credit, students will need to submit their official scores to the Registrar's Office and obtain approval from the department chair. Students who score a 5 on the Advanced Placement exam in Macroeconomics or Microeconomics will receive credit for Introductory Macroeconomics (ECON 0150) or Introductory Microeconomics (ECON 0155) respectively and cannot enroll in these courses at Middlebury. Students who score a 5 on the advanced placement exam in statistics are strongly encouraged to enroll in Economic Statistics (ECON 0210) but they may choose to use their AP credit instead. Note: Students may not receive AP credit and course credit for the same course.
Students who score a 4 on the advanced placement exam in Macroeconomics, Microeconomics or Statistics must earn a B- or better grade in the corresponding intermediate-level course ECON 0250, ECON 0255, or ECON 0211, respectively, to receive college credit for the AP course. Note: Students are required to complete an additional elective for each of these courses when a grade of B- or higher is not earned in the corresponding intermediate-level course.
International Baccalaureate/A-Levels: Students who have completed an International Baccalaureate and have earned a score of 7 on IB Economics or a grade of A on A-Level Economics should begin their studies of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics with ECON 0250 and ECON 0255. These students will be given one course credit toward the economics major, and will be prohibited from enrolling in ECON 0150 or ECON 0155. Students who have earned a score of 6 on IB economics or a grade of B on A-Level economics are encouraged to begin their studies of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics with ECON 0250 and ECON 0255, but they may elect to enroll in ECON 0150 or ECON 0155. Students majoring in Economics will need to replace the other introductory course with an ECON elective. Students who have completed a statistics course with a score of 6 or higher on IB Statistics, or a grade of B or better on A-Level Statistics may begin their course of study of economics statistics with ECON 0211 or MATH 0310. If they choose to start with ECON 0211 or MATH 0310, they will need to replace the ECON 0210 credit with an ECON elective. The same rules apply where ECON courses are requirements for other majors.
Transfer of Credit: Students may take economics courses in approved programs (abroad and domestic) and have those courses count towards the major and/or the general graduation requirement. Summer school courses will not generally be given credit for the major unless there is an overriding reason to take a summer school course. Any summer school course must meet a minimum of six weeks and have at least 36 hours of class time. Students planning to take courses off-campus should discuss the proposed course(s) with their advisor and get pre-approval from the department chair. Upon completion of the course(s), students should submit their course material and a copy of their transcript along with a Transfer Credit Application Form to the department chair for departmental approval. After receiving departmental approval, students must submit their forms to the Registrar’s Office for final approval by the director of off-campus study. Note: Transfer Credit Forms are not required for courses listed in the Course Information Data base (CID) as approved to count towards the major. However, students must notify the Registrar’s Office of any transferred courses approved in the CID that they wish to be counted towards their major requirements. Courses having a BU (Business) or MGMT (Management) prefix will not normally be considered the equivalent of an economics course. No credit will be given for business courses taken over the summer. A maximum of one general credit will be given for a business course taken through a junior year abroad business program. Business courses taken in a non-business program will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Those that match the department's offerings, and have strong liberal arts content, have the best chance of receiving credit.

II. Post-Graduate Preparation
Graduate programs in economics or finance [other than a Masters of Business Administration (MBA)] generally require a high degree of mathematical sophistication. Students thinking of continuing in such a program are encouraged to: (i) take MATH 0310 in place of ECON 0210; (ii) select economics electives with significant mathematically and statistically rigorous content [recommended courses fulfilling the elective requirements of the economics major include: ECON 0229, ECON 0280, ECON 0390, and ECON 0411]; (iii) take a number of additional courses in mathematics and computer science [recommended courses include: CSCI 0101, MATH 0315, MATH 0318, MATH 0323, MATH 0410, and MATH 0423]. Good training for graduate school might include being a statistics tutor or having worked as a research assistant at Middlebury College or at a Federal Reserve Bank, or as an intern at a research institute or NGO. Students thinking about this option should discuss their plans with their advisor and other faculty members.. Masters of Business Administration (MBA) programs look for students who have taken a wide range of courses across the curriculum rather than for students who have narrowly focused on economics and math. Thus, it is not necessary for someone planning to go on in business or to an MBA program to have majored in economics. MBA programs normally expect that students have worked for a couple of years in business, government, or similar organization before they begin the MBA program. The appropriate coursework for these MBA programs is a wide range of liberal arts courses.

III. Minor in Economics
The Department of Economics does not offer a minor.

ECON 0150 Introductory Macroeconomics (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (Fall 2019: E. Wolcott, C. Craven, C. Artunc; Spring 2020: D. Munro, C. Artunc, C. Craven)

ECON 0155 Introductory Microeconomics (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (Fall 2019: J. Holmes, P. Wunnava, S. Pecsok; Spring 2020: J. Isham, S. Pecsok, P. Sommers)

ECON 0200 Health Economics and Policy (Spring 2020)

In this course we will focus on the health care system of the United States. We will apply standard microeconomic tools to the problems of health and health care markets. The course provides the fundamental tools with which to understand how the health care market is different from the markets for other goods. For example, students will learn about the dominant presence of uncertainty at all levels of health care, the government's unusually large presence in the market, the pronounced difference in knowledge between doctors and patients, and the prevalence of situations where the actions of some impose costs or benefits on others (e.g., vaccinations, drug research). (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (J. Holmes)

ECON 0207 Economics and Gender (Spring 2020)

Economics and Gender is an introduction to using the tools of economics to understand gender-related issues. In the first part of the course we will review economic models of the household, fertility, and labor supply and discuss how they help us interpret long-term trends in marriage and divorce, fertility, and women’s labor-force participation. In the second part of the course we will study economic models of wage determination and focus on explanations of, and policy remedies for, earnings differentials by gender. The final part of the course will focus on new research in economics on gender-related topics. (ECON 0155) 3hrs. lect. CW, SOC (T. Byker)

ECON 0210 Economic Statistics (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, or MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab DED (Fall 2019: P. Sommers, A. Rao; Spring 2020: E. Gong, A. Rao)

ECON 0211 Introduction to Regression Analysis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab DED (Fall 2019: T. Byker; Spring 2020: P. Wunnava)

ECON 0212 Empirical Research Methods in Economics (Fall 2019)

In this course we will provide students with the tools to conceptualize, design, and carry out a research project in economics. Topics will include survey design, sampling and power, experimental design (in and out of the lab), natural experiments, and other approaches to identifying causal relationships. Drawing from several sub-disciplines in economics, students will examine, replicate, and critique various studies. Emphasis will be placed on the formulation of valid, feasible research questions, and on the description and interpretation of results. (ECON 0211) 3 hrs. lect. (E. Gong)

ECON 0222 Economics of Happiness (Spring 2020)

We will explore the economics of happiness in both the micro and macro realm. We start with the neoclassical model of rational individuals who know with great precision what makes them happy. Next we explore behaviorist challenges to that model, including issues of regret, altruism, fairness, and gender. On the macro side, we investigate the puzzle of why, though most of us like more income, a growing GDP does not seem to make societies happier; we examine the impact of the macroeconomic environment on individual happiness. Finally we touch on current policy issues such as quantitative happiness indicators that have been adopted around the world, “paternalistic” policy measures to increase happiness, and the no-growth movement. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (C. Craven)

ECON 0228 Economics of Agricultural Transition (Fall 2019)

In 1860 farmers made up over half the population of this country and fed about 30 million people. Today they number 2% of the population and produce more than enough to feed 300 million people. In this course we will look at the history, causes, and results of this incredible transformation. While studying the economic forces behind the changing farming structure, we will examine farm production, resources, technology, and agricultural policy. Field trips to local farms and screenings of farm-related videos and movies will incorporate the viewpoint of those engaged in agriculture. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 2hrs. lect., 2 hrs. lab AMR, NOR, SOC (S. Pecsok)

ECON 0229 Economic History and History of Economic Thought (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course will provide an introduction to economic history and the history of economic thought. We will investigate and understand the causes and consequences of important historical events and trends, such as industrialization and globalization, from an economic perspective. We devote considerable attention to the dissemination throughout Europe of new industrial and agricultural practices originating in Britain. Along the way, we evaluate how prominent economists perceived and analyzed the events of their time. (ECON 0150, ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. EUR, HIS, SOC (K. Sargent)

ECON 0232 The Chinese Economy (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore the economic development of China up until the present day, giving particular attention to the socialist era and the post-1978 reforms. Specific topics to be covered will include growth and structural change, the urban-rural divide, the state’s ongoing role in the economy, demography, and the country’s integration into the global economy. (ECON 0150 orECON 0155; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, NOA, SOC (W. Pyle)

ECON 0234 Economics of Africa (Fall 2019)

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to some of the poorest and some of the fastest growing economies in the world. In this course, we will explore the opportunities for sustained, inclusive economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa, the challenges that must be overcome in realizing these opportunities, and the policy options for overcoming these challenges. Topics may include demography, institutions, infrastructure, agriculture, urbanization, climate change, health, natural resources, mobile technology, trade, and regional integration. Students will be exposed to relevant economic theory and recent empirical economic research on Africa. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155; or by approval) This course counts as elective credit towards the Economics major and IPEC major. AAL, SAF, SOC (O. Porteous)

ECON 0240 International Economics: Theory and Policy (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

International Economics: Theory and Policy
This course provides an overview of international trade and finance. We will use economic theory to help us understand how and why countries interact in the global economy and evaluate the effects of different trade, exchange rate, and macroeconomic policies. Topics covered will include the reasons for trade, the winners and losers from trade, trade policies, trade agreements, exchange rates, the balance of payments, causes of and solutions to financial crises, and the role of the WTO and IMF. ECON 0240 does not count towards the ECON major or minor requirements. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect.
(O. Porteous)

Spring 2020

Students registering for ECON 0240 A must also register for one of the ECON 0240 discussion sections, either Y or Z. (O. Porteous)

ECON 0250 Macroeconomic Theory (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (MATH 0121 and ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2019: K. Sargent, A. Fieldhouse; Spring 2020: P. Matthews, A. Fieldhouse)

ECON 0255 Microeconomic Theory (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2019: M. Abel; Spring 2020: A. Robbett, W. Pyle)

ECON 0265 Environmental Economics (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is dedicated to the proposition that economic reasoning is critical for analyzing the persistence of environmental damage and for designing cost-effective environmental policies. The objectives of the course are that each student (a) understands the economic approach to the environment; (b) can use microeconomics to illustrate the theory of environmental policy; and (c) comprehends and can critically evaluate: alternative environmental standards, benefits and costs of environmental protection, and incentive-based environmental policies. (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. CW (Spring 2020) (A. Rao)

ECON 0280 Game Theory (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Game theory is general in scope and has been used to provide theoretical foundations for phenomena in most of the social and behavioral sciences. Economic examples include market organization, bargaining, and the provision of public goods. Examples from other behavioral sciences include social dilemmas and population dynamics. In this course students will learn the basics of what constitutes a game and how games are solved. (ECON 0155 and MATH 0121 required; ECON 0255 recommended) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2019: J. Carpenter; Spring 2020: A. Robbett)

ECON 0301 CSPW: Economic Journalism (Spring 2020)

Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Economic Journalism*
Drawing on core courses in the major, students will strengthen their understanding of economic analysis and develop their writing skills by addressing contemporary economic issues in a journalistic format. In a series of weekly assignments, including book reviews, op-eds, and coverage of recent research articles, students will translate the language of formal economics into pieces that are both interesting and accessible to educated non-economists. Most class sessions will be organized as workshops devoted to critiquing the economic and expository content of student work. (ECON 211 and ECON 250 and ECON 255) 3 hr. sem.
CW, SOC (W. Pyle)

ECON 0344 International Economics (Spring 2020)

International trade and financial flows are increasingly important in today’s interconnected world. In this advanced course we will use tools from introductory and intermediate courses to help us analyze the causes and consequences of these flows. We will investigate why countries trade, what they trade, who gains (or loses) from trade, and the motives and effects of trade policies. We will then consider the monetary side of the international economy, including the balance of payments, the determination of exchange rates, and financial crises. This course is not open to students who have taken ECON 0240. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. lect. (O. Porteous)

ECON 0350 Advanced Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (Fall 2019)

In this course we will build on ECON 0250 to further develop the analytical tools for exploring key macroeconomic outcomes and policy. Topics covered may include, but are not limited to, economic growth; distribution; institutions; monetary, fiscal and macroprudential policy; and behavioral macroeconomics. We will explore modern developments in macroeconomic theory, and compare and critically evaluate the ability of different theoretical perspectives to provide insight into current events and the efficacy of macroeconomic policy (ECON 0240 or ECON 0250 and MATH 0121, or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. (D. Munro)

ECON 0401 Poverty, Inequality and Distributive Justice (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This seminar will explore recent theoretical and empirical research on socioeconomic inequality. The definitions, causes and consequences of inequality at both the individual (micro) and national and international (macro) levels will be considered. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Matthews)

ECON 0405 Economics of Discrimination (Spring 2020)

In this seminar we will explore the economics of discrimination from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. After reviewing the main theoretical frameworks, we will discuss recent empirical studies on issues of discrimination associated with race, ethnicity, gender, or nationality, focusing on applications in the labor market. We will then investigate to what extent inter-group contact or policies such as quotas or affirmative action can address discrimination. Students will explore a specific topic of interest (e.g., police violence, sexual orientation, sport, education, etc.) in more detail and develop a research proposal. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0255 or ECON 0240) 3 hrs. sem. CMP (M. Abel)

ECON 0418 Macroeconomics of Depressions (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will develop a framework for analyzing liquidity traps, economic depressions, and failures of macroeconomic stabilization policy. We will contrast the causes of and policy responses to the Great Depression, Japan’s “Lost Decades,” the Great Recession, and the ongoing depression in Greece. We will also study the international transmission of the Great Depression through the gold standard and the global transmission of the Great Recession through modern financial and trade linkages. Throughout, we will track the evolution of views on stabilization policy, austerity, and the costs of prolonged periods of depressed demand. (ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. (A. Fieldhouse)

ECON 0420 Globalization and US Inequality (Spring 2020)

Does globalization increase inequality in the United States? In this course we will study how trade, automation, immigration, and financial integration relate to the distribution of income, wealth, and employment in the US over the last century. In the first part of the course we will study theoretical frameworks to shed light on this question. In the second part, we will turn to the data and read peer-reviewed articles, discussing evidence for and against globalization increasing US inequality. Lastly, we will debate policy prescriptions, to address these issues. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. AMR, NOR (E. Wolcott)

ECON 0427 ECON 0427 Population Economics (Spring 2020)

In this course we will use an economic perspective to analyze changes in fertility, mortality, marriage, and household structure in both industrialized and developing countries. We will explore how these changes interact with labor markets, poverty, inequality, urbanization, migration and the status of women using the theoretical and empirical tools of applied economic analysis. Students will engage in data-driven projects to study demographic behavior. Experience with statistical analysis is strongly encouraged. (ECON 0255 or 0240 required; ECON 0211 strongly recommended) 3 hrs. sem. (T. Byker)

ECON 0429 Trade and Foreign Aid in Latin America (Fall 2019)

This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of a number of critical issues that currently confront policymakers in Latin America. The topics of development, regionalization and free trade, and the efficacy of foreign aid will be analyzed in the context of Latin American economic development. (ECON 0240, ECON 0250, or ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, AMR (J. Maluccio)

ECON 0430 The Post-Communist Economic Transition (Fall 2019)

This seminar will use the “natural experiment” of the post-communist transition to better understand the origin and consequences of various economic and political institutions. Drawing on research related to China and Russia as well as other formerly communist economies in Europe and Asia, we will explore such themes as property rights reform, the finance-growth nexus, contract enforcement institutions, and the economic consequences of corruption and different political regimes. (ECON 0210 or MATH 0310 or MATH 0311 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250, or by approval) CMP (W. Pyle)

ECON 0431 Economics of the European Union (Spring 2020)

This course will introduce students to the major economies of Western Europe and also the economic functions and structure of the institutions of the European Union. The course aims to familiarize students with the theoretical economic and policy issues that are currently of concern in the European Union. Moreover, the course aims to analyze economic problems that are of particular relevance to the member states of the European Union, such as the coordination of policies within an intergovernmental supranational framework and how to sustain the integration dynamic. (ECON 0250 or ECON 0240) 3 hrs. sem. EUR (K. Sargent)

ECON 0445 International Finance (Fall 2019)

An analysis of the world's financial system and the consequences for open economies of macroeconomic interdependence. Particular topics include: exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, and monetary and fiscal policies in open economies. Special attention is paid to the issues and problems of the European Economic Community and European integration and debt in developing countries. (ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. (D. Munro)

ECON 0453 Historical Development of the World Economy (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Many of the controversies and tensions modern economies have to contend with today, such as growth, inequality, and instability, emerged during the last few centuries. In this seminar we will use economic and historical tools to develop a better understanding of the profound transformations in technology, finance, and international trade over time. We will analyze the challenges the world faced as capital, labor, and commodity markets became rapidly integrated, including financial crises, rising income and wealth inequality, and modernizing policies. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0250 or ECON 0240) 3 hrs. sem. (C. Artunc)

ECON 0465 Special Topics in Environmental Economics (Fall 2019)

The objective of this seminar is that each student achieves fluency in a set of advanced concepts in environmental economics. The seminar is divided into two main sections. First, we introduce the core theory and policy implications of environmental economics. These include the theory of externalities and public goods; the Coase theorem; and policy instrument choice. Empirical methods used to measure the costs and benefits of environmental policies are also introduced. Second, we study some selected topics: the economics of local air pollution and greenhouse gases; the design of market-based environmental policies; the economics of non-renewable resources, including fossil fuels and old-growth forests; and the management of renewable resources, including fisheries and second-growth forest resources. (ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (J. Isham)

ECON 0485 The Economics of Sports (Spring 2020)

This is a survey course of topics illustrating how microeconomic principles apply to the sports industry. Topics covered will include the industrial organization of the sports industry (notably, issues of competitive balance and the implications of monopoly power), the public finance of sports (notably, the impact teams have on host municipalities), and labor issues related to sports (including player worth and discrimination). The prerequisites for this course are meant to ensure that students can both understand fundamental economic concepts and present the results of econometric research as they apply to the sports industry. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0211 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Sommers)

ECON 0499 Research in Behavioral and Experimental Economics (Spring 2020)

In this seminar we will consider current research topics in behavioral and experimental economics. Although the theme for the course is likely to change from semester to semester, all students will design their own study, gather decision-making data, and write a research paper summarizing their main findings. (ECON 0255 and one of the following: ECON 0280 or ECON 0399) 3 hrs. sem. (J. Carpenter)

ECON 0500 Individual Special Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards the major or minor requirements.

ECON 0701 Senior Research Workshop I (Fall 2019)

In this first semester, students will design and begin their projects. Emphasis will be on designing a novel research question (while making the case for its importance) and an appropriate strategy for answering it. This requires immersion in the academic literature on the topic. General research principles and tools will be taught in class, as a group, while those specific to individual projects will be covered in one-on-one meetings. By the end of the term, students will outline their plan for completing the project, including demonstrating that it is a feasible research question for which the necessary information (e.g., data or source materials) is available or can be generated by the student (e.g., lab or other experiment). (Approval required) (J. Carpenter, E. Gong, P. Wunnava)

ECON 0702 Senior Research Workshop II (Spring 2020)

In this second semester of the senior research workshop sequence, the focus is on the execution of the research plan developed in ECON 0701. Most instruction is now one-on-one but the workshop will still meet as a group to discuss and practice the presentation of results in various formats (seminars, poster sessions, et cetera) to the rest of the workshop and others in the college and broader communities. Feedback and critiques from such presentations will be incorporated into the project, which will culminate in a research paper in the style of an economics journal article. (ECON 0701; Approval required) (J. Maluccio, E. Wolcott)
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Program in Education Studies

The study of Education necessitates an understanding of the reasons for the deep inequities that characterize education in the USA and other countries of the world.   Through the investigation of educational theory, policy, research and practice from a variety of disciplinary perspectives students learn to think critically and creatively about the processes of teaching and learning and about the place of education in society.  Effective fall 2017, Education Studies offers a double-major for those students who seek teacher licensure in either elementary (EDEL) or secondary (EDSL) education and a minor in general education (EDGW) for those who are interested in the field of education, but who do not seek teacher licensure. [Students may not choose to major in Education Studies as a stand-alone major. The double major option is available only to those students seeking teacher licensure.] Students who matriculated to Middlebury prior to fall 2017 should speak to the Program Director about maintaining their current program of study.

Requirements for the Double Major in Teacher Licensure
Students interested in earning a Vermont teaching license should meet with the Director of the Education Studies Program as soon as possible in their course of study. The four, state-required elements that must be satisfactorily completed in order to be recommended for Vermont initial educator licensure are: (i) Relevant coursework that satisfies the content requirements of the endorsement, (ii) Professional Semester, (iii) Vermont Licensure Portfolio, and (iv) state required examinations such as Praxis. The specific requirements for elementary and secondary teacher licensure are as follows:

Elementary Licensure
Required for major, Elementary Licensure
: A major in another discipline. EDST 0115A (Education in the USA), EDST 0215 (Culturally Responsive Pedagogy), EDST 0300 (Models of Inclusive Education), EDST 0305 (Elementary Literacy and Social Studies Methods), EDST 0306 (Elementary Science Methods), EDST 0307 (Elementary Math Methods), EDST 0317 (Children and the Arts) or approved art internship, Professional Semester (see below). PSYC 0225 (Child Development), PSYC 0327 (Educational Psychology).

  • Elementary licensure students must complete both the SCI and DED Distribution Requirements.

Secondary Licensure
Required for major, Secondary Licensure
: A major in the endorsement area. EDST 0115A (Education in the USA), EDST 0215 (Culturally Responsive Pedagogy), EDST 0300 (Models of Inclusive Education), EDST 0327 (Field Experience in Secondary and Special Education); EDST 0505 (Independent Study Secondary Methods taken twice with different placements) and the Professional Semester (see below). PSYC 0216 (Adolescence); PSYC 0327(Educational Psychology).

  • Middlebury College is authorized to recommend licensure in the following subject areas for secondary education (7-12): Modern and Classical Languages: French, German, Russian, Spanish; Computer Science; English; Mathematics; Science; Social Studies. Art (preK-12).
  •  In order for secondary licensure candidates to be recommended for licensure they must meet Vermont content endorsement requirements. Generally, this means that students should select their second major in the content area they wish to teach.

Professional Semester
(Fall semester only; by application and approval): Students who elect to pursue licensure either in Elementary (K-6) or Secondary (7-12) education must apply to the Education Studies program for acceptance into the Professional Semester. The Professional Semester is a four credit, full-time, student teaching experience in a local school, with a master teacher, and under the supervision of a college designated supervisor.  Upon acceptance to the Professional Semester, students complete EDST 0410 (the student teaching seminar) and either EDST 0405-7 (elementary) or EDST 0415-17(secondary). Education Studies faculty, in consultation with the student and prospective master teacher, make the final decision regarding where and with whom a student is placed for the Professional Semester.  Students may elect to complete the Professional Semester in either their senior year or in a ninth semester with the degree awarded following completion.

Requirements for the minor in Education Studies (EDGW)
Students interested in completing a minor in Education Studies should meet with a professor in the Education Studies Program to organize a thoughtful course of study. The Education Studies minor consists of five courses two of which are required and three of which are selected at the discretion of the student under consultation with an EDST faculty advisor. There is no option for a major in general Education Studies.

  1. Required (2 courses):
  • EDST 0115     (Education in the USA) Prerequisite for all EDST courses.
  • EDST 0430     (Senior Seminar in Education Studies).

Students must complete three of the 5 required courses prior to enrolling in the Senior Seminar. Required for all students who matriculate fall 2017 and after.

  1. Electives (3 courses):
  • Any three other EDST courses (see course listing).
  • One of the following three PSYC courses may count towards the minor: PYSC 0216 (Adolescence), PSYC 0225 (Child Development), PSYC 0327 (Educational Psychology).
  • One of the following three SOCI courses may count towards the minor: SOCI 0215 (Sociology of Education), SOCI 0351 (Education and Social Policy), SOCI 0430 (Higher Education and Society).

Students may seek to include a course that is not listed above, a course to be taken abroad or a Winter Term internship as one of the five courses.  In each instance, students must secure prior approval from Education Studies faculty for such a course to fulfill the requirements for the minor.

EDST 0115 Education in the USA (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

What are schools for? What makes education in a democracy unique? What counts as evidence of that uniqueness? What roles do schools play in educating citizens in a democracy for a democracy? In this course, we will engage these questions while investigating education as a social, cultural, political, and economic process. We will develop new understandings of current policy disputes regarding a broad range or educational issues by examining the familiar through different ideological and disciplinary lenses. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AMR, NOR, SOC (Fall 2019: M. Hammerle; Spring 2020: T. Affolter, T. Weston)
Cross-listed as: BLST 0115

EDST 0206 Environmental Education (Fall 2019)

In this interdisciplinary course students will learn foundational principles and practices in environmental education. Topics include ecological citizenship, environmental literacy, place-based education, learning theories, nature pedagogy, school gardens, and forest schools. Most class sessions will be held outdoors, where students will apply and extend their learning, develop lessons, and practice teaching. This course is appropriate for students interested in outdoor environmental education in formal or non-formal settings with any age between early childhood and high school. Field experiences with community partners occur outside of class. Approval Required (EDST 0115) 3hrs. lect. (T. Weston)

EDST 0210 Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP, CW (Fall 2019: S. Cassarino; Spring 2020: D. Evans, R. Schine, M. Hammerle)
Cross-listed as: INTD 0210 *

EDST 0215 Culturally Responsive Policy and Pedagogy (Fall 2019)

Building on the work of Gloria Ladson-Billings’ culturally relevant pedagogy, Django Paris developed a theory of culturally sustaining pedagogy that “seeks to perpetuate and foster—to sustain linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism,” for students in schools (Paris, 2012). In this course we examine how teachers might sustain and support students in classrooms and how educational policy might better address and respond to the rich diversity in our schools and communities. This is a required course for all students seeking a Vermont teaching licensure. (EDST 0115) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC (T. Affolter)

EDST 0242 The Non-Native Speaker in a Multilingual World (Spring 2020)

In this course we will address linguistic, educational, and ideological dimensions of the non-native speaker identity and multilingual societies. What does it mean to be a non-native speaker? Why is this linguistic identity considered by some to be a stigma and by others to be a privilege? How do societies succeed in and fail at integrating speakers of different languages? In which ways do language policies and educational practices in the United States and around the world reflect linguistic and social realities? 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC (P. Urlaub)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0242 *

EDST 0300 Models of Inclusive Education (Spring 2020)

In this course we will focus on strategies and techniques for including students with diverse learning styles in general education environments. Legal, theoretical, philosophical, and programmatic changes leading toward inclusive models of education will be approached through a historical overview of special education for students with disabilities. Additionally, the course works to expand notions of inclusion such that students' multiple identities are incorporated into all learning. Emphasis is given to the active learning models and differentiated curriculum and instruction to accommodate a range of learners with diverse disabilities, abilities, and identities. (EDST 0115 or SOAN 0215 or SOCI 0215 or AMST 0105). AMR, NOR, SOC (T. Affolter)
Cross-listed as: BLST 0300

EDST 0305 Reading & Writing the World: Teaching Literacy and Social Studies in the Elementary School (Fall 2019)

In this course, we examine what it means to be literate in the 21st century and ways in which all students can be empowered by the texts and teaching they encounter in schools. Students will develop their ability to enact literacy instruction based on current research about how children learn to read and write. We will take a critical look at texts—fiction, nonfiction, and historical—to consider the ways that texts read and write the world, develop abilities to select texts that empower all learners, and analyze retellings of historical events/persons to take into account multiple perspectives. Many class sessions occur onsite at a local elementary school to provide consistent practice and supportive feedback on authentic components of teaching (transportation provided). In addition to class sessions, students will complete field experiences in a K-6 classroom in the Middlebury area to see the workings of an entire class. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (T. Weston)

EDST 0307 Elementary Math Methods (Spring 2020)

In this course we will approach mathematics as the construction of ideas rather than the memorization of facts and rules. We will investigate children’s mathematical reasoning, how to construct learning experiences to advance conceptual development, and how a social justice stance enables math to be a source of empowerment for children. Many class sessions occur at a local elementary school (transportation provided) so students can ground their thinking about course topics within a school, and consistently practice and receive feedback on authentic components of teaching. Students will also complete field experiences in a local K-6 classroom and Vermont licensure requirements. (EDST 0306) 3 hrs. lect./1 hrs. disc (T. Weston)

EDST 0405 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (Fall 2019)

A semester-long practicum in a local elementary school under the direct supervision of an experienced cooperating teacher. (Corequisite: EDST 0410) (Approval required) non-standard grade (C. Johnston)

EDST 0406 Student Teaching in Elementary School (Fall 2019)

See EDST 0405. (Approval required) non-standard grade (C. Johnston)

EDST 0407 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (Fall 2019)

See EDST 0405. (Approval required) non-standard grade (C. Johnston)

EDST 0410 Student Teaching Seminar (Fall 2019)

Concurrent with student teaching, this course is designed to provide guidance in curriculum development and its implementation in the classroom, and to explore issues related to the teaching process and the profession. Students will construct a Teaching Licensure Portfolio as well as exchange ideas about their student teaching experiences. Topics including technology, classroom management, special education, and assessment will be featured. The Vermont Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities, the five Standards for Vermont Educators, the Principles for Vermont Educators, and ROPA-R will guide the development of the Teacher Licensure Portfolio. (Corequisite: EDST 0405, EDST 0406, EDST 0407 or EDST 0415, EDST 0416 EDST 0417) (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect. CW (C. Johnston)

EDST 0415 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2019)

A semester-long practicum in a local middle or high school under the direct supervision of an experienced cooperating teacher. (Corequisite: EDST 0410) (Approval required) non-standard grade (T. Weston)

EDST 0416 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2019)

See EDST 0415. (Approval required) non-standard grade (T. Weston)

EDST 0417 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2019)

See EDST 0415. (Approval required) non-standard grade (T. Weston)

EDST 0430 Senior Seminar in Education Studies (Fall 2019)

In this capstone seminar for General Education minors, students will engage, analyze, and offer solutions to real world problems in the current landscape of education. We will read extensively in the field, consider multiple research methods and approaches, and enlist community experts. Working across disciplines and collaboratively, students will create final projects that integrate and apply what they have learned in their coursework, developing and enhancing skills for creative problem solving and leadership in the field. Final projects will vary; all students will make oral presentations. (three of five required courses for the general EDST minor.) 3 hrs. Sem. SOC (C. Johnston)

EDST 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

EDST 0505 Independent Study - Secondary Methods (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is for students who are pursuing a VT teaching license in a Secondary content area. Students are required to commit to a school placement under the guidance and supervision of a certified, secondary VT teacher. The content of the course will be developed collaboratively by the EDST professor overseeing the independent student, the VT secondary teacher who is overseeing the school placement, and the student. Regular meetings involving all three will take place throughout the semester. The exact meeting schedule will be determined on a case by case basis. Students will complete assignments that address the requirements of the VT Educator Portfolio. (EDST0115, EDST0215 and relevant courses in Psychology). By Approval only. Interested students must meet with the Director of Education Studies. (Fall 2019: T. Affolter; Spring 2020: C. Johnston)

EDST 4001 Individuals and Societies (Fall 2019)

(J. Miller-Lane)
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Department of English & American Literatures

Requirements for the Major: Students majoring in English and American Literatures will take a total of 11 classes in the ENAM department (transfer credits from other institutions must be approved). Of these, two are required classes: 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101 and 2) ENAM 0205. Students will then choose nine electives from the available course offerings, making sure that these courses satisfy the following distribution requirements. A single course may fulfill more than one distribution requirement.

  • at least three will be devoted to literature (English, British, and/or American) before 1800, and only one of the three used to meet this requirement may be a Shakespeare course. These courses will bear the (Pre-1800) designation.
  • At least one will be an advanced seminar. All 04XX courses in ENAM are advanced seminars.
  • at least one will be devoted to American Literature before 1900. These courses will bear the (Pre-1900 AL) designation.
  • at least one will expose students to cultural diversity in Literatures in English. Such courses are centrally concerned with material and approaches attending to differences in race, ethnicity, class, gender, and/or sexuality. These courses will bear the departmental (Diversity) designation.

These requirements are intended to offer students broad and historically grounded training in the discipline as well as a range of different pathways through the major. Students should confer closely with their advisers concerning their choices of electives.
Creative writing classes do not fulfill ENAM major requirements. LITS 0705, Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies, may be used to fulfill the advanced aeminar requirement in ENAM. Students should plan to complete an advanced seminar prior to beginning a critical honors thesis project.
Students wishing to pursue a CRWR 0701 honors thesis will first need to complete one introductory (0100-level) CRWR workshop and two advanced (0300-level) workshops with a grade of at least B+ prior to beginning the thesis.

Requirements for the Joint Major: A joint major in English and American Literatures requires a minimum of eight ENAM courses, including three required courses: 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0205; 3) a joint thesis or other project that integrates both parts of the major. In addition, students will choose at least five electives from the available offerings, making sure that these courses satisfy the following distribution requirements. A single course may fulfill more than one distribution requirement:

  • At least one course will be devoted to literature (English, British, and/or American) before 1800. These courses will bear the (Pre-1800) designation.
  • At least one will be an advanced seminar. All ENAM 04XX classes are advanced seminars.
  • At least one will be devoted to American Literature before 1900. These courses will bear the (Pre-1900 AL) designation.
  • At least one will expose students to cultural diversity in Literatures in English. Such courses are centrally concerned with material and approaches attending to differences in race, ethnicity, class, gender, and/or sexuality. These courses will bear the departmental (Diversity) designation.

*Students wishing to undertake a joint major in ENAM and Theatre should be advised that senior work will normally consist of two full-credit classes, ENAM 0708 and THEA 0708. We strongly recommend that these classes be taken in the same semester, with the understanding that a central goal of the joint major is the thorough integration of both aspects of the joint major. A single-credit, single-semester joint project remains an option for those who wish to pursue a joint thesis that does not include a practical component such as acting or directing.

Students wishing to undertake a joint major in ENAM and Film and Media Culture (FMMC) should follow the joint major requirements listed above.  Such students may also wish to take FMMC electives such as FMMC 0257 – Storytelling in Film and Media and FMMC 0279 – Film and Literature. Students wishing to write a joint creative senior thesis must also take 3 CRWR workshops, and those wishing to write a screenplay for their joint thesis must take specifically FMMC/CRWR 0106 – Writing for the Screen and FMMC/CRWR 0341 – Writing for the Screen II—prior to beginning the thesis. 

Students writing a joint thesis with HIST or HARC should register for HIST 0700 and 0711 or HARC 0710 and 0711, and attend the required thesis workshops is both departments.


Requirements for the Minor: Students minoring in English and American Literatures will take a minimum of six courses, including ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101 and five electives, chosen carefully to satisfy the following distribution requirements. A single course may fulfill more than one distribution requirement:

  • At least one course will be devoted to literature (English, British, and/or American) before 1800. These courses will bear the (Pre-1800) designation.
  • At least one will be an advanced seminar. All ENAM 04XX classes are advanced seminars.
  • At least one will be devoted to American Literature before 1900. These classes will bear the (Pre-1900 AL) designation.
  • At least one will expose students to cultural diversity in Literatures in English. Such courses are centrally concerned with material and approaches attending to differences in race, ethnicity, class, gender, and/or sexuality. These courses will bear the departmental (Diversity) designation.

 

Senior Program: The ENAM senior program consists of an optional one-semester creative or critical Honors Thesis of 30-35 pages in length (ENAM 0700, CRWR 0701). CRWR 0701 requires the prior completion of one 0100-level CRWR workshop and two 0300-level CRWR workshops and a grade of at least B+ in both 0300-level courses before undertaking a thesis. Students writing a critical thesis must enroll concurrently in the thesis workshop (ENAM 0710 or CRWR 0711). All students will participate in an oral defense of their work with the adviser and second reader of the project. Students are encouraged to complete their Advanced Seminar requirement before embarking on their senior work. Students must have a minimum 3.5 GPA in ENAM courses to be eligible to write an Honors Thesis. (Applicable to new majors only; those declaring an ENAM major prior to January 2019 may choose to write a thesis even if their departmental GPA is below 3.5.)

Honors
: Departmental honors will be awarded to those students who achieve a departmental GPA of 3.85 and who complete a Honors Thesis (ENAM 0700 or CRWR 0701) in the fall or spring of the senior year. (See the ENAM website for more information on the Honors Thesis guidelines.) Departmental GPA is calculated by counting all ENAM courses and other courses used to fill requirements for the major (including those taken abroad or at other institutions), and the Honors Thesis grade. The Honors Thesis will be weighted 20% more than other ENAM course grades in the overall GPA calculation for honors. Joint majors are eligible to receive ENAM honors, calculated by counting all ENAM courses and the joint thesis.

Courses for Non-Majors: The Department of English and American Literatures offers a wide variety of courses in literature that are open without prerequisite to all students in the college. These include most 0100 and 0200-level courses and some 0300-level courses. The ENAM 0103/CMLT 0101, ENAM 0201/0204 sequence is intended for declared or potential majors and minors. The 0100 or 0200 level courses are recommended for students, primarily in their first or second years, with interests in comparative, thematic, and theoretical approaches to literature. They are especially suitable for meeting the colleges Literature (LIT) distribution requirement.

 

CRWR 0106 Writing for the Screen I (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem. ART (D. Miranda Hardy)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0106 *

CRWR 0170 Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem. ART (Fall 2019: K. Gottshall, M. Mayhew-Bergman; Spring 2020: S. Ulmer, S. Cassarino)

CRWR 0173 Environmental Literature: Reading & Writing Workshop (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of environmental literature. We will analyze classic and contemporary model works in prose and poetry, in nonfiction and fiction, all directed at human interaction with the natural world. Our writing assignments will explore this theme in personal essays, poems, literary reportage, poetry, and fiction. Workshops will focus on inspiration, form, craft, and thematic issues associated with the environment. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0370, CRWR 0375, CRWR 0380, and CRWR 0385. ART, LIT (Fall 2019: P. Lourie; Spring 2020: S. Ulmer)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0173

CRWR 0175 The Structure of Poetry (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet. ART (Fall 2019: K. Gottshall; Spring 2020: J. Parini)

CRWR 0215 The Feminine Heroic (Fall 2019)

In this class we will explore the hero’s journey in literature as it relates to women and the natural world: who gets to go on the adventure, and who arrives home, transformed? How do race and gender complicate the traditional man-versus-nature narrative? We will discuss character agency, narrative authority, style, and structure — and look at texts where women undertake the journey, including work by Isak Dinesen, Annie Dillard, Camille Dungy, Rachel Carson, Anne LeBastille, Rahawa Haile, and Pam Houston. Students will generate creative and critical work. 3 hrs. sem. LIT (M. Mayhew-Bergman)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0215

CRWR 0218 Playwriting I: Beginning (Fall 2019)

The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218) ART, CW (D. Yeaton)
Cross-listed as: THEA 0218 *

CRWR 0318 Playwriting II: Advanced (Spring 2020)

For students with experience writing short scripts or stories, this workshop will provide a support structure in which to write a full-length stage play. We will begin with extended free and guided writing exercises intended to help students write spontaneously and with commitment. Class discussions will explore scene construction, story structure, and the development of character arc. (ENAM 0170 or THEA 0218 or ENAM/THEA 0240; by approval) (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0318) 2 1/2 hrs. lect./individual labs ART, CW (D. Yeaton)
Cross-listed as: THEA 0318 *

CRWR 0341 Writing for the Screen II (Spring 2020)

Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (FMMC 0106) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen. ART (I. Uricaru)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0341 *

CRWR 0370 Advanced Fiction: Reading and Writing Short Novels (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

Workshop: Fiction
Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem.
ART (R. Cohen)

Spring 2020

Advanced Fiction: Reading and Writing Short Novels
Ian MacEwan once said that very few novels earn their length. In this course we will read short works by Roberto Bolaño, Shirley Jackson, Toni Morrison, Renata Adler, Justin Torres, and Denis Johnson to explore the power of short novels and take a close look at prose, style, and economic character development. We will examine the constraints of space, and the freedom to experiment with form. Students will generate and workshop the beginnings of their own novellas, and class discussion will be based on our reading and creative work. 3 hrs. sem. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem.
ART (M. Mayhew-Bergman)

CRWR 0375 Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Walk of a Poem (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

As Lyn Hejinian writes, “Language makes tracks.” Poets from Chaucer to Whitman to O’Hara have used walking as a poetic method, thematic subject, narrative device, and pedestrian act. The walk is literal and imaginary, metrical and meandering; it traverses urban grids and bucolic landscapes, junctions of space, time, and lexis. In this workshop we will read the topographies of poems, focusing on lyrical cities from Paris to Harlem, Thoreauvian ambles through woods and field, and other literary wanderings and linguistic itinerancies, in order to examine how language gets made and mirrored in the act of moving through place. Students will also set out on walks through the local landscape as they produce their own work. Students will address crucial questions and challenges focused on the craft of poetry through rigorous readings, in-class writing exercises, critical discussions, collaborations, and the development of a portfolio of writing, including drafts and revisions. By the end of the course, students will have engaged deeply with the practice of poetry, established a writing discipline, honed their skills, generated new work, explored by foot, and extended their sense of the possibilities of a poem. (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms ) ART (Fall 2019: J. Parini; Spring 2020: K. Gottshall)

CRWR 0380 Advanced Nonfiction Workshop: Reading and Writing Memory and Landscape (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

Advanced Nonfiction Workshop
In this course we will study and practice techniques of nonfiction writing through contemporary essay and narrative nonfiction workshops and readings in the contemporary essay. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (CRWR 0170, CRWR 0175, or CRWR 0185) (formerly ENAM 0380)
ART (S. Ulmer)

Spring 2020

Advanced Nonfiction Workshop: Reading and Writing Memory and Landscape
The human animal is shaped by place and memory of place. How can a writer best create what Nabokov called "bright blocks of perception" and evoke the power of formative landscapes? We will move between memoir, narrative non-fiction, and autobiographical fiction, reading Virginia Woolf, Nabokov, Jesmyn Ward, and Mary Oliver. We will contemplate the way memory works with Oliver Sacks and Robin Kimmerer. Students will generate critical and creative work based on their own experiences and adventures, with room for interdisciplinary/multi-genre output. (CRWR 0170) (formerly ENAM 0380) 3 hrs. sem.
ART (M. Mayhew-Bergman)

CRWR 0388 Writing the Environment in the Digital Age (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore the environmental narrative in the digital age. Equipped with laptop, camera, audio and video recorders–the tools of today’s investigative journalists–students will undertake their own environmental investigation in the Middlebury area (anything from wind energy to bat disappearance to land-use along rivers), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history and narrative thread. Students will read from a wide selection of environmental authors including Andy Revkin, Elizabeth Kolbert, Tim Robinson, Michael Pollan, Gretel Ehrlich, Rick Bass, Bill McKibben, Annie Dillard, Carl Safina, and Barry Lopez, and write in the environmental genre, incorporating interviews, photos, and audio and video files in the final writing projects. (ENVS 215 and CRWR 170 or CRWR 173) Approval required. (Video and audio equipment supplied by the college) Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms 3 hrs. sem. ART, CW (P. Lourie)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0388 *

CRWR 0560 Special Project: Creative Writing (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Approval Required. (Fall 2019: D. Evans, D. Price, C. Shaw, J. Berg, J. Bertolini, D. Brayton, K. Kramer, M. Newbury, E. Napier, T. Billings, A. Baldridge, J. Parini, Y. Siddiqi, S. Ulmer, C. Cooper, R. Cohen, M. Wells, C. Wright, K. Gottshall, A. Losano, D. Bain, B. Graves, B. Millier, W. Nash; Spring 2020: D. Evans, D. Price, K. Kramer, J. Berg, J. Bertolini, D. Brayton, M. Newbury, E. Napier, B. Graves, A. Baldridge, J. Parini, Y. Siddiqi, S. Ulmer, W. Nash, R. Cohen, M. Wells, C. Wright, C. Cooper, K. Gottshall, A. Losano, T. Billings, D. Bain, B. Millier, P. Lourie)

CRWR 0701 Senior Thesis: Creative Writing (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

ENAM 0103 Reading Literature (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

Section A
Reading Literature: Fantastic Voyages
If every work of literature takes us to some “far country” of a world partly real and partly imagined, this course will be a “grand tour” of far-flung destinations, some of which will possess a gentle beauty, some of which will prove dangerous and harrowing. Our main concern, apart from learning how to appreciate a wide variety of styles, techniques, and genres, will be to acquire the analytical and writing skills that will allow students to convincingly communicate their feelings and insights about literature to others. To accomplish this, we will closely read selected works from Shakespeare to the present, become familiar with a lexicon of helpful literary terms, and introduce ourselves to some basics of literary theory. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
CW, LIT (A. Baldridge)
Section B
Border-Crossings
This course investigates the multitude of borders crossed in and by literature. Reading literary works by ethnic, diasporic, and Indigenous writers, we will consider the divisions between different identities, cultures, histories, and nation-states that they transgress. Just as importantly, we will analyze how these literatures span the borders of different genres and media, in the form of poetry, plays, short stories, and novels. Texts include: poetry by Gwendolyn Brooks, Mitsuye Yamada, and Ocean Vuong; short stories by Toni Morrison, Sandra Cisneros, and Jhumpa Lahiri; plays by David Henry Hwang, Young Jean Lee, and Marie Clements; and novels by Nella Larsen, Louise Erdrich, and Karen Tei Yamashita. 3 hrs. lect./disc
CW, LIT (J. Wang)
Section C
Spelling Bees: Literature’s Environments
The literary texts at the heart of this course probe our complex relationships to other living beings in the so-called “natural” world. We will adopt a flexible eco-critical approach to a wide range of creative and critical writing foregrounding the impact of human activity on both green and urban spaces. In this gateway course to the major, students will also develop skills in reading, writing, and critical analysis crucial to further study in the field. Readings will trespass conventional historical and national boundaries, moving from canonical Anglo American poetry to a vibrant sampling of multi-ethnic American and postcolonial writing. Topics explored include the industrialization of food production, climate change, gardening, species-extinction, capitalist enclosure, agricultural work and workers, flowers, and dolphins. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
CW, LIT (B. Graves)

Spring 2020

Section A
Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc
CW, LIT (T. Billings)
Section B
Reading Literature: Towards a Poetics of Community
Why read literature? One answer: such reading is not individual but communal. It links readers to each other in aesthetic experience, in ethical and hermeneutic debate, and in appreciation for writers and fellow readers. As we read literary texts from different times, cultures, and genres, we will examine how they anticipate, create, or recreate readerly communities, and how these communities in turn help shape the texts as they are experienced. We will also strive to form our own readerly community—one that is as inclusive and as intellectually generous as possible. We will begin with close analysis of poetry in various forms from various historical periods. We will then read dramas by such playwrights as William Shakespeare, Margaret Edson, and/or Lolita Chakrabarti, as well as two works from among such prose writers as Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Marilynne Robinson, Virginia Woolf, Toni Morrison, Ian McEwan, Walter Moseley, and Jean Rhys. 3 hrs. lect./disc
CW, LIT (J. Berg)
Section C
Reading Literature: Spelling Bees: Literature’s Environments
The literary texts at the heart of this course probe our complex relationships to other living beings in the so-called “natural” world. We will adopt a flexible eco-critical approach to a wide range of creative and critical writing foregrounding the impact of human activity on both green and urban spaces. In this gateway course to the major, students will also develop skills in reading, writing, and critical analysis crucial to further study in the field. Readings will trespass conventional historical and national boundaries, moving from canonical Anglo American poetry to a vibrant sampling of multi-ethnic American and postcolonial writing. Topics explored include the industrialization of food production, climate change, gardening, species-extinction, capitalist enclosure, agricultural work and workers, flowers, and dolphins. 3 hrs. lect./disc
CW, LIT (B. Graves)

ENAM 0108 Animals in Literature and Culture (Spring 2020)

Animals, wrote anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss, are good to think with. They are good to write with as well; almost all works of literature include animals, their importance varying from the merely peripheral to the absolutely central. Among other narrative functions, animals serve as essential metaphors for understanding the human animal. In this course we will read a wide variety of fiction, poetry, children's literature, philosophy, science, history, and cultural theory from Ancient Greek sources (in translation) to the present. We will consider theoretical, ethical, religious, psychological, linguistic, and political issues pertaining to animals and their representation in literary texts. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (A. Losano)

ENAM 0109 Literary “Character” (Spring 2020)

In this course we will investigate literary character—what it is; what makes it “round,” “flat,” “deep,” “shallow”; its history. In seeking to understand “character,” we will create our own stories, using characters from our readings, or introducing characters we create into plots or settings from those readings. In expository essays and class discussions, we will also consider the following questions: how and why did “fictional person” acquire the name “character” (literally “engraved mark”)? How does “character” relate to representations of body, property, authorship, gender, race? How does theatrical character relate to novelistic and short-story character? Possible authors: Aristotle, Theophrastus, Terence, Geoffrey Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Laurence Sterne, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Virginia Woolf, Richard Wright, Julia Alvarez. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (J. Berg)

ENAM 0115 Introduction to Ethnic North American Literature (Fall 2019)

This course introduces ethnic Canadian and U.S. literature by investigating how cultural representations of “ethnic America” are formed in relation to its social, political, and material histories. We will begin by analyzing the nested issues of labour, legality, and immigration that have shaped black, Asian, and Indigenous presence within North America. From there, we will move on to the themes of national assimilation, multiculturalism, diaspora, and empire in order to track the trajectory of ethnic Canadian and U.S. literature in the late-20th and 21st centuries. Authors include: Amiri Baraka, Frank Chin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tomson Highway, Julia Alvarez, Karen Tei Yamashita, Toni Morrison, Viet Nguyen, and Mohsin Hamid. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR (J. Wang)

ENAM 0117 The Short Story (AL) (Fall 2019)

This course approaches the short story as a distinct prose genre, beginning with work by Edgar Allen Poe and Guy de Maupassant and concluding with stories by contemporary authors. We will examine the particularly notable growth of the genre in America and survey various trends in the form, from "local color" sketches and realistic tales to experiments in modernism and postmodernism. Throughout, we will consider issues of structure, characterization, style, and voice. Other authors may include Anderson, Barthelme, Cheever, Chekhov, Hemingway, Joyce, Moore, O'Connor, Twain, and Welty. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR (R. Cohen)

ENAM 0204 Foundations of English Literature (Pre-1800) (Spring 2020)

Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th- and 17th-century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (D. Price)

ENAM 0205 Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce multiple interpretations of a given literary work. The approaches covered may include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Race Theory and Multicultural Criticism, Feminism, Post-Colonial Criticism, Queer Studies, Eco-Criticism, Post-Structuralism, and others. These theories will be applied to various works of fiction, poetry, and drama. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc. EUR, LIT (Fall 2019: Y. Siddiqi; Spring 2020: A. Baldridge)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0205

ENAM 0206 Nineteenth-Century American Literature (Pre-1900 AL) (Spring 2020)

This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. . 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR (D. Evans)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0206

ENAM 0209 American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (AL) (Pre-1900 AL) (Fall 2019)

A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. Required for all majors and minors. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR (D. Evans)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0209 *

ENAM 0215 Contested Grounds: U.S. Cultures and Environments (Spring 2020)

Throughout the history of the United States, Americans have created a complex set of meanings pertaining to the environments (wild, pastoral, urban, marine) in which they live. From European-Native contact to the present, Americans’ various identities, cultures, and beliefs about the bio-physical world have shaped the stories they tell about “nature,” stories that sometimes share common ground, but often create conflicting and contested understandings of human-environment relationships. In this course we will investigate these varied and contested stories from multi-disciplinary perspectives in the humanities—history, literature, and religion--and will include attention to race, class, gender, and environmental justice. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, NOR (D. Brayton)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0215 *

ENAM 0219 English Romantic Novel, 1764-1847 (Pre-1800) (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine novels written in England at the turn of the eighteenth century. Romantic in sensibility, these works are far from romantic in content, preoccupied with quite the opposite of amour: pride, revenge, incest, lascivious monks, transgressive scientists, and religious fanaticism. Each of these novels explores questions of identity, religion, sexuality, science, and landscape in innovative ways, experimenting with organizational and narrative strategies that challenge prevailing views of novelistic form. We will read three Gothic novels (The Castle of Otranto, The Mysteries of Udolpho, and The Monk) and one anti-Gothic work, ,Northanger Abbey, as well as Frankenstein, The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, and Wuthering Heights. LIT (E. Napier)

ENAM 0225 Travails of the Self: Eighteenth-Century Literature (Pre-1800) (Fall 2019)

The 'long' 18th century opens with poems of affairs of state and ends with intensely private and often anguished meditations on the self. In this course we will examine the rich range and complexity of 18th century literary concerns through a loosely chronological look at major works of poetry, drama, and fiction of the period: poems of Gay, Pope, Swift, Cowper, and Gray; Congreve's The Way of the World and Sheridan's The School for Scandal; and Fielding's Joseph Andrews and Inchbald's A Simple Story. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (E. Napier)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0225 * FMMC 0225

ENAM 0243 Maritime Literature and Culture (Fall 2019)

Writers have long found the sea to be a cause of wonder and reflection. A mirror for some and a desert for others, the sea has influenced the imaginations of writers throughout history in vastly different ways. In this course we will read a variety of literary works, both fiction and non-fiction, in which the sea acts as the setting, a body of symbolism, an epistemological challenge, and a reason to reflect on the human relationship to nature. Readings will be drawn from the Bible, Homer's Odyssey, Old English Poetry, Shakespeare, Tennyson, Kipling, Conrad, Melville, Hemingway, Walcott, O'Brian, and others. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (D. Brayton)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0243

ENAM 0250 The Romantic Revolution (Spring 2020)

he generation of British poets and novelists known collectively as the Romantics decisively rebelled against earlier conceptions of what literature could speak about, how it could best describe a rapidly changing world, and who was fit to be its reader. Arguably the first environmentalists, the Romantics also initiated our modern discussions of gender, class, race, and nationalism. To encounter the Romantics is to witness intellectual courage taking up arms against habit, prejudice, and tyranny. We will trace their genius and daring (and follow their personal attachments for, and rivalries with, each other) through the poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, and the novels of Mary Shelley and Emily Brönte. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (A. Baldridge)

ENAM 0252 African American Literature (AL) (Fall 2019)

This course surveys developments in African American fiction, drama, poetry, and essays during the 20th century. Reading texts in their social, historical, and cultural contexts—and often in conjunction with other African American art forms like music and visual art—we will explore the evolution and deployment of various visions of black being and black artistry, from the Harlem Renaissance through social realism and the Black Arts Movement, to the contemporary post-soul aesthetic. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ishmael Reed, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, and Octavia Butler. 3 hrs lect./disc. (Diversity)/ AMR, LIT, NOR (W. Nash)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0252 *

ENAM 0253 Science Fiction (Fall 2019)

Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0253 *

ENAM 0263 American Psycho: Disease, Doctors, and Discontents (Pre-1900 AL) (Spring 2020)

What constitutes a pathological response to the pressures of modernity? How do pathological protagonists drive readers toward the precariousness of their own physical and mental health? The readings for this class center on the provisional nature of sanity and the challenges to bodily health in a world of modern commerce, media, and medical diagnoses. We will begin with 19th century texts and their engagement with seemingly "diseased" responses to urbanization, new forms of work, and new structures of the family and end with contemporary fictional psychopaths engaged in attacks on the world of images we inhabit in the present. Nineteenth century texts will likely include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Later 20th-century works will likely include Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Thomas Harris, The Silence of the Lambs, Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted, and Bret Easton Ellis, American Psycho. AMR, LIT, NOR (M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0263

ENAM 0275 Multi-Ethnic British Literatures (Spring 2020)

"My name is Karim Amir," announces the protagonist of a Hanif Kureishi novel, "and I am an Englishman born and bred, almost." In this course we will investigate the complex subject of ethnic and national identity in the writing of British authors of Asian, African, and Caribbean descent. We will trace the shifting meanings of "black" and "British" as we move from 1950s migrant fictions to more recent reckonings with British multiculturalism. Topics to be considered will include diaspora and the work of memory; race and religion after 9/11; the representation of urban space; and the experience of asylum-seekers and refugees. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Diversity)/ CMP, EUR, LIT (B. Graves)

ENAM 0282 Reconstructing Literature: Realism, Regionalism, and the American scene, 1870-1919 (Pre-1900 AL) (Fall 2019)

American literature evolved in the late 1800s as a new generation of writers portrayed a rapidly changing culture, transformed by urbanization, industrial growth, immigration, class tensions, new roles for women, shifting race relations, and demographic transformations that seemed to split the nation into city and country. While realism was an effort to describe “life as it is” and regionalism focused on the distinctive features of specific places, both modes of representation stemmed from historical forces that were reshaping the nation. Works to be covered may include fiction by William Dean Howells, Charles Chesnutt, Sarah Orne Jewett, Kate Chopin, and Theodore Dreiser. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, LIT, NOR (T. Spears)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0282

ENAM 0285 Magical Realism(s) (Fall 2019)

Novels that juxtapose the marvelous with the everyday have shadowed (and mocked) mainstream realism for the better part of two centuries, and have proliferated in recent years to the point where they may constitute the predominant genre of our globalized culture. Why should such strange mélanges of the quotidian and the supernatural strike so many authors as the perfect vehicle to express 20th and 21st century anxieties and possibilities? We will explore examples of these boundary-defying fictions across several decades and various national literatures. Authors to be studied will include Woolf, Kafka, Calvino, Morrison, Pynchon, Rushdie, and Garcia-Marquez. CMP, LIT (A. Baldridge)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0285

ENAM 0286 Race, Dystopia, and Contemporary Fiction (Spring 2020)

What happens to race after the world ends? From environmental disasters to zombie invasions, the radical breakdown of human life haunts the cultural imaginary. A specific development within this cultural trend is the emergence of writers of colour who have turned to the dystopian and speculative genre. We will read such literary texts to consider representations of racial subjectivities, such as the lived experiences and perceptions of race, outside the conventions of realism. Themes that we will cover include: Afrofuturism, techno-Orientalism, zombies, cyborgs, climate change, and borderlands. Authors include: Junot Diaz, Colson Whitehead, Chang-rae Lee, Octavia Butler, Larissa Lai, Amitav Ghosh, and Louise Erdrich. 3 hrs. lect/disc. LIT (J. Wang)

ENAM 0312 Modern Poetry (Spring 2020)

This course will examine the nature and achievement of the major modern poets of Britain and America during the modern period, beginning with the origins of poetic modernism in the work of Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman. The central figures to be studied are William Butler Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, and W.H. Auden. The course will conclude with a look at some after-echoes of modernism in the work of Elizabeth Bishop and others. Two papers, one exam, with occasional oral presentations in class 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (J. Parini)

ENAM 0317 Poetics of Translation (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore the philosophical and linguistic questions raised by translingual discourse [with an emphasis on poetic writing] by surveying the most important theoretical writings on translation as we compare selections of poetry in multiple translations. Selections will include both “classic” texts such as the Psalms, the Illiad, Catullus, Li Bo, Rumi, Clément Marot, and/ Eugene Onenin/ as well as new experimental translingual poetry. We will discuss such questions as: How does language shape thought? How does culture shape language? Is poetry “untranslatable” by definition? What are the challenges of translating sacred or “exotic” poetry? 3 hrs. lect/disc. AAL, CMP, LIT, NOA (T. Billings)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0317

ENAM 0330 Shakespeare’s Career (Pre-1800) (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study the whole arc of William Shakespeare's literary career from the earliest histories, comedies, and non-dramatic poetry to the more mature tragedies and romances, with an eye to understanding Shakespeare’s development as a writer in his own time. How might the plays have resonated for his first audiences on stage, and how have subsequent readers drawn their own meanings from the published texts? Reading one play a week, we will pay close attention to such dramaturgical issues as Shakespeare’s construction of character and of plot, his adaptation of sources, and his modes of versification, as well as the ethical, political, and commercial implications of Shakespeare’s works during his lifetime, some of which stand in contrast with what we learn from them today. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc./3 hrs. screen. EUR, LIT (T. Billings)

ENAM 0359 The Art of Vladimir Nabokov (in English) (Spring 2020)

A study of the "perverse" aesthetics of this Russian-American writer. We will expose the hidden plots under the surface of his fiction, follow and arbitrate the ongoing contest between the author and his fictional heroes, and search for the roots of Nabokov's poetics in Western and Russian literary traditions. An attempt will be made to show the continuity between the Russian and English works of this bilingual and bicultural writer. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, LIT, NOR (M. Walker)

ENAM 0373 Postcolonial Literature and the City (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447) (Diversity)/ CMP, LIT, SOC (Y. Siddiqi)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0373

ENAM 0409 Seminar: James Joyce (Spring 2020)

In this seminar we will study three of Joyce’s major works of fiction: Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses. There will be some emphasis on background material to illustrate and clarify the rich array of specific details, settings, persons, and events which make up the turn-of-the-century world of Irish Catholic Dublin, the exclusive scene of all of Joyce’s fiction. We will also consider various critical approaches to Joyce’s monuments of modernism. 3 hrs. sem. (D. Price)

ENAM 0419 Gender, Power, and Politics on the Early Modern Stage (I) (Pre-1800) (Fall 2019)

In this class we will explore the representation of gendered embodiment on the early modern stage, considering as we do so how theatrical embodiment intersects with other treatments of the body in early modern culture. We will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as performance, investigating among other issues the use of boy actors, the representation of specifically “female” disorders (e.g., “suffocation” or hysteria), the performance of maternity, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism. Of particular importance will be the representation of the articulate or angry woman as the “shrew” or “scold,” and we will begin the class with an investigation of so-called “shrew-taming” narratives. Primary readings will include: Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew and The Winter’s Tale, Webster’s Duchess of Malfi, and Cavendish’s Convent of Pleasure. We will end the semester with a look at how this material plays out in our current political moment, focusing in particular on the representation of Hillary Clinton, Michelle Obama, and Christine Blasey Ford. 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LIT (M. Wells)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0419

ENAM 0442 Batter My Heart: Religious Poetry from Donne to Mary Oliver (Fall 2019)

In this seminar we will look closely at some of the major religious poets (broadly defined to include a variety of traditions) in the course of English and American poetry from the 17th century writers John Donne and George Herbert to the contemporary American poet Mary Oliver. Major figures will look at include Donne, Herbert, Wordsworth, Hopkins, Dickinson, T. S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, Charles Wright, and Mary Oliver. There will be prose selections from various poets and spiritual writers, including Emerson. LIT, PHL (J. Parini)

ENAM 0445 Recent Novels of Environmental Justice (Fall 2019)

In recent years the global Anglophone novel has emerged as a literary forum for negotiating issues of Environmental Justice in what has been called The Global South. Novelists from Sri Lanka to the United States, South Africa, South Asia, Britain, and Canada have recently explored such issues as hunger, land access, migration, environmental toxicity, indigeneity versus national identity, and diminishing resources in novels that explore the lives of some of the globe’s most vulnerable populations. The books we read and discuss are set in far-flung regions, from South Africa, India, and Oceania to what some have called “third-world North America.” Our task will be to theorize and interpret the way these novels represent environmental inequality, injustice, and exploitation and to consider what Environmental Justice might look like in these places 3 hrs. sem. (Diversity)/ AAL, CMP, LIT (D. Brayton)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0445

ENAM 0462 Literature of Displacement: Forced Migration, Diaspora, Exile (Spring 2020)

We will study contemporary postcolonial literature and theory about migration, displacement, exile, and diaspora. Spurred variously by force, necessity and desire, migrants leave their homes and homelands with regret and with hope. Writers address the historical forces that shape these migrations: decolonization and neo-colonialism, globalization, warfare, dispossession, political violence, religious conflict, and environmental catastrophe. These writers experiment with narrative form and poetic language to explore the experiences of undocumented immigrant workers, exiles, refugees and well-to-do migrants. We will examine constructions of identity, history, community and place in texts by Anzaldua, Ali, Darwish, Diome, Patel, Gomez Pena, Said, Rushdie, Spivak, and others. (Diversity)/ AAL, CMP, LIT, SOA, SOC (Y. Siddiqi)

ENAM 0464 Radical Fictions: Protests, Refuge, Revolution (Spring 2020)

The key premise of this course is to ask: Why are successful revolutions so difficult to imagine in contemporary literature? Minority authors often depict social movements, which strive to install those who were previously oppressed into positions of power and self-determination, to varying degrees of fulfillment. From historical precedents (the Black Power movement) to speculative societies that exclude men (feminist utopias), we will examine literary representations of political movements, refuges, and revolutions defined by power reversals. What can we learn from their shortcomings as much as their successes? Theoretical works include: Hegel, Marx, Fanon, Hannah Arendt, Valerie Solanas, and the Combahee River Collective. Authors include: Ralph Ellison, Danzy Senna, Paul Beatty, Susan Choi, Don Lee, R. O. Kwon, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. 3 hrs. sem. LIT (J. Wang)

ENAM 0500 Special Project: Literature (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Approval Required.

ENAM 0700 Senior Thesis: Critical Writing (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM 0705 Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies (Fall 2019)

Although it is required of all Literary Studies seniors, this course is intended for students working in any discipline who seek a close encounter with some of the greatest achievements of the literary imagination. In addition to being understood as distinctive artistic and philosophical accomplishments, the major works which constitute the reading list will also be seen as engaged in a vital, overarching cultural conversation across temporal and geographical boundaries that might otherwise seem insurmountable. The texts for this semester include Homer’s Odyssey, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Cervantes’ Don Quixote, Dostoevsky’ Crime and Punishment, Pirandello’ Six Characters in Search of an Author, and Borges’ Ficciones. (Open to non-majors with the approval of the instructor.) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Sfyroeras)
Cross-listed as: LITS 0705 *

ENAM 0708 Senior Work: Joint Majors in English & American Literatures and Theatre (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Approval required.

ENVS 0173 Environmental Literature: Reading & Writing Workshop (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of environmental literature. We will analyze classic and contemporary model works in prose and poetry, in nonfiction and fiction, all directed at human interaction with the natural world. Our writing assignments will explore this theme in personal essays, poems, literary reportage, poetry, and fiction. Workshops will focus on inspiration, form, craft, and thematic issues associated with the environment. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0370, CRWR 0375, CRWR 0380, and CRWR 0385. ART, LIT (Fall 2019: P. Lourie; Spring 2020: S. Ulmer)
Cross-listed as: CRWR 0173 *
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Program in Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies Requirements

Students matriculating Fall 2018 or later must follow these requirements. Students matriculated prior to Fall 2018 have the option to follow these requirement or the [previous requirements].

Minor in Environmental Studies: The minor in environmental studies consists of five courses: three environmental studies core courses to be completed by the end of the sixth semester: ANTH 0211 or ENVS 0112; ENVS or ENVS/PSCI 0211; and ENVS or ENVS/ENAM 0215; one course selected from among: ART 0309, DANC 0277, ECON 0265, ENAM 0227, ENVS 0209, ENVS 0210, ENVS 0385, ENVS 0395, GEOG 0207, HARC 0231, HIST 0222, PHIL 0356, PSCI 0214, PSYC 0233/0333; and one course from among: BIOL 0140, CHEM 0270, ENVS/GEOG 150, GEOL 0112, GEOL 0161, or GEOL 0323. Except for transfer students, the environmental studies core courses must be taken at Middlebury College. With the approval of the Environmental Studies program director, a maximum of one course taken off campus may be credited toward completion of other (e.g., non-core course) minor requirements.

Joint Majors: Environmental studies majors who focus in architecture, biology, chemistry, geology, geography, or sociology/anthropology automatically qualify as joint majors. Students may pursue a joint major between environmental studies and other majors. The other major usually overlaps the student's focus and represents additional coursework in the focus. Students interested in completing such a “non-automatic” joint major should consult with the chair of their focus department about joint majors. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the environmental studies major, there is no reduction in course requirements for the environmental studies component of a joint major.

Major in Environmental Studies: The environmental studies major is composed of course work in four areas: four environmental studies core courses; 7-8 courses in a focus area; two environmental cognate courses; and an integrative capstone experience. Except for transfer students, the core courses and capstone experience must be Middlebury College courses, which for the purposes of the Environmental Studies major are defined as those offered by the undergraduate college during fall, winter, spring, and summer terms. The student's advisor must approve any non-Middlebury College courses within the focus area; the ES Director must approve any non-Middlebury College courses within the rest of the major. A maximum of three non-Middlebury College courses may be credited toward completion of the major.

I. Core Course Requirements
All majors are required to complete four core courses: ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and either ENVS/GEOG 0120 (recommended for students focusing in the social sciences, humanities or arts) or ENVS/GEOG 0150 (recommended for students focusing in the natural sciences).

ENVS 0112 should be completed by the end of the sophomore year; all core courses must be completed by the end of the junior year. Only those students who have completed the core courses are eligible to enroll in advanced integrative work.

II. Focus Course Requirements
Majors must complete the 7-8 course requirements for one of 16 established foci. Foci fall into one of four academic divisions: arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. These divisions govern which cognate courses a student may take. Courses taken within the focus that are not specified must be approved by the student's advisor. As indicated, some foci automatically qualify the student for joint major status.

 Arts Foci

Environmental Dance: ARDV 0116; DANC 0160; DANC 260; DANC 0277 or       
DANC 1025; DANC 0284; DANC 0376; DANC 0700.

Environmental Studies-Architecture joint major: HARC 0100; HARC 0130; HARC 0230; HARC 0231 (prerequisite for HARC 0731); HARC 0330 (or approved substitute); one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; HARC 0731 and HARC 0732, to be taken sequentially. Note: This joint major does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Students wishing to pursue graduate study in architecture are advised to take additional science and math courses and should consult with their advisor.

Environmental Studio Art: One 100- or 200-level drawing course; HARC 0327 (strongly suggested) or other approved substitute in the history of art-practice; ART 0309; four electives in studio art, three of which must be at the 300-level; ART 0700.

Environmental Theatre: ARDV 0116 or THEA 0101; THEA 0102; THEA 0208; DANC 0277; THEA 0235 or a THEA literature course chosen in consultation with advisor; two THEA electives of which only one may be a Production Studio course; and completing a crew requirement. The crew requirement must be completed by the end of the 5th term and will normally be satisfied by undertaking a running crew assignment on a for-credit production; the requirement may also be fulfilled by stage managing a faculty show, or by completing THEA 0119 or THEA 0129.

Humanities Foci

Environmental History: HIST 0222; three 100-300-level HIST courses; one 400-level HIST course or equivalent approved by adviser; HIST 0600 or equivalent approved by adviser; one additional course from the ENVS humanities cognate list or an approved substitute.

Environmental Literature: ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; ENAM 0205; three approved environmental literature courses (see full list) of which one must be at the 100-200 level and one must be at the 300-400 level; one term of senior independent work, typically ENAM 0700, or, upon approval, a senior thesis, typically ENAM 0700/ENVS 0701.

Environmental Writing: ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; CRWR 0170 or CRWR 0175; two approved environmental literature courses (see full list) of which one must be at the 100-200 level and one must be at the 300-400 level; two 300-level writing workshops; one term of senior independent writing, typically ENAM 0701.

Religion, Philosophy, and the Environment: ENVS 0395; PHIL 0356; ENVS 0700; and four courses in accordance with either the Religion track or the Philosophy track.

Religion track: RELI 0100 or an approved alternative; three RELI 100-200 level courses, of which two should focus either on a particular religious tradition (e.g. Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism) or on a particular geographic area (e.g. religions of South Asia) and one should focus on an alternate religious tradition/geographic area. ANTH 0211 or HIST/PHIL 0237 maybe substituted for a 200-level course with approval of the advisor.

Philosophy track: PHIL 0150 or PHIL 0151; at least one ethics course selected among: PHIL 0205, PHIL 0210, PHIL 0285, or an approved alternative; at least one philosophy of science course selected among: PHIL 0214 (strongly recommended), PHIL 0216, or an approved alternative; an additional PHIL course selected in consultation with the advisor.

Students with strong comparative interests in both religion and philosophy should consult with their advisor.

Natural Science Foci

Conservation Biology (Environmental Studies-Biology joint major): BIOL 0140; BIOL 0145; BIOL 0392; two field methods courses chosen from BIOL 0302, BIOL 0304, and BIOL 0323; one organismal course chosen from among BIOL 0201, BIOL 0202, BIOL 0203, BIOL 0302, and BIOL 0310; and two BIOL electives chosen from the 0200-0700 level (only one of which can be BIOL 0500 or higher). Notes: BIOL 0302 may count toward the field methods or the organismal requirement but not towards both; Winter Term courses offered through the Biology Department can be used to satisfy one of the elective courses; BIOL 0211 is a prerequisite for independent study in Biology (BIOL 0500 and higher). ENVS 0401 or, if approved, an integrative senior thesis, satisfies the required joint work for ENVS-BIOL joint majors.

Environmental Studies-Chemistry joint major: CHEM 0103; CHEM 0104 or 0107; CHEM 0203, CHEM 0204; CHEM 0270; and CHEM 0311.  Students wishing to pursue graduate study in chemistry are advised to take additional science and math courses and should consult with their advisor.

Environmental Studies-Geology joint major: One introductory course chosen from among: GEOL 0112 (preferred), GEOL 0161, and GEOL 0170; one course from among GEOL/GEOG 0251, GEOL 0255, and GEOL 0257; one course from among GEOL 0201, GEOL 0211, and GEOL 0281; three GEOL 0200-level or higher courses, and two-term senior thesis focusing on geology and the environment: GEOL 0400/0700. Students wishing to pursue graduate study in geology are advised to take additional science and math courses and should consult with their advisor.

Social Science Foci

Conservation Psychology: PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201; PSYC 0202; PSYC 0233/0333; PSYC 0416; two additional courses to be determined in consultation with the student's advisor.

Environmental Economics: MATH 0121 or MATH 0122; ECON 0155; ECON 0210; ECON 0211, ECON 0255; ECON 0265; ECON 0465; one course from among ECON 0228, ECON 0275, ECON 0425, ECON 0428, and ECON 0466.

Environmental Justice:  ENVS 208 (EJ in the Anthropocene); one course from the foundations list; three courses from the electives list; and two courses from the advanced list.  Substitute or additional courses not listed here, including Winter Term courses and off-campus courses, may count toward the focus with the approval of an ESEJ faculty adviser. This is a social science-based focus, so majors in ESEJ follow the cognate course requirements for the social science division.  Majors may count any humanities course listed for the focus (HIST, RELI, ENAM, PHIL, HARC, CLAS) as a cognate if they do NOT count it toward the focus.  In choosing their natural science cognate, ESEJ majors are encouraged to consider CHEM 270, Environmental Chemistry and Health for their natural science lab cognate.

Environmental Policy: ECON 0155; ECON 0265; ECON 0210 or MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201; PSCI 0214 or ENVS 0385; PSCI 0421 or PSCI 0452; two courses from among ENVS 0209, GEOG 0207, and any PSCI courses at the 0200-0300 level.

Environmental Studies-Geography joint major: GEOG 0100; four elective courses at the 0200- or 0300-level, at least one of which must be at the 0200 and one at the 0300 level; and one 0400-level seminar. The electives and seminar must be selected in consultation with, and approved by, the student’s Geography advisor. ENVS 0401 or, if approved, an integrative senior thesis, satisfies the required joint work for ENVS-GEOG joint majors.

Environmental Studies - Anthropology joint major.  ANTH 0103; ANTH 0211; ANTH 0301; ANTH 0306; and four electives related to environmental topics from the Anthropology curriculum or ENVS 0210 or ENVS 0385 in consultation with the student’s advisor. Students pursuing senior work may only count one semester towards their elective requirement. No more than one elective may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., as a winter term course or transfer credit).  Any departures from this program must be approved by the Anthropology department chair.

Other Environmental Perspectives
For students interested in studying the environment from perspectives for which there is not an established focus (e.g., international environmental studies, food studies, environmental justice), we recommend that students select the established focus that most closely meets their goals, select cognates that complement these goals, and, when possible, select topics on course assignments and projects that complement their goals and interests. Students are also encouraged to consider the possibility for intersecting study abroad opportunities with their goals and interests. Finally, students might consider completing a minor in environmental studies alongside a major of their choice. Students are encouraged to meet with the ES Director or with faculty advisors who advise for foci related to their interests to discuss their options.

III. Cognate Course Requirements
Two cognate courses must be selected from the approved list of cognates, subject to the following:

  • cognates must represent an academic division outside the division of the student’s chosen focus (see academic division for each focus above (section II));
  • for students focusing outside the natural sciences, at least one cognate must be an approved natural science cognate with a laboratory;
  • one cognate may be integrative (representing two or more academic divisions).

Because integrative courses represent more than one academic division, they inherently represent an academic division outside the division of the student’s focus; therefore, all integrative courses can be counted by all majors toward completion of the cognate requirement, subject to the rules above. Not all approved cognates are offered each semester. Please check with relevant departments regarding course offerings.

IV. Advanced Integrative Capstone Requirement
After completing the required core courses, majors must complete one of two options for an advanced integrative capstone experience: either the community-engaged environmental studies practicum (ENVS 0401, open to juniors and seniors) or, with program consultation and approval, a multi-term integrative senior thesis (typically ENVS 0700/0703).

Senior Work in Environmental Studies
ENVS does not universally require senior independent work; however, some foci within ENVS do. With program consultation and approval, required senior work in a focus may be expanded to meet the criteria for a multi-term integrative senior thesis, thereby simultaneously fulfilling the senior work requirement in the focus and the advanced integrative capstone requirement. In other cases, majors must complete the required senior independent work in the focus and, in addition, complete ENVS 0401 as their required advanced integrative capstone experience.

Majors who are not required to complete independent senior work in their focus may, in consultation and approval of an advisor, apply to complete (optional) senior independent work in ENVS. Senior work in ENVS may be carried out as a one-term senior project (ENVS 0700); as a multi-term senior thesis (ENVS 0700/0701); or as a multi-term integrative senior thesis (ENVS 0700/703). Whereas a multi-term integrative senior thesis satisfies the advanced integrative capstone requirement of the major, other types of senior work do not.

All senior independent work carried out in ENVS or toward honors eligibility (i.e., carried out in a focus department) in Environmental Studies must be on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and environment; be supervised by at least one faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the environmental studies program; and must be presented publicly. In consultation with the thesis committee, students may present as part of the Spring Research Symposium or as a separate event arranged with the committee and ES Program.

To qualify as an integrative senior thesis, the multi-term work must also meaningfully and substantially integrate perspectives, lenses, or methodologies from the academic division of the student’s focus and typically at least one other division; and be supervised by at least two faculty advisors typically from different academic divisions, at least one of whom is appointed in or affiliated with the environmental studies program.

For additional important details regarding the integrative capstone requirement and/or senior work options, please visit the senior work page.

Environmental Studies Program Honors
Program honors will be awarded to majors who complete a multi-term senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment and meet the following requirements: the thesis must be supervised by a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the environmental studies program; the work must be presented publicly, orally defended before their committee, and be of superior quality (B+ or higher); the student must achieve an average GPA of B+ or higher in courses taken toward completion of the major. Courses counting toward the GPA in the major include core courses, courses taken in fulfillment of focus with the exception of senior thesis courses (i.e., 700-level courses are excluded), cognates, and ENVS 0401 (if taken). If extra cognates or courses within the focus were taken, those with the highest grades will be applied toward completion of the major and toward the GPA calculation for honors eligibility.

ENVS 0112 Natural Science and the Environment (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

We will explore in detail a series of current environmental issues in order to learn how principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as interdisciplinary scientific approaches, help us to identify and understand challenges to environmental sustainability. In lecture, we will examine global environmental issues, including climate change, water and energy resources, biodiversity and ecosystem services, human population growth, and world food production, as well as the application of science in forging effective, sustainable solutions. In the laboratory and field, we will explore local manifestations of global issues via experiential and hands-on approaches. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2019: M. Lapin, K. Doyle; Spring 2020: P. Ryan, M. Lapin)

ENVS 0120 Human Geography with GIS (Spring 2020)

This course applies spatial thinking (integrating spatial concepts, spatial representations, and spatial reasoning) using geographic information systems (computer systems for processing location-based data). Students will learn to frame and solve a sequence of applied problems with GIS across a wide range of topics, including environmental planning, biogeography and conservation biology, environmental justice, political geography, and urban geography. Fundamental concepts and methods of GIS will include raster and vector data structures and operations, geographic frameworks, error and uncertainty, and principles of cartographic design. (First semester first year students and second semester seniors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SOC (J. Holler)
Cross-listed as: GEOG 0120 *

ENVS 0150 Environmental Geography with GIS (Fall 2019)

How do geographers study spatial interactions between humans and the natural world? How do patterns and processes of climate, hydrology, biogeography, geology, and geomorphology interact with human societies? How can geographic information systems (GIS) help geographers describe, understand, and explain these spatial interactions? In this course we will study applications of GIS in environmental geography from local to global scales. Case studies will introduce methods for using elevation models, remotely sensed imagery, and environmental data for inquiries of environmental change, environmental hazards, and natural resource conservation. Students will learn how to gather geographic data, perform spatial analyses, critically interpret results, and communicate findings with cartographic layouts. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED (J. Howarth)
Cross-listed as: GEOG 0150 *

ENVS 0200 Global Warming (Spring 2020)

In this course we will cover the science, economics, politics, psychology, art and literature of climate change, understanding how we know what we know and what the implications are for the future. We will move quickly since there is a lot of ground to cover: climate change is arguably the largest thing humans have ever done. Some time in each class session will be devoted to the latest developments as they occur. 3 hrs. lect. (W. McKibben)

ENVS 0208 Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene (Fall 2019)

We live in a moment defined by environmental change. Yet the causes and consequences of these transformations are profoundly uneven. Across race, class, gender, and other forms of difference, “environmental problems” manifest in radically unequal ways, disproportionately burdening some while benefiting others. In this class we will dwell on this central tension in thinking about present socio-environmental crises and what to do about them, from toxic landscapes and biodiversity loss to global hunger and a warming climate. Certainly, these problems pose urgent, even existential problems that demand intervention. Yet common refrains about ‘how to save the environment’ always come with baggage. They have deep histories and hidden assumptions about causes and solutions, justice and inequality, politics and social change, which we will wrestle with together in this course. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (D. Suarez)

ENVS 0209 Gender Health Environment (Fall 2019)

Growing concern for the protection of the environment and human health has led policy makers and scholars to consider ways in which gender, class, and race and other forms of identity mediate human-environment interactions. In this course we will explore how access to, control over, and distribution of resources influence environmental and health outcomes both in terms of social inequities and ecological decline. Specific issues we will cover include: ecofeminism, food security, population, gendered conservation, environmental toxins, climate change, food justice, and the green revolution. We will draw comparisons between different societies around the globe as well as look at dynamics between individuals within a society. The majority of case studies are drawn from Sub Saharan Africa and Asia, however some comparisons are also made with the United States. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, CMP, SAF, SOC (M. Baker-Medard)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0209

ENVS 0210 Social Class and the Environment (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore the consequence of growth, technological development, and the evolution of ecological sacrifice zones. Texts will serve as the theoretical framework for in-the-field investigations, classroom work, and real-world experience. The Struggle for Environmental Justice outlines resistance models; Shadow Cities provides lessons from the squatters movement; Ben Hewitt's The Town that Food Saved describes economy of scale solutions, and David Owen's The Conundrum challenges environmentalism. Texts will guide discussions, serve as lenses for in-the-field investigations, and the basis for writing. We will also travel to Hardwick and Putney, Vermont, to explore new economic-environmental models. (Not open to students who have taken ENVS/WRPR 1014) AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (H. Vila)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0210 *

ENVS 0211 Conservation and Environmental Policy (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (crosslisted with PSCI 0211 Fall 2018 only) AMR, NOR, SOC (Fall 2019: C. Klyza; Spring 2020: M. Baker-Medard, D. Suarez)
Cross-listed as: PSCI 0211

ENVS 0215 Contested Grounds: U.S. Cultures and Environments (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Throughout the history of the United States, Americans have created a complex set of meanings pertaining to the environments (wild, pastoral, urban, marine) in which they live. From European-Native contact to the present, Americans’ various identities, cultures, and beliefs about the bio-physical world have shaped the stories they tell about “nature,” stories that sometimes share common ground, but often create conflicting and contested understandings of human-environment relationships. In this course we will investigate these varied and contested stories from multi-disciplinary perspectives in the humanities—history, literature, and religion--and will include attention to race, class, gender, and environmental justice. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, NOR (Fall 2019: R. Gould; Spring 2020: D. Brayton)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0215

ENVS 0231 Architecture and the Environment (Spring 2020)

Architecture has a dynamic relationship with the natural and cultural environments in which it operates. As a cultural phenomenon it impacts the physical landscape and uses natural resources while it also frames human interaction, harbors community, and organizes much of public life. We will investigate those relationships and explore strategies to optimize them, in order to seek out environmentally responsive architectural solutions. Topics to be covered include: analysis of a building's site as both natural and cultural contexts, passive and active energy systems, principles of sustainable construction, and environmental impact. Our lab will allow us to study on site, "off-the-grid" dwellings, hay-bale houses, passive solar constructions and alternative communities, meet with "green" designers, architects, and builders, and do hands-on projects. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART (J. Nelson)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0231 *

ENVS 0243 Maritime Literature and Culture (II) (Fall 2019)

Writers have long found the sea to be a cause of wonder and reflection. A mirror for some and a desert for others, the sea has influenced the imaginations of writers throughout history in vastly different ways. In this course we will read a variety of literary works, both fiction and non-fiction, in which the sea acts as the setting, a body of symbolism, an epistemological challenge, and a reason to reflect on the human relationship to nature. Readings will be drawn from the Bible, Homer's Odyssey, Old English Poetry, Shakespeare, Tennyson, Kipling, Conrad, Melville, Hemingway, Walcott, O'Brian, and others. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (D. Brayton)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0243 *

ENVS 0300 Approaching Sustainability From the Roots (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore root causes of environmental problems through systems and emergent ways of approaching ecology, philosophy, the economy and mainstream media. It begins from the premise that humans are born belonging to animals, plants and the rest of nature - connected to our instincts - but that we are conditioned immediately away from this inter-dependence. We will work to understand how we can overcome this state of being by considering indigenous thinkers and eastern philosophers. We will read Robin Wall Kimmerer, Kate Raworth, George Lakoff, Gary Snyder, Peter Senge, Confucius, Lao Tzu, Wes Jackson and others. The texts will be complemented by an exploration of current and emergent practices in the private sector through partnerships with non-profits and government agencies. 3 hrs. sem. (N. Barnicle)

ENVS 0310 Theories of Change (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine various organized efforts aimed at transforming (and maybe saving) our world. In particular, we will compare different conceptions of how social change happens. In analyzing underlying beliefs, hypotheses, and assumptions—i.e., “theories of change”—we will grapple with fundamental questions and clashing perspectives regarding the nature of power, political economy, and social struggle, which continue to animate sharp disagreements among activists. As we mobilize to confront multiplying socio-environmental crises, getting our theories of change right has never seemed more urgent. (ENVS 0211) 3 hrs. sem. SOC (D. Suarez)

ENVS 0332 The Perennial Turn in Ag and Culture (Fall 2019)

Can new forms of thinking help shift humanity from destructive and unjust practices to compatible partnerships with all life? Blending insights from physics, philosophy, and life sciences with ancient and indigenous understandings, we will explore an emerging story of thinking more like a prairie than a plow. We start by discussing old ways of thinking we have inherited--surplus, power hierarchies, mechanistic worldviews, separation from a creative sacred Earth--that have wrought negative impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems and cultures. Then we will deepen our exploration of perennialism by engaging with community groups to develop teaching modules that will help create new options and opportunities for both agriculture and society. 3 hrs. sem PHL (M. Lapin, N. Barnicle, W. Vitek)

ENVS 0335 Hope in a time of Climate Change (Spring 2020)

Climate change is arguably the most important challenge facing the world; addressing it will require the cooperation of diverse stakeholders. In this course we will ask how Christian theological and ecological viewpoints contribute to our understandings of climate change: how we got here, what it means to live in a time of climate change, and the basis of hope for the future. We will also explore how partnerships between science and religion can contribute to efforts to address climate change. Readings in the course will include works of Christian theology, history of science, and selections from the primary scientific literature. (not open to students who have taken ENVS 1040) 3 hrs sem. PHL (A. Nagy-Benson, A. Lloyd)

ENVS 0369 Henry David Thoreau in His Time and Ours (Spring 2020)

How did Henry David Thoreau’s words and deeds speak to the most profound moral challenges of his time and how might they continue to speak to us today? We will begin by examining Thoreau’s work within the social context of mid-nineteenth century New England, closely examining primary texts including Walden, “Civil Disobedience,” The Journals, and his essays on slavery. Next, we will ask what relevance Thoreau has today. How do Thoreau’s critiques of nineteenth-century US culture speak to the current issues we now face, including environmental degradation, social injustice, the climate crisis and our quest for well-being? (ENVS 0215) 3 hrs. sem. AMR, NOR, PHL (R. Gould)

ENVS 0385 Global Political Ecology (Spring 2020)

In this course we will draw on theories of social and political change to understand the systematic causes of inequality and environmental degradation around the world. Using a political ecology lens, we will look at both proximate as well as ultimate drivers of environmental conflict focusing on the relations between production and consumption, representation and regulation, rights and responsibilities, and information and norms. We will compare the disproportionate distribution of environmental benefits and burdens across communities and nations. We will also study prospective solutions, focusing on the role of individuals and organizations in achieving these solutions. (ENVS 0211 or PSCI 0214) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, SOC (D. Suarez)

ENVS 0388 Writing the Environment in the Digital Age (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore the environmental narrative in the digital age. Equipped with laptop, camera, audio and video recorders–the tools of today’s investigative journalists–students will undertake their own environmental investigation in the Middlebury area (anything from wind energy to bat disappearance to land-use along rivers), then sharpen their skills as writers, focusing on setting, character, history and narrative thread. Students will read from a wide selection of environmental authors including Andy Revkin, Elizabeth Kolbert, Tim Robinson, Michael Pollan, Gretel Ehrlich, Rick Bass, Bill McKibben, Annie Dillard, Carl Safina, and Barry Lopez, and write in the environmental genre, incorporating interviews, photos, and audio and video files in the final writing projects. (ENVS 215 and CRWR 170 or CRWR 173) Approval required. (Video and audio equipment supplied by the college) Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms 3 hrs. sem. ART, CW (P. Lourie)
Cross-listed as: CRWR 0388

ENVS 0401 Community-Engaged Environmental Studies Practicum (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course students work in small groups with one of a variety of partners and organizations to complete a semester-long, community-engaged project. Project themes vary by term and typically focus on local and regional environmental issues that have broader application. Projects rely on students’ creativity, interdisciplinary perspectives, skills, and knowledge developed through their previous work. The project is guided by a faculty member and carried out with a high degree of independence by the students. Students will prepare for and direct their project work through readings and discussion, independent research, collaboration with project partners, and consultation with external experts. The course may also include workshops focused on developing key skills (e.g., interviewing, public speaking, video editing). The project culminates in a public presentation of students’ final products, which may various forms such as written reports, policy white papers, podcasts, or outreach materials. (Open to Juniors and Seniors) (ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0150) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. lab (Fall 2019: C. Klyza, D. Munroe; Spring 2020: M. Baker-Medard, D. Munroe, M. Costanza-Robinson)

ENVS 0442 Transnational Feminist Conservation (Fall 2019)

In this course we explore a transnational feminist approach to conservation. We will start by delving into the masculinist history of conservation, and reviewing a set of theories and vocabularies focused on gender, as well as race, class, and ability as key sites of power that effect both human and non-human bodies and ecological processes, from coral reefs to the arctic tundra. We will compare case studies across multiple regions globally on topics such as conservation via population control, feminist food, community-based conservation, and feminist-indigenous approaches to inquiry. We will debate feminist science, examining the conflicting epistemic foundations of objective versus situated knowledge. We will hone our writing skills in a variety of genres including blogs, academic essays, poems, and zines. (ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215 or ENVS/GSFS 209) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, CW, SAF, SOC (M. Baker-Medard)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0442

ENVS 0445 Recent Novels of Environmental Justice (Fall 2019)

In recent years environmental justice has emerged as a major topic in the humanities. This intersection of environmentalism and social justice is motivated by a concern for the differential access to natural resources (clean water, clean air, tillable land) afforded to different groups of people within particular social systems. Students will encounter these themes thorugh the reading of many global Anglophone novels, including Waterland, by Graham Swift; The Hungry Tide, by Amitav Ghosh; Animal's People, by Indra Sinha; A Thousand Acres, by Jane Smiley; Ceremony, by Leslie Marmon Silko; and Disgrace, by J.M. Coetzee. 3 hrs. sem. CMP, LIT (D. Brayton)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0445 *

ENVS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course, students (non-seniors) carry out an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

ENVS 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course, seniors complete an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. During the term prior to enrolling in ENVS 0700, a student must discuss and agree upon a project topic with a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program and submit a brief project proposal to the Director of Environmental Studies for Approval. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 as a one-term independent study OR up to twice as part of a multi-term project, including as a lead-up to ENVS 0701 (ES Senior Thesis). (Senior standing; Approval only)

ENVS 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is the culminating term of a multi-term independent project, resulting in a senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. Approval to enroll is contingent on successful completion of at least one term (and up to two) of ENVS 0700 and the approval of the student’s thesis committee. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, will result in a substantial piece of scholarly work that will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum and defended before the thesis committee. (Senior standing; ENVS major; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120, and ENVS 0700; Approval only)

ENVS 0703 Senior Integrated Thesis (Fall 2019)

This course is the culminating term of a multi-term independent project, resulting in a senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment and that meaningfully integrates perspectives, methodologies, and/or approaches from multiple academic divisions (e.g., humanities/arts, natural sciences, social sciences). Approval to enroll is contingent on successful completion of at least one term (and up to two) of ENVS 0700 and approval of the Environmental Studies Program. The project, carried out under the co-supervision of two faculty advisors from different academic divisions of whom at least one is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, will result in a substantial piece of scholarly work that will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum and defended before the thesis committee. (Open to Senior ENVS majors) (Approval Only)
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Department of Film & Media Culture

Major Requirements: Students must complete ten courses to satisfy the requirements for a major in Film and Media Culture. Before declaring a Film and Media Culture major, the student must have completed or be currently enrolled in one of the basic core courses. Those courses are as follows:
     Basic Core Course Requirements: FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image; FMMC 0102 Film History; FMMC 0104 TV and American Culture; and one production course - either FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound or FMMC 0106 Writing for the Screen I. The basic core courses should be completed by the end of the junior year.
     Required Advanced Courses: One 0300 level course in theory -- FMMC 0354, FMMC 0355, FMMC/GSFS 0358, FMMC 0360, or another approved 0300 level course -- typically to be completed during junior year; and FMMC 0700 Film and Media Senior Tutorial.
     Electives: Four additional FMMC courses, with at least two of these being critical studies or history courses. With the prior permission of a student's academic advisor, one winter term FMMC course may be counted as an elective. Independent study courses will typically not count as an elective unless approved by the department chair for exceptional circumstances. Students taking courses focused on film and media taught in a foreign language, either at Middlebury or abroad, may request major elective credit from their advisor. Note that courses may not count toward both FMMC and another department's major or minor. Courses transferred from other institutions will normally count only as an elective toward the FMMC major, not to fulfill core requirements.
     Minor: Three required courses - FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image, FMMC 0102 Film History, FMMC 0104 TV and American Culture. In addition, minors must take three additional courses that are listed or cross-listed as FMMC. At least one of the three electives must be at the 0300 or 0400-level. At least one of the three electives must be a critical studies or history course.
     Joint Major: The joint major with FMMC is a combination of two disciplines, culminating in a joint senior project; the plan for joint majors is negotiated between the student and the two departments in which the joint program of study is pursued at the time of declaring the joint major. The senior project must combine aspects of both majors and in most cases will require approval, supervision, and evaluation from either departments or programs. The Film and Media Culture part of the joint major requires a minimum of seven courses, including four 100-level FMMC core courses, a 300-level theory course, FMMC 0700 Film and Media Senior Tutorial (or the equivalent senior project course in the other department), and any courses required or appropriate prior to undertaking the joint senior project. FMMC supports a concentration in American Studies, as detailed on its page.
     Joint Major with ENAM: A common joint major is ENAM/FMMC, combining an interest in storytelling in both literary and visual forms. Joint ENAM/FMMC majors are required to fulfill the basic Joint requirements for FMMC as listed above, and are encouraged to take the relevant electives FMMC 0257 Storytelling in Film & Media and FMMC 0279 Film & Literature if possible. Students who wish to write a screenplay for their joint senior project are required to take FMMC 0106 Writing for the Screen I and FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II; additionally, their screenwriting project must be tied to literary topics or issues (including adaptation).
     Honors:
The faculty of Film and Media Culture will award honors to select students based on their overall excellence in film and media coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.7, and on the merit of their senior project.

FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen ART (N. Dobreva)

FMMC 0102 Film History (Fall 2019)

This course will survey the development of the cinema from 1895 to present. Our study will emphasize film as an evolving art, while bearing in mind the influence of technology, economic institutions, and the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Screenings will include celebrated works from Hollywood and international cinema. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen ART, HIS (A. Grindon)

FMMC 0104 Television and American Culture (Fall 2019)

This course explores American life in the last seven decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to today’s digital convergence via YouTube and Netflix, we will consider television's role in both representing and constituting American society through a variety of approaches, including: the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of various television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, the medium's technological transformations, and television as a site of global cultural exchange. 3 hrs. lect./disc. / 3 hrs. screen AMR, NOR, SOC (J. Mittell)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0104

FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound I (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. Open to FMMC majors only. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART (Fall 2019: D. Miranda Hardy; Spring 2020: N. Ngaiza)

FMMC 0106 Writing for the Screen I (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem. ART (D. Miranda Hardy)
Cross-listed as: CRWR 0106

FMMC 0215 3D Computer Animation (Spring 2020)

3D computer animation has revolutionized animation, graphics, and special effects. In this course students will explore basic 3D modeling techniques, virtual material and texture creation, digital lighting, rendering, and animation. Every workshop will be hands on and fully immersed in this rapidly evolving technology. Students will leave with a strong conceptual understanding of the 3D graphics pipeline, a fundamental 3D skill set, options for further study, and an independent final animation project. 3 hrs. workshop ART (D. Houghton)
Cross-listed as: INTD 0215 *

FMMC 0224 African Cinema (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine how films written and directed by African filmmakers address the evolving identities of post-colonial Africans. Students will explore the development of various national cinemas and the film movements that helped define African cinema as a tool for cultural expression and social change. We will pair film studies, post-colonial studies, and African studies readings with a diverse selection of films from across sub-Saharan Africa, from Senegal’s 1967 Black Girl (Ousmane Sembene) to the 2018 Netflix-produced Nigerian “Nollywood” film, Lionheart (Genevieve Nnaji). 3 hours lect./3 hours screen. AAL, ART, CMP, HIS, SAF (N. Ngaiza)

FMMC 0225 Gothic and Horror (Fall 2019)

This course examines the forms and meanings of the Gothic and horror over the last 250 years in the West. How have effects of fright, terror, or awe been achieved over this span and why do audiences find such effects attractive? Our purpose will be to understand the generic structures of horror and their evolution in tandem with broader cultural changes. Course materials will include fiction, film, readings in the theory of horror, architecture, visual arts, and electronic media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. 3 hrs lect. AMR, HIS, NOR (M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0225 * ENAM 0225

FMMC 0227 African American Cinema (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine various representations of Blackness in American Cinema, from Oscar Micheaux’s early silent films to Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther. While we will primarily focus on films written and/or directed by African-Americans, we will also study the social, cultural, and political impact of Hollywood ideas and images of Black people and how they changed over time. Through a framework of both film theory and critical race theory, students will analyze how Black creative expression has manifested itself through film, influencing both form and content. 3 hours lect./3 hours screen AMR, ART, HIS, NOR (N. Ngaiza)

FMMC 0228 HBO’s Game of Thrones: A Global Cultural Phenomenon (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study the HBO series Game of Thrones as a global cultural phenomenon. We’ll explore the series’ development from a straightforward television adaptation to a transmedia narrative set in a recognizable visual universe. We will examine how the series reinvents the fantasy genre within the changing media landscape and how issues of race, class, and gender affect the production and reception of the series on a global scale. We will also consider the material ways in which the series’ fans engage with the universe of the show through the consumption and creation of merchandising, cosplay, fanfiction, and blogs. 3 hrs. lect. ART, SOC (N. Dobreva)
Cross-listed as: FYSE 1507 *

FMMC 0232 Documentary: Art of the Nonfiction Film (Fall 2019)

Documentary film combines nonfiction with an aesthetic aspiration. This course will explore the achievement in the documentary, raising issues about the influence of documentary upon political persuasion, historical memory, the status of film as evidence, and its utility as a means of investigation. Questions will be posed, such as: Can documentary achieve a distinctive understanding of a phenomenon? How does nonfiction address/guide the relationship between sound, image, and subject? The course will offer a historical perspective, as well as study contemporary works, with the aim of preparing students to both understand and produce documentary films. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. ART (A. Grindon)

FMMC 0244 International Cinema: Art of Ellipsis (Fall 2019)

In 1936, film critic Roger Leenhardt declared, “cinema is the art of ellipsis.” But this claim seems to contradict our most basic understanding of film. After all, movies are about what we see, not about what we don’t. Or are they? In fact, Leenhardt was suggesting that the richest tradition in cinema explores the dynamic between the seen and the unseen, the shown and the unshown. In this course we will carefully study international films that effectively work this dynamic in terms of narrative, character, and most importantly, cinematic style. Films studied will include: Jean Renoir’s Rules of the Game (France, 1939); Christian Petzold’s Barbara (Germany, 2012). Abbas Kiarostami’s Like Someone in Love (France/Iran/Japan, 2012); Otto Preminger’s Anatomy of a Murder (US, 1959). 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen ART (C. Keathley)

FMMC 0249 Introduction to Podcasting (Fall 2019)

In this course we will immerse ourselves in the rich world of podcasting as listeners and producers. Students will become acquainted with the wide variety of podcast work including, but not limited to: serial narrative, daily news features, audio fiction, talk, comedy, and interview podcast programming. We will record and produce our own original podcast segments with a focus on non-fiction features. Students can expect to walk away with a foundational understanding of the variety of podcast formats and production techniques including recording, sourcing, and editing sound. (Not open to students who have taken FMMC 1134) 3 hrs lect. (E. Davis)

FMMC 0250 Chinese Cinema (Spring 2020)

This course, taught in English, surveys the history of movies in China since the 1930s and also offers an in-depth look at the work of: China's fifth-generation directors of the 1980s and their successors up to the present; Taiwan's new wave; and Hong Kong popular cinema, including martial arts film. Our focus is the screening and discussion of films such as The Goddess (a 1934 silent classic), Stage Sisters (1965; directed by the influential Xie Jin), the controversial Yellow Earth (1984), In the Heat of the Sun (a 1994 break with the conventional representation of the Cultural Revolution), Yang Dechang's masterpiece A One and a Two (2000), and Still Life (Jia Zhangke's 2006 meditation on displacement near the Three Gorges Dam). The course is designed to help students understand the place of cinema in Chinese culture and develop the analytical tools necessary for the informed viewing and study of Chinese film. We will look at everything from art film, to underground film, to recent box office hits. (No prerequisites) One evening film screening per week. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, ART, CW (5 seats), NOA (T. Moran)
Cross-listed as: CHNS 0250 *

FMMC 0261 Podcasting the Past: Leisure and Middlebury College (Spring 2020)

This course explores aspects of American life through an analysis of a widely underutilized luxury: leisure time. Using the college archives, we will study the microcosm of the Middlebury campus and identify noteworthy leisure activities through out the College’s history (i.e., fraternity boat rides down Otter Creek in the late-19th century or the establishment of Middlebury’s Quidditch team in 2005). We will consider how these acts of leisure reflect the broader values of the era(s) in which they emerged. Ultimately students will share their findings in an original, sound-rich documentary podcast. By the end of this course, students will have developed basic recording and sound editing skills and have new tools for translating complicated scholarly ideas into a format appropriate for a lay audience. Previous experience with sound editing or familiarity with podcasting is not required. 3 hrs. lect. (E. Davis)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0261 *

FMMC 0334 Videographic Film and Media Studies (Spring 2020)

Digital video technologies—such as DVDs, digital editing software, and online streaming—now enable film and media scholars to “write” with the same materials that constitute their object of study: moving images and sounds. But such a change means rethinking the rhetorical modes traditionally used in scholarly writing, and incorporating more aesthetic and poetic elements alongside explanation and analysis. In this hands-on course, we will both study and produce new videographic forms of criticism often known as “video essays,” exploring how such work can both produce knowledge and create an aesthetic impact. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0105 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem (C. Keathley)

FMMC 0335 Sight and Sound II (Fall 2019)

In this course students will work in teams to produce several short films, having the opportunity to take turns at fulfilling all the essential crew positions: director, producer, cinematographer, production sound mixer, editor, and sound designer. We will emphasize thorough pre-production planning, scene design, cinematography, working with actors, and post production —including color correction and sound mixing. The critical dialogue established in FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound I will be extended and augmented with readings and screenings of outstanding independently produced work. (FMMC 0105) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART (N. Ngaiza)

FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II (Spring 2020)

Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (FMMC 0106) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen. ART (I. Uricaru)
Cross-listed as: CRWR 0341

FMMC 0346 Special Topics in Media Production: Sound Aesthetics and Production (Spring 2020)

Ever since the invention of recording, sound has increasingly been incorporated into all forms of contemporary art. In this course we will investigate the aesthetic power of sound as an expressive medium, while reviewing the rich history of sound art and its influence in a wide range of audiovisual practices. Through creative projects, lectures, auditions, and readings, we will develop students’ sensibilities and imagination concerning the use of sound, while improving their critical thinking and listening skills. We will cover basic concepts of acoustics, sound technology, audiovisual analysis, and sound production for film/video. (FMMC 0105 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. ART (D. Miranda Hardy)

FMMC 0349 Acting and Directing for the Camera (Spring 2020)

In this advanced workshop we will focus on the relationship between actors and directors in the context of live action media production (film, television, advertising, web series). Students will gain practical knowledge of actor-director engagement and insight into both facets of this process. Students will also analyze produced screenplays, practice actor-director communication, and direct and perform for the camera. All students will take turns fulfilling the roles of director and performer, culminating in recording and editing workshopped scenes. (FMMC 0105 or THEA 0102) ART (I. Uricaru, A. Draper)
Cross-listed as: THEA 0349

FMMC 0355 Theories of Popular Culture (Fall 2019)

This writing-intensive course introduces a range of theoretical approaches to study American popular culture, exploring the intersection between everyday life, mass media, and identity and social power. We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying culture, including ideology and hegemony theory, audience studies, subcultural analysis, the politics of taste, and cultural representations of identity. Using these theoretical tools, we will examine a range of popular media and sites of cultural expression, from television to toys, films to music, to understand popular culture as a site of ongoing political and social struggle. (FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or AMST 0101 or instructor approval) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen. CW, SOC (J. Mittell)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0355

FMMC 0360 Methods of Film & Media Criticism (Spring 2020)

This writing-intensive seminar takes a close look at four key theoretical concepts for film & media criticism: textuality, authorship, genre, and narrative. How do we understand the boundaries between any film “text” and its broader intertextual contexts? How does authorship frame our understanding of the style and ethics of any given film? How do genre categories help us make sense of films and media, as well as their cultural contexts? How do films and media tell stories in distinctive and innovative ways? Through theoretical readings and exemplary screenings, we will learn to become sharper critics of films and media. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or instructor's approval) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. screen CW (J. Mittell)

FMMC 0361 Movement and Media (Fall 2019)

In this course we will take an interdisciplinary look at the dynamic relationship between the body and digital media. Students will develop skills in basic film editing, real-time software manipulation, open-source media research, project design, and collaboration. We will address design history and theories of modern media through readings and multimedia sources. Process and research papers and work-in-progress showings will document ongoing collaborations that will culminate in an informal showing at the end of the semester. This course is open to students of all artistic backgrounds who are interested in significantly expanding their creative vocabularies and boundaries to include dance. (Approval required; DANC 0261 required for dance students) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART, PE
Cross-listed as: DANC 0361 *

FMMC 0507 Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites. (Fall 2019: I. Uricaru, A. Grindon, D. Miranda Hardy, L. Stein, C. Keathley, J. Mittell, N. Ngaiza, N. Dobreva; Spring 2020: J. Mittell, L. Stein, I. Uricaru, C. Keathley, D. Miranda Hardy, N. Ngaiza)

FMMC 0700 Senior Tutorial (Spring 2020)

All FMMC majors must complete this course in their senior year, during which they undertake the process of devising, researching, and developing the early drafts and materials for an independent project in Film and Media in their choice of medium and format. Students will be poised to produce and complete these projects during Winter Term, via an optional but recommended independent study. Prerequisites for projects in specific formats are outlined on the departmental website. (D. Miranda Hardy, C. Keathley)
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Lois ’51 and J. Harvey Watson Department of French and Francophone Studies

Required for the Major in French and Francophone Studies: Total of no fewer than 10 courses. All courses for the major must be taught in French.

I. Two introductory-level courses in reading and culture: FREN 0209, FREN 0210, FREN 0220-0229, or specified courses in France (Paris, Poitiers, Bordeaux), or Cameroon; or equivalent in the Middlebury summer French School when offered.
II. One course in contemporary French or Francophone studies: FREN 0230-0239, courses on contemporary France, or specified French or Francophone studies in France (Paris, Poitiers, Bordeaux), or Cameroon; or equivalent in the Middlebury summer French School when offered.
III. One course on the history of France or a Francophone region or country.
IV. Three advanced courses in French or Francophone studies (FREN 0300 level).
V.  One unit of senior work, usually a senior seminar (FREN 0400 level. Honors candidates may fulfill the senior work requirement by writing an Honors essay (FREN 0700) or Honors thesis (FREN 0701).

During their senior year, majors must take at least one advanced course (Category IV) in French at Middlebury in addition to the senior seminar.

     Other courses counting for the major include:

(1) At the Vermont campus: FREN 0205, FREN 0255, among others; certain advanced courses offered during the winter term (with permission of the chair); certain summer courses at the 0300 (intermediate) or 0400 (advanced) level; and,

(2) In France and Cameroon: language and linguistics courses; comparative literature (with a major French or Francophone component); French or Francophone arts, theatre, cinema, television, or politics.

     All majors study abroad for a semester or a year in a French-speaking country. The year program carries nine units of credit; the semester program carries four or five units of credit. In order to ensure that students are exposed to a variety of disciplines, no more than five units (full-year program) or three units (semester program) may be counted toward the French and Francophone Studies major. Most courses in France will be at the advanced level.
     The French and Francophone Studies Department does not offer a joint major.

     Required for a Minor in French and Francophone Studies: Minimum of five courses, FREN 0205 and above, including at least two introductory courses (FREN 0209, FREN 0210, FREN 0220-0239) and at least one course at the advanced level (Category IV) to be taken during the student’s final two semesters. The minor may include courses taken at the Middlebury School in France or the School in Cameroon (maximum of two from the semester program, three from the full-year program).  Students electing the French minor are encouraged to consult with faculty members in the French Department about course planning.

     Students with a College Board AP score of 4 or 5 will receive one unit of credit toward graduation if the first course successfully completed at Middlebury is FREN 0209 or above in accordance with placement and departmental advising. AP credits may not be counted toward the major or minor.

     Senior Work: Upon completing at least two 0300-level courses in French or Francophone studies, majors are required to complete senior work consisting of a significant research paper in the context of a senior seminar (0400-level).

     Honors: Exceptional students with a grade point average in French and Francophone Studies of 3.8 or higher may petition the department to pursue an independent project for honors in French and Francophone Studies. Candidates for honors may propose a one-semester senior honors essay (FREN 0700) or a senior honors thesis (FREN 0701, one semester and winter term). Eligible students should consult the departmental guidelines and present their proposals well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be started. The department will determine whether to award honors, high honors, or highest honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance on the senior honors project.
       International and Global Studies Major with French Language: Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies Major section, completion of the French language component requires: (1) proficiency in French (a minimum of two of (FREN 0209, FREN 0210, FREN 0220-0239) or work in the French summer school at the 0300 level or above); (2) at least one semester, and preferably a year, at the Middlebury College School in France, or in Cameroon, or in another French-speaking country; and (3) one or more courses at the 0300 or 0400-level upon return from abroad.

     International and Global Studies Major, European Studies Track:
[For Classes of 2015.5 and 2016 only. New rules, available in the International and Global Studies section, apply to the Class of 2017]
(1) Language proficiency: see above; (2) regional specialization: choose from FREN 0230 and courses at the 0300-level, or others (Vermont campus), in consultation with the track director; courses in French or Francophone studies at Middlebury in France or in another French-speaking country; (3) disciplinary specialization: two courses from (FREN 0209, FREN 0210, FREN 0220-0239); three advanced French or Francophone studies courses at Middlebury or one of the Middlebury Schools in France; (4) at least one semester, and preferably a year, at the Middlebury College School in France or in another French-speaking country; and (5) one or more courses at the 0300 or 0400 level, or senior independent work in French, upon return from abroad.

     Study Abroad in France and in Cameroon: Middlebury offers both year and semester abroad programs in France (Paris, Poitiers and Bordeaux) and in Cameroon.  Students planning to study in France or Cameroon must have completed two full years of college credit by the time they undertake their study abroad; they must have successfully completed at least one course beyond FREN 0209 (previously FREN 0210)  by the time they arrive abroad; and they must have an average in French of at least B. We expect all applicants to demonstrate their commitment to French and maintain their fluency by continuous study of French from the time of their enrollment at Middlebury and to maintain their academic level if they are accepted to study abroad.  They are required to take a French course in the semester before study abroad. Students may count three courses from the semester program, five from the full year program toward a major in French; two courses from the semester program and three from the full year program toward a minor in French.

It should be noted that while students wishing to attend one of our programs in France or in Cameroon must demonstrate a level of proficiency in the language that will allow them to function successfully in the French or Cameroonian university setting, they need not be French majors: the C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in France (Paris, Poitiers, and Bordeaux) offers students the opportunity to take courses in history, history of art, economics, cinema, political science, psychology, sociology, studio art, the natural sciences, and the environment, among other disciplines, in addition to courses in languages and literature. Students interested in studying abroad should speak to someone in the Office of International Programs & Off-Campus Study, Sunderland Language Center, well in advance of applying. They will need to seek prior approval of School in France and School in Cameroon courses from the appropriate department chairs if they wish course work to count toward a specific minor or major. The Office of Off-Campus Study will provide information about the program and application forms.

FREN 0101 Intensive Beginning French (Fall 2019)

For students who have not previously studied French, an introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French, providing the syntactic and semantic foundation of the French language in a concentrated program of grammar presentation, drills, laboratory work, and discussion. Primary emphasis will be placed on the student's active use of the language, and weekly attendance at the French language table will be required. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. Students are expected to continue with FREN 0102 in the winter term after successfully completing FREN 0101, and with FREN 0201in the spring. 6 hrs. lect./disc. (E. Dessein, L. Sainte-Claire)

FREN 0201 Intermediate French I (Spring 2020)

Emphasis on increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Readings and film enlarge the student's view of French life and culture. (FREN 0102 or by placement) 5 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (C. Nunley, J. Weber)

FREN 0203 Intermediate French II (Fall 2019)

An active and intensive review of French grammar for students having had good beginning-level training in French. We will work not only to perfect mastery of the structures of the language with practice of writing and reading, but also to develop oral comprehension and production skills. (FREN 0103 or FREN 0105 or placement) 5 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (C. Nunley, W. Poulin-Deltour)

FREN 0205 Toward Liberated Expression (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

A course designed to increase and perfect the ability to express oneself in spoken and written French. Emphasis on precision, variety, and vocabulary acquisition. Sections limited to 15 students. (FREN 0201, 0203 or placement) This requirement for the major and the minor may be satisfied by placement at a higher level. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Fall 2019: J. Weber, W. Poulin-Deltour, P. Schwartz; Spring 2020: L. Sainte-Claire, E. Dessein, P. Schwartz)

FREN 0209 Self and Society: Effective Writing in French (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course, students will deepen their knowledge of the French language and French-speaking cultures while developing their reading and writing skills through examination of a variety of texts and media. This course facilitates the transition from language-oriented courses (FREN 0205) to content-oriented courses (such as FREN 0220 and FREN 0230) by introducing students to strategies for interpretation and discussion, with a focus on effective writing. Course materials may include essays/articles, theater, fiction, poetry, videos, and films. (FREN 0205 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LNG (Fall 2019: J. Weber, B. Humbert; Spring 2020: C. Nunley, L. Sainte-Claire)

FREN 0220 Imagining Community in France and Beyond (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine how notions of community have been imagined within French culture, drawing on a variety of sources including essays, short novels and film. Particular attention will be given to works in which difference (ethnic, regional, national, generational, class) plays an important role in initiating and sustaining innovative forms of partnership. The course provides an array of opportunities to hone oral expression, critical thinking and writing in French. Writers and directors studied may include Chamoiseau, Dai Sijie, Daudet, Duras, Gary, Glissant, Kassovitz, Malle, and Tournier. (FREN 0209, 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, EUR, LIT, LNG (C. Nunley)

FREN 0224 Travelers and Migrants in French and Francophone Literature (Spring 2020)

Multiple forms of traveling emerged with the expansion of the French empire, from colonial ventures to forced migration. In this course we will study how writers represent such experiences. We will discuss fictions that focus on mobility, passages, and border-crossing, and question what these fictions reveal about the cultures in contact. How do travel and migration narratives reconfigure the relation between here and there, self and other, the individual and the community? Studying literary texts in their historical contexts will allow us to discuss varied topics, such as nationhood, slavery, exoticism, identity, and difference, as well as to explore several artistic movements that have shaped French and Francophone culture. Writers will include Montesquieu, Balzac, Baudelaire, Madame de Staël, Gide, Césaire, Glissant, and Sinha. (FREN 0209, 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, EUR, LIT (J. Weber)

FREN 0230 Introduction to Contemporary France (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this interdisciplinary course we will examine the evolving social and political landscape of France in the 21st century. How is French society reconciling contemporary challenges with deeply entrenched institutions and values? How does everyday life reflect the evolution of long-term trends? How are immigration, growing inequalities, and membership in the European Union challenging French identity and the notion of “Frenchness”? We will focus our attention on demography and the family, the educational system, politics, and the French social model or welfare state. Emphasis will be on oral expression and the acquisition of specialized vocabulary. Sources will include articles from the French and American press, documents, and film. This course is recommended for all students planning to study in France. (FREN 0209, 0210 or placement); open to first-semester first-year students with permission.) EUR, LNG, SOC (Fall 2019: P. Schwartz; Spring 2020: W. Poulin-Deltour)

FREN 0330 Childhood and Education in the Caribbean (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study contemporary Caribbean writers’ unease with, and denunciation of, a European post-colonial school system implanted in the French Caribbean that ignored the socio-economic and linguistic reality of the population, and therefore alienated them. How did the French curriculum shape the identity of Caribbean children? What methods did these writers use to resist assimilation? By focusing on first-person narratives from a variety of French Caribbean countries we will study topics such as colonization, alienation, diversity, inclusion, and equity. Writers will include Chamoiseau, Condé, Pineau, Victor, and Tyrolien. (FREN 0220-0230 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG (L. Sainte-Claire)

FREN 0341 French Cinema (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study two aspects of French cinema: French history through films and French filmmaking through history. We will examine films dealing with specific eras or events of French history or culture, as well as the major trends of French film history and the evolution of French filmmaking. Directors studied may include: Renoir, Truffaut, Godard, Rohmer, Kurys, Besson. (FREN 0220-0230 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc., 2 hrs. screening. ART, EUR, LNG (B. Humbert)

FREN 0359 Resistance and Memory: France in the Second World War (Spring 2020)

The Second World War has cast a long shadow over France's postwar history and politics. Contemporary events are still refracted through the prism of a past that, as one historian has noted, never seems to go away. We will focus on a critical aspect of that past, the French Resistance, a politically and socially diverse underground movement that took root in a divided nation under the collaborationist Vichy regime and German occupation. What forms did refusal take, how did resistance function, and what motivated resisters to risk their lives? We will examine the myths, realities, and legacy of the Resistance through original documents and period artifacts, memoirs and testimony, film and fiction, and seminal works of postwar historiography. (FREN 0220-0230 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect/disc. EUR, LNG, SOC (P. Schwartz)

FREN 0368 French Sexual Politics (Spring 2020)

Reaction to the recent Dominic Strauss-Kahn scandal and deliberations over same-sex marriage are but two illustrations of the important role sex and gender differences continue to play in contemporary French society. In this course we will examine the political responses such phenomena have elicited. Topics will include: the evolution of gender roles within French family structure, including homoparentalité; attempts to increase women's participation in French national politics, especially via the parité initiative; the question of Muslim women's integration in-or exclusion from-French society; and the attention given to sex and gender differences in anti-discrimination policies. We will critically assess French media and writings from sociology and political philosophy. (This course will be taught in French; FREN 0230 or by waiver) 3 hrs.lect./disc. EUR, LNG, SOC (W. Poulin-Deltour)

FREN 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Qualified students may be permitted to undertake a special project in reading and research under the direction of a member of the department. Students should seek an advisor and submit a proposal to the department well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken. (Approval required)

FREN 0700 Senior Honors Essay (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval required).

FREN 0701 Senior Honors Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Qualified senior majors who wish to be considered for Honors in French must submit a proposal well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken. (Approval required; see requirements above.)
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Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Program in Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies

All students declaring a GSFS major, joint major, or minor beginning Fall 2017 will adopt the following requirements. Students who declared their major prior to Fall 2017 may choose whether to adopt these requirements or to complete their study following the old requirements (see below). 

The major requires a minimum of ten courses and comprises several discrete aspects, as outlined below.

Major requirements (10 courses total)
1. Core (5 courses):

  • GSFS/SOCI 0191   
  • GSFS 0200  
  • GSFS 0289  
  • GSFS 0320  
  • GSFS 0435  

2. Breadth Requirements (2 courses, one in each):

  a. Critical Race Feminisms
  b. National/Transnational Feminism

3. Electives (2 courses bearing the GSFS prefix)

4. Senior Work (one-semester capstone or two-semester thesis)

Breadth Requirements (two courses): To ensure that students are conversant with and have some in-depth knowledge of the key concerns animating the field, they must take at least one course each from two breadth requirements. Courses meeting the breadth requirement can be found on the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies webpage.

Senior Work:  All majors must enroll in GSFS 0700, a one-semester capstone, where they will complete a portfolio and an essay critically engaging with their accumulated knowledge about gender, sexuality and feminism. With permission, some majors may extend this to a two-semester thesis (GSFS 0710), conducting original research. GSFS 0710 provides the flexibility to produce a formal written document, a multi-media project such as a movie, or a creative activity such as a performance or an installation project.

Senior work provides one of the primary means through which students demonstrate their critical thinking skills and their ability to communicate complex ideas effectively and persuasively. This is the primary site through which learning goals will be assessed; advisors will provide their assessment in writing to the students. A public presentation is part of the senior work requirements.

Joint Major: The joint major is comprised of seven (7) courses each in the two disciplines/programs. For GSFS, the requirement includes:

  • GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0289
  • GSFS 0200
  • GSFS 0320
  • Breadth Requirements, 2 courses, one each in:

          a. Critical Race Feminisms

          b. National/Transnational Feminisms

  • One elective bearing the GSFS prefix
  • Senior Work that combines both majors and is agreed upon by the advisers and department or program chairs (or designees) involved.

Minor Requirements: The minor comprises five courses including:

  • Two of the following courses: GSFS 0191, 0200, 0289
  • GSFS 0320
  • Two additional GSFS courses at least one of which fulfills the Critical Race Feminisms  breadth requirement

Requirements prior to Fall 2017:

The major requires a minimum of ten courses and comprises several discrete aspects, as outlined below. Some of the courses can be double-counted if they fulfill different requirements within the major.

Major requirements (10 courses):

  • SOCI/GSFS 0191
  • One introductory course from the humanities, such as GSFS 0102, or GSFS 0234, or approved by the director
  • GSFS 0200
  • GSFS 0320
  • Two courses to fulfill the Breadth Requirements (explained below)
  • Three electives bearing the GSFS prefix, one of which must be at the 0300-level or higher and one that must be at the 0400-level or higher
  • Senior Work (one-semester senior essay or multi-semester thesis)

Joint Major: The joint major is comprised of 7 courses each in the two disciplines. For GSFS, the requirement includes:

  • SOCI/GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0189/0289
  • GSFS 0200
  • GSFS 0320
  • Breadth requirement 1
  • Breadth requirement 2
  • One elective
  • Senior Work

Breadth Requirements (two courses): To ensure that students are conversant with and have some in-depth knowledge of the key concerns animating the field, they must take at least one course each from two of three breadth requirements. Courses meeting the breadth requirement can be found on the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies webpage.

  • Intersectionality/Critical Race
  • Critical Sexuality Studies
  • Gender in National/Transnational Contexts

Senior Work: Majors are required to complete an independent project that applies feminist theory and methodology. The project may be either a one-semester senior essay or other creative work (GSFS 0700), or a multi-semester senior thesis (GSFS 0710).

Minor Requirements: The minor comprises five courses including:

  • one introductory course from among SOCI/GSFS 0191, ENAM/GSFS 0102, or PHIL/GSFS 0234
  • GSFS 0200
  • GSFS 0320
  • two electives bearing the GSFS prefix

GSFS 0172 Writing Gender and Sexuality (Spring 2020)

In this course we will read, discuss, and write creative works that explore issues of gender and sexuality. Readings will include stories, poems, and essays by James Baldwin, Ana Castillo, Peggy Munson, Eli Clare, Junot Diaz, Audre Lorde, Michelle Tea, Alison Bechdel, and others. The course will include writing workshops with peers and individual meetings with the instructor. Every student will revise a range of pieces across genres and produce a final portfolio. We will do some contemplative work and will engage with a visiting choreographer to explore movement in conversation with writing, gender, and sex. 3 hrs. lect. ART (C. Wright)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0172

GSFS 0191 Gender and the Body (Fall 2019)

What is your gender and how do you know? In order to answer this question, we need to consider how gender is known through biology, psychology, consumer capitalism, and our everyday embodiment. We will also look at how the meaning and performance of gender have changed over time from Classical Greece to Victorian England to the contemporary U.S. Throughout, we will consider how gender does not operate along, but is always entangled with, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and ability. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (L. Essig)
Cross-listed as: SOCI 0191

GSFS 0200 Feminist Foundations (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Focusing on the histories of feminism in the U.S., from the nineteenth century to the present, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which feminist movements have resisted these processes. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (H. Gupta)

GSFS 0205 Race, Rhetoric, and Protest (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study the theoretical and rhetorical underpinnings of racial protest in America. We will begin by studying movements from the 1950s and 1960s, moving from bus boycotts to Black Power protests, and will build to analyzing recent protests in Ferguson, Dallas, and New York. Readings will include texts from Charles E. Morris III, Aja Martinez, Shon Meckfessel, Gwendolyn Pough, and various articles and op-eds. Students will write analyses of historical and contemporary protest, op-eds about the local culture, and syntheses on the course readings. 3 hrs. Lect AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (J. Sanchez)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0205 *

GSFS 0206 Contemporary Women Playwrights (Fall 2019)

In this course we will read and discuss the work of the most influential and interesting American and European playwrights from the 1980s to the present. Authors will include: Maria Irene Fomes, Caryl Churchill, Suzan-Lori Parks, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Judith Thompson, and Naomi Wallace. Issues of race, class, and gender will be closely examined. Readings will include selections from performance and feminist theory. 3 hrs. lect. ART, LIT (C. Faraone)
Cross-listed as: THEA 0206 *

GSFS 0208 Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine representations of black womanhood in popular culture, analyzing the processes by which bodies and identities are constructed as dangerous, deviant, and unruly. For example, materials will include the work of bell hooks and Patricia Hill Collins to analyze the imagery of black womanhood propagated by the television shows The Jerry Springer Show and Bad Girls Club. By contrast, we will also read Saidiya Hartman’s Scenes of Subjection as a lens through which to view “bad” black womanhood as a radically stylized means of redress in the Blaxploitation-era film Foxy Brown. (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, NOR (J. Finley)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0208 *

GSFS 0209 Gender Health Environment (Fall 2019)

Growing concern for the protection of the environment and human health has led policy makers and scholars to consider ways in which gender, class, and race and other forms of identity mediate human-environment interactions. In this course we will explore how access to, control over, and distribution of resources influence environmental and health outcomes both in terms of social inequities and ecological decline. Specific issues we will cover include: ecofeminism, food security, population, gendered conservation, environmental toxins, climate change, food justice, and the green revolution. We will draw comparisons between different societies around the globe as well as look at dynamics between individuals within a society. The majority of case studies are drawn from Sub Saharan Africa and Asia, however some comparisons are also made with the United States. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, CMP, SAF, SOC (M. Baker-Medard)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0209 *

GSFS 0210 History of Sexuality in the United States (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore sexuality in relation to race, class, gender, and religion in US history using primary and secondary sources. We will study indigenous sexualities and the impact of settler colonialism, sex work during the American Revolution, sexuality under slavery, the medicalization and criminalization of homosexuality, urban gay subcultures, Cold War sexuality, the politics of birth control, sex during the AIDS epidemic, and sexuality from transgender and non-binary perspectives. Beyond learning historiography, we will examine methodological issues with writing histories of sexuality. When relevant, we will study examples from Europe and Canada. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (L. Povitz)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0210 *

GSFS 0211 Trickery, Bodies, and Resistance: The Tradition(s) of Rhetoric (Spring 2020)

How do female-identifying subjects position themselves (and their bodies) rhetorically in a male-dominated society? How do Black and Latinx rhetorical traditions of call-and-response and code-switching connect with and resist classical traditions of oration and stylistics? In this course we will study the tradition(s) of rhetoric by moving from the trickery of sophists to budding works in feminist rhetorics and cultural rhetorics. Students in this class will learn to synthesize the various traditions of rhetoric in historical and contemporary terms and to critically understand cultural customs that exist outside the white, heteronormative Greco-Roman tradition. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, SOC (J. Sanchez)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0211 *

GSFS 0214 Modern and Contemporary Japanese Women Writers (Spring 2020)

A thousand years ago, women writers dominated the Japanese literary world. Then, for centuries, their skill was discounted, their works overlooked, and their voices silenced. Starting with the nineteenth century, however, Japanese women writers started to reclaim their grandmothers’ heritage. They took the male-dominated literary world by assault, pushing boundaries, drawing on their literary legacy and reinventing it, resisting the label of “women’s literature” so often pejoratively attached to their works. In this course we will explore these figures of resistance and their multilayered works in the context of the changing socio-political conditions that shaped women’s positions in Japanese society.3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT, NOA (O. Milutin)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0214 *

GSFS 0215 The Feminine Heroic (Fall 2019)

In this class we will explore the hero’s journey in literature as it relates to women and the natural world: who gets to go on the adventure, and who arrives home, transformed? How do race and gender complicate the traditional man-versus-nature narrative? We will discuss character agency, narrative authority, style, and structure — and look at texts where women undertake the journey, including work by Isak Dinesen, Annie Dillard, Camille Dungy, Rachel Carson, Anne LeBastille, Rahawa Haile, and Pam Houston. Students will generate creative and critical work. 3 hrs. sem. LIT
Cross-listed as: CRWR 0215 *

GSFS 0218 Women in U.S. Electoral Politics (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore the current and historical status of women in U.S. electoral politics, using case studies, guest speakers, hands-on campaign training, and academic and political research. Recent years have been pivotal for women in U.S. politics, with Hillary Clinton's loss in 2016, the historic 2017 Women's March, and the 2018 Year of Women. How have these events affected women in politics specifically and electoral politics generally? Can women achieve political parity with men and why does it matter? How do factors such as race, gender identity, region, and party intersect with electoral success and experience? 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC (R. Hardy)
Cross-listed as: INTD 0218 *

GSFS 0225 Feminist Blogging (Fall 2019)

Blogging is a genre that lends itself to both feminist theory and practice because it involves writing from a particular place and a particular embodiment, about how power operates in our social worlds. Feminist theory demands intersectionality: an ability to weave race, class, gender, sexuality and other forms of power into a single theoretical approach. Feminist blogging transforms intersectionality into a single narrative arc. In this course we will think about blogging as a genre and how feminist theory can infuse that genre into a more vibrant, complex, and even transformative site. Throughout the course we will read feminist theory, analyze feminist blogs, and produce our own feminist blogs. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, CW, LIT, NOR, SOC (L. Essig)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0225

GSFS 0234 Philosophy and Feminism (Fall 2019)

This course will examine the contributions of various feminists and feminist philosophers to some of the central problems of philosophical methodology, epistemology, philosophy of science, metaphysics, and ethics. Are there gendered assumptions in operation in the way particular philosophical problems are framed? For example, do the politics of gender contribute to accounts of objective knowledge and rationality? Are some philosophical perspectives better suited to the goals of feminism than others? We will also examine the general relationship between feminism and philosophy, and we will reflect on the relevance of theorizing and philosophizing for feminist political practice. CMP, PHL (H. Grasswick)
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0234 *

GSFS 0235 Gender Politics of the Arab World (Fall 2019)

The aim of this course is to explore the ways in which the social and cultural construction of sexual difference shapes the politics of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and North Africa. Using interdisciplinary feminist theories, we will explore key issues and debates including the interaction of religion and sexuality, women’s movements, gender-based violence, queerness and gay/straight identities. Looking at the ways in which the Arab Spring galvanized what some have called a “gender revolution,” we will examine women’s roles in the various revolutions across the Arab World, and explore the varied and shifting gender dynamics in the region. Taught in English (formerly ARBC/GSFS 0328) 3 hrs. Sem. (National/Transnational Feminisms) AAL, CMP, CW, MDE, SOC (D. Ayoub)
Cross-listed as: ARBC 0235 *

GSFS 0261 Globalizing Gender (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore gender and the process of gendering as a complex and evolving global phenomenon of the 21st century. The readings will focus on the politics and experience of gender and sexualities in various parts of the world, including India, Pakistan, Muslim minorities in South Asia, and among diasporic communities in Europe and the United States. Through lectures and small group discussions, we will critique and analyze themes including third gender, masculinity, changing practices of marriage, the politics of sexuality, and the impact of the women’s movement, and gay rights movement on existing understanding of gendered traditions. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC (B. Taylor)
Cross-listed as: SOCI 0261

GSFS 0289 Introduction to Queer Critique (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC (C. Thomsen)

GSFS 0303 Outlaw Women (Spring 2020)

In this course we will read and discuss literary texts that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, servants, revolutionaries. Texts include Powell’s The Pagoda, Duras’s The Lover, Lorde’s Zami, and Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. The course will take postcolonial and global approaches to desire and difference and to narratives of resistance, rescue and freedom. We will discuss rhetorical practices, such as écriture féminine, and readerships, such as women’s book groups, in national and global contexts. Students will develop their critical imaginations through discussion, contemplation, research, and analytical and creative writing. (Any one GSFS Course) (Critical Race Feminisms; National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. CMP, CW, LIT, SOC (C. Wright)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0303

GSFS 0308 Gender, Technology, and the Future (Spring 2020)

Can technology make the world more just and equitable? Scientific and technological inventions continually surprise us with visions of the future that promise an end to global inequality and injustice: cooking robots, microcredit apps, test–tube babies. We will center these powerful ideas to unpack how they galvanize raced and sexed bodies to articulate the future. Through an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies we will ask how technological imaginations and interventions invent new global futures, examine their impact and implications, and explore the possibilities for new technological horizons.3 hrs. sem. SOC (H. Gupta)
Cross-listed as: ANTH 0308

GSFS 0311 Gender, Sexuality, and Psychiatry in US History (Spring 2020)

In this seminar we will examine how gender and sexuality have intersected with the psychiatric profession since the nineteenth century, focusing mostly on women, and to a lesser extent gender-nonconforming people and men. Course material will be rooted in the U.S. but will occasionally also cover Europe and Latin America. Topics will include racialized notions of madness and hysteria, depression, psychoanalysis, “deviant” genders and sexualities, the rise of psychotropic prescription drugs, addiction, PTSD, eating disorders, and the medicalization of heterosexual women’s desire. Students will explore relevant historiography and will conduct oral histories of a related topic. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, HIS, NOR, SOC (L. Povitz)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0311 *

GSFS 0314 Sociology of Heterosexuality (Spring 2020)

Most people believe that heterosexuality is natural or rooted in biology and so never look very closely at it as a product of culture. In this course we will examine the artifacts, institutions, rituals, and ideologies that construct heterosexuality and the heterosexual person in American culture. We will also pay close attention to how heterosexuality works alongside other forms of social power, especially gender, race, and class. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC (L. Essig)
Cross-listed as: SOCI 0314

GSFS 0320 Feminist Theory (Spring 2020)

The course offers an overview of key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. We will examine foundational theoretical texts that have animated the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Working within a transnational perspective, the course encompasses texts which fall under the categories of critical race and critical sexuality studies. (GSFS 0200 or GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0289) 3 hr. lect. CMP, SOC (S. Moorti)

GSFS 0324 Ladies at Work: Global Politics of Care, Kinship, and Affect (Fall 2019)

Why are some forms of work valued more than others? When did people start believing entrepreneurs and innovators when they say, we should “Do What You Love”? Is work life separate from life at home and with friends? This class will journey across global care chains, drawing on feminist writings and ethnographic texts to examine conditions structuring middle class housework in the U.S., garment manufacturing in Sri Lankan factories, call center work in the Philippines, and elite startup innovations in India. Engaging questions of class, race, gender, and heterosexuality, we will learn about forms of feminized work and consider more just alternatives. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, SOA, SOC (H. Gupta)
Cross-listed as: ANTH 0324

GSFS 0325 American Misogyny (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore the place of misogyny in U.S. media and politics. Early topics will include film noir, Cold War gender scapegoating, and lesbian pulp fiction. Subsequent topics will include the backlash against second-wave feminism, the rise of “post-feminism,” and the impact of reality TV and social media on feminist and antifeminist expression. We will conclude by examining how misogyny informs U.S. culture and politics in the Trump era. Throughout the course, we will consider how discourses of misogyny are inflected by white, cisgender, ableist, ageist, and class privilege. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR (H. Allen)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0325 *

GSFS 0329 The Politics of Reproduction: Sex, Abortion, and Motherhood (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine contemporary reproductive issues both in the United States and around the world. We will work to understand both how reproductive politics are informed by broader cultural ideas regarding gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, and geography and also how ideas about reproduction reinforce conceptions of these very identity markers and ways of experiencing the world. Because requirements for being considered a “good” woman are intimately tied to what it means to be a “good” mother, challenging dominant understandings of gender and sexuality requires critical engagement with ideas about reproduction. 3 hrs. lect. (Critical Race Feminisms, National/Transnational Feminisms)/ AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC (C. Thomsen)

GSFS 0338 Gender and the Making of Space (Spring 2020)

In this course we will investigate the complex relationship between gender and architecture, examining how the design of the built environment (buildings, urban spaces, etc.) can reinforce or undermine ideas about the respective roles of women and men in society, from the creation of masculine and feminine spaces to the gendered nature of the architectural profession. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will also uncover how the social construction of gender roles and gendered spaces are, and continue to be, inflected by race, class, and sexuality. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1407. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CMP, HIS (E. Sassin)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0338 *

GSFS 0372 Gender and International Relations (Fall 2019)

Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) /(National/Transnational Feminisms)/ CMP, SOC (K. Fuentes-George)
Cross-listed as: PSCI 0372 *

GSFS 0373 History of American Women: 1869-1999 (Fall 2019)

This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc. AMR, CMP, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0373 *

GSFS 0384 Women, Religion, and Ethnography (Fall 2019)

In this course we will focus on ethnographic scholarship regarding women in various religious traditions. We will begin with questions of feminist ethnography as proposed by Lila Abu-Lughod and then read a range of ethnographies focusing on women in different contexts, including a female Muslim healer in South India, Kalasha women in Pakistan, Bedouin Muslim women in Egypt, and Catholic nuns in Mexico. We will focus on how gendered and religious identities are constructed and intertwined, and what ethnography contributes to the study of both religion and gender. A prior course in Religion, Anthropology, or Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies is recommended. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, PHL (J. Ortegren)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0384 *

GSFS 0393 A History of Gender in Early America (Spring 2020)

Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AMR, CMP, CW, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0393 *

GSFS 0402 Sex and Society (Fall 2019)

In this seminar we will explore the pleasures, power, and problems of sex and will place sexuality in dynamic interaction with larger social issues. It is impossible to understand sexuality as separate from other dimensions of the human condition such as economics, politics, work, family, race, and gender. In particular, we will examine questions related to the science of sex, morality, monogamy, sex work, power and domination, desire and fantasy, and sexual politics. Overall, students will gain an understanding of sexuality as a social phenomenon. 3 hrs. sem. (J. McCallum)
Cross-listed as: SOCI 0402 *

GSFS 0419 Gender, Power, and Politics on the Early Modern Stage (I) (Pre-1800) (Fall 2019)

In this class we will explore the representation of gendered embodiment on the early modern stage, considering as we do so how theatrical embodiment intersects with other treatments of the body in early modern culture. We will read both early modern and contemporary theoretical accounts of gender as performance, investigating among other issues the use of boy actors, the representation of specifically “female” disorders (e.g., “suffocation” or hysteria), the performance of maternity, and the treatment of same-sex eroticism. Of particular importance will be the representation of the articulate or angry woman as the “shrew” or “scold,” and we will begin the class with an investigation of so-called “shrew-taming” narratives. Primary readings will include: Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew and The Winter’s Tale, Webster’s Duchess of Malfi, and Cavendish’s Convent of Pleasure. We will end the semester with a look at how this material plays out in our current political moment, focusing in particular on the representation of Hillary Clinton, Michelle Obama, and Christine Blasey Ford. 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LIT (M. Wells)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0419 *

GSFS 0425 Men and Masculinities (Spring 2020)

In this course we will consider the creation and performance of masculinities in the American context.  We will ask how men are made and how that making relies on class, race, sexuality, and nation. We will begin with early capitalism and the birth of the ideal man as “market man.”  We will then look at how ideal masculinity depends on the creation of “degenerate” men, like the myth of the hyper-masculinized Black male “beast” and the creation of the mythic mannish lesbian.  We will then trace these late 19th century men and masculinities into our current moment of political machismo, trolling misogyny, bromance, feminist men, hipster men, dandy bois, transmen, and more.  Readings will include: Michael Kimmel, Guyland; C.J. Pascoe and Tristan Bridges, Exploring Masculinities: Identity, Inequality, Continuity and Change; C.J. Pascoe, Dude, You’re a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School; Judith Halberstam, Female Masculinity, and bell hooks, We Real Cool: Black Men and Masculinity.  (GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0200 or GSFS 0289) 3 hrs. sem. (Critical Race Feminisms)/ AMR, CW, HIS, NOR, SOC (L. Essig)

GSFS 0435 Feminist Engaged Research (Fall 2019)

What makes research feminist? How does one conduct feminist research? How has feminist research been useful to social movements and how have movements informed feminist research? What happens to feminist research when it moves to the public sphere? In this class students learn how to produce original feminist research—how to craft research questions, write a literature review, choose relevant methodologies, and collect and analyze qualitative data. In addition to writing a research paper, students will translate their research findings into an alternative (non-academic paper) format and for an audience beyond our classroom. (GSFS 0320 or instructor approval). 3 hrs. Sem. AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (C. Thomsen)

GSFS 0442 Transnational Feminist Conservation (Fall 2019)

In this course we explore a transnational feminist approach to conservation. We will start by delving into the masculinist history of conservation, and reviewing a set of theories and vocabularies focused on gender, as well as race, class, and ability as key sites of power that effect both human and non-human bodies and ecological processes, from coral reefs to the arctic tundra. We will compare case studies across multiple regions globally on topics such as conservation via population control, feminist food, community-based conservation, and feminist-indigenous approaches to inquiry. We will debate feminist science, examining the conflicting epistemic foundations of objective versus situated knowledge. We will hone our writing skills in a variety of genres including blogs, academic essays, poems, and zines. (ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215 or ENVS/GSFS 209) (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, CW, SAF, SOC (M. Baker-Medard)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0442 *

GSFS 0443 Readings in African History: Women and Gender in Africa (Spring 2020)

This course takes up the challenge of understanding women's experiences and the role of gender in Africa's past. We will read from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives and literary forms, including ethnographies, life histories, and fiction, in order to explore different methodological and interpretive approaches to these subjects. Themes will include: changes in the structure of patriarchy and women's status in the pre-colonial period, the gendered impact of colonial rule on African economies and ecologies, historical identities of masculinity and femininity, and gendered experience of postcolonial "development." Prior experience in African history is not required. (formerly HIST/WAGS 0421) 3 hrs. seminar AAL, HIS, SOC

GSFS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval required)

GSFS 0700 Senior Essay (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval required)

GSFS 0710 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval required)
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Department of Geography

Required for the Major: The geography major consists of 10 courses. All students who elect to major in geography must complete: GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120; GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0170 or GEOG 0150; six elective courses at the 0200 or 0300 level, at least one of which must be at the 0200 and one at the 0300 level; one 0400-level seminar.  Only one of the 0200-level courses may be numbered 0250 or above.   The electives and the seminar must be selected in consultation with, and approved by, the major advisor. At least four of the electives must be semester-long courses completed on the Middlebury Campus
  Required for a Joint Major: The Geography Department frequently offers joint majors with Environmental Studies, Computer Science, and the History of Art and Architecture, and often students design joint majors with other departments and programs. The Geography Joint Major consists of 7 courses. All joint majors must complete: GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0150; four elective courses at the 0200 or 0300 level, at least one of which must be at the 0200 and one at the 0300 level; and one 0400 level seminar. All joint majors must complete joint senior work in Geography or an equivalent. ENVS 401 satisfies the required joint work for ENVS-GEOG joint majors. At least two of the electives must be semester-long courses completed on the Middlebury Campus. Students wishing to pursue a joint major with any department or program other than Environmental Studies must submit a formal proposal to their intended Geography advisor for departmental approval. The proposal must describe the proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken.  All electives and senior work must be approved by their advisor.
  Required for a Minor: The Geography minor consists of 5 courses: GEOG 0100, GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0150, and three additional Geography courses.
  Advanced Placement: One course credit will be awarded for an advanced placement (AP) score of 5 in human geography. Geography majors who receive a 5 on the AP exam may count this course credit as one 0200-level equivalent toward their major requirements, but are still required to complete GEOG 0100. The AP credit may not be used to satisfy joint major or minor requirements.
  Departmental Honors: Students who seek to earn honors are required to write a two-credit honors thesis. They must have at least a 3.3 GPA in the major when they propose the thesis and must have a 3.5 GPA in the major, not including the thesis grade, to be considered for honors upon graduation. In order to complete a senior thesis, students must have a proposal approved by a primary thesis advisor and a secondary departmental reader prior to registering for the first 0701 credit. Upon completion of the thesis, thesis students will present their work in a public lecture and defend the thesis in front of the departmental faculty. Thesis presentations and defenses will typically take place during the final week of classes or the examination period. Upon completion of the presentation and defense, the primary advisor and secondary departmental reader will be responsible for evaluating and grading the thesis. It is strongly encouraged that students considering a thesis discuss their ideas with an advisor during the semester prior to registering for formal thesis credits. Honors will be conferred or denied on the basis of an evaluation of the thesis by the faculty and the student’s GPA in the major, as explained above.

GEOG 0100 Place and Society: Local to Global (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is an introduction to how geographers view the world and contribute to our understanding of it. Where do the phenomena of human experience occur? Why are they there? What is the significance? These questions are fundamental for explaining the world at different scales from the global to the local. Throughout, we will focus on the spatial basis of society, its continual reorganization through time, and how various human and environmental problems can be usefully analyzed from a geographic perspective. (Open only to first-year students and sophomores) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SOC (Fall 2019: P. Nelson; Spring 2020: G. Herb)

GEOG 0120 Human Geography with GIS (Spring 2020)

How do geographers study spatial interactions between people, society, and the environment? How do factors like race, ethnicity, age, and income relate to spatial cognition, movement, settlement, and social organization? How can geographic information systems (GIS) help geographers describe, understand, and explain these spatial patterns and processes? In this course we will study applications of GIS in human geography from local to global scales. Readings and case studies will introduce and contextualize methods for using mental maps, big data, regional statistics, and network models for inquiries of gerrymandering, gentrification, spatial justice, and other topics. Students will learn to gather geographic evidence, conduct analyses with GIS, and critically present results with cartographic layouts. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SOC (J. Holler)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0120

GEOG 0150 Environmental Geography with GIS (Fall 2019)

How do geographers study spatial interactions between humans and the natural world? How do patterns and processes of climate, hydrology, biogeography, geology, and geomorphology interact with human societies? How can geographic information systems (GIS) help geographers describe, understand, and explain these spatial interactions? In this course we will study applications of GIS in environmental geography from local to global scales. Case studies will introduce methods for using elevation models, remotely sensed imagery, and environmental data for inquiries of environmental change, environmental hazards, and natural resource conservation. Students will learn how to gather geographic data, perform spatial analyses, critically interpret results, and communicate findings with cartographic layouts. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED (J. Howarth)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0150

GEOG 0202 Border Geographies (Fall 2019)

We live in an age of intense globalization with near instantaneous transfers of information and unprecedented movements of goods and people across the world. At the same time, there are more walls constructed between countries today than ever before. How do we explain this paradox of increasingly restrictive borders in an age of globalizing flows? In this course we will trace the history of political borders, critically evaluate theories in the scholarly literature about borders and flows, and investigate strategies, experiences, and imaginaries that produce different border-scapes and representations. Students will be actively engaged in unraveling the paradox of walls and flows through group research projects on specific border regimes around the world. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, HIS, SOC (G. Herb)

GEOG 0208 Land and Livelihoods - From Local to Global (Fall 2019)

How do flows of money, people, materials, and ideas connect local livelihoods to distant sites and global processes? How do geographers study patterns of poverty and inequality at different scales? How do we define human development and wellbeing, how do we determine who participates, and why does it matter? In this course we will draw from perspectives in fields ranging from development geography and political ecology to post-colonial studies to examine livelihood dynamics in the Global South. We will use texts, interviews, writing assignments, problem sets, and mapping exercises to explore relationships between economy, identity, and place in an increasingly connected world. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, CMP, SOC (J. L'Roe)

GEOG 0210 Geographic Perspectives on International Development (Fall 2019)

This class is an exploration of some of the key concepts, theories, ideologies, and practices of international development as they relate to issues of environmental and social change. We will approach these “ways of knowing” about development and the environment through three topics: (1) “natural” disasters; (2) oil; and (3) waste. For each of these topics we will draw on multiple case studies across the world including Haiti, New Orleans, Pakistan, India, Nigeria, and South Africa. These case studies will help us to more fully discuss and understand the dynamics of who does development, how, where, why, and with what results. With each of the themes we will examine different practices of international development, including post-disaster international aid, the shipping and dumping of waste, and environmental conflicts in the everyday lives of people in oil-rich areas of the world. This approach will allow us to break down mainstream discourses of development and “sustainability,” critically examine development practice, and imagine alternative approaches to development. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, CMP, SOC (T. Mayer)

GEOG 0212 Urban Geography (Spring 2020)

Urban landscapes are the expression of economic, political, and socio-cultural processes layered on top of each other in particular time-space contexts. In this course, students will theoretically and empirically examine the complex and dynamic urban landscape. Students will gain a theoretical understanding of the location of cities within a larger global economic system of cities, along with the internal organization of economic, cultural, and social functions within cities. We will also examine the processes behind contemporary urban issues such as homelessness, boosterism, urban renewal, gentrification, poverty, and crime. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC (P. Nelson)

GEOG 0216 Rural Geography (Fall 2019)

This course explores the intersection between demographic, economic, cultural, and environmental forces on the rural landscape in both advanced economies and LDCs. Students will be exposed to theoretical and empirical approaches to rural development in different international and regional contexts, as well as problems associated with these development paradigms. Particular attention will be paid to neoliberal economic policies and their impacts on rural areas, and the course will frequently draw on examples from New England and North America. Additionally, the world is becoming increasingly urbanized, so we will examine the ways people come to know rural areas through the media, literature, and travel. This course includes opportunity for service learning. (Formerly GEOG 0221) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC (P. Nelson)

GEOG 0225 Environmental Change in Latin America (Spring 2020)

This course examines Latin America from a geographical perspective with emphasis on the social, political and ecological underpinnings of change in the region. Building upon the theme of global environmental change in the context of human-environment geography, we will explore urgent challenges linked to the agricultural and extractive industries, urban expansion, land grabs, land reform, indigenous rights, and rural and urban poverty. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, AMR, SOC (J. L'Roe)

GEOG 0255 Water Resources and Hydrogeology (Spring 2020)

Fresh water is the most fundamental resource sustaining life on the continents. This course is an introduction to the study of water and its interactions with the geologic environment. Basic hydrological processes such as precipitation, stream flow, and the subsurface flow of ground water are analyzed by quantitative methods. Climatic and human-induced changes in the hydrological cycle are examined, and current issues and policies are discussed in light of the increasing demands and impacts of a technological society on water resources and associated natural systems. (ENVS 0112 or any 0100-level Geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (P. Ryan)
Cross-listed as: GEOL 0255 *

GEOG 0310 Conservation Planning with GIS (Fall 2019)

Conservation planners try to identify and protect places with natural and cultural values. In this course we will investigate different methods for using geographic information systems (GIS) at local to regional scales to evaluate scenic landscapes, wetlands, wildlife habitat and connectivity, land use and energy suitability, and other topics. For each, we will consider the contributions and shortcomings of using GIS for conservation planning through a combination of computer-based analyses, field investigations, readings, and discussions. The Town of Middlebury will provide a case study to learn methods with GIS, and students will develop independent projects that compare Middlebury to other towns in Vermont. (GEOG 150). 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED (J. Howarth)

GEOG 0323 Open Source Geographic Information Science (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study geographic information science (GIS) with open-source software and critical GIS scholarship. In labs, we will practice techniques to include: data acquisition and preparation for analysis, spatial SQL database queries, automating analysis, spatial interpolation, testing sensitivity to error and uncertainty, and data visualization. We will read and apply critical research of GIS as a subject and with GIS as a methodology. Spatial data sources for labs and independent research projects may include remote sensing, micro-data, smart cities and open government data, and volunteered geographic information (e.g. OpenStreetMap and social media). (GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab DED (J. Holler)

GEOG 0325 Cartographic Design (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study principles of cartographic design in the digital era. Major topics will include cartography before computing, reference map design, thematic map design, and atlas production. Laboratory exercises will develop workflows for cartographic design with geographic information systems and graphics software. Through authentic projects and group critiques, students will learn to design cartographic products that facilitate spatial thinking and effectively communicate geographic information to specialist and lay audiences. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, SOC (J. Howarth)

GEOG 0339 Practicing Human Geography (Spring 2020)

Whether you are planning to do your own research or want to be a more savvy consumer of research produced by others, it is useful to develop an understanding of the process of creating, discovering, and interpreting information about the world. In this course, students will explore quantitative and qualitative methodologies and the ways they can be used in human geography research. Through examples, exercises, and readings, students will learn the types of questions different techniques are designed to answer, how they work, and how to interpret the results. Students will gain hands on experience conducting surveys, generating and interpreting qualitative data, selecting and implementing statistical analyses, and writing research reports, to build competence and critical awareness in the practice and communication of research. (At least one course in geography, AP human geography credit, or instructor approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab CW, DED (J. L'Roe)

GEOG 0351 Applied Remote Sensing: Land Use in Sub-Saharan Africa (Spring 2020)

Satellite images are indispensable for mapping forest cover, agriculture, and other land uses. Off-the-shelf image processing approaches struggle to capture features in complex landscapes: for example, fine-scale forest changes, urban sprawl, or small agricultural fields. In this course we will analyze extant remote sensing products for tree cover, urban areas, and cropland in sub-Saharan Africa. We will recreate those studies while critically reading about their social contexts. In labs we will learn image analysis approaches that could improve land use maps. As a final project, students will apply those approaches to re-analyze one of the case studies introduced during the semester. (GEOG150 or GEOL0222) GEOG 120 is recommended 3 hrs. lect./3hrs lab. AAL, DED, SAF, SCI (N. Kimambo)

GEOG 0406 Seminar in Human-Environment Geography: Landscapes in Transition (Fall 2019)

What will Vermont look like in 100 years? What about the Brazilian Amazon, the Albertine Rift, or your home town? In this seminar, we will explore the ways that processes of change discussed in our thematic Geography classes like urbanization, climate change, gentrification, commoditization, 'globalization', and more may interact and play out in the future. We will discuss studies of historic and ongoing landscape transitions and conduct our own studies of student-selected places, focusing both on the changes most likely to occur given existing trajectories, and attempting to imagine and articulate what changes would be desirable. (Open to senior majors only; others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. SOC (J. L'Roe)

GEOG 0414 Seminar in Political Geography: Radical Geographies (Spring 2020)

Geography has always been associated with the exercise of power and came into being as an academic discipline because it supported imperialism, nationalism, and war. However, the field of geography also has a lesser-known emancipatory tradition that emphasizes social justice, empowerment, and resistance to oppression. Early radical voices—anarchists, socialists, and pacifists—were silenced and often forced into exile. It was only in the context of the protest culture of the 1960s that radical geographies started to find an audience. In this seminar we will examine how geography and geographers have engaged in revolutionary activism, education for justice, social mobilization, and theorizations of alternative models of society. (Open to senior majors only; others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (G. Herb)

GEOG 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

A one-credit intensive research project developed under the direction of a faculty member. Junior majors only. (Approval Required) WTR (Spring 2020: 99 seats)

GEOG 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

A one-credit intensive research project developed under the direction of a faculty member. Senior majors only. (Approval Required)

GEOG 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Students with a departmental GPA of 3.3 or higher are eligible to complete a two-credit senior thesis. In order to complete a senior thesis, students must have a proposal approved by a primary thesis advisor and a secondary departmental reader prior to registering for the first 0701 credit. Upon completion of the thesis, thesis students will present their work in a public seminar and defend the thesis in front of the departmental faculty. Thesis presentations and defenses will typically take place during the final week of classes or the examination period. Upon completion of the presentation and defense, the primary advisor and secondary departmental reader will be responsible for evaluating and grading the thesis. It is strongly encouraged that students considering a thesis discuss their ideas with an advisor during the semester prior to registering for formal thesis credits. (Approval only)
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Department of Geology

Required for the Major: The program for a geology major consists of 11 courses within the department and two additional cognate courses. These courses must include:

(1) One 0100-level course (we strongly recommend Environmental Geology (GEOL 0112), Elements of Oceanography (GEOL 0161) or Dynamic Earth (GEOL 0170).

(2) Four core courses: Bedrock Geology of Vermont (GEOL 0201), Mineralogy (GEOL 0211), and Structural Geology (GEOL 0281) are required, plus either Landscape Evolution (GEOL 0251) or Water Resources and Hydrogeology (GEOL 0255).

(3) Four elective courses (GEOL 0200-level or higher) chosen from the Middlebury geology curriculum.  A maximum of two electives (total) can be GEOL 0500, courses taken off campus (with approval of the Chair), or a combination of the two.

(4) Two cognate courses (any Biology, Chemistry, or Physics laboratory course, or Math 0116 or higher).

(5) Two Credits of Senior Work (GEOL 0400 and GEOL 0700)

The two course senior sequence (GEOL 0400 and 0700) is the culmination of the geology major and consists of original research based on field and/or laboratory investigations by the student. The requirements for the major listed above are considered to be minimal. We suggest students planning a career in geology or the earth sciences take additional courses in other sciences and mathematics, as well as additional geology courses. The requirements for the major allow for considerable flexibility and thus students should consult regularly with their geology department advisors for the selection of specific courses.
 
Geology Minor: A total of five courses is required. The minor shall consist of one introductory course (either GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170), plus four upper-level courses, which must include GEOL 0201 or GEOL 0211. After completing an introductory geology course, students who intend to minor in geology should arrange specific upper-level courses with the geology chair or designate.  Only one GEOL 0500 or off-campus course can count toward the minor.

Environmental Studies-Geology joint major: One introductory course chosen from among: GEOL 0112 (preferred), GEOL 0161, and GEOL 0170; one course from among GEOL/GEOG 0251, GEOL 0255, and GEOL 0257; one course from among GEOL 0201, GEOL 0211, and GEOL 0281; three GEOL 0200-level or higher courses, and two-term senior thesis focusing on geology and the environment: GEOL 0400/0700. Students wishing to pursue graduate study in geology are advised to take additional science and math courses and should consult with their advisor.

Departmental Honors in geology are based primarily on outstanding work in original research (GEOL 0700), and are related to course grades only in the context of guidelines in the College Handbook.

 

GEOL 0111 Natural Hazards (Spring 2020)

Despite increasing technological sophistication, modern civilization remains vulnerable to natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, flooding, landslides, extraterrestrial impacts, and other events. In this course we will consider the geologic mechanisms behind these hazards, the societal implications of these hazards, and approaches to reducing risk. Case studies will be combined with exploration of fundamental geologic concepts to provide students a foundation for understanding risk exposure and evaluating approaches to hazard management. (Not open to students who have taken GEOL 0112 or 0170) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI (K. Walowski)

GEOL 0112 Environmental Geology (Spring 2020)

Geological processes form the physical framework on which ecosystems operate. We require an understanding of the geological environment in order to minimize disruption of natural systems by human development and to avoid hazards such as floods and landslides. This course is an overview of basic tectonic, volcanic, and landscape-forming processes and systems, including earthquakes, rivers, soils, and groundwater. Environmental effects of energy, mineral, and water resource use, and waste disposal are also examined. Weekly field labs after spring break. Registration priority for first and second-year students. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 3 hrs. lab/field trips SCI (J. Munroe)

GEOL 0142 The Ocean Floor (Spring 2020)

Have you wanted to view the ocean floor from a submersible? It is a dark but dynamic place. The constant interchange between water and sediments has created sedimentary drifts and mudwaves over 500 feet high! Earthquakes cause underwater mud avalanches that travel over 60 m.p.h. Hydrothermal vents along the ocean ridges host a variety of unusual plant and animal life. This course will explore the ocean depths via the classroom and will introduce the development of ocean basins, their evolution, and processes occurring within them (Not open to students who have taken GOEL 0170) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI (P. Manley)

GEOL 0161 Elements of Oceanography (Fall 2019)

Oceanographic exploration is introduced through study of ocean basins and continental margins. The multidisciplinary nature of oceanography is emphasized by using principles of marine geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and biology to address contemporary problems. Techniques of data collection and analysis are taught aboard the College's research vessel, R/V Folger, located on Lake Champlain. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips DED, SCI (T. Manley)

GEOL 0170 The Dynamic Earth (Fall 2019)

Sea-floor spreading and continental drift, earthquakes and volcanoes, origin and evolution of mountain systems, and concepts of plate tectonics are viewed in light of the geology of ocean basins and continents. Modern processes such as river, coastal, wind, and glaciers will be studied and their effect on shaping the geologic landscape. Laboratory: field problems in Vermont geology; interpretation of geologic maps, regional tectonic synthesis. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips SCI (P. Ryan)

GEOL 0201 Bedrock Geology of Vermont (Fall 2019)

This course explores the fascinating geology of Vermont. Students learn the geology through six field problems, involving extended trips around western Vermont. Lectures on the meaning of rocks support the fieldwork. The last few indoor labs are devoted to understanding the geologic map of Vermont. Emphasis is on descriptive writing and on use of data to interpret origin of rocks. Culminates in a written report on the geologic and plate tectonic evolution of Vermont. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips CW, SCI (K. Walowski)

GEOL 0211 Mineralogy (Spring 2020)

This course covers the nature, identification, composition, and meaning of minerals and mineral assemblages. Introduction to crystallography, hand-specimen identification, optical mineralogy, x-ray analysis, and electron microbeam analysis. Laboratory: study of minerals in hand-specimen and under the polarizing microscope; use of x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy in mineral analysis. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (D. West)

GEOL 0255 Surface and Ground Water (Spring 2020)

Fresh water is the most fundamental resource sustaining life on the continents. This course is an introduction to the study of water and its interactions with the geologic environment. Basic hydrological processes such as precipitation, stream flow, and the subsurface flow of ground water are analyzed by quantitative methods. Climatic and human-induced changes in the hydrological cycle are examined, and current issues and policies are discussed in light of the increasing demands and impacts of a technological society on water resources and associated natural systems. (ENVS 0112 or any 0100-level Geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (P. Ryan)
Cross-listed as: GEOG 0255

GEOL 0281 Structural Geology (Fall 2019)

Plate tectonics and mountain building processes result in deformation of the Earth's crust. Structural geology is the study of this deformation, and this course will examine the many types of structures found in crustal rocks (folds, faults, etc.) and explore the forces responsible for their formation. Laboratory exercises will emphasize the hands-on description and analysis of structures in the field, as well as the practical aspects of map interpretation and computer analysis of structural data. (GEOL 0112, or GEOL 0161, or GEOL 0170 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips CW, SCI (D. West)

GEOL 0301 Plate Tectonics and World Geology (Spring 2020)

Tectonics refers to the many processes associated with development of regional-scale geologic features. These features include the origin and evolution of mountain belts, the growth of continents and ocean basins, and the causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The challenge of tectonic analysis lies in the accumulation and synthesis of a wide range of geologic information in an attempt to reconstruct the tectonic history of a particular region. An overnight weekend field trip towards the end of the semester will introduce students firsthand to the tectonic elements of the Appalachians. (GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (K. Walowski)

GEOL 0400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (Fall 2019)

This seminar will focus on methods and strategies for completing advanced geological research and provides a springboard for senior thesis research. Topics will include field and laboratory techniques, primary literature review, and scientific writing. Students taking this course are expected to be simultaneously working on the early stages of their senior thesis research. During the semester students will present a thesis proposal and the seminar will culminate with each student completing a draft of the first chapter of their senior thesis. GEOL 0400 is required of all geology majors. 3 hrs. disc. or lab (K. Walowski)

GEOL 0500 Readings and Research (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Individual or group independent study, laboratory or field research projects, readings and discussion of timely topics in earth and environmental science. (Approval only)

GEOL 0700 Senior Thesis Research (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Upon completion of GEOL 0400, all senior geology majors will continue their independent senior thesis research by taking one unit of GEOL 0700. This research will culminate in a written thesis which must be orally defended. (Approval only)
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Department of German

Requirements for the Major: Students are normally required to complete eight courses in German, above GRMN 0299, including at least one advanced level seminar (above GRMN 0399) or a 0700 level honors thesis during the senior year. Where appropriate, one course may be taken in English. At the beginning of each term a placement test is administered for incoming students to determine which course would be most suitable for their level of competence. The department expects that majors will spend at least one semester of study in a German-speaking country before graduating. Normally, they will spend one or two semesters at the Freie Universität in Berlin and/or the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität in Mainz. Before enrolling in one of our Schools in Germany, students must complete two courses at the 0300-level. For more information, please consult Study in Germany.
     Honors: To be a candidate for honors, students must have an average of at least B+ in German. Honors work (a senior thesis or project) is normally done during a student's last year at Middlebury.
     Minor in German: The German minor consists of a sequence of five courses, taught in German, starting at or above the 0200-level. At least three of those courses must be at the 0300-level or higher. First-year students who place above the 0200-level in the placement test must take at least one 0400-level course as part of their minor. One course may be satisfied through advanced placement (AP) credit in combination with a departmental placement test. Students who receive AP credit start their minor on the 0300-level.
     Credit for Advanced Placement is given for scores of 4 or 5, a high score on the departmental placement test, and a placement conference with the student. In addition, the student must successfully complete at least one course above the 0200-level in the department, taught in German, to qualify for AP credit.
     Germany: The Middlebury School in Germany has sites located in Berlin and Mainz.

GRMN 0101 Beginning German (Fall 2019)

Geared toward quick and early proficiency in comprehension and free expression. Grammatical structures are practiced through group activities and situational exercises (e.g., role-playing games and partner interviews). Active class participation by students is required and will be counted toward the final grade. Since this is an integrated approach, there will be laboratory assignments but no special drill sections. Classes meet five times a week. Students take GRMN 0102 as their winter term course. 5 hrs. sem. LNG (R. Graf, F. Feiereisen)

GRMN 0103 Beginning German Continued (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of GRMN 0101 and 0102. Increased emphasis on communicative competence through short oral presentations and the use of authentic German language materials (videos, songs, slides). Introduction to short prose writings and other documents relating to contemporary German culture. Five class meetings per week. (GRMN 0101 plus winter term GRMN 0102, or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect. LNG (N. Eppelsheimer, F. Feiereisen)

GRMN 0111 Accelerated Beginning German (Spring 2020)

This class is aimed at students who wish to begin the study of German on the fast lane. In one semester, we will cover a year's material, the equivalent of GRMN 0101, 0102, and 0103. We will develop all four skills in an intensive, immersion-style environment, allowing students to continue German in the regular second-year classes in the fall. Classes meet five times per week, including two 75-minute meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and an additional drill session. Students are expected to fully participate in all departmental activities. No prerequisites. 6 hr lect./disc./1 hr. drill LNG (B. Matthias)

GRMN 0201 Intermediate German (Fall 2019)

GRMN 0201/0202 is a culture-based intermediate language sequence that focuses students' attention on intercultural aspects of language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, reading and writing strategies, and a review of grammar. It moves from a focus on issues of individual identity and personal experiences to a discussion of Germany today (GRMN 0201), explores national identity in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and supplies an overview of cultural history, literary achievements, and philosophical traditions in the German-speaking world (GRMN 0103 or equivalent, or GRMN 0111) 4 hrs. sem. EUR, LNG (B. Matthias)

GRMN 0202 Intermediate German Continued (Spring 2020)

GRMN 0201/0202 is a culture-based intermediate language sequence that focuses students' attention on intercultural aspects of language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, reading and writing strategies, and a review of grammar. It moves from a focus on issues of individual identity and personal experiences to a discussion of Germany today (GRMN 0201), explores national identity in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and supplies an overview of cultural history, literary achievements, and philosophical traditions in the German-speaking world (GRMN 0201) 4 hrs. sem. EUR, LNG (R. Graf)

GRMN 0341 Berlin: History, Architecture, and Urbanism in Faust’s Metropolis (in English) (Fall 2019)

In this course we will investigate the rich and complicated built environment of Berlin. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will uncover how the city has been transformed from a cultural backwater during the early modern period to the current capital of a reunified Germany. By the conclusion of this course, you will be comfortable “reading” buildings and spaces and will be able to navigate both the physical city of Berlin and the many layers of history buried within. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Sassin)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0341 *

GRMN 0350 Advanced Writing Workshop (Fall 2019)

The goal of this course is to train students to present their thoughts, ideas, and arguments in correct, coherent, and effective writing. Students will practice writing several text forms that are required in higher education and, during study abroad. Students will also learn about format requirements for writing a longer term paper in German. Some class time will be used for creative, structured, or contemplative writing practice. Students will expand their active vocabulary and aim for a consistently high level of grammatical accuracy. Grammar topics will be covered within the context of writing, through targeted teaching of linguistic structures and peer-editing/peer-teaching sessions. (Formerly GRMN 0304) 3 hrs. sem. CW (10 seats), LNG (B. Matthias)

GRMN 0375 Exhibiting the Bauhaus (Fall 2019)

The Bauhaus (1919-1933) was an experimental school, a modern laboratory for artistic innovation. In three different German cities over a period of 14 tumultuous years three different artistic directors, their colleagues, and students challenged the traditional hierarchy of the arts by placing the fine arts, design, and architecture on equal footing. With the help of primary and secondary source readings, we will not only consider the Bauhaus’ far reaching influence on the practice and teaching of art, design and architecture, but also its enormous social and political impacts. Taking these ideas as our point of departure, our class will work with select works from the holdings of the Sabarsky Foundation in New York City (including those by Walter Gropius, Wassily Kandinsky, Anni Albers and Oskar Schlemmer). A major part of our inquiry will involve the planning of an exhibition of these original artworks at the Middlebury College Museum in the spring of 2020. 3 hrs. sem ART, EUR, HIS (E. Sassin)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0375 *

GRMN 0415 Colonialism and Racism (Spring 2020)

Racism, the ideology that humans may be divided into separate and exclusive biological entities called “races,” justified colonial exploitation and was the essence of Nazism. In this course we will examine Germany’s short era of colonialism (1894-1918), analyze literary and cinematic representations of colonial life, and deconstruct colonialist and racist thinking. We will also trace definitions and usages of the term “race” in German language and culture, read UNESCO’s 1950 “Statement on Race,” which declared that there was no scientific basis or justification for racial distinction, and discuss why in Germany the term “race” (“Rasse”) is no longer used. Taught in German. 3hrs. sem. EUR, HIS, LNG (N. Eppelsheimer)

GRMN 0442 Germany Today (Fall 2019)

In this course students will encounter the Germany of today through an exploration of current newspaper and journal articles. The theories of Kramsch, Foucault, Byrum, and others allow for intercultural analyses and enable students to critically assess assumptions, definitions, and expressions of their own cultures vis-á-vis German culture. In addition to completing short writing assignments and presentations, students work in pairs in order to develop projects that focus on specific issues in current German cultural debates. 3 hrs. sem. CMP, LNG, SOC (R. Graf)

GRMN 0470 How Grim Are the Grimm Brothers? Rereading Fairy Tales (Spring 2020)

This course focuses on modern (re)readings of the Grimm brothers' fairy tales. Starting with a discussion of the brothers' lives and the cultural setting at the beginning of the nineteenth century, we concentrate on contemporary issues in these tales. Various approaches to literature allow us to create many spheres of interpretation. Historical, textual, psychological, and philosophical readings generate an array of possible meanings for modern audiences. (Formerly GRMN 0313) 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LIT (B. Matthias)

GRMN 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval only)

GRMN 0700 Honors Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval only)
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Global Health Minor

The purpose of the Global Health minor is to encourage students to take an interdisciplinary perspective when thinking about global health problems. The minor in Global Health is more flexible than many other majors and minors on campus. Students design a course of study within the minor that fits their own educational goals. Choosing courses therefore requires substantial thought and planning on the part of the student.

The minor in Global Health is available to students who complete the courses listed below. No course for the minor may also count towards a student’s major. No more than two courses taken from the same department may count towards the minor.

All students must take a total of five courses for the minor:

(1) the core course:

SOAN 0267 Global Health or INTD 0257 Global Health

(2) One of the following methods courses (if the methods requirement is met through coursework for a major, students may substitute an additional elective in place of a methods class):

ANTH 0302 The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
ECON 0210 Economic Statistics
GEOG 0120 Human Geography with GIS
GEOG 0150 ENV Geography with GIS
MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science
PSCI 1130 Statistics for Social Sciences
PSYC 0201 Psychological Statistics

AP credit for Statistics

(3) Three elective courses; no more than one course may be a 0100-level course. Classes that count as electives are listed on the “Courses” tab.

Many other appropriate courses exist on campus, depending on the educational goals of a particular student. Courses may be substituted for the methods or elective courses with the approval of the program director.  Approval requires submission of a petition form found here.  Approval of a course for minor credit requires the student to show that they made connections between the course material and their study of Global Health, for example by writing a final paper on a public health topic. Students must turn in this paper or other approved course material for review for credit.

To declare the minor, submit the following to the Program Director: (1) a minor declaration form (http://www.middlebury.edu/offices/academic/records/Forms/stuforms) and (2) a 200-500 word statement explaining how the classes you chose fit together and further your educational goals within the field of Global Health. To declare the minor, these materials must be submitted at least one week before the end of the add period of your seventh semester at Middlebury.

In addition, students minoring in Global Health are strongly encouraged to take advantage of Middlebury’s resources by studying abroad, preferably in a program with health-related courses, and by becoming proficient in a foreign language.

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Hebrew Minor

Middlebury offers courses in both Classical and Modern Hebrew, and students may focus on one or the other in the Minor in Hebrew.  (Knowledge of one stage in the history of Hebrew may complement the other; students may therefore combine the study of Classical and Modern Hebrew, within the guidelines below.)  Courses taken in the summer at the Brandeis University-Middlebury School of Hebrew will be granted credit toward the minor.  Courses taken elsewhere may be granted credit with the permission of the Hebrew faculty.

Students should plan the minor with following limitations in mind:

a.        Beginning Modern Hebrew is offered every fall term. 

b.       Beginning Classical Hebrew is normally offered in alternate years with the next sequence beginning in the 2012-2013 academic year.

Requirements for the Minor

Modern Track:
(I) Four semesters of Modern Hebrew starting at the level of HEBM 0102 or higher; plus (II) a fifth course in Modern Hebrew, or a course taken abroad in Hebrew, or a course on Hebrew literature in translation (e.g. HEBR 0220), or a course in Classical Hebrew beyond the introductory level (HEBR 0102 or higher).  When appropriate, students may also register for independent study (HEBM 0500) to fulfill requirements for a course in Modern Hebrew.

Classical Track:
(I) Three semesters of Classical Hebrew (HEBR 0101-0102-0201 or higher); (II) either CLAS/RELI 0262 The Formation of Judaism in Antiquity or RELI 0280 Hebrew Bible/Old Testament; plus (III) either a fourth semester of Classical Hebrew (HEBR 0301 or higher) or a course in Modern Hebrew beyond the introductory level (HEBM 0102 or higher).

HEBR 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019)

Approval required.

HEBM 0101 Introductory Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2019)

In this course students will become acquainted with the basic grammatical and formal concepts necessary for the comprehension of the Modern Hebrew language. We will focus on the fundamentals of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with a particular emphasis placed on the acquisition of conversational ability. We will also make use of audiovisual, situational, and cultural exercises, and give attention to the elements of Classical form and style that provided a foundation for Modern Hebrew, which was revived as a vernacular in the late 19th century. No previous knowledge of Hebrew is required. 6 hrs. LNG (F. Alasiri)

HEBM 0103 Introductory Modern Hebrew III (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of Modern Hebrew 0102 which will be offered during winter term. Students will further develop their skills in written and oral communication, and will expand their knowledge of the cultures of modern Israel through both audio and visual media. (HEBM 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect. LNG (F. Alasiri)

HEBM 0201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2019)

This course is a continuation of HEBM 0103. Using authentic audio and visual materials, we will place emphasis on developing the skills required for intermediate-level written and communicative competence. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the forms and style of Classical Hebrew, both of which are necessary for formal composition, interaction, and reading comprehension in Modern Hebrew. (HEBM 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc LNG

HEBM 0234 State and Society in Contemporary Israel (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine Israeli society and politics in a period of rapid and profound transformation. We will begin with an introductory unit on Zionism, Palestinian nationalism, and the history of the state. Subsequent units will examine the social, cultural, and political characteristics of Israel’s main population sectors and religious groupings. The final units will examine ongoing political struggles, including struggles over the role of religion in public life; civil rights and democracy; and West Bank settlements and the Palestinian-Israeli peace process. Most readings assignments will be social scientific in nature but will also include journalism and literature. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, MDE, SOC (Z. Gazit)
Cross-listed as: SOCI 0234

HEBM 0269 Rites and Rituals in Israeli Society (Fall 2019)

In this course we will use theory and case studies, from Israel and its neighbors, to explore a wide range of rituals. We will examine national goals achieved with the assistance of ceremonies, and society’s imprint on its members through life-cycle rituals. We will address similarities and differences in the ways specific rituals are performed, and the diverse meanings they may hold for groups and individuals in geographically proximate yet culturally distinct countries, and in the heterogeneous Israeli society. Our aim is to analyze cultural repertoires and social relations, as are represented, reproduced, and contested in ritualistic activities. (formerly HEBM/SOAN 0254) 3 hrs. lect CMP, CW (5 seats), SOC (Z. Gazit)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0269

HEBM 0411 Translating Hebrew - Theory and Practice (Fall 2019)

In this course students at the advanced level of Hebrew will learn about the central themes of the theory and practice of translation. Special attention will be given to the particular issues emerging from the translation of Hebrew. Keeping in mind the theoretical background, we will translate Hebrew texts of various genres and periods. We will discuss the linguistic structure of these texts as well as their cultural background. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LNG, MDE (O. Tzuriel)

HEBM 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)
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Department of History

All students declaring a History major or joint major in the Fall of 2018 or later will adopt the following requirements.  Students who declared their major prior to Fall 2018 may choose to adopt these requirements or follow all of the old requirements.

Please note all course in the history department are preceded by HIST. All courses designated with the HIST prefix - denote count towards the major or minor. The HIS tag (usually at the end of course descriptions) denotes college wide history distribution requirements. These classes outside of the history department with the HIS tag do not count towards the major or minor.

Required for the Major in History: Students must take 11 history courses before graduation including: (1) at least one but no more than three 0100-level courses; (2) three courses, 0200-level or above, in three of the following six areas: Americas; Europe; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; South and Southeast Asia, including the Pacific; North Asia including China, Korea, Japan, and the Asian Steppes; (3) two 0400-level reading seminars in two different geographical regions, one of which may be trans-regional for those not writing a thesis OR one 0400-level reading seminar for those writing a thesis; (4) HIST 0600.

Of the eleven courses required for the major, one must be trans-regional or comparative and two must deal primarily with the period before 1800. Courses which qualify as comparative or for the pre-1800 requirement are identified in the course descriptions and a list is available from the department. In addition to winter term senior thesis study, one other winter term history course may be counted as an elective toward the eleven courses necessary for a major in history. Students planning to spend all or part of the junior year abroad should consult with the department before the second semester of their sophomore year. Students planning to go abroad or away for a full year may request to have a maximum of three courses count towards the major. Students planning to go abroad for one semester may request to have a maximum of two courses count towards the major. Upon their return to Middlebury, students must fill out the transfer of credit form from the Registrar’s office  and have it signed by the chair as soon as possible. Students may take a maximum of two cross-listed HIST/CLAS courses to fulfill History requirements. HIST 0400 and 0600 seminars must be taken in the history department at Middlebury. Cognates or other departmental seminars will not be accepted.

Honors Thesis: Students who have earned a minimum 3.5 GPA in at least 5 history department courses (including up to two courses taken abroad) and at least a B+ in HIST 0600, are eligible to write a two-term honors thesis (HIST 0700). See information below.

 Advanced Placement/International Baccalaureate: Up to two IB credits or AP history courses, with a grade of 4 or 5, can count toward the major requirement of 11 history courses, but cannot be used to fulfill any specific requirements listed above. Students counting AP European History may not count HIST 0103 or 0104 toward the major, and those counting AP U.S. History may not count HIST 0203 or 0204 toward the major.

 Joint Major Requirements: Students must take a total of at least eight courses in history, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. Cognates are not allowed. A student must take: (1) at least one course in two of the following six areas: Americas; Europe; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; South, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific; North Asia including China, Korea, Japan, and the Asian Steppes and one course that is trans-regional or comparative. The choice of courses should depend upon the need to achieve an intellectual coherence and integrity in the student's program; (2) two 0400-level reading seminars, one of which must be taken in the senior year and enable students to combine work from both disciplines, or one 0400-level reading seminar for those writing a thesis.  (3) HIST 0400 and 0600 seminars must be taken in the history department at Middlebury. Cognates or other departmental seminars will not be accepted. No more than two courses may be taken abroad or at another undergraduate institution.  AP and IB credit cannot be counted towards a joint major in history.

 Joint Major Honors Thesis: Students who have earned a minimum 3.5 GPA in at least 5 History department courses (including up to two courses taken abroad) and at least a B+ in HIST 0600 may choose to write a two-term honors thesis (HIST 0700).  Joint majors choosing to write a thesis must combine the skills of both major disciplines in their thesis.

 Minor Requirements: Students must take at least five courses, including one 0100-level course, one 0200-level course and one 0400-level course. Students are strongly encouraged to take HIST 0600 as one of the elective courses. HIST 0400 and 0600 seminars must be taken in the history department at Middlebury. No more than two courses may be taken abroad or at another undergraduate institution. Cognate courses cannot be counted towards the joint minor. AP and IB credit cannot be counted towards a minor in history.

History course numbering: As a rule, the History Department has no pre-requisites. Courses are not arranged hierarchically; they are arranged thematically and chronologically, with the 100-level courses being the broadest and the 300 and 400-level courses being the most specific in subject matter.

 HIST 0100-Level Courses
These courses deal with events and processes that affect human societies over long periods of time and across broad geographical areas not confined to national boundaries. Courses include components that act as introductions to the field of history.

HIST 0200-Level Courses
These are lecture courses that deal with a single cultural or national entity, or a clearly related group of such entities, over a substantial period of time (usually a century or more).

HIST 0300-Level Courses
These courses, for the most part, are topically focused courses. Many of them are lecture courses and some are taught in a seminar format. These are not, however, seminars that fulfill the reading seminar requirement.

HIST 0400–Level Reading Seminars
These topically based seminars, which usually meet once a week involve reading and analyzing texts, discussions, student presentations, historiography and writing or producing a final project. The history department offers many types of seminars: seminars on a topic within a given country or region; transnational or global seminars, digital humanities seminars and public history seminars.  Seminars are open to all students except those designated for seniors and juniors. See course description for requirements. A list of seminars is available from the department.

HIST 0600: Writing History
In this course students discuss historical methods and writing strategies to create convincing historical narratives.  With the approval and guidance of the professor, students complete a 20-25-page research paper based on primary and secondary sources. Students take this course in the fall of their junior year or with permission in the spring. If students are away for the entire junior year, they can take the course in the fall of their senior year.

HIST 0700 Senior Honors Thesis
If students have earned a minimum 3.5 GPA in at least 5 History department courses (including up to two courses taken abroad) and at least a B+ in HIST 0600, they may choose to write a two-term honors thesis (HIST 0700). Writing a thesis is a prerequisite for departmental honors. Students must submit a thesis proposal to the department chair and coordinator one week prior to course registration for the term in which the thesis is to be started. Students opting to write a thesis must also take at least one 0400-level reading seminar prior to graduation, but preferably before their last semester at Middlebury. Students may not write a thesis in the same semester that they are taking HIST 0600. If students submit a request to write a senior thesis in the semester in which they are taking HIST 0600, they may receive conditional approval pending the completion and grade in HIST 0600.

Approved students will write a two-term thesis under an advisor in the area of their choosing. The department strongly encourages students to write their theses during the fall and winter terms. Winter/Spring theses are also acceptable with the permission of the chair and the theses advisor. On rare occasions and for compelling reasons, a student may initiate a thesis in the spring of an academic year and finish in the fall of the following year with the approval of the department. All students beginning their thesis in a given academic year must attend the Thesis Writers' Workshops held in the fall and winter of that year. Further information about the thesis is available from the department.

Overall History Honors: To receive departmental honors, high honors*, or highest honors** students must have completed an honors thesis (HIST0700) with a grade of B+, A-*, or A** and must have achieved an overall average of at least 3.5, 3.67*, or 3.75** in all departmental courses.

 Students who declared prior to Fall 2018 may follow the old requirements:

Required for the Major in History: For students who entered prior to Fall 2017, each major must take 11 history courses before graduation, including: (1) at least one but no more than three 0100-level courses; (2) at least one course in European history (which may include Russia/Soviet Union); (3) at least one course in United States history; (4) and at least one course in the history of Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, or Russia/Soviet Union, all to be taken at the 0200-level or higher.  (A course in Russia/Soviet Union may not be used for more than one geographical area);  (5) a 0400-level reading seminar; (6) HIST 0600; (7) a two-term senior thesis, which counts as two of the required 11 courses.

Two of the courses required for the major must deal primarily with the period before 1800. Courses which qualify for the pre-1800 requirement are identified in the course descriptions and a list is available from the department. In addition to winter term senior thesis study, one other winter term history course may be counted toward the eleven courses necessary for a major in history. Under extenuating circumstances, and with the written permission of the chair, one cognate course in historical aspects of other disciplines may count toward a major in history. Students planning to spend all or part of the junior year abroad should consult with the department before the second semester of the sophomore year.  Students planning to go abroad or away for a full year may request to have a maximum of three courses count towards the major. Students planning to go abroad for one semester may request to have a maximum of two courses count towards the major. Upon their return to Middlebury, students must fill out the transfer of credit form from the Registrar’s office  and have it signed by the chair as soon as possible.

Students entering in Fall 2017 or later must take 11 history courses before graduation, including: (1) at least one but no more than three 0100-level courses; (2) three courses, 0200-level or above, in three of the following six areas: Americas; Europe; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; South, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific; North Asia including China, Korea, Japan, and the Asian Steppes; (3) a 0400-level reading seminar; (4) HIST 0600; (5) a two-term senior thesis, which counts as two of the required 11 courses.

Students must also follow the pre-1800, winter term, and cognate requirements listed in the paragraph above.

Advanced Placement: Up to two AP history courses, with a grade of 4 or 5, can count toward the major requirement of 11 history courses, but cannot be used to fulfill any specific requirements listed above. Students counting AP European History may not count HIST 0103 or 0104 toward the major, and those counting AP U.S. History may not count HIST 0203 or 0204 toward the major.

Joint Major: For students who entered prior to Fall 2017, a student who is a joint major in history and another department must take a total of at least eight courses in history, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. Cognates are not allowed. A student must take at least one course in two of three sub-fields: Europe, North America, and AAL (Asia, Africa, Latin America, Middle East, Russia/Soviet Union), and one course in the period before 1800. The choice of courses should depend upon the need to achieve an intellectual coherence and integrity in the student's program. Joint majors must take a 0400-level reading seminar, HIST 0600, and must write a two-term thesis combining the skills of both major disciplines.

Students entering in Fall 2017 or later must take a total of at least eight courses in history, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. Cognates are not allowed. A student must take at least one course in two of the following six areas: Americas; Europe; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; South, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific; North Asia including China, Korea, Japan, and the Asian Steppes. The choice of courses should depend upon the need to achieve an intellectual coherence and integrity in the student's program. Joint majors must take a 0400-level reading seminar, HIST 0600, and must write a two-term thesis combining the skills of both major disciplines.

Minors in History: Students must take a total of five courses, including one 0100-level course, one 0200-level course and one 0400-level course. No more than two courses may be taken abroad or at another undergraduate institution. Cognate courses from other disciplines will not normally be permitted.
AP and IB credit cannot be counted towards a minor in history.

Honors: To earn departmental honors, high honors*, or highest honors** a student must have at least a 3.4, 3.5*, or 3.67** average or above in history department courses other than the senior thesis, have an oral examination on the senior thesis, and receive a grade of at least B+, A-*, or A** on the thesis (HIST 0700).

HIST 0100-Level Courses
The 0100-level courses (0100-0199) deal with events and processes that affect human societies over long periods of time and across broad geographical areas not confined to national boundaries. These courses include components that act as introductions to the field of history.

HIST 0200-Level Courses
These are lecture courses that deal with a single cultural or national entity, or a clearly related group of such entities, over a substantial period of time (usually a century or more).

HIST 0300-Level Courses
These courses, for the most part, are topically focused courses. Many of them are lecture courses and some are taught in a seminar format. These are not, however, seminars that fulfill the reading seminar requirement.

HIST 0400–Level Reading Seminars
Unlike the courses below the 0400 level, which are primarily lecture courses, these courses are reading seminars on particular periods or topics. They are open to all students, although in cases of overcrowding, history majors will be given priority. First-year students are admitted only by waiver.

HIST 0600 Research Seminar
All history majors are required to take HIST 0600 their junior fall or, if abroad at that time, their senior fall semester. In this course students will conceive, research, and write a work of history based on primary source material. After reading and discussion on historical methods and research strategies, students will pursue a paper topic as approved by the course professors.

International and Global Studies Seminars
These seminars are "capstone" courses required for the International and Global Studies major. They are thematic, interdisciplinary, cross-regional, and team-taught. Students who are not International and Global Studies majors may take these courses for departmental credit, but they will not normally fulfill the History Department major requirement of a 0400-level seminar.

HIST 0700 Senior Independent Study
All senior history majors will write a two-term thesis under an advisor in the area of their choosing. The department encourages students to do their theses during the fall and winter terms. Fall/spring theses are also acceptable and, with permission of the chair, winter/spring. On rare occasions, with departmental approval given for compelling reasons, a thesis may be initiated in the spring of an academic year and finished in the fall of the following year. All students beginning their thesis in a given academic year must attend the Thesis Writers' Workshops held in the fall and winter of that year. Further information about the thesis is available from the department.

 

HIST 0103 The Making of Europe (Fall 2019)

This course covers the history of Western Europe from the death of Caesar in 44 B.C. to the Peace of Westphalia in A.D. 1648. We will examine three interrelated themes: political authority within European society, the development of the religious culture of the West and the challenges to that culture, and the ways in which the development of a European economy contributed to the making of Europe itself. While examining these questions from the Roman Empire to early modern Europe, students will focus on the use of original sources, and on how historians interpret the past. Pre-1800. Not open to seniors. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS, SOC (L. Burnham)

HIST 0108 The Early History of Islam and the Middle East (Fall 2019)

This course is an introduction to the history of Islamic civilizations from the advent of Islam around 610 C.E. to the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Since "Islam" encompasses not simply a religion but an entire cultural complex, this course will trace the development of religious, political, economic, and social institutions in this region. Topics covered include the early Islamic conquests, the rise of religious sectarianism, gender relations, and the expansion of Islamic empires. Pre-1800. 2 hrs lect./1 hr. disc. AAL, HIS, MDE, SOC (F. Armanios)

HIST 0113 History of Africa To 1800 (Fall 2019)

This course offers an introductory survey of African history from earliest times to 1800. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and films, we will explore Africa’s complex and diverse pre-colonial past. Themes examined in the course include development of long-distance trade networks, the linkages between ecological change and social dynamics, the formation of large pre-colonial states, and the transatlantic slave trade and its impact on social and economic relations within Africa. A broader concern in the course is how we have come to understand the meaning of “Africa” itself and what is at stake in interpreting Africa’s pre-colonial history. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, SAF, SOC (J. Tropp)

HIST 0114 History of Modern Africa (Spring 2020)

We begin looking at revolutions in the early 19th century and the transformations surrounding the slave trade. Next we examine the European colonization of the continent, exploring how diverse interventions into Africans' lives had complex effects on political authority, class and generational dynamics, gender relations, ethnic and cultural identities, and rural and urban livelihoods. After exploring Africans' struggles against colonial rule in day-to-day practices and mass political movements, the last few weeks cover Africa's transition to independence and the postcolonial era, including the experience of neo-colonialism, ethnic conflict, poverty, and demographic crisis. (formerly HIST 0226) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. AAL, HIS, SAF, SOC (J. Tropp)
Cross-listed as: BLST 0114

HIST 0115 Genocides Throughout History (Spring 2020)

With the devastation of the Holocaust and other more recent events, the study of genocide has mainly focused on the modern period. Yet, mass killings and other atrocities abound in earlier centuries as well. In this course we will focus on examples across time and space to gain a more comprehensive understanding of such phenomena. We will consider the very meaning of “genocide” as well as the suitability of other terms. We will also discuss different explanations of everything from perpetrators’ motivations to victims’ responses. Finally, we will examine the possibility of preventing genocides. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, HIS, SOC (R. Bennette)

HIST 0203 United States History: 1492-1861 (Fall 2019)

A survey of American political, social and intellectual developments from the colonial period to the Civil War. Students receiving AP credit in American history may not take HIST 0203 for credit. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, CW (5 seats), HIS, NOR, SOC (W. Hart)

HIST 0209 History of US Food Politics (Spring 2020)

In this course we will use U.S. food politics as a lens for understanding developments in political economy, changes in the role of the state, and evolving attitudes toward gender, race, labor, childhood, citizenship, health, and the body during the twentieth century. How have government, corporations, and scientists shaped U.S. foodways? How have people been affected by broad trends in food politics, and how have they resisted, as consumers, citizens, and activists? To answer these questions, we will use methods of social and cultural history to explore food politics from the top down and the bottom up. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (L. Povitz)

HIST 0210 History of Sexuality in the United States (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore sexuality in relation to race, class, gender, and religion in US history using primary and secondary sources. We will study indigenous sexualities and the impact of settler colonialism, sex work during the American Revolution, sexuality under slavery, the medicalization and criminalization of homosexuality, urban gay subcultures, Cold War sexuality, the politics of birth control, sex during the AIDS epidemic, and sexuality from transgender and non-binary perspectives. Beyond learning historiography, we will examine methodological issues with writing histories of sexuality. When relevant, we will study examples from Europe and Canada. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (L. Povitz)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0210

HIST 0212 Civil War and Reconstruction: 1845-1890 (Spring 2020)

This course explores the era of the American Civil War with an emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, class discussion, and film to address such questions as why the war came, why the Confederacy lost, and how the war affected various elements of society. We will also explore what was left unresolved at the end of the war, how Americans responded to Reconstruction, and how subsequent generations have understood the meaning of the conflict and its legacy. We will make a special effort to tie military and political events to life on the home front. (formerly HIST 0364) 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AMR, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)

HIST 0215 America, 1955-1991 (Spring 2020)

This course focuses on the history of the United States from the end of the “Crucial Decade” until the end of the Cold War. We will pay special attention to how domestic development shaped America's place within the international community, and vice versa. Topics to be considered include: the rise and fall of the post-1945 social welfare state, Eisenhower’s New Look and JFK’s New Frontier, the Vietnam War, civil rights activism, increasing American investment in the Middle East, the modern conservative movement, and globalization and its contexts. (formerly HIST 0368) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. AMR, HIS, NOR (J. Mao)

HIST 0225 African American History (Spring 2020)

This course will explore the history of the African American people from the slave trade to the present. It will examine the process of enslavement, the nature of American slavery, the meaning of emancipation, the response to the rise of legalized segregation, and the modern struggle for equality. Special attention will be given to placing the African American story within the context of the developing American nation, its institutions, and its culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, HIS, NOR (W. Hart)
Cross-listed as: BLST 0225

HIST 0231 Imperial China (Spring 2020)

China’s is the world’s oldest continuous civilization, and we will survey the history of the Chinese empire from its cultural beginnings until the conflicts with the West in the 1840s and the internal unrest of the 1850s and 1860s. Our study of China’s political progression through successive dynasties will reveal archetypal patterns of historical disruption amidst continuity. We will also examine those perennial social, institutional, and intellectual forces — such as the stratification of the classes, the absolutist tendencies of monarchy, and the civilly-focused yet competitive atmosphere fostered by a state-sponsored examination culture — that proved determinative in shaping China’s traditional development. Pre-1800 3 hrs. lect. AAL, HIS, NOA, SOC (D. Wyatt)

HIST 0237 Chinese Philosophy (Fall 2019)

A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, NOA, PHL (D. Wyatt)
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0237

HIST 0241 Europe in the Early Middle Ages (Spring 2020)

This course covers the formative centuries in European history which witnessed the emergence of Western Europe as a distinct civilization. During this period, A. D. 300-1050, the three major building blocks of Western European culture: the classical tradition of Greco-Roman antiquity, the Judeo-Christian tradition, and Germanic tradition, met and fused into an uneasy synthesis that gave Western Europe its cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious foundations. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, HIS, SOC (L. Burnham)

HIST 0243 The Mediterranean World, 400-1600 (Spring 2020)

The Mediterranean has long been a crossroads between East and West and North and South, a meeting point of the Middle East, Northern Africa, and Southern Europe. Merchants and armies have plied the seaways carrying with them their religions and cultures. The pre-modern Mediterranean offered an exhilarating but, at times uncomfortable, mix of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim cultures. Starting from Fernand Braudel's conceit, we will consider the Mediterranean itself as an important character in the narrative of history. We will study the geography of the Mediterranean as well as its religious, economic, environmental, and cultural history with a view to bringing together different understandings of Mare Nostrum (our sea). Pre-1800. 2 hrs lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, HIS (L. Burnham)

HIST 0245 History of Modern Europe: 1800-1900 (Fall 2019)

This course will trace several complex threads across the nineteenth century, a period that saw enormous changes in economic structures, political practices, and the experience of daily life. We will look specifically at the construction of nation-states, the industrial revolution and its effects on the lives of the different social classes, the shift from rural to urban life, and the rise of mass culture and its political forms. Taking a cultural perspective, we will consider, for example, the language of working-class politics, the painting of modern urban life, and imperialism in popular culture. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, HIS, SOC (R. Bennette)

HIST 0262 History of the Modern Middle East (Fall 2019)

This course investigates the history of social and political change in the Middle East from 1798 to the present. Within a general political framework, the course will cover the main social, economic, and intellectual currents. Emphasizing political, economic, social and cultural history, the course seeks to examine the impact of outside powers on the region, the responses of the region's peoples to this challenge, colonization, nationalism and identity, religious and ideological trends, gender issues, major "crises" (including the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese civil war, and the Iranian Revolution), and efforts to reassert Islamic identity in an era of globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, MDE, SOC (F. Armanios)

HIST 0288 Modern Brazil (Spring 2020)

Brazil is the Portuguese-speaking power of Latin America. In this course, we will study the history of modern Brazil from independence to the present day, and discuss the contemporary developments that have transformed Brazil into an international force today. The class will pay close attention to the construction of national institutions, racial and national ideologies, and the celebration of national culture. We will also study Brazil’s impact on the world, from its export of cultural products in cinema, music, and literature in translation, to soccer. It will be important to study the communities of Brazilians in diverse places such as Miami, New York, London, and Paris. We will utilize various writing, oral, and digital methods to examine the major political, economic, and cultural movements that defined Brazilian history from the creation of the empire in the 1820s to the political and cultural tensions of the current regime 3 hr. lect. AAL, AMR, HIS (D. Davis)
Cross-listed as: BLST 0288

HIST 0311 Gender, Sexuality, and Psychiatry in US History (Spring 2020)

In this seminar we will examine how gender and sexuality have intersected with the psychiatric profession since the nineteenth century, focusing mostly on women, and to a lesser extent gender-nonconforming people and men. Course material will be rooted in the U.S. but will occasionally also cover Europe and Latin America. Topics will include racialized notions of madness and hysteria, depression, psychoanalysis, “deviant” genders and sexualities, the rise of psychotropic prescription drugs, addiction, PTSD, eating disorders, and the medicalization of heterosexual women’s desire. Students will explore relevant historiography and will conduct oral histories of a related topic. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, HIS, NOR, SOC (L. Povitz)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0311

HIST 0312 Tokyo: Between History and Utopia (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore the history of Tokyo—from its "prehistory" as a small castle town in the 16th century to the cosmopolitan metropolis of the 20th century—and trace how Tokyo has captured the imagination as a space of possibility, of play, and for many, of decadence. Through a range of sources, including films, novels, ethnographies, and historical essays, we will use Tokyo as a "site" (both urban and ideological) through which to explore broader questions related to capitalist modernity, the formation of the nation-state, cultural identity, gender politics, and mass-culture. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, HIS, NOA, SOC (M. Ward)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0312

HIST 0315 Health and Healing in African History (Fall 2019)

In this course we will complicate our contemporary perspectives on health and healing in Africa by exploring diverse historical examples from the continent's deep past. Our readings, discussions, and papers will cover a range of historical contexts and topics, such as the politics of rituals and public healing ceremonies in pre-colonial contexts, state and popular responses to shifting disease landscapes in the colonial era, long-term cultural and economic changes in healer-patient dynamics, the problematic legacies of environmental health hazards in the post-colonial period, and Africans' engagement with global health interventions in recent decades. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, HIS, SAF, SOC (J. Tropp)

HIST 0326 Histories of U.S. Radicalism, 1917-2017 (Fall 2019)

From communism to libertarianism, Black Nationalism to radical feminism, this seminar examines the many facets of radical social movements in the United States during the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. In particular, we will draw on individual and collective biographies of radicals to explore chronological linkages and social connections between apparently discrete political tendencies. We will also consider the political, social, cultural, and economic contexts that catalyzed these movements, the various forms of backlash and repression they faced, and the changing political uses to which these historical movements have been put. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (L. Povitz)

HIST 0373 History of American Women: 1869-1999 (Fall 2019)

This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc. AMR, CMP, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0373

HIST 0375 Struggles for Change in Southern Africa (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine the tumultuous period of social struggle in southern Africa in the decades following World War II. Major topics to be covered include the rise of apartheid and the mobilization of anti-apartheid resistance in South Africa and Namibia; the liberation struggle against white settler rule in Zimbabwe; the fight for freedom from Portuguese colonialism in Mozambique; and Mozambique's protracted civil war following independence. A central purpose of this course is to explore how these different arenas of struggle transformed individual lives and social relations in complex and diverse ways, generating enduring impacts and challenges within the region. AAL, HIS, SAF, SOC (J. Tropp)
Cross-listed as: BLST 0375

HIST 0377 Comparative Slavery in the Americas (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine the development and decline of the institution of slavery in the United States between 1619 and 1865 by comparing the institution to slavery in the Caribbean and Latin America (principally Brazil). Themes and topics to be explored include: ecology and slavery, religion and slavery, the international slave trade, nationalisms and race, slave communities, slave resistance, emancipation, and freedom. Readings for the course will range from scholarly monographs to slave narratives. CMP, HIS (W. Hart)

HIST 0391 Native Americans in the American Imagination (Spring 2020)

In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will examine the changing image of Native Americans in American popular culture from 1800-2000. Through novels, plays, films, photography, advertisements, amusements, sport-team mascots, and museum displays, we will trace and analyze how the American Indian has been defined, appropriated, and represented popularly to Americans from the early republic to the turn of the twenty-first century. We will consider how American popular culture has used over time the image of the American Indian to symbolize national concerns and to forge a national American identity. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, HIS, NOR (W. Hart)

HIST 0393 A History of Gender in Early America (Spring 2020)

Exploration, conquest, settlement, revolution, and nation-building: no course in early American history should ignore such traditional topics. In this course, though, we will examine the various ways that gender shaped these historical processes. How, for example, did colonials’ assumptions about manhood and womanhood affect the development of slavery in America? Or how did the Founding Fathers’ identities as men inform their attitudes about democracy and citizenship? We will scrutinize historical documents, of both a private and public nature, and discuss several recent scholarly works on gender from 1600-1850 to consider these kinds of questions. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AMR, CMP, CW, HIS, NOR (A. Morsman)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0393

HIST 0429 Gandhi (Fall 2019)

This course will focus on the works and actions of Mahatma Gandhi. At one level, the readings will provide an introduction to the philosophy and life of one of the most significant, influential, and well-known figures of the 20th century. At another level, the course will discuss in detail the major themes and occurrences in modern Indian history, tracing the rise and ultimate victory of the Indian nationalist movement. The class will read a variety of texts, including books written by Gandhi, tracts published by his political and religious opponents, social commentaries, contemporary novels, and engaging histories. (formerly HIST 0414)3 hrs. sem AAL, HIS, SOA (I. Barrow)

HIST 0431 Readings in Chinese History: China's Historical Minorities (Spring 2020)

China is often reflexively visualized as an ethnically homogeneous nation-state. However, this conception fails to account for the minority populations that have for centuries resided in China and contributed greatly to its socio-cultural identity. Throughout the imperial age, the four groups called Manchu, Mongol, Hui, and Tibetan surpassed all other non-Chinese ethnicities in influencing the direction of Chinese history and shaping the contours of China's developmental experience. In this reading seminar we will examine the imprint of the collective legacy of these particular minorities as well as those of certain related groups, such as the ancestors of the Uyghurs of modern Xinjiang. Pre-1800 3 hrs. sem. AAL, HIS, NOA, SOC (D. Wyatt)

HIST 0433 Latin America in the 1960s: A Digital History Course (Fall 2019)

Latin America was at the center of the Cold War in the 1960s. U.S. intervention and military repression contrasted with Marxist and other utopian visions for peace and social justice. This seminar will explore these tensions by examining critical political, economic, and cultural watersheds of the era. We will study the influence of personalities such as Franz Fanon, Che Guevara, Elena Poniatowska and movements that challenged the status quo of the post World War II era. We will explore the tensions between nationalism and transnationalism, as well as the dissonance between class and racial utopian ideals and migration and exile. The class will work on digital projects and exercises that allow us to recreate the past and analyze specific case studies. We will immerse ourselves in the new revolutionary and the countercultural aesthetics in art, film, and music in movements such as tropicália, black consciousness, and liberation theology. We will also uncover the links with the historical dynamics in the United States and Europe. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, AMR, CMP, HIS, SOC (D. Davis)

HIST 0435 American Conservatism after 1932: Ideology, Politics, History (Spring 2020)

“Let’s grow up, conservatives!” was Sen. Barry Goldwater’s dictum at the 1960 Republican convention. Once dismissed as practically extinct, American conservatism became the most enduring political movement of the 20th century. In this seminar we will trace conservative thought and politics from the New Deal era through the contemporary moment, highlighting both domestic and international developments that shaped the modern American right. Students will closely engage with recent scholarly works as well as primary sources such as speeches, magazines, campaign texts, and visual media to effectively understand conservatism’s historical evolution. 3 hrs. sem AMR, HIS, NOR (J. Mao)

HIST 0447 Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Reporting Genocide (Fall 2019)

While reports of atrocities and genocides have appeared frequently in the news, little has helped to effectively stop these acts. Even the basic facts are often poorly understood by the wider public. We will focus on a variety of atrocities and genocides, considering them from multiple angles and with a particular emphasis on prevention and resolution. Using our knowledge, we will craft short pieces of public writing, such as op-eds, reviews, and briefings intended to inform and/or influence a general audience. (open to juniors and seniors) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, HIS (R. Bennette)

HIST 0500 Special Research Projects (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Special research projects may only be taken during the Junior or Senior year, preferable after taking HIST 0600. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST 0600 Writing History (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course students discuss historical methods and writing strategies to create convincing historical narratives. With the approval and guidance of the professor, students complete a 20-25-page research paper based on primary and secondary sources. Students take this course in the fall of their junior year or with permission in the spring. If students are away for the entire junior year, they can take the course in the fall of their senior year. 3 hr. sem. CW (Fall 2019: D. Wyatt)

HIST 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

The optional History Senior Thesis is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. Approval is required. Students submit thesis proposals in the spring before the year that they choose to write their thesis. Students generally begin their thesis in the fall and complete it during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring. All students must attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops in fall and winter semesters and work with a faculty advisor to complete a 55-70 page paper. Please see detailed guidelines under history requirements.
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Department of History of Art & Architectural Studies

Required for the Major, History of Art Track (11 courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in Asian art and architecture; one course in Artistic Process (for example: HARC 130, ART 159, ART 167, ART 185, ART 195, ARDV 116, DANC 160, THEA 102, THEA 205, or another course chosen in consultation with your major advisor and the HARC department chair); HARC 0301 (Ways of Seeing; sophomore or junior year; prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711); at least five additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions, with at least one being at the 0300-level or above; HARC 0710 (Senior Thesis Research Seminar, fall of senior year); HARC 0711 (Senior Thesis, winter term senior year). Advisory: Graduate programs in the history of art and classical archaeology require students to pass reading examinations in at least two foreign languages. Students can improve job prospects by acquiring practical experience, such as internships or participation in the Museum Assistants Program (MAP).
     Joint Major, History of Art Track (eight courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art ); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in Asian art and architecture; HARC 0301 (Ways of Seeing; sophomore or junior year; prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711); three additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions, one of which should be at the 0300-level or above; HARC 0710 (Senior Thesis Research Seminar, fall of senior year); HARC 0711 (Senior Thesis, winter term of senior year). A proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken, must be submitted to the department for approval before registering as a joint major.
     Minor, History of Art Track (six courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in Asian and architecture; four additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions.

     Requirements for the Major, Museum Studies Track (11 courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in Asian art and architecture; HARC 0248; HARC 0301; HARC 0540 (MAP Participation for credit), or a pre-approved internship, or a pre-approved independent project (HARC 0510) if a suitable faculty member is available to supervise it; HARC 0710; HARC 0761; four additional courses in history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions, with at least one being at the 0300-level or above.
     Joint Major, Museum Studies Track (eight courses): HARC 0100 or HARC 0102; HARC 0248; HARC0 0301; HARC 0540, or an approved internship, or a pre-approved independent project (HARC 0510); HARC 0710; HARC 0761; Two electives in HARC to be selected in consultation with the advisor.
     Minor, Museum Studies Track (six courses): HARC 0100 or HARC 0102; HARC 0248; HARC 0540 (MAP Participation for credit) or a pre-approved independent project (HARC 0510) if a suitable faculty member is available to supervise it; Three HARC electives to be selected in consultation with the advisor.

      Honors: Honors are awarded to students with a GPA** of 3.5 and a thesis grade of B+ or higher; high honors to students with a GPA of 3.7 and a thesis grade of A- or A; and highest honors to students with a GPA of 3.8 and a thesis grade of A.
** The History of Art + Architecture  GPA is calculated on the basis of those courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major.  Only courses taken on the Middlebury College campus and applied towards the major will be used in the calculation of GPA for purposes of determining honors.  Study abroad and transfer courses will not be used.
     Please note: Courses offered by other departments and programs may, by prior departmental approval, be used to satisfy elective requirements.

Architectural Studies Program
Required for the Major, Architectural Studies Track (11 courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0120 (DesignLab) or another approved course in studio art, theatre set or lighting design, or dance; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture); HARC 0330 (Intermediate Architectural Design), or a pre-approved substitute taken off-campus; three additional courses that deal with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; and HARC 0731 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research) and HARC 0732 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design), open only to HARC majors and joint majors, to be taken sequentially. Advisory: This major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.
Joint Major, Architectural Studies Track (eight courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture); HARC 0330 (Intermediate Architectural Design), or a pre-approved substitute taken off-campus; one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; and HARC 0731 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research) and HARC 0732 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design), open only to HARC majors and joint majors, to be taken sequentially. A proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken, must be submitted to the department for approval before registering as a joint major. Advisory: This joint major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.
Joint Major, Architectural Studies/ Environmental Studies "Architecture and the Environment" (15 courses): ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and GEOG 0120, all to be taken before the end of junior year; two ES Cognate Courses (both science courses with labs, listed under Environmental Studies); HARC 0100; HARC 0130; HARC 0230; HARC 0231; HARC 0330 or a pre-approved substitute to be taken off-campus; one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; ENVS 0401; and HARC 0731 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research) and HARC 0732 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design), open only to HARC majors and joint majors, to be taken sequentially. Advisory: This joint major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.
Minor, Architectural Studies (five courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture); and HARC 330 (Intermediate Architectural Design) or a pre-approved substitute taken off-campus. Advisory: many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken calculus, physics, and a survey of modern architecture.
Honors: Honors in all tracks are awarded to students with a GPA** of 3.5 and a thesis grade of B+ or higher; high honors to students with a GPA of 3.7 and a thesis grade of A- or A; and highest honors to students with a GPA of 3.8 and a thesis grade of A.
** The History of Art + Architecture GPA is calculated on the basis of those courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major.

HARC 0100 Monuments and Ideas in Western Art (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is an introduction to the study of Western art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. The course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture of the western world. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Western art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, groups, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority will be given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. ART, EUR, HIS (Fall 2019: P. Broucke; Spring 2020: C. Anderson)

HARC 0102 Monuments and Ideas/Asian Art (Fall 2019)

Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art*
This course is an introduction to the study of Asian art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. This course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and other media of Asia. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Asian art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, group, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc..
AAL, ART, CMP, HIS, NOA (C. Packert)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0347 *

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Are you fascinated by buildings and interested in trying your hand at architectural design? This course will introduce you to principles of architecture and teach you the skills architects use to explore and communicate design ideas. We will consider urban and rural settings, sustainability, energy efficiency, functionality, comfort, and the role architecture plays in shaping community. Classroom instruction by a practicing architect will provide hands-on drawing, model-making, and materials research as well as field trips to see innovation in the works, including house tours (both in construction and finished). Students will work in teams and individually to analyze existing buildings and design their own. Students seeking to improve their understanding of the built environment are encouraged to take this course. No prior experience is needed. ART (Fall 2019: J. McLeod; Spring 2020: B. Allred)

HARC 0201 Italian Renaissance Art: 1350-1550 (Spring 2020)

This course will focus on the art produced in Italy during the late fourteenth through the early sixteenth centuries. In addition to studying the chronological development of painting, sculpture, and architecture, we will consider such issues as artistic training, patronage, domestic life, and the literary achievements of this period of "rebirth." Focusing on urban environments such as Florence, Siena, Padua, Venice, Rome, and Urbino, we will give special attention to the manner in which artistic production was shaped by place. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (K. Smith Abbott)

HARC 0202 Modern Art (Fall 2019)

In this course we will survey the major movements and artists in the history of modern art in Europe and the United States, from Impressionism to the postwar period. We will focus on the development of style, aesthetic concerns, and social contexts. Topics will include individual artists, such as Picasso and Matisse, as well as the development of styles, such as Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (S. Rogers)

HARC 0209 Venice in Renaissance (Fall 2019)

Venetian art was long shaped by its unique setting, distinctive political structure, and a collective identity enforced by its patrician leaders. In this course, we will engage in a close consideration of the socio-political conditions that both reinforced tradition and ultimately made way for a "golden age" in Venetian painting, sculpture, and architecture. Topics will include individual artists, such as Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, and Palladio, as well as artistic training and workshop practice, patronage, and the rise of Venetian humanism. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (K. Smith Abbott)

HARC 0218 History of Photography (Spring 2020)

In this course we will survey the history of photography from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century to the present. From its inception, the photograph created a global network of circulation as art, document, and portable knowledge. Moreover, photographs have been historically deployed across a number of disciplines, including science, medicine, criminal studies, law, journalism, anthropology, and the visual arts. Organized along chronological lines and looking at case studies in Europe, America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia, the course will consider a range of genres, formal strategies, and contexts for photography. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which photographic images are mobilized to produce knowledge and disrupt conventional ways of seeing in the service of science, social reform, political activism, and aesthetics. Students will have the opportunity to work first hand with the photography collection at Middlebury College Museum of Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART, HIS (S. Rogers)

HARC 0227 Poetry, Piety and Power: Indian Painting 1200-Present (Spring 2020)

This course considers the history, context, style, and significance of a broad spectrum of Indian painting traditions. We will look closely at Jaina and Hindu religious illustrations, the evocative courtly and religious imagery from the Rajput and other regional kingdoms, the extraordinarily refined and naturalistic Mughal imagery, the influence of colonialism, and the development of modern and contemporary works. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, HIS, SOA (C. Packert)

HARC 0230 Modern Architecture (Spring 2020)

Rotating skyscrapers, green roofs, and avant-garde museums: how did we arrive in the architectural world of the early 21st century? In this course we will survey the major stylistic developments, new building types, and new technologies that have shaped European and American architecture since the late 18th century. Students will learn about the work of major architects as well as key architectural theories and debates. Special emphasis will be placed on the cultural and political contexts in which buildings are designed. 2 hrs. Lect./1 hr. disc. ART, HIS (E. Sassin)

HARC 0231 Architecture and the Environment (Spring 2020)

Architecture has a dynamic relationship with the natural and cultural environments in which it operates. As a cultural phenomenon it impacts the physical landscape and uses natural resources while it also frames human interaction, harbors community, and organizes much of public life. We will investigate those relationships and explore strategies to optimize them, in order to seek out environmentally responsive architectural solutions. Topics to be covered include: analysis of a building's site as both natural and cultural contexts, passive and active energy systems, principles of sustainable construction, and environmental impact. Our lab will allow us to study on site, "off-the-grid" dwellings, hay-bale houses, passive solar constructions and alternative communities, meet with "green" designers, architects, and builders, and do hands-on projects. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART (J. Nelson)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0231

HARC 0237 Architecture of Planning and Place (Spring 2020)

As the earliest design activity of the architectural process, context analysis and planning play a significant role in shaping our built environment, from individual dwellings to campuses, towns and cities. This course introduces students to fundamental planning concepts such as open space and density, site characteristics and context, and the circulation of people, traffic, and services, with a strong focus on the relationship between built and natural environments. We will examine national and international case studies as well as local examples. Though no formal architecture experience is required, students will learn and use methods of graphically representing information and conveying design concepts. 3 hrs. lect. ART (J. McLeod)

HARC 0248 Gold, Sex, and Death at the Museum (Fall 2019)

Most visitors to museums notice the architecture, carefully chosen collections, and meticulously curated special exhibitions. However, behind this façade is a busy network of museum professionals coordinating every aspect of the institution’s life. Through readings and guest lectures, we will explore how directors, curators, and staff navigate the challenges facing the modern museum, such as establishing acquisitions policies in an increasingly uncertain art market, defining ethical standards for conservation, and addressing audiences with ever-changing needs. Speakers such as a curator, art critic, and conservator will contribute to our discussion, and attendance at a series of public talks is required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, NOR (S. Laursen)

HARC 0251 Court, Castle, and Cathedral: The Gothic World (Fall 2019)

This survey course will consider closely the major architectural monuments of the Gothic period in Western Europe, using them as a point of departure in a larger consideration of the artistic culture of this time. In looking at Gothic art and architecture, the class will ask some of the following questions: How were buildings embedded in the promotion of distinct political programs? How do liturgical considerations determine the shapes of buildings and sites? How can we track the emergence of a non-Christian "other" in art of all media? How can we characterize the visual and intellectual culture of "courtly love"? 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Garrison)

HARC 0254 Art in the Dutch Golden Age (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine the art made in the Northern Netherlands during the 17th century, the so-called “Golden Age” of the Dutch Republic. We will consider the effects of politics, patronage, religion, and warfare on the paintings and practices of such artists as Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, as well as many other lesser-known professionals, who specialized in still life, landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes, church interiors, portraits, and tavern scenes. We will also consider the history of printmaking in the early modern Dutch Republic. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (C. Anderson)

HARC 0256 Photography in the Middle East (Fall 2019)

In this course we will survey 19th and 20th century photographs of the Middle East. We will consider indigenous studios as well as European and U.S. photographers and artists who traveled to the region and circulated their photographs as visual knowledge of distant cultures, peoples, monuments, landscapes, and experiences. Looking at a range of genres, we will examine how photographs visually construct notions of race, gender, class, religion, and cultural otherness. Students will work with original photographs in the collection at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. 3 hrs. lect. ART, HIS, MDE (S. Rogers)

HARC 0270 Chinese Art (Spring 2020)

This course is an introductory survey of the arts of China from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. Considering works in their original context and in museum collections, we will investigate how art objects and monuments reflect the religious beliefs, political agendas, and aesthetic preferences of their creators. At the same time, we will pay particular attention to the local development of artistic technologies, the role of ethnic and national identity in art production, and China's place in the larger histories of the Silk Road and modern international commerce and diplomacy. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, HIS, NOA (S. Laursen)

HARC 0281 Viewer Discretion Advised: Controversies in American Art & Museums, 1876-Present (Spring 2020)

What are the “culture wars,” and why do they matter? What ideas are considered too “obscene” for American audiences? In this course we will explore controversies and scandals sparked by public displays of art in the U.S. including: Eakins’s Gross Clinic (1876), seen as too “bloody” for an art exhibition; the U.S. Navy’s objections to Paul Cadmus’s painting of sailors (1934); censorship and NEA budget cuts (Mapplethorpe & Serrano, 1989); backlash to The West as America’s deconstruction of myths of the frontier (1991); tensions surrounding Colonial Williamsburg’s “slave auction” reenactment (1994); debates over the continued display (and occasional defacement) of Confederate monuments in the era of the Black Lives Matter Movement. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, ART, HIS, NOR (E. Foutch)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0281 *

HARC 0301 Ways of Seeing (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CW (Fall 2019: C. Anderson; Spring 2020: E. Garrison)

HARC 0313 From Velázquez to Cabrera: The Arts of Spain and the Spanish Americas (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine the art and visual culture of Spain and the Spanish Americas from the early sixteenth to the early nineteenth century. We will consider the impact that religion, politics, and patronage had on artists working in Spain and the Viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru, focusing especially on how visual traditions, iconographies, and practices were reshaped when they crossed the Atlantic. We will also consider how—in the wake of global trade and exploration—contact between Amerindian, African, Asian, and European artisans transformed artistic production, patronage, and collecting practices throughout the Iberian world. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CMP, HIS (C. Anderson)

HARC 0330 Intermediate Architectural Design (Fall 2019)

This studio course emphasizes the thought and method of architectural design. Members of this studio will be involved in developing their insights towards cultural value systems and their expression in the environments they create. Participants work primarily in the studio space and rely heavily on individual instruction and group review of their work. The course provides a foundation for more advanced study in the areas of architecture, landscape architecture, and other fields related to the design of the built environment, and an opportunity to work with the Cameron Visiting Architect. (HARC 0130) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART (J. Nelson)

HARC 0338 Gender and the Making of Space (Spring 2020)

In this course we will investigate the complex relationship between gender and architecture, examining how the design of the built environment (buildings, urban spaces, etc.) can reinforce or undermine ideas about the respective roles of women and men in society, from the creation of masculine and feminine spaces to the gendered nature of the architectural profession. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will also uncover how the social construction of gender roles and gendered spaces are, and continue to be, inflected by race, class, and sexuality. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1407. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CMP, HIS (E. Sassin)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0338

HARC 0341 Berlin: History, Architecture, and Urbanism in Faust’s Metropolis (in English) (Fall 2019)

In this course we will investigate the rich and complicated built environment of Berlin. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will uncover how the city has been transformed from a cultural backwater during the early modern period to the current capital of a reunified Germany. By the conclusion of this course, you will be comfortable “reading” buildings and spaces and will be able to navigate both the physical city of Berlin and the many layers of history buried within. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Sassin)
Cross-listed as: GRMN 0341

HARC 0347 The Aesthetics of Asian Art: Is Beauty in the Eye of the Beholder? (Spring 2020)

In this course we will consider select Asian (Indian, Chinese, Japanese) and Islamic artworks in the Middlebury College Museum of Art’s permanent collection to explore the fundamental question: “Is beauty in the eye of the beholder?” Are standards in beauty universal, or are they always relative? We will ask how the act of beholding is entwined with cultural assumptions and conditioning and will address those assumptions through an intensive combination of close looking, critical analysis, and comparative consideration of a diverse range of artworks and aesthetic traditions. Comparisons will be made with select works of Western art in the museum. (not open to students who have taken HARC 0102) 3 hrs. lect./disc AAL, ART, CMP, NOA (C. Packert)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0102

HARC 0355 Digital Methodologies for Art Historians (Spring 2020)

In this seminar we will learn new technologies and study old gold in preparation for an upcoming exhibition of ancient Chinese gold at the Middlebury Museum of Art. Gold objects produced in China during the nearly one thousand years from second century BCE to the mid-eighth century CE bear witness to China’s military expansion and the interconnectedness of the Eurasian continent at the height of the Silk Road. The distribution of these luxury items across the ancient world is mirrored in the modern period by the global trade in Chinese antiquities in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which brought gold ornaments, horse trappings, and vessels into North American Museum collections. We will explore these captivating objects through readings about Chinese archaeology, goldsmithing, and the history of collecting, while at the same time learning about the latest digital tools for data management, analysis, mapping, and imaging used by curators and art historians. No prior experience with Asian art necessary. 3 hrs. sem AAL, ART, NOA (S. Laursen)

HARC 0357 Orientalism and the Visual Arts (Spring 2020)

In this course we will consider the relationship between visual culture and the politics of knowledge. Comparatively examining a series of cross-cultural encounters in modern and contemporary art, we will ask how knowledge is visually codified, labeled, and displayed. The course will begin with a reading of Edward Said’s Orientalism. We will then examine a series of case studies in order to identify and compare strategies of both “representing the other” and “speaking back.” We will address notions of exoticism, cultural difference, authenticity, and native authority with a particular focus on the ways in which the visual arts construct notions of race and gender and difference in representations of the Middle East, and more specifically, the Arab world. Case studies, drawn from the late eighteenth century until today, will be focused in the discipline of art history and the geographical regions of primarily the Middle East and Africa, as well as Europe and the U.S. 3 hrs sem. AAL, ART, CMP, HIS, MDE (S. Rogers)

HARC 0359 Artemisia Gentileschi (Spring 2020)

Who was Artemisia Gentileschi, and why do her personal history and her art continue to provoke such a wide range of scholarly and artistic responses? In this course we will investigate the culture of early seventeenth-century Rome, as well as the artistic training that shaped Artemisia’s style and approach. At the same time, we will vigorously examine the ways in which gender and sexuality conditioned the reception—and distortion—of Artemisia from the start. A consideration of recent scholarship, literature, film, and painting will invite us to critically examine the construction of this singular artist’s identity. 3 hrs. sem. ART, EUR (K. Smith Abbott)

HARC 0370 Potter, Painter, and Goldsmith: How Asian Art is Made (Fall 2019)

In this seminar we will explore the manner in which the distinctive artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan were shaped by the materials and techniques available to ancient craftsmen. Some of these technologies remained localized, while others—like porcelain and silk—went on to transform world history by fueling major export markets. Through observation of objects from the Middlebury Museum of Art, we will explore such questions as: How was Asian art made; Why was it made that way? What was its historical impact? Topics will include jade and other hardstones, bronze, textiles, ceramics, painting, lacquer, glass, and gold. AAL, ART, CW, HIS, NOA (S. Laursen)

HARC 0371 AS/Habitat: Plan and Design (Spring 2020)

AS/Habitat for Humanity Housing Unit: Research, Planning, and Schematic Design Architectural Studies at Middlebury partners with Habitat for Humanity of Addison County for the design and realization of high-quality, energy-efficient, affordable housing. The objective of this studio is to research, plan, and begin the architectural design for a housing unit with a specific program and location. Students will work primarily in the studio space and rely heavily on internal and external review of their work. The course provides a foundation for more advanced study in architecture, landscape architecture, and other fields related to the design of the built environment, and provides opportunities to work with professionals and Cameron Visiting Architects. Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time. (HARC 0130) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART (J. McLeod)

HARC 0375 Exhibiting the Bauhaus (Fall 2019)

The Bauhaus (1919-1933) was an experimental school, a modern laboratory for artistic innovation. In three different German cities over a period of 14 tumultuous years three different artistic directors, their colleagues, and students challenged the traditional hierarchy of the arts by placing the fine arts, design, and architecture on equal footing. With the help of primary and secondary source readings, we will not only consider the Bauhaus’ far reaching influence on the practice and teaching of art, design and architecture, but also its enormous social and political impacts. Taking these ideas as our point of departure, our class will work with select works from the holdings of the Sabarsky Foundation in New York City (including those by Walter Gropius, Wassily Kandinsky, Anni Albers and Oskar Schlemmer). A major part of our inquiry will involve the planning of an exhibition of these original artworks at the Middlebury College Museum in the spring of 2020. 3 hrs. sem ART, EUR, HIS (E. Sassin)
Cross-listed as: GRMN 0375

HARC 0510 Advanced Studies (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required) (Fall 2019: P. Broucke, R. Saunders, S. Laursen, C. Packert, K. Hoving, E. Vazquez; Spring 2020: P. Broucke, S. Laursen, R. Saunders, C. Anderson, C. Packert, E. Vazquez)

HARC 0530 Independent Architect. Design (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Supervised independent work in architectural analysis and design. (Approval Required) (Fall 2019: P. Broucke, J. McLeod, M. Lopez Barrera; Spring 2020: E. Sassin, P. Broucke)

HARC 0540 Supervised Independent Work in Museum Studies (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This practicum builds upon the Museum Assistants Program (MAP), the hands-on museum education program at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. In MAP, the Curator of Education trains students to conduct tours of the Museum’s permanent collection and of special exhibitions for audiences of peers, school groups, and the general public. Combining service learning with the opportunity to both support and learn more about the arts, students gain expertise in public speaking, art history, and public programming. HARC 0540 should be taken concurrently with the second semester of MAP. The class will culminate with a public presentation on a museum-related topic evaluated by a faculty member of the Department of History of Art & Architecture. (Approval required) (Fall 2019: P. Broucke, J. Vrooman, S. Laursen, C. Packert, K. Hoving, E. Vazquez; Spring 2020: R. Saunders)

HARC 0710 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (Fall 2019)

In this course students will conceive, undertake research, and plan the organization of their senior thesis in art history or senior museum studies projects. Seminar discussions and workshops will focus on research strategies, conventions in art historical writing, project design, and public presentation skills. (HARC 0301; Approval Required) 3 hr. sem. (C. Packert)

HARC 0731 Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research (Fall 2019)

This studio course constitutes the first part of the two-term senior design project in Architectural Studies. Pre-design research includes precedent study, programming, site analysis, and formulation of a thesis to be investigated through the design process. Preliminary design work begins with conceptual studies, and culminates in a coherent schematic design, to be developed further in Senior Architectural Design, Part II. Students present their work in graphic, oral, and written formats. (HARC 0330 or equivalent) 6 hrs. sem. (B. Allred)
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Independent Scholar Program

The Independent Scholar Program is designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have clearly defined educational goals that cannot be fulfilled within the framework of a normal departmental or interdisciplinary major. Independent Scholars plan their own curricular programs with the assistance of a faculty adviser. Independent Scholars cannot propose two majors, but can pursue an independent scholar major and one minor. For the 2019-20 academic year, application materials are due to the Curriculum Committee by Monday, October 7, 2019, for fall review; and Monday, February 17, 2020, for spring review.

Eligibility: For an application to be considered, a student must be in the sophomore year and have a GPA of 3.5 or higher. If approved, students must fulfill all requirements for the degree using their approved Independent Scholar plan as their major course of study. Independent Scholar proposals will be evaluated in light of feasibility, academic disciplinary integrity, and demonstrated ability of the student. A successful proposal must articulate a fully developed program of study, must include a methods course, and must demonstrate compellingly that the student’s academic goals cannot be met through existing majors.

Application process: To be designated an Independent Scholar, a student must undergo a rigorous approval process overseen by the Curriculum Committee. The process begins with an interview with the dean of curriculum. The student must subsequently prepare and submit a well-defined program to the Curriculum Committee, covering a description of the aim of the program, the independent work, and the courses he or she proposes to comprise the major. The proposal must be accompanied by a written endorsement of a faculty member who is willing and qualified to supervise the student, as well as a statement of support from an alternate faculty member. The Curriculum Committee will review all submitted materials, and if warranted, convene a meeting with the candidate and advisers. Final approval rests with the Curriculum Committee. An applicant whose proposal is denied is entitled to meet with the dean of curriculum or the Curriculum Committee.

Oversight: The Curriculum Committee will solicit updates from each Independent Scholar twice a year. Changes to the program must also be submitted to the Curriculum Committee, and the faculty supervisor will cosign all registration materials. The Major Declaration Form and Degree Audit Forms will be signed by both the faculty adviser and dean of curriculum. Students who elect to withdraw from the Independent Scholar Program, or who have their independent scholar status withdrawn, may be allowed, at the discretion of the committee, to graduate in general studies, without a formal major in any department.

Senior work: The INDE 0800 is a culminating experience for this program of study. This project brings together the course work the student has completed and incorporates all aspects of the study into one final project. Students applying to be independent scholars are asked to provide an indication of possible INDE 0800 projects at the time that they submit their proposals. Students are able, however, to change the topic of their INDE 0800 project in order to respond to new interests and information acquired during the course of their study.

The INDE 0800 project is undertaken for one or two terms. Students who wish to be considered for honors must work with a thesis committee. Thesis work most typically follows the procedures for the department most closely related to the project. Others may choose to work with an individual faculty member, usually the student's adviser. The choice of senior project is flexible. For example, with permission from the adviser, a student in the performing arts might want to incorporate a dance performance, musical composition, or some other feature as part of his or her course of study.

Honors: In order to be considered for honors, independent scholars normally must meet two criteria: a minimum average of B+ in courses taken towards the major and a minimum grade of B+ on the senior work component. The Dean of Curriculum oversees the first requirement and will inform the adviser of the student's eligibility. The senior work component must be evaluated by a committee of three faculty members (one of whom, at the adviser's request, may be a faculty member on the Curriculum Committee). Minimum thesis grades for each level of honors are B+ (Honors), A- (High Honors), and A (Highest Honors), but the determination of the appropriate level will be made by the thesis committee.

For more information about this program, contact Suzanne Gurland, Dean of Curriculum.
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Interdepartmental Courses

FOOD 0280 Middlebury's Foodprint: Introduction to Food Systems Issues (Fall 2019)

Food systems encompass all activities, people and institutions determining movement of food from input supply and production (on land and water) through waste management. The dominant U.S. food system is responsible at least in part for some of the nation’s most troubling environmental and health challenges. What do we eat at Middlebury? What difference does it make? How do we know? We will examine impacts of how Middlebury sources and consumes its food, and disposes of food waste, as a lens to understand sustainable food systems and how they can be achieved. (formerly INTD 0280) 3 hrs. lect./disc. SOC (M. Anderson)

FOOD 0281 Food, Power, & Justice (Spring 2020)

Students in this course will learn to analyze power and justice in relation to the food system. We will explore cases in which groups of people are experiencing injustice in opportunities to make a living through food production or other food system activities, inequitable access to food and resources, inequitable health outcomes related to diet (e.g., diabetes, obesity), and silencing or lack of political participation. Students will investigate organizations of their choice that are working to remedy inequitable power relations in the food system, and will present their findings to the rest of the class. (formerly INTD 0281) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (M. Anderson)

FOOD 0380 Hunger, Food Security & Food Sovereignty (Fall 2019)

Why have no countries—including the U.S.—been able to ensure universal food security, even though more than enough food is produced for everyone? To examine this question, we will analyze historical famines, the "food price crisis" of 2008, and debates about how to address hunger and food insecurity including calls for food sovereignty. We will read Julian Cribb's The Coming Famine as well as other sources. Students will select international or domestic food security as their emphasis, and examine an organization trying to tackle hunger and food insecurity. This course is open to juniors and seniors. (formerly INTD 0480) 3 hrs. sem. SOC (M. Anderson)

INTD 0116 Accounting, Budgeting, and the Liberal Arts (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Accounting is the lingua franca of commercial and financial activity, and applies equally to corporations, non-profits, and governments. In this course we will learn the basic concepts and standards underlying the accounting language including: revenue recognition, inventory, long-lived assets, present value, long-term liabilities, and financial statements. We then turn to the application and use of accounting information in forecasting, operating, and measuring an enterprise. These managerial accounting concepts are used to develop budgets and evaluate results. Our understanding of accounting and financial statements is needed to understand how business interrelates with society. The major course project will be developing an Excel financial model; no prior Excel experience required. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hr. lab (not open to students who have taken INTD 0316). (A. Magri)

INTD 0120 Introduction to Business and Enterprise (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course provides students who have little to no background in business with a broad overview of business and enterprise in the economy. Students will learn about types of enterprises and a functional framework for understanding a business, including strategy, finance, production, and marketing. This framework will be used to analyze various businesses and non-profits, exploring the advantages and disadvantages of various structures. The course will give overviews of accounting and entrepreneurship, and explore policy and philosophical debates about the morality of for-profit business and the need for corporate responsibility. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (Fall 2019: A. Biswas; Spring 2020: T. Nguyen)

INTD 0130 Business Ethics (Fall 2019)

Capitalism and competitive markets are often considered the most efficient system of simultaneously maximizing private wealth and public good. In the real world, however, truly competitive markets do not exist. Imperfect markets have been made to work efficiently while protecting public good through systems of public intervention, i.e., laws and regulations, and voluntary self-restraint by business organizations in response to societal expectations. In this class we will consider the role of ethics in business, with students analyzing the process by which ethical norms and strongly held moral beliefs guide the conduct of economically driven business organizations. Students will reflect on business managers’ responsibility to their owners, i.e., shareholders, other stakeholders, and society-at-large. 3 hrs. lect./dsc (T. Nguyen)

INTD 0198 Privilege and Poverty: The Ethics of Economic Inequality (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study the ethical implications of domestic and global economic inequality. Drawing from history, economics, sociology, philosophy, theology, and other disciplines, we will examine the causes and consequences of inequality, critically evaluate our usage of the terms “privilege” and “poverty,” and consider the range of moral responses individuals and society might have to inequality. We will ask whether it is unfair, unfortunate, or necessary that some citizens live with significantly less material wealth than others, and whether those who experience “privilege” have any moral responsibility to those who exist in “poverty.” (not open to students who have taken RELI/INTD 0298) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. PHL, SOC (S. Viner)
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0198 *

INTD 0205 Marketing: Formulation, Methods, and Research (Fall 2019)

Marketing is both a qualitative and a quantitative discipline. It is one of the rare business fields that actively draws upon and integrates the creative and analytical components of the liberal arts tradition. In this course students will be exposed to a broad overview of marketing principles, focusing on the application of marketing theory to for-profit, not-for-profit, and the public sectors. Cause marketing and social marketing techniques will also be discussed to determine their utility in combating social ills and promoting favorable public health behaviors and outcomes. As the implementation of marketing programs is undergoing a massive transformation from conventional to digital media, students will be exposed to digital designing and marketing, which are driven by a sound understanding of consumer segmentation, brand positioning, distinct product benefits, and relevant in-market executions. (INTD 0120) Introductory statistics course recommended. 3 hrs. lect. (T. Nguyen)

INTD 0206 Mathematics and Science as Art in Contemporary Theatre (Spring 2020)

In Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, the playwright somewhat miraculously manages to use the tension between Euclidean geometry and modern fractal geometry to explore the classical/romantic dichotomy in literature, science, art, and human personality. This is just one example of how acclaimed playwrights such as Stoppard, Rinne Groff, Michael Frayn, Simon McBurney, and others have effectively incorporated mathematical and scientific themes for artistic purposes. Our goal is to explore this relatively recent phenomenon in theater with an eye toward understanding the complementary ways in which science and art aim to seek out their respective truths. The course is intended to be experiential in both theatrical and scientific terms; our explorations will include the staging of scenes and discussions of theatre as performance; we will also undertake labs in the various mathematical sciences related to the material within the plays. (Dramatic Literature)/ DED, LIT (C. Faraone, S. Abbott)

INTD 0210 Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP, CW (Fall 2019: S. Cassarino; Spring 2020: D. Evans, R. Schine, M. Hammerle)
Cross-listed as: EDST 0210

INTD 0211 Public Health of Disasters (Spring 2020)

Both natural and man-made disasters, including the release of weapons of mass destruction, reveal a community’s preexisting vulnerabilities. The emergency response, and the nature of the disaster itself, combine to affect the short- and long-term health of the disaster-struck community. We will examine public health components of disasters, including emergency preparedness and response, relief efforts, health surveillance, and the ethical considerations of these activities. With case studies and readings, we will employ a public health perspective to understand the community impact of natural and man-made disasters in both developed and developing countries. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (P. Berenbaum)

INTD 0215 3D Computer Animation (Spring 2020)

3D computer animation has revolutionized animation, graphics, and special effects. In this course students will explore basic 3D modeling techniques, virtual material and texture creation, digital lighting, rendering, and animation. Every workshop will be hands on and fully immersed in this rapidly evolving technology. Students will leave with a strong conceptual understanding of the 3D graphics pipeline, a fundamental 3D skill set, options for further study, and an independent final animation project. 3 hrs. workshop ART (D. Houghton)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0215

INTD 0217 Introduction to Finance (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this introductory survey course we will cover the role of finance in society, the basic workings of the financial system, how funds are allocated within the economy, and how institutions raise money. We will cover a range of topics, including: interest rates and the time value of money; uncertainty and the trade-off between risk and return; security market efficiency; stocks, bonds and optimal capital structure; financing decisions and capital budgeting; sovereign risk; foreign currencies; derivatives markets; and concerns about the role of finance in society. The course will include discussions of current news events in global markets. Recommended: INTD 0116 (formerly INTD 0316). Students who have not taken INTD 116 (or INTD 0316) will be required to demonstrate basic proficiency in Accounting. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hr. lab (F. Van Gansbeke)

INTD 0218 Women in U.S. Electoral Politics (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore the current and historical status of women in U.S. electoral politics, using case studies, guest speakers, hands-on campaign training, and academic and political research. Recent years have been pivotal for women in U.S. politics, with Hillary Clinton's loss in 2016, the historic 2017 Women's March, and the 2018 Year of Women. How have these events affected women in politics specifically and electoral politics generally? Can women achieve political parity with men and why does it matter? How do factors such as race, gender identity, region, and party intersect with electoral success and experience? 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC (R. Hardy)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0218

INTD 0220 Management, Enterprise, and Business (Fall 2019)

What does it mean to lead or manage a business, non-profit or any other enterprise, and how does one go about doing it? Drawing on different management theories, this course will review case studies of organizations facing serious management challenges, and how those challenges could be addressed. Students will also work in small groups over the semester with a local business to explore their background and current issues, preparing a final report on how to approach those issues using practical management techniques including business problem solving, teamwork, and effective communications. Professor Colander will be assisting with the class, giving occasional lectures, and connecting the class to broad liberal arts themes. 3 hrs. lect. 3 hour lab (A. Biswas)

INTD 0221 Creating New Enterprises To Solve Significant Problems: For-Profit and Social Entrepreneurship (Spring 2020)

In this class students will explore how entrepreneurial innovators solve significant problems by creating new enterprises, and how these new organizations impact our society. In today’s society, entrepreneurship seems ubiquitous. At times, it appears that entrepreneurs can do no wrong. At other times, they are depicted as over-optimistic fools. Such polar characterizations may sell magazines, but they do not capture what entrepreneurship is, which involves a more complex and interesting story— in both for-profit and social entrepreneurship environments. Students will explore entrepreneurship in depth with the goal of penetrating the popular veneer and uncovering the essence of starting and growing new enterprises designed to solve significant societal problems. (T. Nguyen)

INTD 0235 Social Entrepreneurship and Global Health (Fall 2019)

Social and structural determinants of health create barriers to availability, accessibility and uptake of health services in many countries. We will take a case study approach to examining how social entrepreneurs develop and scale up responses to help clients overcome these barriers. We will explore factors including: human rights, poverty, disenfranchisement of women, government health care systems and infrastructure, human resources for health, task shifting, the politics of sexual/reproductive health, and infectious diseases. We will draw on articles and online materials. This course mixes theory and case study, and will count as an elective towards the Global Health minor. (not open to students who have taken INTD 1213) 3 hrs. lect. (D. Torres)

INTD 0255 Reporting and Writing the News (Fall 2019)

Students in this introductory journalism class will learn how to conceive, report, write, edit, and publish a variety of stories, including hard news, features, and opinion pieces. They will develop story ideas, conduct interviews, and write balanced, engaging articles on deadline, covering the campus and local community. Like professional journalists, they will practice crafting clear, accurate, and fair stories. They will follow the news daily and read a wide range of exemplary pieces. We will also explore the pros and cons of social media, and discuss the key ethical and legal issues facing reporters today. (Not open to students who have taken CRWR 1002) 3 hrs. lect. CW (S. Greenberg)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0255

INTD 0257 Global Health (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, demonstrating the inextricability of public health problems from the social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental issues that exist in an era of globalization. Examining these connections will enable us to critically evaluate the goals and strategies of public health interventions, and discuss factors impacting their success or failure. To do this, we must also examine the lens through which the West views public health problems as they relate to our cultural beliefs, biomedical views of health, sense of justice, and strategic interests. (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 0267) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, SOC (Fall 2019: P. Berenbaum; Spring 2020: D. Torres)

INTD 0273 AS/Habitat for Humanity Housing Unit: From Design Development to Bidding (Fall 2019)

Architectural Studies at Middlebury partners with Habitat for Humanity of Addison County for the design and realization of high-quality, energy-efficient, affordable housing. The objective of this interdisciplinary studio course is to develop the design of the housing unit from a conceptual level to the point that it can be bid upon competitively by contractors. This intensive process will be driven by a schedule of deliverables conceived to allow for construction to start in the following spring. Studio components include materials selection; energy analysis; code review, construction detailing; permitting; physical and digital modeling; engineering coordination; and construction specifications.
This studio will continue into INTD 0274: AS/Habitat for Humanity: Design Production. Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time. Contact Prof. McLeod prior to registration. (Approval Required) 3 hrs. lect./3hrs lab
(J. McLeod)

INTD 0319 Investment Management (Fall 2019)

In this course we will build on knowledge of accounting and finance and apply that knowledge to investment analysis, asset allocation, portfolio management, and capital markets and risk analysis. Designed to provide the basic concepts and principles of investing, the course examines investment theory and practice for investing a portfolio and evaluating its performance. We will discuss both traditional and non-traditional investments. Topics include securities markets, risk and return, capital asset pricing model (CAPM) and diversification, portfolio theory, private equity, valuation of equity, valuation of fixed-income securities, options and futures markets. (Not open to students who have taken INTD 0419). Recommended: Math 0116, INTD 0116 and INTD 0217. Students who have not taken INTD 0116 or INTD 0217 will be required to demonstrate basic proficiency in Accounting and Finance. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs lab (F. Van Gansbeke)

INTD 0320 Capital Markets (Spring 2020)

This course surveys and analyzes the instruments traded in modern asset markets, the mechanisms that facilitate their trading and issuance, as well as, the motivations of issuers and investors across different asset classes. The course will balance functional and institutional perspectives by highlighting the problems market participants are seeking to solve, as well as the existing asset markets that have arisen to accomplish these goals. We will consider the nature of structure of asset markets, and the design, issuance, and pricing of financial instruments, focusing on how arbitrage strategies keep their prices in-line with one another. Recommended: INTD 0116 (formerly INTD 316), and INTD 0217, (formerly INTD 317). Students who have not taken INTD 0116 (INTD 316) and INTD 0217 (INTD 317) will be required to demonstrate basic proficiency in accounting and introductory finance. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab (F. Van Gansbeke)

INTD 0426 Health, Food, and Poverty: Critical Frameworks for Social Change (Spring 2020)

Concerns around food, health, and poverty often intersect around the world, and pose shared challenges for countries in how to address them. What frameworks might maximize social impact in addressing such complicated global concerns? In this capstone course for students interested in privilege and poverty, global health, and food studies, we will critically examine a variety of frameworks for social impact, including solidarity, responsibility, development, aid, and entrepreneurship. Our examination of these frameworks will necessarily involve critical comparisons among the countries in which they have been employed. We will identify goals, strategies, and assumptions within each framework, as well as our role in social transformation in conjunction with other actors. Students will engage in interdisciplinary theoretical analysis and employ one or more frameworks to develop a proposal for a project on social change. (By approval only.) 3 hrs. Sem (Comparative Politics)/ CMP, SOC (M. Anderson)

INTD 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

Sections A, B, D, E, G, H, I
Independent Study
Approval Required
Section C
Animation Studio
Animation Studio is a real-world production studio in which students collaborate on the key roles in the animation production process. Under the guidance of the studio director and a faculty member, students will contribute to the creation of short films, scientific illustrations, historical recreations, and other projects. All work is done in the studio and students commit to nine hours per week. (Approval Required)
(D. Houghton)

Spring 2020

Independent Study
Approval Required

INTD 0501 Animation Studio I (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

Independent Study
Approval Required
(D. Houghton)

Spring 2020

Animation Studio 1
Having completed introductory coursework in the study of computer animations, students will collaborage on substantial, real-world animation projects spearheaded by the producer of the Animation Studio. This work will balance the needs of the Current Animation Studio project with the interests of all animators involved.
(D. Houghton)

INTD 0502 Animation Studio 2 (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

Independent Study
Approval Required
(D. Houghton)

Spring 2020

Animation Studio 2
Having completed Animation Studio 1, students will deepen their practices of computer animation by choosing a focus area (Modeling, Rigging, Animation, Materials/Textures, Lighting/Rendering, Concept Art, Storyboarding, Python Scripting, Project Research, etc.) Students will commit to a rigorous practice of this focus in a real-world scenario by applying their develoing skills to the needs of an actual production.
(D. Houghton)

INTD 0503 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

Independent Study
Approval Required
(D. Houghton)

Spring 2020

Animation Studio 3
Having completed Animation Studio 2, students will take on a leadership role in the studio, furthing their work in their chosen focus area while mentoring newer studio members. They will work closely with the Animation Studio Producer to make significat decisions about the targets of the current project. And they will investigate connections beween their animation work and the major field of study.
(D. Houghton)

INTD 0504 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Fall 2019

Independent Study
Approval Required
(D. Houghton)

Spring 2020

Animation Studio 4
Having completed Animation Studio 3, students will complete the study of their chosen focus area, creating professional calliber work that has a substantial impact on the outcome of the current Animation Studio Project. furthermore, students at this level will help shape future Animation Studio projects, mentor newer members of the studio and plan for independent thesis level work in their major field of study.
(D. Houghton)
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Program in International & Global Studies

International and Global Studies Requirements

General Requirements: A major must specialize in one of the following nine tracks: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European Studies, Latin American Studies, Middle East and Maghreb Studies, Russian and East European Studies, South Asian Studies, Global Gender and Sexuality Studies, or Global Security Studies. IGS majors may not double-count any course, including required language courses, towards their regional or thematic specialization.

Regardless of their track, all majors must complete: IGST 0101, five regional or thematic courses, three global courses for the regional tracks (from the Global list) or three regional courses for the thematic tracks (from the Regional list). Students must also study one of the non-English languages taught at Middlebury; study abroad for at least one semester; complete at least one advanced level language course upon return from abroad; and take a 0400 level IGST senior seminar.  With the preapproval of the IGS director, a student may take a thematic global seminar in a department.

Minors: There is no IGS minor. However, IGS majors are strongly encouraged to minor in any department or program that offers a minor and can accommodate them, so long as they do not double-count any course. Students wishing to minor in the department that teaches the IGS language of their focus should discuss their minor with the IGS director.

Specific Requirements: All IGS majors are required to take IGST 0101, and are expected to do so before studying abroad. IGST 0101 is not open to seniors except for those who declared the major as sophomores and spent the fall semester of their junior year abroad. Students who declare their major as a sophomore but have not taken IGST 0101, and plan to study abroad for only one semester must take it in the fall of their junior year prior to going abroad.

Language Study: Students must become proficient in one of the languages that Middlebury College teaches. Individual language departments determine what level of study constitutes proficiency, and students are expected to do advanced work in their target language. All majors must take at least one advanced course in the language of study upon returning from abroad and are encouraged to take more than one. The only exception to this language requirement is South Asian Studies majors or students who major in a thematic track but study abroad in India: these students must study a language when abroad, but are not expected to achieve language proficiency or complete an advanced language course once they return. Instead, these majors must take one additional regional or global course in their senior year.

Language Study for East Asian Studies
: Students who already have native proficiency in Chinese must fulfill the language requirements for Japanese. Students who already have native proficiency in Japanese must fulfill the language requirements for Chinese. The Chairs of the Chinese and Japanese Studies departments or their designees determine what constitutes native proficiency by evaluating students individually through interviews or tests.

Note: for EAS majors whose language is Chinese, the language requirement is: (1) CHNS 0101-CHNS 0202 (strongly encouraged to attend Middlebury Chinese Summer School, or take CHNS 0301/0302); (2) one semester at one of the three Middlebury CV Starr Schools Abroad in China; and (3) one, preferably two, of the following: CHNS 0411, 0412, 0425, 0426, OR 0475 upon return from study abroad in China.

Language Study for Latin American Studies: Students who place into Spanish 0220 or above must take at least two semesters of Portuguese (0210 and above) to fulfill the language requirement. Students who place into Portuguese 0215 or above must take at least two semesters of Spanish (0105 and above) to fulfill the language requirement.

Regional Specialization: IGS majors must take five courses that correspond to their regional track, in at least three departments. At least three regional courses must be taken at Middlebury. For East Asian Studies majors, at least three of the regional courses should be exclusively or primarily on the country that is the focus of language study, and at least one should be on East Asia as a region or the East Asian country that is not the focus of language study.

Thematic Specialization: IGS majors must take five courses that are specific to their track, in at least three departments.  At least three thematic courses must be taken at Middlebury.

Global Courses: Students with regional specialization are required to take three global courses (from the Global list); only one can be at the 0100 level. These global courses are thematic, trans-regional, emphasize connectivity of places and the circulation of ideas and phenomena. Except for students who study abroad an entire year (see below), these courses must be taken on the Middlebury College campus.

Regional Courses for Thematic Tracks: Students with thematic specialization are required to take three regional courses that correspond to their language of specialization (from the Regional list).  Except for students who study abroad an entire year, these courses must be taken on the Middlebury College campus.

Study Abroad: Students must study abroad for at least one semester (and preferably two) on a Middlebury-approved study abroad program in their region of focus. Study abroad must be in the language of study at Middlebury. Effective for the class of 2021, students who study abroad for one semester may count up to two courses and those who study abroad for a full year may count up to four courses toward the major. Major credit will be granted, pending approval, upon the student’s return from abroad. For regional courses, approval is granted by the track director and for global courses by the IGS director. Students should share the syllabi and all written work for all courses they wish to count with the track or program director, respectively.

Advanced Placement: Advanced Placement credit will not count toward the major.

Senior Program: The senior program consists of: (1) a senior IGST seminar at 400-level or with permission of IGS director, a thematic senior seminar in a department  and (2) an upper-level course, preferably two, in the language of emphasis after returning from abroad. South Asian Studies majors or students who major in the thematic track but would like to study in India do not take an upper-level language course, but rather, one additional regional or global course. The language departments will determine which courses fulfill this requirement, in consultation with the program director.

Honors: Students who seek to graduate with Honors may elect to write a two-term senior honors thesis. Students are eligible to write an honors thesis if they have a 3.5 GPA or better in all courses that count for the major. These include all language courses, all regional courses, all global courses, all courses taken abroad, and all courses with an IGST designation. Thesis grades do not count in the calculation of the GPA for honors. Thesis guidelines and procedures can be found at go/igsthesis.

Honors are awarded to students with a GPA of 3.5 and a thesis grade of B+; high honors to students with a GPA of 3.7 and a thesis grade of A- or A; and highest honors to students with a GPA of 3.8 and a thesis grade of A.

Seniors wishing to pursue a one semester independent research project should register for IGST 0700.

Winter Term Course: Students may count no more than one winter term course taken at Middlebury towards IGS requirements, pending approval of the track director. Students wishing to count a winter term course must provide the track director with a copy of the course syllabus.

Area Specializations

African Studies
Language/Culture: Language competency in French or Swahili; satisfactory completion of at least one advanced French course or one independent study in Swahili upon students return from abroad. If French is the language of emphasis, students must study an appropriate indigenous African language to a level of reasonable competence while abroad. The French Department will specify which courses fulfill the French requirement. The African Studies director will specify which courses fulfill the Swahili requirement.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

East Asian Studies
Language/Culture: Satisfactory completion of advanced work in either Chinese or Japanese. The Chinese and Japanese departments will specify which courses fulfill this requirement. Students who already have native or near-native proficiency in Japanese must fulfill the language requirements for Chinese, while students who already have native or near-native proficiency in Chinese must fulfill the language requirements for Japanese.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

European Studies
Language/Culture: Satisfactory completion of at least one advanced course taught in the language of emphasis (French, German, Italian, or Spanish). Individual departments will specify which courses fulfill these requirements.

Regional Specialization
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Latin American Studies
Language/Culture
: Satisfactory completion of advanced work in either Portuguese or Spanish. Students who place into Spanish 0220 or above must take at least two semesters of Portuguese (0210 and above) to fulfill the language requirement. Students who place into Portuguese 0215 or above must take at least two semesters of Spanish (0105 and above) to fulfill the language requirement.

Regional Specialization
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Middle East and Maghreb Studies
Language/Culture: Successful completion of three years of Arabic or Modern Hebrew (or the equivalent as determined by the Arabic or Hebrew program). Students who choose Modern Hebrew must be willing to pursue language study beyond Middlebury, if the Colleges Hebrew program is unable to offer a full range of advanced courses.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Russian and East European Studies
Language/Culture: Satisfactory completion of at least second- and preferably third-level Russian or the Russian School equivalent.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

South Asian Studies
Language/Culture: Students must pursue a formal course of study of a South Asian language while abroad.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program: See Courses and Requirements above. Note: because Middlebury does not currently offer a South Asian language, students are not required to take an additional language course on their return from South Asia; instead, they must take one additional regional or global course.

Global Gender and Sexuality Studies
Concerns pertaining to gender and sexuality, as well as how feminism is articulated around the world, have become central to the interdisciplinary project of international and global studies. The thematic cluster will be comprised of five courses, through which students can gain the knowledge and tools to bring feminist epistemologies to bear on their analyses of international and global issues. Scholars in feminist and queer studies—and in the subfields of postcolonial feminism and transnational queer studies, for example—have centralized the construction of space and place in ways that will be useful to IGS students. The cluster reflects the rigor of feminist and queer analyses of the global and international and is flexible enough to permit choices among students. The core GSFS courses will offer students the theory and methods needed for an engagement with global concerns, while the courses in the breadth requirements will enable an analysis of specific national/transnational courses. Since GSFS is an interdisciplinary program, the track reflects an interdisciplinary approach to questions of gender and sexuality

Language/Culture: See Language Study above. 

Track Requirements: Students must take 5 thematic courses from the list of approved courses.  They must take one introductory course (GSFS 0191, 0200, or 0289); Feminist Theory (GSFS 0320); one critical race studies course; and two transnational/national feminism courses, one of which should be taken during the study abroad semester.

Study Abroad:  See Study Abroad above. At least one study abroad course should transfer as a GSFS elective that meets the national/transnational feminism breadth requirement. In the semester prior to studying abroad, the student should consult with the GSFS director to confirm the proposed course would transfer appropriately.

Senior Requirements: See Senior Program above.

Global Security Studies
Security concerns are generated by a constellation of economic, political, historical, and environmental forces and are experienced at different scales—from the local to the global, and from the individual to the state. By drawing on courses from various departments, this track exposes students to security issues along three dimensions: global, international, and societal. The track highlights strategic concerns and issues of injustice, as well as the causes of insecurity over time and how it is experienced cross-culturally.

Language/Culture: See Language Study above.

Track Requirements: Students must take 5 thematic courses, in at least three departments and across two divisions, from the list of approved courses.  They must take one introductory course, two courses on international security issues, one course on societal security issues, and one course on global security issues. 

Study Abroad:  Security Studies majors must learn a foreign language and study abroad for at least one semester in the region corresponding to that language. Because security issues transcend countries and regions, majors may learn any language taught at Middlebury. Students who wish to study security issues abroad in an English language environment may do so, provided that they also study at least one semester in the region corresponding to their language.

Senior Requirements: See Senior Program above.

IGST 0101 Introduction to International and Global Studies (Fall 2019)

This is the core course of the International and Global Studies major. It is an introduction to key international issues and problems that will likely feature prominently in their courses at Middlebury and study abroad. Issues covered will differ from year to year, but they may include war, globalization, immigration, racism, imperialism, nationalism, world organizations, non-governmental organizations, the European Union, the rise of East Asia, politics and society in Latin America, and anti-Americanism. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP (G. Herb, D. Silva)

IGST 0410 Borders, Migration, and Identification in Global Perspective (Fall 2019)

In this course we will investigate the concept and historical emergence of borders, their relation to mobility, and the identification regimes that grew up around them. After interrogating the implications of what a border can mean and the different forms it can take—ideal and material, of mind and body—we will focus our study on the historical origins of modern state borders, various representations of borders, and case studies that particularly highlight the importance of borders regarding the supervision and the sorting of movement. Topics of study will include cities, physical barriers, refugees, and passportization. Regions of study will include the United States, France, Israel, Angola, and Guantanamo Bay. 3 hrs. sem. CMP, HIS, SOC (A. Prakash)

IGST 0478 Global Cities of the United States (Spring 2020)

In this seminar we will engage the study of New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles as "global cities." We will explore each as a site of networks that link populations in the United States to people, things, media, money, and ideas beyond the borders of the nation-state. The principal themes and issues covered during the semester will include the formation of transnational communities, flows of labor and capital cultural production, and religious responses to diaspora. Our interdisciplinary approach to these topics will require students to use methods and theories from both the social sciences and the humanities. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, NOR, SOC (R. Joo)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0478

IGST 0483 The Rise of Asia and US Policy (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, NOA, SOC (J. Lunstead, O. Lewis)
Cross-listed as: PSCI 0483 *

IGST 0500 East Asian Studies Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0501 Latin American Studies Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0502 Middle East Studies Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0503 African Studies Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required) (Fall 2019: M. Sheridan, E. Gebarowski-Shafer)

IGST 0504 South Asian Studies Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0505 European Studies Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0506 REES Independent Project (Spring 2020)

(K. Moss)

IGST 0507 Global Security Studies Independent Project (Fall 2019)

(Approval Only) (O. Lewis)

IGST 0700 Senior Work (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0701 Russian and East European Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0702 European Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0703 Latin American Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0704 East Asian Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0705 African Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0706 Middle East Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0707 South Asian Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)
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Program in International Politics and Economics

(1) Courses in Political Science: PSCI 0103, PSCI 0109, PSCI 0304 and three electives in comparative politics or international relations. At least one elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar in comparative politics or international relations.  See IP&E website for a list of eligible electives. PSCI 0304 must be taken at Middlebury College. Majors are encouraged to take ECON 0240 prior to PSCI 0304.
(2) Courses in Economics:  ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0210, ECON 0240 and two electives with an international orientation. One elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar. See IP&E website for a list of eligible electives. Majors must take a minimum of five courses in economics, regardless of credits earned at the secondary level (see the Advanced Placement policy for detailed information); at least four economics courses meeting the major requirements must be taken at Middlebury College, including the 0400-level seminar. Majors are encouraged to take ECON 0240 prior to PSCI 0304. Majors are strongly encouraged to take ECON 210 prior to any 400-level seminars.
(3) Language Study: Majors must achieve the language department's standard of linguistic competence before going abroad or must demonstrate equivalent competence in a language taught at Middlebury College through a language placement exam. Foreign language study while at Middlebury College is strongly encouraged. 
(4) Term or Year Abroad: Under normal circumstances, this will be completed at one of the Middlebury schools abroad. Majors should complete PSCI 0103, PSCI 0109, ECON 0150, ECON 0155, and ECON 0210 before going abroad. Majors are encouraged, but not required, to take ECON 0240 and PS 0304 before studying abroad.

Advanced Placement:
Students must take a minimum of 5 courses in each discipline. See the Advanced Placement policy for detailed information.
Winter Term CoursesWinter Term courses count towards the major only if they are listed on the IPEC Courses web page prior to winter term registration. No more than one Winter Term elective in economics and no more than one Winter Term elective in political science may count toward the major.

Double Majors and Minors: Because of the complex and interdisciplinary nature of the International Politics & Economics major, IPEC students are strongly advised not to pursue an additional major. In addition, IPEC majors may not minor in either economics or political science and may not major or minor in their primary language of focus.

Declaring a Major: To declare a major, students need to fill out both a major declaration form and an advising wizard form. Discuss your plan for completing the major (outlined on the advising wizard form) with your advisor who can be from either the political science or economics department. Have both your advisor and the Director of International Politics & Economics sign the major declaration form. Turn in one copy of both forms to the coordinator of International Politics & Economics. Turn in one copy of the major declaration form to the Registrar's Office.
First semester of senior year:
Early in the first semester of your senior year, fill out both a degree audit sheet and an advising wizard form. Print out a copy of your unofficial transcript and evidence that any courses from abroad have been approved for IPEC major credit (such as an email approval from a chair or director, or information from the programs abroad office). Bring these items to the Director of International Politics & Economics no later than a week before registration for classes for your final semester. Once signed, turn in one copy of the advising wizard form and the degree audit sheet to the coordinator of International Politics & Economics. Turn in one copy of the degree audit sheet to the Registrar's Office.
Honors: 
In addition to their 12 required courses, qualifying students can choose to write a senior thesis. To launch a thesis project, students must obtain a thesis advisor in both political science and economics, and submit to their advisors a thesis prospectus for formal approval. To identify suitable thesis topics, it is highly recommended that IPEC thesis candidates begin consulting with the potential advisors during their junior year. For details, deadlines, and a timetable, see the Honors Thesis page.
Honors Thesis RequirementsThe determination of honors, high honors, and highest honors is based on (1) the level of the grade achieved on the thesis; and (2) the level of the average grade received in all Middlebury College courses that count toward the IPEC major. Honors candidates must have an IPEC course average of 3.3 and a thesis grade of B+ to attain honors; an IPEC course average of at least 3.5 and a thesis grade of A- to attain high honors; and an IPEC course average of at least 3.7 and a thesis grade of A to attain highest honors. Note: Thesis grades do not count in the calculation of the GPA for honors, and a thesis cannot be pursued as a fifth course during any term.

IPEC 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

IPEC 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required) (J. Cason, P. Sommers, G. Winslett, E. Bleich, T. Byker, O. Porteous, O. Lewis, W. Pyle, J. Maluccio, S. Stroup, A. Stanger, M. Williams, A. Yuen)
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Department of Italian

Our programs offer students the opportunity to achieve high competence in written and spoken Italian, in understanding Italian literature and culture, and in applying this linguistic, literary, and cultural knowledge to the study of other disciplines. During the academic year our program emphasizes the study of literature and culture in the context of language acquisition. The other integral components of Italian at Middlebury are the Italian School (summer on the Middlebury College campus or at our satellite campus at Mills College, in Oakland, California), and the C. V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Italy (junior year or semester), where students can take courses in our beautiful Sede in Florence, or can direct-enroll in our programs at the University of Firenze, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome, La Sapienza. These rich programs encourage students to deepen and broaden their study of Italian literature, cinema, history, art history, political science, and many other disciplines. During the academic year in Middlebury, all four levels of courses in Italian are available every semester, and — for qualified students — faculty members are also available to direct independent research projects (ITAL 0550).
     Major in Italian:
For a full or double major in Italian, students must complete nine credits beyond ITAL 0103, including senior work: two courses at the 0400 level, but only one 0400 course for students who spend a whole year in Italy (Please note: ITAL 0101, 0102, and 0103 do not count for the major). Majors are normally expected to study at least one semester at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Italy (Florence), or at the Universities of Firenze, Ferrara or Rome, and upon their return from Italy they must normally take an Italian course each semester. A student can complete a major with courses at the Italian School in the summer. No more than three credits per semester from Study Abroad in Italy are applicable to the major. One credit towards the Major can be fulfilled by successfully taking a course in English with an approved section in Italian (History of the Italian Language; Italian Cinema; Italy Through Sicily).
     Joint Major in Italian: For the joint major in Italian, students must complete seven credits beginning with ITAL 0251, including one course at the 0400 level. Students must also complete a joint project credited in either of the two disciplines, as well as fulfill the requirements in the second discipline. Students are normally expected to complete one semester at either the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Florence, the University of Firenze, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome, La Sapienza. No more than three credits per semester from coursework in Italy are applicable to the Italian part of the major.
     International and Global Studies Major with Italian (European Studies Track):
Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies major section, the Italian language component of an International and Global Studies major requires completion of the following: 1) Italian courses required for study in Italy (see below); 2) one semester, and preferably a full year, at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Florence, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome; 3) at least one 0400-level course in Italian upon return from Italy. Regional specialization requirements for the International and Global Studies major may include ITAL 0290-level courses (in English) as well as 0300-level courses taught at Middlebury or in Italy.
     Minor in Italian: The Italian minor consists of six courses: ITAL 0251, ITAL 0252 (or two courses counted from ITAL 3251-3252-3253 in the Italian Summer School) and four courses at the 0300-level or higher. Students entering the program with a standing beyond the ITAL 0252-level are required to take at least one 0400-level course as part of the Italian minor. All courses at the 0300-level can be completed during the academic year at Middlebury, at the Italian School, or at one of the affiliated Middlebury programs in Italy (Florence, Ferrara, or Rome).
     Senior Work:Students who major in Italian are required to complete a senior project (ITAL 0755).
     Honors
: To earn departmental honors, high honors*, or highest honors** a student must have at least a 3.6, 3.7*, or 3.8** average or above in Italian courses other than the senior project, have a project defense, and receive a grade of at least B+, A-*, or A** on the thesis (ITAL 0755).
     Fulfilling The Middlebury College Writing Requirement: All Italian majors, joint majors, minors, and International and Global Studies majors with literature and culture focus in Italian are strongly encouraged to fulfill their college writing requirement by enrolling in CMLT 0101 Introduction to World Literature.
     Requirements for Junior Year/Semester Abroad: The Italian language proficiency requirements for participation in study abroad in Italy can be completed with any combination of courses at the Middlebury campus (summer or academic year) that culminates with the successful completion of ITAL 0252 during the academic year or ITAL 3253 at the Summer School. Students must also have an overall academic average of at least B-, an average of B in Italian (or additional course work), and be enrolled in an Italian course the semester before departure. Because of the demanding and intensive nature of our programs in Middlebury, and because of the difficulty of finding equivalent programs in the United States or in Italy, we do not accept alternative programs for the fulfillment of study abroad requirements.
     C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Italy-Florence:
Students may study for a semester or for a full year in Italy. Fall and spring term students enroll for language, literature, and civilization courses in September and January. For examples of recent courses, please refer to the course database: http://www.middlebury.edu/international/sa/cid.  Students studying in Florence are also expected to enroll in at least two elective courses at the Università degli Studi di Firenze. Subject areas generally offered there include archeology, philology, Italian literature, linguistics, international relations, political science, comparative politics, sociology, history, art history, and history of economics.
     C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Italy-Ferrara/Rome: Students who apply to the programs at the University of Ferrara or the University of Rome must contact the department chair to discuss their plans. Important: All students studying at the University of Ferrara or the University of Rome must take a literature course, in consultation with the department chair. Subject areas often offered include Italian literature, comparative literature, history, linguistics, philosophy, geography, art history, architecture, theater history, sociology, and international economics as well as other disciplines.

ITAL 0101 Beginning Italian (Fall 2019)

This course is an introduction to the Italian language that provides a foundation in both spoken and written Italian. Focus on the spoken language encourages rapid mastery of the basic structures and vocabulary of contemporary Italian. The exclusive use of Italian in dialogue situations and vocabulary building encourages the student to develop skills in a personalized context. Conversation and drill are stimulated and fostered through active reference to popular Italian music, authentic props, and slides of Italian everyday life and culture. Students are required to participate in the Italian table. 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen LNG (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, S. Mula, M. Van Order)

ITAL 0103 Beginning Italian III (Spring 2020)

This course emphasizes increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Italian life and culture continue to be revealed through the use of realia. Short reading selections on contemporary Italy and discussions enlarge the student's view of Italian life and culture. Students continue to participate in the Italian table. (ITAL 0102 or equivalent) 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen. LNG (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, M. Van Order)

ITAL 0123 Accelerated Beginning Italian (Spring 2020)

This course is an intensive introduction to the Italian language that condenses the material normally covered in ITAL 0101, 0102 and 0103. We will focus on the spoken language and encourage rapid mastery of the basic structures and vocabulary. Conversation and drill will be stimulated and fostered through active reference to popular Italian culture, film, and music. We will meet 5 times a week including two 75-minutes meetings and an additional drill session. After completing this course students will be fully prepared for second-year Italian. 6 hr lect./disc./1.5 hr drill LNG (M. Van Order)

ITAL 0251 An Introduction to Contemporary Italy (Fall 2019)

Intended for students at the intermediate level, this course will afford the opportunity to expand conversation, writing, and reading skills while consolidating knowledge of the more difficult points of grammar. The contextual focus of the course is contemporary Italian culture, including contemporary history and politics, the economy, the division between North and South, immigration from developing countries, environmental issues, and popular music, among others. Italian films, music, and articles from newspapers and news magazines will enhance and complete the learning experience. (ITAL 0250, waiver, or equivalent) EUR, LNG, SOC (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, P. Zupan)

ITAL 0252 Italian Culture II: From the Sixties to the Present Day (Spring 2020)

To deepen the historical knowledge gained in ITAL 0251, we will discuss and analyze modern and contemporary Italian literature of various genres, as well as essays, art, and film. In the context of reading, critical viewing, textual analysis, and discussion, we will continue to develop both historical and linguistic competence. Discussion and the writing process, along with selected exercises, will continue to refine grammatical competence. (ITAL 0251) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, LNG (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, P. Zupan)

ITAL 0299 Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English) (Fall 2019)

This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. EUR, LIT (S. Carletti)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0299

ITAL 0351 The Italian Family (Fall 2019)

Recent sociological analyses indicate that in Europe, family solidarity still remains strongest in Italy. The Italian family offers positive benefits, as the wide-spread image of close-knit, multigenerational families suggests. However, recent studies also demonstrate negative results, occasioned by adult children’s long dependence on the family, power struggles between matriarchs and patriarchs, and a relatively closed attitude toward blending Italian families with those of other ethnicities and races. How did Italian families evolve from the early 20th century to the present? Supported by historical and social science analyses, modern and contemporary literature and film will provide the focus of our explorations. (ITAL 0252 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem. EUR, HIS, LIT (P. Zupan)

ITAL 0380 Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Italy and Migrants (Spring 2020)

International migration is a major contemporary phenomenon for many countries, including Italy. We will read, analyze, and write effectively about migrants' stories, struggles, related issues for host countries, and how migrants' lives are portrayed in various media. The goals of this Calderwood Seminar are to learn about migration through the lenses of Italy, and to improve student writing. We will pay particular attention to writing effectively and for a general audience, through peer-writing sessions and group discussions. Class meetings are once a week, but students will be required to interact regularly outside of class, providing in-depth feedback to each other's essays. (ITAL 0252 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. CW, EUR, LNG (S. Mula)

ITAL 0459 Modern Italian Literature and Culture (Fall 2019)

This course will consider the works of Italian twentieth-century novelists and will explore the authors' narrative techniques within a larger discussion of the social context that their works reflect and interpret. Focusing on novels by Natalia Ginzburg, Carlo Levi, Carlo Collodi, Italo Calvino, we will discuss issues related to gender roles, family, education, class, and politics. Special attention will be devoted to each author's approach to the art of storytelling. Films inspired by some of the novels will supplement the readings. (ITAL 0355 or equivalent) 3 hrs. disc. EUR, LIT (S. Carletti)

ITAL 0490 Dante in Italian (Spring 2020)

This course concentrates on a close reading of the whole of Dante's Inferno. Students will learn about the historical and literary context of the work, read excerpts from the Purgatorio and the Paradiso, get acquainted with the long tradition of Dante commentaries, and contribute twice a week to an on-line discussion on the weekly readings. After two short papers that will analyze specific aspects of a canto, students will prepare as a final project a Lectura Dantis: a detailed analysis of a canto of the Inferno that will include critical material. (ITAL 0355 or equivalent) 3 hrs. disc. EUR, LIT (P. Zupan)

ITAL 0550 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Italian faculty as a group will consider and approve requests by qualified juniors and seniors to engage in independent work. Students must submit a prospectus that includes a bibliography of no less than five sources. Interested students should contact members of the Italian faculty before the end of the preceding term to discuss their project and to see if they are available to direct the Independent Study. Students must submit a prospectus with the department chair by the end of the first week of classesfor fall and spring term approvals, by the end the last week of fall semesterfor winter term approvals. Prior to submission, sufficient advance consultation with project directors is required.Junior students are strongly encouraged to consider independent study as preparation for senior honors thesis work. (S. Carletti, P. Zupan, S. Mula, M. Van Order, I. Brancoli Busdraghi)

ITAL 0755 Senior Honors (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Students majoring in Italian must complete an independent senior project. Italian faculty as a group will consider and approve the proposals, which should be submitted before the last week of the preceding semester. The senior project will be advised by one member of the Italian department, but will be presented to the whole department. Italian honors will be awarded to eligible students depending on the final grade. (Staff)
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Department of Japanese Studies

Required for the Major: The major requires students to achieve proficiency in Japanese language and culture. In addition, students must study in Japan for at least one semester and complete a 0400-level seminar in the Japanese Studies department.
     Proficiency in Japanese language requires four years of study (completion of JAPN 0402) or equivalent with at least 4 semesters of language at Middlebury in cases of advanced placement. To meet the language proficiency requirement, students are strongly encouraged to begin the study of Japanese in their first academic year. Students who begin study of Japanese in the sophomore year must attend the summer Middlebury School of Japanese or achieve completion of the equivalent of JAPN0202 before study abroad in Japan.
     Proficiency in culture requires a total of five elective content courses. At least three of the content courses must come from those offered by the department, while two may come from courses taken during study abroad or courses with a focus on Japan taught in other departments at the College (History, Religion, History of Art, etc.) and cross-listed in Japanese Studies. Departmental courses fulfilling the elective content course requirement include all courses below the 0400-level taught by the department in English.  At least two elective content courses must be taken before approval for study in Japan.  (One of the two courses may be one of the Japan-focused content courses cross-listed in the department.)
     Studying in Japan for one semester (Fall or Spring) is required, but studying in Japan for the full junior year is strongly encouraged. Elective content courses taken in Japan may count toward the major as determined by the department on a case-by-case basis.  
     Seniors are required to take at least one seminar in the Japanese Studies department at the 0400 level.
     Honors: Successful completion of a 0400-level seminar and JAPN 0700 Senior Thesis with a grade of B+ or above are required for graduation with departmental honors. Departmental honors will be awarded according to the grade point average of courses taken in the department, in the summer Middlebury Japanese School, and in Japan. A grade point average of 3.3 in these courses is required for graduation with honors. A grade point average of 3.75 and a grade of A on the thesis are required for High Honors.
     Required for the Minor:  Courses required for the minor in Japanese are completion of language courses to the level of JAPN 0202, or the equivalent, or at least four terms of Japanese in case of advanced placement, and two additional courses offered by the Japanese Studies department in culture, literature, linguistics, or film.

     Middlebury's Summer Language School: Intensive language courses are available each summer at Middlebury's Japanese School. During the eight-week session, students and faculty live in the same Japanese language dormitory, take their meals together, and communicate exclusively in Japanese, whether in the classroom or outside of class. For all students pursuing the study of Japanese language and culture, and especially prior to study abroad in Japan, a summer of concentrated study at the second-, third,- or fourth-year level in Middlebury's intensive Japanese School is strongly recommended. Students who are unable to begin the study of Japanese in their first year at Middlebury are strongly encouraged to begin or accelerate their study by taking a course in the intensive summer program.
     Study in Japan: Majors in Japanese Studies are required to spend at least one semester studying abroad in Japan. The C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Japan, located in Tokyo, offers intensive language courses and topics courses in Japanese. Students have residential options in dormitories or in home-stays arranged by the program.
     
Language Technology and Resources:
Japanese courses incorporate a variety of computer-driven teaching and learning strategies. Video and audio materials for first- and second-year levels are available on any computer, so that students can view and listen to authentic materials at any time in their dorm rooms or in labs. Japanese films, scripts, and anime in advanced-language courses are also available on the Web to students enrolled in those courses. Many Japanese literature and culture offerings are Web-based multimedia courses. Instructors often make use of conferencing and other electronic tools to extend learning beyond regular class hours. The Middlebury College Library contains an extensive collection of works in English on most aspects of Japan; in addition, there are 1,700 works in Japanese, with special strengths in literature and linguistics.

JAPN 0101 First-Year Japanese (Fall 2019)

This course is an introduction to the modern Japanese language aimed at acquisition of the four basic skills speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on thorough mastery of the basic structures of Japanese through intensive oral-aural practice and extensive use of audiovisual materials. The two kana syllabaries and kanji (characters) will be introduced toward the goals of developing reading skills and reinforcing grammar and vocabulary acquisition. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (L. White)

JAPN 0103 First-Year Japanese (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with the introduction of more advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. The continuing emphasis of the beginning Japanese course will be upon acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese sociocultural context. (JAPN 0101, JAPN 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (O. Milutin)

JAPN 0110 Current Social Issues in Japan (in English) (Spring 2020)

In this course we will use ethnography, fiction, and historical studies to examine some of the underlying themes of Japanese culture. Japan is a highly developed, post-industrial society renowned across the globe for economic success in the post-World War II period. What historical and social factors have shaped Japan’s contemporary culture, and how have interactions with other countries influenced Japanese society? We will study a number of different spheres of Japanese life including the family and the workplace to better understand contemporary society. We will pay special attention to Japan’s global position and its relationship to the United States. 3 hr. lect./disc. (Anthropology) AAL, NOA, SOC (L. White)

JAPN 0201 Second-Year Japanese (Fall 2019)

The goals of the intermediate course are to develop the ability to understand conversational Japanese at natural speed, to express oneself accurately and smoothly in various situations, to read nontechnical materials at reasonable speed with the use of the dictionary, and to express oneself in writing with relative ease. Understanding of Japanese culture will be broadened and deepened through mastery of the course materials. (JAPN 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (K. Davis)

JAPN 0202 Second-Year Japanese (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of JAPN 0201. (JAPN 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (K. Davis)

JAPN 0210 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (in English) (Fall 2019)

This course will provide an introduction to linguistics theories as applied to the study of Japanese. Through the exploration of a language that is very different from Indo-European languages, students will gain a better understanding of how human languages work and are structured. The relationship of language to culture will be a central theme in the course. Topics covered will include key concepts in linguistics, Japanese linguistics, culture, and pedagogy. This course will be taught in English; no Japanese language or linguistics knowledge required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, NOA (S. Abe)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0210

JAPN 0214 Modern and Contemporary Japanese Women Writers (Spring 2020)

A thousand years ago, women writers dominated the Japanese literary world. Then, for centuries, their skill was discounted, their works overlooked, and their voices silenced. Starting with the nineteenth century, however, Japanese women writers started to reclaim their grandmothers’ heritage. They took the male-dominated literary world by assault, pushing boundaries, drawing on their literary legacy and reinventing it, resisting the label of “women’s literature” so often pejoratively attached to their works. In this course we will explore these figures of resistance and their multilayered works in the context of the changing socio-political conditions that shaped women’s positions in Japanese society. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT, NOA (O. Milutin)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0214

JAPN 0230 Rethinking the Body in Contemporary Japan (In English) (Fall 2019)

In this course we will examine attitudes toward and tensions related to the human body in Japan. Looking at art, music, style, and social issues we will examine the symbolic as well as material concerns of bodies in contemporary Japan. Religious, historical, martial, and aesthetic understandings of bodies will be addressed. We will analyze Japan's current attitudes toward organ transplantation, treatment of the deceased, plastic surgery, surrogacy, sex change surgery and other embodied practices. Readings will include Twice Dead and Commodifying Bodies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, NOA, SOC (L. White)
Cross-listed as: ANTH 0230

JAPN 0280 Making Sense of Race and Ethnicity in Japan (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine and come to understand ideas about ethnicity and race in Japan using a critical historical approach. Probing the categorization of various groups in Japan provides insight into Japan’s diverse population and at the same time helps students see the historical and cultural specificities of racial categories across cultures. Students will read historical and contemporary texts on Korean Japanese, burakumin, new immigrants, and other groups, and examine both the development of these often-marginalized identity categories and the challenges faced by people considered “other” in Japan today. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, CMP, NOA, SOC (L. White)

JAPN 0301 Third-Year Japanese (Fall 2019)

This advanced course aims to increase the student's proficiency in modern standard Japanese, both spoken and written. A variety of written and audiovisual materials will be used to consolidate and expand mastery of more advanced grammatical points and vocabulary. Oral presentation, discussion, and composition in Japanese are also important components of the course. (JAPN 0202 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (O. Milutin)

JAPN 0302 Third-Year Japanese (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of JAPN 0301. (JAPN 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (S. Abe)

JAPN 0310 Variation and Change in Japanese (In English) (Spring 2020)

What can linguistic change tell us about human cognition and behavior? How does the notion of “politeness” vary across communities? How do speakers of Japanese perform gender and other social identities? In this course we will address linguistic diversity and dynamism by examining the Japanese language. Topics include workplace discourse and change in honorific systems. Employing classic works in linguistics and addressing contemporary cultural materials such as manga and J-drama we will apply theoretical frameworks from (socio-)pragmatics, historical linguistics and linguistic typology to gain a deeper understanding of how and why Japanese has developed to its present forms and uses. Students with an interest in linguistics, or in teaching and learning language, or science in general, may also enjoy the analytical approach. (No prerequisites. JAPN0103 above or equivalent recommended). Heritage speakers are also welcome. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, NOA, SOC (S. Abe)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0310

JAPN 0312 Tokyo: Between History and Utopia (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore the history of Tokyo—from its "prehistory" as a small castle town in the 16th century to the cosmopolitan metropolis of the 20th century—and trace how Tokyo has captured the imagination as a space of possibility, of play, and for many, of decadence. Through a range of sources, including films, novels, ethnographies, and historical essays, we will use Tokyo as a "site" (both urban and ideological) through which to explore broader questions related to capitalist modernity, the formation of the nation-state, cultural identity, gender politics, and mass-culture. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, HIS, NOA, SOC (M. Ward)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0312 *

JAPN 0401 Advanced Japanese (Fall 2019)

In this course we will read, analyze, and discuss advanced Japanese materials from a variety of modern and contemporary sources. (JAPN 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (S. Abe)

JAPN 0402 Advanced Japanese (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of JAPN 0401. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (K. Davis)

JAPN 0435 Workshop in Literary Translation (Spring 2020)

Literary translation is a valuable but often neglected skill for advanced language learners. In this workshop we will consider the basic theoretical arguments in translation studies influencing translation styles and then practice translation in a variety of literary genres. Sessions will include discussions of translation strategies and active peer critique of sample translations. Each student will produce a substantial translation as the semester project. Topics covered will include: text selection, translation ethics, practical methodologies, and publishing industry standards. (JAPN 0402 concurrent or prior) AAL, LIT, LNG, NOA (S. Snyder)

JAPN 0475 Advanced Reading in Japanese Studies (Fall 2019)

In this course students will read original materials in a variety of disciplines and develop skills to analyze and discuss them in Japanese. Advanced listening practice, oral presentation and academic writing will also be emphasized. (Approval only) 3 hrs. disc. (K. Davis)

JAPN 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Qualified students may be permitted to undertake a special project in reading and research under the direction of a member of the department. Students should seek an advisor and submit a proposal to the department well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken.

JAPN 0700 Honors Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Students write a thesis in English with a synopsis in Japanese on literature, film, or culture. The topic for the thesis is chosen in consultation with the instructor. (JAPN 0475)
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Jewish Studies Minor

What is Jewish Studies?

Jewish Studies ranges over the study of Jews and Judaism from the Biblical period to the present.  It takes Judaism not only as a "religion," but as a civilization and culture encompassing a rich textual tradition, literature in several languages, philosophy and theology, customs and ritual, art, music and film.  Jewish Studies is by its nature interdisciplinary and can be approached, for example, from within the disciplines of history, religion, sociology and anthropology, or literary study.  The program also sponsors a wide array of lectures and other events, including the annual Hannah A. Quint Lecture in Jewish Studies.

A distinguishing aspect of Middlebury's program is the depth of study possible in Hebrew.  Middlebury also offers a Hebrew Minor, with courses in both Modern and Classical Hebrew.  Introductory Modern Hebrew is offered every year, and Introductory Classical Hebrew in alternate years, usually in Winter Term. (For Hebrew course descriptions, click on the link to “Courses,” upper left.)

Participating Faculty:

Professors: Rebecca A. Bennette (History),  Theodore Sasson, (Jewish Studies); O. Larry Yarbrough (Religion); Tamar Mayer (Geography; Robert Cohen (English and American Literatures). Associate Professors: Rebecca Bennette (History and Director of the Jewish Studies program); Oz Aloni (Hebrew), Zohar Gazit (Hebrew). Program Coordinator: Vijaya L. Wunnava

JWST 0261 What is Jewish Thought? The Modern Era (Spring 2020)

What’s left of religion once reason is done with it? This is the question posed by the Enlightenment and confronted by the major Jewish thinkers we study in this course. Some become champions of Enlightenment reason; others later react against it. Is Judaism actually a rational religion after all-universal, but endowed with a particular identity by its practices and ceremonies (per Moses Mendelssohn)? Or is it unique because of its ethical monotheism (per Hermann Cohen)? Is it essentially a national identity (per Zionism)? As Jewish thinkers face challenges to received tradition, what exactly is the task of Jewish thought? 3 hrs. lect/disc EUR, PHL (R. Schine)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0261 *

HEBM 0101 Introductory Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2019)

In this course students will become acquainted with the basic grammatical and formal concepts necessary for the comprehension of the Modern Hebrew language. We will focus on the fundamentals of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with a particular emphasis placed on the acquisition of conversational ability. We will also make use of audiovisual, situational, and cultural exercises, and give attention to the elements of Classical form and style that provided a foundation for Modern Hebrew, which was revived as a vernacular in the late 19th century. No previous knowledge of Hebrew is required. 6 hrs. LNG (F. Alasiri)

HEBM 0103 Introductory Modern Hebrew III (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of Modern Hebrew 0102 which will be offered during winter term. Students will further develop their skills in written and oral communication, and will expand their knowledge of the cultures of modern Israel through both audio and visual media. (HEBM 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect. LNG (F. Alasiri)

HEBM 0201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2019)

This course is a continuation of HEBM 0103. Using authentic audio and visual materials, we will place emphasis on developing the skills required for intermediate-level written and communicative competence. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the forms and style of Classical Hebrew, both of which are necessary for formal composition, interaction, and reading comprehension in Modern Hebrew. (HEBM 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc LNG

HEBM 0234 State and Society in Contemporary Israel (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine Israeli society and politics in a period of rapid and profound transformation. We will begin with an introductory unit on Zionism, Palestinian nationalism, and the history of the state. Subsequent units will examine the social, cultural, and political characteristics of Israel’s main population sectors and religious groupings. The final units will examine ongoing political struggles, including struggles over the role of religion in public life; civil rights and democracy; and West Bank settlements and the Palestinian-Israeli peace process. Most readings assignments will be social scientific in nature but will also include journalism and literature. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, MDE, SOC (Z. Gazit)
Cross-listed as: SOCI 0234

HEBM 0269 Rites and Rituals in Israeli Society (Fall 2019)

In this course we will use theory and case studies, from Israel and its neighbors, to explore a wide range of rituals. We will examine national goals achieved with the assistance of ceremonies, and society’s imprint on its members through life-cycle rituals. We will address similarities and differences in the ways specific rituals are performed, and the diverse meanings they may hold for groups and individuals in geographically proximate yet culturally distinct countries, and in the heterogeneous Israeli society. Our aim is to analyze cultural repertoires and social relations, as are represented, reproduced, and contested in ritualistic activities. (formerly HEBM/SOAN 0254) 3 hrs. lect CMP, CW (5 seats), SOC (Z. Gazit)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0269

HEBM 0411 Translating Hebrew - Theory and Practice (Fall 2019)

In this course students at the advanced level of Hebrew will learn about the central themes of the theory and practice of translation. Special attention will be given to the particular issues emerging from the translation of Hebrew. Keeping in mind the theoretical background, we will translate Hebrew texts of various genres and periods. We will discuss the linguistic structure of these texts as well as their cultural background. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LNG, MDE (O. Tzuriel)

HEBM 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

HEBR 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019)

Approval required.
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Linguistics Minor

The linguistics minor consists of a minimum of five courses: two required introductory level courses and three electives.

Required courses for the minor are as follows:
LNGT 0101 Introduction to Linguistics
LNGT 0102 Introduction to Sociolinguistics or LNGT/ANTH 0109 Language, Culture, Society

Electives include the following:
LNGT 0226 Phonetics and Phonology
LNGT 0250 Morphology and Syntax
LNGT 0280 Formal Semantics
LNGT/WRPR 0110 English Grammar: Concepts & Controversies
LNGT/EDST 0205 Second Language Acquisition and Educational Technology
LNGT/JAPN 0210 Japanese Linguistics
LNGT/ARBC 0225 Arabic Linguistics
LNGT/ARBC 0227 Arabic Sociolinguistics
LNGT/RUSS 0232 Nature and Origin of Language
LNGT/CHNS 0270 Chinese Sociolinguistics
LNGT/SPAN 0303 Introduction to Spanish Phonetics/Pronunciation (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/SPAN 0317 Spanish Pronunciation (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/SPAN 0322 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/SPAN Bilingualism in the Spanish-speaking World (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/PHIL 0354 Philosophy of Language
LNGT/GRMN 0370 German Linguistics (taught in German)
LNGT/SPAN 0390 Linguistic Variation (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/ANTH 0395 Environmental Communication
LNGT/ARBC 0421 Arabic Linguistic Variation (taught in Arabic)
LNGT/SPAN 0426 Spanish in the US (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/ARBC 0435 Arabic Diglossia (taught in Arabic)
LNGT/ANTH 0459 Language and Power
LNGT 1001 Introduction to Translation Studies
LNGT/EDST 1003 Introduction to TESOL  

Please Note: Students are advised to check with the director for a complete list of courses that count as electives. All electives are taught in English, unless otherwise indicated.

LNGT 0101 Introduction to Linguistics (Fall 2019)

In this course we will discuss the major issues and findings in the study of human language within theories of modern linguistics. The main topics include the nature of human language as opposed to other communication systems; sound patterns (phonology); word-formation (morphology); sentence structure (syntax); meaning (semantics); language and the brain; language acquisition; geographical and social dialects; and historical development of language and language change. 3 hrs. lect./disc. SOC (T. Cook)

LNGT 0102 Introduction to Sociolinguistics (Fall 2019)

In this course, we will explore the ways that language creates and reflects social identities. We will look at the contextual factors-social, cultural, geographical, political, etc.-that impact language use and variation. Themes for this course will include linguistic variation, language and identity, language policy, and language in the media. We will consider questions such as: What distinguishes a language from a dialect? How and why do some language varieties become privileged? How do notions of politeness and respect vary across linguistic contexts? In essence, we will learn how language shapes our world, and how we shape language itself. SOC (S. Shapiro)

LNGT 0109 Language, Culture and Society (Fall 2019)

In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ CMP, SOC (M. Nevins)
Cross-listed as: ANTH 0109 *

LNGT 0206 Narratives in News Media (Spring 2020)

In this course we will consider questions such as: What linguistic strategies do the news media use to craft compelling stories? What are the dominant narratives at play about national and global social issues, and how are some journalists working to counter those narratives? We will employ Critical Discourse Analysis as a central framework, reading theoretical and empirical work by linguists such as Teun van Dijk, as well as from sociologists and political scientists. We will engage with “On the Media” and other podcasts, TED talks, documentaries such as Outfoxed (2004), and online magazines. Students will write for a variety of audiences. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW, SOC (S. Shapiro)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0206 *

LNGT 0210 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (in English) (Fall 2019)

This course will provide an introduction to linguistics theories as applied to the study of Japanese. Through the exploration of a language that is very different from Indo-European languages, students will gain a better understanding of how human languages work and are structured. The relationship of language to culture will be a central theme in the course. Topics covered will include key concepts in linguistics, Japanese linguistics, culture, and pedagogy. This course will be taught in English; no Japanese language or linguistics knowledge required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, NOA (S. Abe)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0210 *

LNGT 0226 The Sounds of Language: Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study the description and analysis of speech: how the sounds of language are physiologically produced, acoustically represented, and psychologically perceived and categorized. Through acoustic and phonological analysis, students will develop the skills to distinguish and produce the sounds of the world’s languages, as well as explore the sound systems of different languages, in order to determine which patterns differ and which patterns are common to all. Students will hone their analytical and technical skills by solving phonological problem sets as well as by using computer software (Praat) to analyze the acoustics of speech. 3 hrs. lect./disc. SCI (B. Baird)

LNGT 0232 The Nature and Origin of Language (Fall 2019)

This course will provide students with the basic principles and tools needed to study and explore languages. Relying on philology and contemporary linguistics, we will examine both the history of human language, along with recent efforts to explain its origin and development. This course will encourage individual effort and learning by incorporating independent readings, research, and weekly written and oral presentations. (T. Beyer)
Cross-listed as: RUSS 0232 *

LNGT 0242 The Non-Native Speaker in a Multilingual World (Spring 2020)

In this course we will address linguistic, educational, and ideological dimensions of the non-native speaker identity and multilingual societies. What does it mean to be a non-native speaker? Why is this linguistic identity considered by some to be a stigma and by others to be a privilege? How do societies succeed in and fail at integrating speakers of different languages? In which ways do language policies and educational practices in the United States and around the world reflect linguistic and social realities? 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC (P. Urlaub)
Cross-listed as: EDST 0242

LNGT 0250 The Structure of Language: Introduction to Morphology and Syntax (Spring 2020)

In this course we will focus on two fundamental areas in the study of language structure: morphology and syntax. Morphology is the study of the internal structure of words and their meaningful parts (e.g., roots and affixes), whereas syntax studies how words are combined to form larger units (phrases and sentences). Linguistic data for illustration and analysis will be taken both from English and a variety of languages belonging to different language families to help us better understand the unity and diversity of human language with regard to word and sentence structure. The course is intended to enhance students’ skills in linguistic description and analysis, as well as general problem-solving and analytical reasoning skills. DED, WTR (U. Soltan)

LNGT 0270 Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English) (Spring 2020)

Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver) AAL, NOA, SOC (H. Du)
Cross-listed as: CHNS 0270 *

LNGT 0303 Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (M. Rohena-Madrazo)
Cross-listed as: SPAN 0303 *

LNGT 0310 Variation and Change in Japanese (In English) (Spring 2020)

What can linguistic change tell us about human cognition and behavior? How does the notion of “politeness” vary across communities? How do speakers of Japanese perform gender and other social identities? In this course we will address linguistic diversity and dynamism by examining the Japanese language. Topics include workplace discourse and change in honorific systems. Employing classic works in linguistics and addressing contemporary cultural materials such as manga and J-drama we will apply theoretical frameworks from (socio-)pragmatics, historical linguistics and linguistic typology to gain a deeper understanding of how and why Japanese has developed to its present forms and uses. Students with an interest in linguistics, or in teaching and learning language, or science in general, may also enjoy the analytical approach. (No prerequisites. JAPN0103 above or equivalent recommended). Heritage speakers are also welcome. 3 hrs. sem. AAL, NOA, SOC (S. Abe)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0310 *

LNGT 0377 Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World (Spring 2020)

What does it mean to be bilingual? In this course we will study bilingualism with a special emphasis on Spanish-speaking bilinguals in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Course topics will include social, political, linguistic, and psychological aspects of bilingualism. Special attention will be paid to societal bilingualism, language use among a group or community, individual bilingualism, how an individual’s language use changes in different contexts and throughout an individual’s lifespan, and government and educational policies throughout the Spanish-speaking world. We will study texts, speech samples, and media that highlight different aspects of bilingualism. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LNG, SOC (B. Baird)
Cross-listed as: SPAN 0377 *

LNGT 0390 Linguistic Variation (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world. The focus will be on the linguistic aspects of the varieties of Spanish spoken in Spain, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. Topics will include lexical variation, phonological variation, morphosyntactic variation, and geographic and social factors in linguistic variation. Special attention will be paid to Spanish in contact with other languages, e.g. with indigenous languages in Latin America, and with Basque and Catalan in Spain. The discussion will also include creole languages (e.g. Papiamentu). We will study texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate specific cases of variation. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP (M. Rohena-Madrazo)
Cross-listed as: SPAN 0390 *

LNGT 0395 Language and the Environment (Spring 2020)

Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ CMP, SOC (M. Nevins)

LNGT 0396 Linguistic Anthropology Methods (Fall 2019)

In this course we will work with a method and theory known as the “ethnography of communication” to examine language use in socio-cultural context. Students will learn to form research questions and collect different kinds of data, including everyday spoken interactions, archival print sources, and social media. Students will learn how to document, annotate, and analyze their samples as speech events linked to broader discursive contexts and social relations. Students will also turn ethnography of communication upon social science research itself, examining interviews and surveys as communicative interactions. The course provides an empirical pathway to questions of cultural difference and social inequality. 3 hrs. sem. SOC
Cross-listed as: ANTH 0396 *

LNGT 0426 Spanish in the US (Fall 2019)

Aside from Mexico, there are more Spanish speakers in the US than in any other country. In this seminar we will explore various facets of Spanish-speaking populations in the US, including, but not limited to, linguistic aspects (e.g. Spanglish, Mock Spanish, Latinx English), and the use and reception of Spanish in public spaces (e.g. literature, television, music). Fundamentally, we will consider the diversity of Spanish speakers in the US and myths about them and the language(s) they speak. In addition to conducting original research, students will engage in community outreach in order to help dispel polemic stereotypes. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem. AMR, LNG, NOR, SOC (B. Baird)
Cross-listed as: SPAN 0426 *

LNGT 0500 Independent Work (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)
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Program in Literary Studies

Required for the Major:

The overall design of the program is simple, and its expectations are clearly defined. This is a program of study designed for students who by the time of their graduation from Middlebury wish to secure a comprehensive background in a full range of major achievements of world literature, as well as an ability to read and appreciate works of literature in at least one language other than English. To accomplish those ends, each Literary Studies major is required to take a total of 15 courses in literature over the course of four years. No more than six of these courses may be taken within a single department, and the individual courses may be selected from the literature of any language and of any period. They can be wide-ranging surveys or courses devoted to the study of single authors. The specific selection of courses is entirely up to the student, but in order to fulfill the requirements for the major, he or she will be expected to take: (a) two courses—one historical, one generally theoretical in orientation—selected from the list specified below under the "Summary of Major Requirements"; (b) one literature course in a foreign language (including Greek and Latin)—normally 0300-level (though FREN 0210 and the FREN 0200-series will usually qualify); and (c) a Colloquium for majors to be taken during the fall semester of the senior year. In addition, in conjunction with an independent reading course taken during the fall semester of the senior year, the student will arrange to take a one-hour oral examination in an area of specialization (as described below) that he or she has defined. This oral examination takes place at the end of the fall semester, and it is followed by a five-hour written comprehensive examination at the end of winter term. 
The written examination will require the student to demonstrate a knowledge of a range of major works by the authors listed below. For reasons of practicality, the number of authors from this list whose works students will actually have an opportunity to discuss on the comprehensive examination in any given year will be limited to 12.
 The following current list will give the student a clear sense of the particular range of major authors it is presumed that he or she will be familiar with by senior year:

Homer
Aeschylus
Sophocles
Vergil
Ovid
Lucretius
Dante
Boccaccio
Pirandello
Cervantes
Tirso de Molina
Calderón
Lope de Vega
Borges
Moliere
Baudelaire
Proust
Goethe
Kafka
Mann
Wang Wei
Cáo Xuegin
Lu-Xùn
Gogol
Dostoevsky
Tolstoy
Shakespeare
Milton
Wordsworth
Joyce
Emerson
Melville
Faulkner
Murasaki Shikibu
Chikamatsu Monzaemon
Natsume Soseki

In addition to works by authors whose names appear on this primary list, Literary Studies majors will be urged to deepen their general cultural background by becoming acquainted with the Old and New Testaments (especially Genesis, Psalms, Job, Song of Songs, Matthew, John, Revelation, and the Epistle to the Romans), as well as principal works of Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Darwin, Marx, and Freud. A full list of the specific works by these authors included on the current Literary Studies comprehensive reading list is available on the Literary Studies Program website, or from Professor Donadio, the director of the program.

Beyond the two historical and theoretical courses required for the program (both of which are counted toward the major), the 0300-level foreign language literature course, the senior year colloquium (LITS 0705) and independent reading course (LITS 0701), and the total of 15 courses, the general, defining requirement for the Literary Studies major is the winter term comprehensive examination (LITS 0700), the overall range of which is specified in the comprehensive reading list. In the process of working toward this general literary education, the student will also be expected to use the independent reading course (LITS 0701) to focus on a group of works chosen to represent an individual specialization in the literature of a particular culture (e.g., German, English, American, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, etc.), or period (e.g., the eighteenth century, the twentieth century, etc.), or genre (e.g., the novel, the drama, lyric poetry, etc.). The specific authors and the 10 to 12 texts selected by the student for this specialization will be approved by the director in conjunction with two faculty examiners with relevant expertise in the fields represented. This oral examination is the culmination of the independent reading course (LITS 0701) in the fall semester. At the end of the following winter term, there is a five-hour written winter term comprehensive examination based on the reading list. Students qualifying for honors (a B+ average in the major, including the comprehensive examination) will complete a Senior Honors Essay (LITS 0710) in their final semester.

After completing all the specified requirements, the student will be graduated from Middlebury College as a Literary Studies major with a particular area of interest: for example, epic poetry, European drama, Japanese literature, the literature of the nineteenth century, etc. Should the student wish to pursue graduate study, depending on the nature of his or her interests and preparation, the student would be in a good position to do so in such fields as English or American literature, comparative literature, or the literature of a specific foreign language; in addition, he or she would have a secure background for further studies in such fields as law, political philosophy, religion, journalism, publishing, medicine, and cultural and intellectual history.
 Literary Studies majors have gone on to do work in all these areas.

As indicated above, students will be eligible for departmental honors in Literary Studies if in their combined performance in literature courses and on the two parts of the comprehensive examination they have achieved an average grade of B+ or higher. Honors will be awarded on the basis of the overall grade average in the major, performance on the comprehensive examination, and a senior honors essay of 30-40 pages to be completed during the spring semester of the senior year (this project counts as one course). A one-hour oral examination on the content and implications of this honors essay is also required, and this examination will be conducted by two faculty members with particular expertise in the fields represented.

Summary of Major Requirements:

Total of 15 courses (no more than six in any one department).

(1) Two courses selected from the historical and theoretical courses listed below, one from each category, as currently offered. (With the permission of the director, alternative courses may be substituted for those specified here.)

Historical:

CLAS 0150 Greek and Roman Epic

CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy

RELI 0180 Introduction to Biblical Literature

PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Science

Theoretical:

ENAM 0205 Contemporary Literary Theory

CHNS/LITS 0360 Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

(2) One course in literature in a foreign language (normally 0300 level, but FREN 0201 and FREN 0220 series would usually qualify).

(3) At least four literature courses, but no more than six, to be taken within a single department. (Courses in language instruction may not be counted toward this requirement.)

(4) Independent Reading Course (LITS 0701) in Area of Specialization (by genre, period, theme, or national literature), an area of particular interest  defined by the student in consultation with the director. A one-hour oral examination, to be taken in the fall semester before the winter term written comprehensive examination in the senior year, is devoted to this area of special interest. The 10 to12 texts required for this examination will be chosen by the student in conjunction with the director and two faculty examiners with appropriate backgrounds in the fields represented.

(5) Senior Colloquium for majors (LITS 0705, open to non-majors if space is available), focused on a range of works on the comprehensive reading list.

(6) Senior Comprehensive Examination (LITS 0700) in preparation for the written comprehensive examination. Students engaged in such preparation arrange  to meet with one another over the course of winter term, and often solicit faculty participation in discussions of individual texts they have chosen to work on as a group.

(7) Written Comprehensive Examination (LITS 0700) (on works that appear on the Literary Studies comprehensive reading list), taken at the end of winter term of the senior year. As indicated, this five-hour written examination represents the second part of the comprehensive requirement, the oral specialization examination in LITS 0701 being the first.

(8) Students achieving an average grade of B+ or higher in the program will be eligible for honors. Honors will be awarded on the basis of the overall grade average in courses in the major, performance on the comprehensive examination, and a senior honors essay of 30-40 pages, to be completed (for one course credit) during the spring semester of the senior year; a one-hour oral examination on the content of this essay is administered by two faculty examiners with expertise in the field of investigation represented.

Please Note: Any literature course in the Middlebury College curriculum (and in approved programs abroad or at other U.S. institutions) may be used to fulfill the requirements in the Program in Literary Studies. Hence, in addition to the specific LITS course descriptions indicated below, students majoring in Literary Studies as well as non-majors with an interest in literature are urged to read through the entire literature offering by various departments (including language departments) to secure a full sense of the range of courses available in any academic year.

LITS 0282 The New Testament in Narrative and Art: Considering the Aesthetics of the Christian Story (Fall 2019)

For two millennia, the figure of Jesus has captivated the imagination of spiritual seekers around the world. In this course we will explore literary and theological dimensions of the New Testament with special attention to the Gospel as stories, while considering works of art inspired by its themes and characters across time. Paintings, cinematography, and literary narratives from The Protevangelium of James and Maximus the Confessor, to Dostoevsky, Kazantzakis, Sholem Asch, Saramago, Flannery O'Connor, and Marilynne Robinson, will invite the question: how have word and image shaped the understanding of the sacred stories and Christian imagination? Through close readings of the New Testament and exegetical discussion combining systematic with narrative theology, we will analyze style and composition, situate the texts in their historical context, and explore various readers’ perspectives, ancient and modern. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, LIT, PHL (M. Hatjigeorgiou)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0282 *

LITS 0500 Independent Research Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required) (Staff)

LITS 0510 Independent Essay Project (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required) (Fall 2019: M. Hatjigeorgiou, P. Sfyroeras)

LITS 0701 Independent Reading Course (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Intended for majors in literary studies preparing for the senior comprehensive examinations. At the conclusion of this course, students will take a one-hour oral examination (part of the senior comprehensive examination) in a specialization of their choice. (Approval Required) (Staff)

LITS 0705 Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies (Fall 2019)

Although it is required of all Literary Studies seniors, this course is intended for students working in any discipline who seek a close encounter with some of the greatest achievements of the literary imagination. In addition to being understood as distinctive artistic and philosophical accomplishments, the major works which constitute the reading list will also be seen as engaged in a vital, overarching cultural conversation across temporal and geographical boundaries that might otherwise seem insurmountable. The texts for this semester include Homer’s Odyssey, Aeschylus’ Oresteia, Cervantes’ Don Quixote, Dostoevsky’ Crime and Punishment, Pirandello’ Six Characters in Search of an Author, and Borges’ Ficciones. (Open to non-majors with the approval of the instructor.) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Sfyroeras)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0705

LITS 0710 Senior Honors Essay (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)
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Department of Luso Hispanic Studies

Major in Spanish: The major consists of a minimum of nine courses numbered 0300 or above. The requirements are as follows:

I. Eight courses from the 0300-0399 level.

  • A maximum of three courses from the 0300-0349 level may count towards the major (one must be taken before studying abroad)
  • At least five courses must be at the 0350 level or above.
  • At least two of these 0350 level or above courses must be taken at Middlebury College during the academic year. The other elective courses may be taken on the Middlebury College campus during the academic year or at the Middlebury College Spanish School, the School in Spain, the Schools in Latin America, or, with departmental approval, at study abroad programs in Latin America sanctioned by Middlebury's Programs Abroad Committee.

II. A 0400-level seminar  must be taken on the Middlebury College campus during the academic year in the student’s senior year.

  • Study abroad in in a Spanish-speaking country for at least one semester is highly recommended and a course at the 300 level is required before studying abroad. Students are expected to consult with their advisor when selecting courses and making plans to study abroad.

Joint Major: The Spanish component of a joint major will consist of at least six courses from departmental offerings numbered 0300 and above, as follows:

II. Five courses from the 0300-0399 level.

  • A maximum of one course from the 0300-0349 level may count towards the major. (must be taken before studying abroad)
  • At least four courses must be at the 0350 level or above.
  • At least two of these 0350 level or above courses must be taken at Middlebury College during the academic year. The other elective courses may be taken on the Middlebury College campus during the academic year or at the Middlebury College Spanish School, the School in Spain, the Schools in Latin America, or, with departmental approval, at study abroad programs in Latin America sanctioned by Middlebury's Programs Abroad Committee.

II. A 0400 level seminar must be taken on the Middlebury College campus during the academic year in the student’s senior year.

  • Study abroad in a Spanish-speaking country for at least one semester is highly recommended and a course at the 300 level is required before studying abroad. Students are expected to consult with their advisor when selecting courses and making plans to study abroad.

Spanish Courses

• Courses labeled SPAN 0100 through 0299 are Elementary, Intermediate and Advanced Intermediate language instruction focused on developing skills in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing.

• Courses labeled SPAN 0300 through 0349 introduce writers and significant themes in literature, film, linguistics, and culture & civilization. These courses are closed to juniors and seniors returning from study in Spain or Latin America.

• Courses labeled SPAN 0350 through 0399 are advanced offerings that explore in greater depth a specific line of inquiry, literary, cultural or linguistic issue, or theme in Spanish and Spanish American writing and thought, and satisfy the International Studies advanced language requirement in Spanish.

Courses taken abroad will count as this level, regardless of their course number.

• Courses labeled SPAN 0400 and above are reserved for seniors who are Spanish majors, Latin American Studies majors with a literature and culture track, and European Studies majors with a Spanish literature and culture track; others only by approval.

Minor in Spanish: The Spanish minor consists of at least four courses numbered 0300 or above, at least two of which are at the 0350-level or above. Courses can be taken on campus during the academic year or at the Middlebury College Spanish School, the School in Spain, the Schools in Latin America, or, with departmental approval, at study abroad programs in Spain or Latin America sanctioned by Middlebury’s Programs Abroad Committee. At least one 0350-level or above course must be taken at the Middlebury College campus during the academic year.

Senior Work: During the senior year, majors and joint majors must complete a 0400-level seminar.

International and Global Studies Major with Spanish Language:   Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies Major section, completion of the Spanish language component requires: (1) proficiency in Spanish (a minimum of one course at the 0300 level or above, or work in the Spanish summer school at the 0300 level or above); (2) at least one semester, preferably a year, abroad in a Spanish-speaking country; and (3) one or more courses at or above the 0350 level upon return from abroad.

Advanced Placement: College credit is awarded for successful performance on the Advanced Placement Examinations in Spanish Language and/or Spanish Literature. In all cases the student must satisfactorily complete a course at the 0300 level before the credit will be awarded. AP credit does not affect course placement, nor does it count towards the major or minor. There is a maximum of one credit allowed for Spanish AP.

Programs Abroad for Juniors: The department expects that majors will spend at least one semester in residence in a Spanish-speaking country. Middlebury's School in Spain offers both year and semester programs in Madrid. Sites in Cordoba, Getafe, and Logroño are designed for immersion in the Spanish university system. Middlebury's Schools in Latin America (Argentina, Chile, México and Uruguay) offers both year and semester programs. Internship opportunities are available. For more information on these programs, please see the Schools Abroad Web page: http://www.middlebury.edu/sa/. Students who are interested in going abroad and who are also double or joint majors or are thinking of participating in the teacher education program should consult with their advisors in both areas as early as possible to avoid any conflict in plans.
Students who are planning to study abroad at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury Schools in Spain or Latin America are required to have taken at least one course at the 0300 level or above.

Honors: The department will award honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance in SPAN 0705. All students interested in receiving honors must contact their advisors at the start of their last year at Middlebury; either in September or in February. Please see the course description for SPAN 0705.

Portuguese

Minor in Portuguese: The Portuguese minor consists of at least four courses numbered 0300 or above, at least two of which are at the 0350-level or above. Courses can be taken on campus during the academic year or at the Middlebury College Portuguese Language School, the C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Brazil, or, with departmental approval, at study abroad programs in Lusophone countries sanctioned by Middlebury’s Programs Abroad Committee. At least one 0350-level or above course must be taken at the Middlebury College campus during the academic year.
     International Studies: Latin American studies majors with a track in the literature and culture of Brazil must take, in addition to their core and regional requirements: PGSE 0202 or its equivalent, four upper level courses in literature or culture taken at Middlebury or in Brazil, and PGSE 0500 during the senior year. At least one elective must be taken at Middlebury during the academic year.

PGSE 0210 Beginning Portuguese for Romance-Language Speakers (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is designed for Romance-language speakers and advanced Romance-language learners at the 0200 or 0300-level, depending on the language. It is an intensive introduction to Portuguese, covering all of the basic structures and vocabulary as well as important aspects of the cultures of Lusophone countries. Language learning is based on the students’ previous knowledge of one or more Romance languages. Students are expected to continue with PGSE 0215, after successful completion of PGSE 0210.
6 hrs. lect./disc.
LNG (Fall 2019: M. Higa, F. Rocha; Spring 2020: F. Rocha)

PGSE 0215 Advanced Portuguese (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of PGSE 0210. It is designed to balance textual and cultural analysis with a thorough review of grammar at an intermediate/high level. Students will hone their critical thinking and linguistic skills through guided readings, oral discussions, and short written assignments on Lusophone cultural topics. (PGSE 0210 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Fall 2019: M. Higa; Spring 2020: F. Rocha)

PGSE 0321 With Flavor: Food and Brazilian Culture (Fall 2019)

In this course we will focus on the food being produced and consumed in Brazil in its relation to Brazilian culture and history. Topics include how food and Brazilian culinary practices are related to certain aspects of Brazilian society, such as the Northeast’s landed oligarchy, Afro-Brazilian culture in Bahia, regional, national, and transnational identities, women and gender constructs, and the experience of hunger. Narratives (fictional, non-fictional, and theoretical) will be drawn from different media: printed and online texts as well as audio-visual materials, such as songs and popular music videos, films, TV series and cooking programs. The course will also entail preparation and degustation of Brazilian dishes. (PGSE 0215 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, AMR, LNG, SOC (F. Rocha)

PGSE 0357 The Luso Hispanic Fiction Writer (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study the representation of the writer of fiction in Luso-Hispanic contemporary narrative. As Julio Premat argues, writers often understand their task not only as the creation of literary works, but also as the fashioning of an authorial self within fiction and through essays, interviews, photographs. We will study how and why such images are crafted, and how they reflect ideas about the aesthetic and political role of the writer, the “truth” of fiction, the interplay between literature and reality, and the relationship between authorship and gender. Portuguese-language texts will be read in Spanish translation. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG (L. Castaneda)
Cross-listed as: SPAN 0357 *

PGSE 0370 A Cultural History of Brazilian Soccer (Spring 2020)

Brazilians usually joke that volleyball is the country’s #1 sport, because soccer in Brazil does not count as a sport, it is a religion. In this course students will learn about the history of Brazilian soccer and how it became a “religion”. This history begins in 1895 when Charles Miller, coming from England, organized in São Paulo the first soccer game ever played in Brazil. Since then, the sport has deeply permeated Brazilian culture and arts (literature, music, cinema). Topics to be examined in this historical context are race, social class, gender, politics, and national identity. Materials to be discussed include fictional and non-fictional texts, songs, videos, and movies. Depending on the number of students enrolled, the course will be scheduled to have one soccer practice and one game (against another team) during the semester. Students may opt out of the practice and/or the game if they want. (PGSE 0215, or by approval) 3hrs. lect AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG (M. Higa)

PGSE 0385 Deconstructing Whiteness in the Luso-Hispanic World (Spring 2020)

In this course we will critically examine constructions and realities of whiteness in the Luso-Hispanic world(s), traversing Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Caribbean, and Europe. Through different readings, cultural products, and disciplinary lenses, we will grapple with whiteness as identity, as concentration of power, as national and global project, and as a set of discourses impacting gender, sexuality, disability, and labor. We will consider how whiteness is claimed and represented in interwoven contexts of colonialism, slavery, eugenics, nationhood, and late capitalism; paying particular attention to how it is simultaneously decentered and reproduced in narratives of racial exceptionalism, mestiçagem/mestizaje, and post-racialism. (PGSE 215 and SPAN 300 or above, or by approval) Taught in Spanish and Portuguese. 3hrs. lect. CMP, HIS, SOC (D. Silva)
Cross-listed as: SPAN 0385

PGSE 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

(Approval Required)

SPAN 0101 Beginning Spanish I (Fall 2019)

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of grammar and focuses on the development of four skills in Spanish: comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be placed on active communication aimed at the development of oral and comprehension skills. This course is for students who have not previously studied Spanish. Students are expected to continue with SPAN 0102 and SPAN 0103 after successful completion of SPAN 0101. 5 hrs. lect./disc. (R. Albarran)

SPAN 0103 Beginning Spanish III (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of SPAN 0101. Intensive reading, writing, and oral activities will advance students' proficiency in Spanish in an academic setting. (SPAN 0101) 5 hrs. lect./disc. (L. Lesta Garcia)

SPAN 0105 Accelerated Basic Spanish (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This accelerated course is designed to reinforce, in one semester, the basic linguistic structures that students need in order to reach the intermediate level of proficiency in Spanish. Strong emphasis will be given to reading and composition. SPAN 0105 is designed specifically for students with 2-3 years of high school Spanish, but who have not yet achieved intermediate proficiency. (Placement test required) 5 hrs. lect./disc. (Fall 2019: A. Fil; Spring 2020: M. Hernandez-Romero)

SPAN 0201 Intermediate Spanish (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This accelerated course is designed to review, reinforce, and consolidate the linguistic structures that students need in order to reach the intermediate level of proficiency in Spanish. A grammar review will accompany intensive language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, readings, discussions, and compositions. (Placement test required) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill. LNG (Fall 2019: L. Lesta Garcia, E. Garcia, M. Hernandez-Romero; Spring 2020: G. Gonzalez Zenteno, M. Rohena-Madrazo)

SPAN 0220 Intermediate Spanish II (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

A course for students seeking to perfect their academic writing skills in Spanish. The course is also an introduction to literary analysis and critical writing and will include reading and oral discussion of literary texts. The course will also include a thorough review of grammar at a fairly advanced level. This course may be used to fulfill the foreign languages distribution requirement. (SPAN 0201, SPAN 0210, or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Fall 2019: B. Baird, N. Poppe, A. Fil, M. Zabala; Spring 2020: L. Castaneda, E. Garcia, R. Albarran, N. Poppe)

SPAN 0301 Advanced Spanish Grammar (Fall 2019)

This course offers a detailed study of complex aspects of Spanish grammar and syntax. Designed to build upon students' existing knowledge of Spanish grammar, the course will begin with a reconsideration of all the tenses in both the indicative and subjunctive moods, their values and their uses. After briefly reviewing the structure of simple sentences, we will analyze in depth all the different types of dependent clauses. Within the context of sentence structure, we will also look at several key aspects of Spanish grammar (ser and estar, prepositions, the infinitive, and the gerund, among others). Students will demonstrate their understanding of the material through a variety of practical and creative exercises. (SPAN 0220 or placement; not open to students who have taken SPAN 0380). LNG (A. Fil)

SPAN 0303 Introduction to Spanish Phonetics and Pronunciation (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study the sound system of Spanish with the aims of introducing the fields of phonetics and phonology while improving pronunciation. Students will become familiar with phonetic transcription, comparing and contrasting articulatory and acoustic characteristics of Spanish as well as English in order to understand and implement different phonological patterns produced by native speakers of Spanish. Additionally, we will discuss major pronunciation differences across the Spanish-speaking world. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (M. Rohena-Madrazo)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0303

SPAN 0306 Narratives of Diversity in 21st Century Spain (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore recent Spanish voices that denounce the inequalities suffered historically by minorities in that country. These narratives strive to criticize oppression and to create a more inclusive space of coexistence. We will analyze the memoirs of the Afro-Spanish activist Desiree Bela-Lobedde and of the Asian-Spanish singer Chenta Tsai. We will also analyze queer cultures in rural spaces, and the controversial use of flamenco by singer Rosalía, among other topics. Finally, through the essay Ofendiditos by Lucía Litjmaer, we will analyze the reactions that these narratives encounter in the current Spanish and international political climate. (SPAN 220 or equivalent). 3 hrs.lect./disc EUR, LNG (L. Lesta Garcia)

SPAN 0307 Ideas and Cultures of the Southern Cone (Spring 2020)

What’s in a name? A sub-region of Latin America, the Southern Cone consists of three countries marked by cultural, geographical, historical, sociopolitical (dis)connection. In this course we will approach Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay not only as nations, but as a region with extensive transnational connections. Through analysis of a wide-range of cultural products like Ercilla’s early modern epic poem La Araucana, Figari’s paintings depicting candombé culture, and films of the New Argentine Cinema, we will study aspects of the cultural identities and intellectual histories of these countries and the region. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG (N. Poppe)

SPAN 0310 (Intimate) Otherness in Contemporary Hispanic Fiction (Fall 2019)

Recent Hispanic literature locates otherness in ambiguous spaces. The "other" can be excluded in order to demarcate selfhood, but also recognized as internal ("intimate") to a complex and perhaps richer self. In this course students will sharpen oral and written communication skills and build a sophisticated vocabulary to analyze the literary and cultural context of the Spanish speaking world. This goal will be accomplished through readings in late 20th/early 21st century short stories and novellas from the Iberian Peninsula and Spanish America. Race, gender, class, nationality, and health are some perspectives we will adopt in order to map the literary production/deconstruction of "others" as marginalized/embraced subjects. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LIT, LNG (L. Castaneda)

SPAN 0314 Long Live the Students! Student Activism in Latin America and the Caribbean (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study student activism in Puerto Rico, Chile, Mexico, and the U.S., focusing on Latin students’ activism in the early 20th century to the present. We will consider approaches to student movements and the role those movements have played in shifting social and political values, practices, and institutions. We will also consider what ideologies and strategies were implemented to shape each student movement. By the end of the course, students will be encouraged to relate these struggles to their lives as students. AMR, CMP, HIS, SOC (M. Hernandez-Romero)

SPAN 0315 Hispanic Film (Fall 2019)

This course will provide an introduction to the cinema of Spain and Spanish America. We will study, among other topics: the idiosyncrasies of film language in Hispanic cultures, the relationships between text and image, representation of history, culture and society. Films from Mexico, Cuba, Argentina, Spain, and other countries will be included in the course. Selected readings on film theory and social and political history, as well as various literary works. In Spanish (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LIT, LNG (E. Garcia)

SPAN 0318 Resistencia Latinex (Spring 2020)

How do Latinex people resist oppression? Chilean survivors of the Pinochet dictatorship preserve their historical memory through textile art; Mexican Indigenous women expel the triple mafia of drug gangs, government, and police from their town; in Vermont, migrant workers sustain the dairy industry and themselves despite structural and institutional violence. Through stories of resistance to oppression, students will learn how communities and individuals take on misogyny, environmental injustice, slavery, and or structural violence. They will convey their findings in personal essays, historical fiction, and public presentations. In Spanish. 3 hrs. lect. (SPAN 0220 or by placement) (not open to students who have taken FYSE 1557) AMR, LNG, NOR (G. Gonzalez Zenteno)
Cross-listed as: FYSE 1557 *

SPAN 0319 #CaribeDIY: DIY Aesthetics and Alternative Markets in the Hispanic Caribbean (Fall 2019)

Recent artistic and cultural productions in the Hispanic Caribbean and its diaspora reflect upon conditions of dislocation, neglect, and decay. They resituate the trinomial “building, dwelling, thinking” (Heidegger) in the tropics to foreground the tensions between precarity and excess that have imprinted their stamp in the region. What aesthetic, political, and social projects emerge from recycling and ruination? What are their emancipatory possibilities? Or, on the contrary, are they themselves condemned to reproduce the logics of the market and its multiple forms of violence? In this course we will examine literary and cultural practices from the Hispanic Caribbean (Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic), from the 1970s to the present, which can be loosely grouped under the concept of do-it-yourself or DIY. Some of the major themes include: intellectuals and materiality; technological disobedience; alternative publics and the rise of cartoneras; migration and objecthood; material poetics, gender, and sexual dissidence; autogestión, collective utopias, and the commons; digital cultures and new media; post-nationalism and decolonial approaches. As a final capstone project, all students will complete two requirements: a short final paper and a DIY audiovisual or digital project (a zine, video, artwork, or sound recording, etc.) inspired by the techniques studied. Previous experience on the latter is not necessary, but willingness to experiment in a self-directed manner is essential. (Spanish 0220 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, AMR, ART, LIT, LNG (R. Albarran)

SPAN 0331 Youth Cultures in Contemporary Spain (Fall 2019)

In this course we will explore youth cultures in contemporary Spain (1980-2016). In 1985 the Spanish punk rock band Siniestro Total wrote the song “I Will Dance On Your Grave”, a metaphor for the end of the dictatorship and the beginning of “freedom”. We will explore the colorful Movida (80s), the grunge movement (90s), queer cultures (2000s), and the disenchantment (2010s). All these events will be framed in a global context and accompanied by critical theory. Through literature, comics, film, arts, and music, we will discuss issues of sexuality, drugs, family, gender, and politics. (SPAN 0220 or equivalent). 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LNG, SOC (L. Lesta Garcia)

SPAN 0338 Advanced Conversation (Spring 2020)

In this course we will focus on the development of oral skills in Spanish at the advanced level. Students will also be exposed to cultural context in Spanish, through which they will be introduced to social and political trends in the Spanish-speaking world. Through oral exams, presentations, debates, and other forms of oral assessment, students will deepen their oral skills, as well as their understanding and production of oral expression in the target language. The course will give special attention to communicative skills in Spanish, particularly speaking (including pronunciation) and listening. The instructor may choose specific grammar points for review when necessary. 3 hrs. lect. LNG (P. Saldarriaga)

SPAN 0339 Peru: Identity, Ethnicity, History (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study Peru’s diverse cultures, races, and ethnicities. Our discussion of Peruvian identity(-ies) will be connected to an exploration of selected topics of history and politics, with an emphasis on contemporary Peru: the Internal Conflict, Fujimori's dictatorship, and the return to democracy (1980-the present). We will read literary works and historical accounts, watch films and documentaries, and look at art and photography in order to extract their key themes and better understand the construction of Peru as a complex, multilingual nation, considering its past, present, and future. Relations with the United States and Latin America will be addressed. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect/disc. AAL, AMR, HIS, SOC (L. Castaneda)

SPAN 0345 Hispanic Painting from the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque Eras (Fall 2019)

The main goal of this course is to analyze art. Focusing on aesthetics, we will learn to appreciate the differences between Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque painting. Regarding formal elements we will work on the use of lines, colors, proportions, and perspective. Artistic appreciation will be complemented with readings on historical and theoretical issues with respect to the intersection among imperial power and religion, race, and ethnicity (Casta painting), mythology, the use of the body as a metaphor, and still-lifes, and Vanitas painting. Students will compare artistic manifestations from Spain and the New World, and will be able to trace connections with contemporary art. Students will engage in at least one creative project using Photoshop. Among the artists we will study are: El Greco, Velázquez, Josefa de Óbidos, Goya (Spain), Illescas and The Quito School of Art, Villalpando, Correa, and Cabrera (México), Zapata, Master of Calamarca and many anonymous painters from the Cusco School (Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia). ART, CMP, LNG (P. Saldarriaga)

SPAN 0348 Afro-Caribbean Music Genres (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study Afro-Caribbean music genres (eg, reggae, mambo, salsa, merengue, reggaeton, and calypso) and their impact within the region and on the global stage. Our main goal will be to compare the contested theoretical concept of cultural hybridity among the larger Caribbean nations (Haiti, Cuba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Dominican Republic) and their diasporas. We will also explore how Caribbean musicians and superstars work within the global infrastructure of the music/dance industry, while occasionally managing to counter the hegemonic erasure of the legacy of Black rebellion, worker revolution, nationalism, and racial/gender politics. (SPAN 0220 or 300 level Spanish course) 3 hrs. lect AAL, AMR, ART, CMP, LNG (E. Garcia)

SPAN 0353 Salsa Music and the Assembly of a Collective Self (Spring 2020)

In this course we will experience Salsa music as a socio-cultural phenomenon as well as an instrument for storytelling. We will discuss topics such as migration, race, gender and mourning as leitmotifs for a collective self that sought a space to narrate its shared experiences in Salsa. Likewise, the relationship between the diaspora in New York and Puerto Rico will be examined. Some of the most well known Salsa hits, along with films and documentaries, literary texts, and cultural theories will be read and examined to strengthen the discussion. By understanding Salsa as a melting pot and/or as a guiso, one of the goals of the course is for students to be able to use musical experiences as a social and cultural manifestation that allows us to understand historical and social events. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above or by permission) (not open to students who have taken SPAN 1352) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, LIT, LNG, NOR (M. Hernandez-Romero)

SPAN 0357 The Luso Hispanic Fiction Writer (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study the representation of the writer of fiction in Luso-Hispanic contemporary narrative. As Julio Premat argues, writers often understand their task not only as the creation of literary works, but also as the fashioning of an authorial self within fiction and through essays, interviews, photographs. We will study how and why such images are crafted, and how they reflect ideas about the aesthetic and political role of the writer, the “truth” of fiction, the interplay between literature and reality, and the relationship between authorship and gender. Portuguese-language texts will be read in Spanish translation. (Two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, AMR, LIT, LNG (L. Castaneda)
Cross-listed as: PGSE 0357

SPAN 0370 Stars and Stardom in Latin America (Fall 2019)

Manila, 2013: Lionel Messi features in a WeChat ad. São Paulo, 1995: Ninón Sevilla walks into frame on an imported telenovela. Middlebury, 1938: Lupe Vélez appears in Life Magazine. Impinging upon even our most mundane moments, stars and stardom have become integral to our modern experience. Through the study of theories on stardom, as well as an array of works of cultural production (films, music, images, performances, etc.), in this course we will examine cultural, economic, political, racial, and social factors that influence the creation, development, and perpetuation of understandings of individual stars and, more generally, stardom in Latin America. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300-level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, AMR, ART, LNG (N. Poppe)

SPAN 0377 Bilingualism in the Spanish-Speaking World (Spring 2020)

What does it mean to be bilingual? In this course we will study bilingualism with a special emphasis on Spanish-speaking bilinguals in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Course topics will include social, political, linguistic, and psychological aspects of bilingualism. Special attention will be paid to societal bilingualism, language use among a group or community, individual bilingualism, how an individual’s language use changes in different contexts and throughout an individual’s lifespan, and government and educational policies throughout the Spanish-speaking world. We will study texts, speech samples, and media that highlight different aspects of bilingualism. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LNG, SOC (B. Baird)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0377

SPAN 0381 Decolonizing Zombies! (Spring 2020)

Zombies are generally depicted as metaphors that represent contemporary affects. In this course we will study a number of zombie movies with a focus on theories of race, gender, coloniality, iconoclasm, and queer temporality. With a strong emphasis on the American continent, the course will have a global approach, which will allow us to delve into issues of neoliberalism, cannibalism, genocide, diaspora, virus spread, and political criticism. The main goal is to expose colonial structures embedded in the representation of zombies, as well as in the making of the genre. Among films included are: White Zombie, The Night of the Living Dead, Savageland, World War Z (United States); Mangue negro (Brazil), Juan de los muertos (Cuba), El desierto (Argentina), El año del apocalipsis (Peru); Ladronas de almas, Halley (Mexico); Descendents (Chile), Rec (Spain), I’ll see You in my Dreams (Portugal), The Girl with All the Gifts (United Kingdom); Train to Busan (Korea); The Empire of Corpses, and Versus (Japan). (Two 3XX courses or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, AMR, ART, CMP, LNG (P. Saldarriaga)

SPAN 0385 Deconstructing Whiteness in the Luso-Hispanic World (Spring 2020)

In this course we will critically examine constructions and realities of whiteness in the Luso-Hispanic world(s), traversing Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Caribbean, and Europe. Through different readings, cultural products, and disciplinary lenses, we will grapple with whiteness as identity, as concentration of power, as national and global project, and as a set of discourses impacting gender, sexuality, disability, and labor. We will consider how whiteness is claimed and represented in interwoven contexts of colonialism, slavery, eugenics, nationhood, and late capitalism; paying particular attention to how it is simultaneously decentered and reproduced in narratives of racial exceptionalism, mestiçagem/mestizaje, and post-racialism. (PGSE 215 and SPAN 300 or above, or by approval) Taught in Spanish and Portuguese. 3hrs. lect. CMP, HIS, SOC (D. Silva)
Cross-listed as: PGSE 0385 *

SPAN 0390 Linguistic Variation (Fall 2019)

In this course we will study linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world. The focus will be on the linguistic aspects of the varieties of Spanish spoken in Spain, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. Topics will include lexical variation, phonological variation, morphosyntactic variation, and geographic and social factors in linguistic variation. Special attention will be paid to Spanish in contact with other languages, e.g. with indigenous languages in Latin America, and with Basque and Catalan in Spain. The discussion will also include creole languages (e.g. Papiamentu). We will study texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate specific cases of variation. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP (M. Rohena-Madrazo)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0390

SPAN 0426 Spanish in the US (Fall 2019)

Aside from Mexico, there are more Spanish speakers in the US than in any other country. In this seminar we will explore various facets of Spanish-speaking populations in the US, including, but not limited to, linguistic aspects (e.g. Spanglish, Mock Spanish, Latinx English), and the use and reception of Spanish in public spaces (e.g. literature, television, music). Fundamentally, we will consider the diversity of Spanish speakers in the US and myths about them and the language(s) they speak. In addition to conducting original research, students will engage in community outreach in order to help dispel polemic stereotypes. (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem. AMR, LNG, NOR, SOC (B. Baird)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0426

SPAN 0461 Colonial Objects: Materiality and the Invention of the New World (Spring 2020)

Beyond gold and silver, what objects served as the building blocks of Spanish colonialism in the New World? What is the relationship between material culture and mestizaje? How do indigenous and black bodies—the flesh of unsovereign otherness—materialize in the language of empire? In this seminar we will explore the role of objects and material culture in shaping colonial discourse during the long history of colonialism in Latin America and the Hispanic Caribbean. Our primary readings assemble an operational canon: from “discovery” and early-contact narratives by Cristóbal Colón and Fray Ramón Pané to the proliferation of ambivalent discourses about colonial subjects, objects, and others that pose a threat to colonial order, including works by Bernardo de Balbuena, Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Alongside these texts, we will consider as well examples of material culture (maps, visual art, artifacts, commodities, and archaeological remnants) from pre-Columbian and colonial times to the present (Two Spanish courses numbered 0350 or above, or by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, AMR, ART (R. Albarran)

SPAN 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

The department will consider requests by qualified juniors and senior majors to engage in independent work. (Approval only)

SPAN 0705 Senior Honors Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

The department will award honors, high honors, or highest honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance in SPAN 0705. (Approval only) (R. Chavez-Castaneda, M. Fernandez, L. Lesta Garcia, E. Garcia, G. Gonzalez Zenteno, L. Castaneda, A. Fil, P. Saldarriaga, M. Rohena-Madrazo)
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Department of Mathematics

Mathematics Requirements

Required for the Major in Mathematics: (Eleven courses total, at least six of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont):
I. Core courses: MATH 0122, MATH 0200, MATH 0223, MATH 0302, and MATH 0323 (at least one of the latter two to be completed by the end of the junior year);
II. Electives: five MATH electives at the 0200-level or above;
III. Senior work: A 0700-level MATH seminar in the senior year.

Students interested in advanced work in applied mathematics may wish to include a post-calculus sequence of courses in their area of specialization.  Examples are MATH 310 & 311, MATH 310 & 410.  A list of current options is maintained on the department web page.  The second course in these specifically designated sequences may be counted in place of MATH 302 for the major. 

Note: Students are strongly encouraged to include a proof-based course such as MATH 0241 or MATH 0247 early in their programs. This is especially helpful prior to taking MATH 0302 or MATH 0323. 

Students planning a "3-2" engineering program who wish to major in Mathematics should complete the 700-level senior seminar in their sixth semester at Middlebury. 

Honors: Students who wish to be considered for departmental honors in mathematics must take one additional elective (12 courses total). Honors designations are based on senior work and GPA within the major.
 
Required for the Minor in Mathematics (six courses total at least half of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont): MATH 0121, MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and three courses at the 0200-level or above.
 
Joint Majors: The Department of Mathematics does not offer a joint major.
 
Advanced Placement: Advanced placement in the department is offered to first-year students whose secondary training indicates they can commonly bypass one or more of the beginning courses in mathematics. Majors typically begin their study of mathematics in MATH 0122 or MATH 0200. Mathematics majors who need to begin the study of calculus with MATH 0121 may arrange with their advisors to use this course as one of the required electives. Credits for MATH 0121 and 0122 may be earned through the College Board AP exams or international exams such as the A-Levels or IB. At the discretion of the chair, additional courses may be waived in recognition of exceptional secondary school preparation. However, in all cases the major must include at least 7 Middlebury College or approved transfer courses, and the minor must include at least 4. Students who have earned grades on advanced placement calculus exams that are eligible for credit may not register for the equivalent course at Middlebury College. Thus students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB exam or a 3 on the Calculus BC exam may not register for MATH 0121, students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC exam may not register for MATH 0121 or MATH 0122.  This policy applies irrespective of whether students choose to use their AP credits toward meeting Middlebury's graduation requirements. The following international credentials carry the same credit as a 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC Exam: A-level exam with a mathematics grade of A, B, or C; or IB Higher Level Mathematics with a grade of 6 or 7.
 
Other Credits: Because of the wide variation in course offerings at other institutions, students wishing to substitute a course from another college for any course in mathematics must seek approval from the department before registering for the course.

Available only to students entering prior to Fall 2019:
Required for the Mathematical Sciences Option in the Mathematics Major
: (Eleven courses total, at least six of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont)
I. Core courses: MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and MATH 0223;
II. Computing-intensive course: CSCI 0150 or MATH 0216 or MATH 0228;
III. Electives. Six courses from categories A and B. At least four of the six courses must have the MATH designation, and at least two must be from category B, and at least one of those two must be MATH 0302 or MATH 0323, to be completed by the end of the junior year. Non-MATH courses must all have the same designation (ECON or PHYS or CSCI)
A. Courses in applied specialization: MATH 0218, MATH 0225, MATH 0310, MATH 0315, MATH 0318, ECON 0280, PHYS 0212, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0463; 
B. Advanced electives: MATH 0302, MATH 0311, MATH 0323, MATH 0325, MATH 0410, CSCI 0302, ECON 0390, ECON 0411, MATH 0500 (with prerequisite: at least one course from categories A or B);
IV. Senior work: A 0700-level MATH seminar in the senior year.

Note: Students should consult the mathematics department for examples of course sequences in the mathematical sciences option recommended for emphases in Mathematical Economics, Computer Science, or Physical Sciences/Engineering. For students completing double majors, electives used towards a major in another department cannot also be counted as electives in the mathematical sciences option.

 

MATH 0100 A World of Mathematics (Fall 2019)

How long will oil last? What is the fairest voting system? How can we harvest food and other resources sustainably? To explore such real-world questions we will study a variety of mathematical ideas and methods, including modeling, logical analysis, discrete dynamical systems, and elementary statistics. This is an alternative first mathematics course for students not pursuing the calculus sequence in their first semester. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring contemporary issues using the mathematics that lies within those issues. (Approval required; This course is not open to students who have had a prior course in calculus or statistics.) 3 hrs lect./disc. DED (J. Albert)

MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

A practical introduction to statistical methods and the examination of data sets. Computer software will play a central role in analyzing a variety of real data sets from the natural and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, elementary distributions for data, hypothesis tests, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, contingency tables, and analysis of variance. The course has no formal mathematics prerequisite, and is especially suited to students in the physical, social, environmental, and life sciences who seek an applied orientation to data analysis. (Credit is not given for MATH 0116 if the student has taken ECON 0210 or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. computer lab. DED (E. Malcolm-White)

MATH 0121 Calculus I (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Introductory analytic geometry and calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, differential calculus of algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications to curve sketching, optimization problems and related rates, the indefinite and definite integral, area under a curve, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Inverse functions and the logarithmic and exponential functions are also introduced along with applications to exponential growth and decay. 4 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2019: S. Abbott, E. Malcolm-White; Spring 2020: P. Bremser)

MATH 0122 Calculus II (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

A continuation of MATH 0121, may be elected by first-year students who have had an introduction to analytic geometry and calculus in secondary school. Topics include a brief review of natural logarithm and exponential functions, calculus of the elementary transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications of integrals including problems of finding volumes, infinite series and Taylor's theorem, polar coordinates, ordinary differential equations. (MATH 0121 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2019: W. Peterson, F. Swenton, P. Schumer; Spring 2020: P. Schumer, D. Dorman)

MATH 0200 Linear Algebra (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Matrices and systems of linear equations, the Euclidean space of three dimensions and other real vector spaces, independence and dimensions, scalar products and orthogonality, linear transformations and matrix representations, eigenvalues and similarity, determinants, the inverse of a matrix and Cramer's rule. (MATH 0121 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2019: P. Bremser, E. Proctor, D. Dorman; Spring 2020: S. Abbott, W. Peterson, J. Schmitt)

MATH 0216 Introduction to Data Science (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

In this course students will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline: forming a statistical question, collecting and cleaning data sets, performing exploratory data analyses, identifying appropriate statistical techniques, and communicating the results, all the while leaning heavily on open source computational tools, in particular the R statistical software language. We will focus on analyzing real, messy, and large data sets, requiring the use of advanced data manipulation/wrangling and data visualization packages. Students will be required to bring their own laptops as many lectures will involve in-class computational activities. 3 hrs lect./disc. CW (Fall 2019: 16 seats), DED (Fall 2019: A. Lyford; Spring 2020: E. Malcolm-White)

MATH 0218 Statistical Learning (Spring 2020)

This course is an introduction to modern statistical, machine learning, and computational methods to analyze large and complex data sets that arise in a variety of fields, from biology to economics to astrophysics. The theoretical underpinnings of the most important modeling and predictive methods will be covered, including regression, classification, clustering, resampling, and tree-based methods. Student work will involve implementation of these concepts using open-source computational tools. (MATH 0216) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (A. Lyford)

MATH 0223 Multivariable Calculus (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

The calculus of functions of more than one variable. Introductory vector analysis, analytic geometry of three dimensions, partial differentiation, multiple integration, line integrals, elementary vector field theory, and applications. (MATH 0122 and MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2019: F. Swenton, J. Schmitt; Spring 2020: F. Swenton, M. Olinick, E. Proctor)

MATH 0225 Topics in Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Topics may include diagonalization of matrices, quadratic forms, inner product spaces, canonical forms, the spectral theorem, positive matrices, the Cayley-Hamilton theorem, ordinary differential equations of arbitrary order, systems of first-order differential equations, power series, and eigenvalue methods of solution, applications. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (M. Olinick)

MATH 0241 Elementary Number Theory (Spring 2020)

Divisibility and prime factorization. Congruences; the theorems of Lagrange, Fermat, Wilson, and Euler; residue theory; quadratic reciprocity. Diophantine equations. Arithmetic functions and Mobius inversion. Representation as a sum of squares. (MATH 0122 or by waiver) DED (P. Schumer)

MATH 0247 Graph Theory (Fall 2019)

A graph (or network) is a useful mathematical model when studying a set of discrete objects and the relationships among them. We often represent an object with a vertex (node) and a relation between a pair with an edge (line). With the graph in hand, we then ask questions, such as: Is it connected? Can one traverse each edge precisely once and return to a starting vertex? For a fixed k/, is it possible to “color” the vertices using /k colors so that no two vertices that share an edge receive the same color? More formally, we study the following topics: trees, distance, degree sequences, matchings, connectivity, coloring, and planarity. Proof writing is emphasized. (MATH 0122 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (J. Schmitt)

MATH 0302 Abstract Algebra (Fall 2019)

Groups, subgroups, Lagrange's theorem, homomorphisms, normal subgroups and quotient groups, rings and ideals, integral domains and fields, the field of quotients of a domain, the ring of polynomials over a domain, Euclidean domains, principal ideal domains, unique factorization, factorization in a polynomial ring. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (E. Proctor)

MATH 0310 Probability (Fall 2019)

An introduction to the concepts of probability and their applications, covering both discrete and continuous random variables. Probability spaces, elementary combinatorial analysis, densities and distributions, conditional probabilities, independence, expectation, variance, weak law of large numbers, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. (concurrent or prior MATH 0223 or MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (W. Peterson)

MATH 0311 Statistics (Spring 2020)

An introduction to the mathematical methods and applications of statistical inference. Topics will include: survey sampling, parametric and nonparametric problems, estimation, efficiency and the Neyman-Pearsons lemma. Classical tests within the normal theory such as F-test, t-test, and chi-square test will also be considered. Methods of linear least squares are used for the study of analysis of variance and regression. There will be some emphasis on applications to other disciplines. (MATH 0310) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (A. Lyford)

MATH 0318 Operations Research (Fall 2019)

Operations research is the utilization of quantitative methods as an aid to managerial decisions. In the course, several of these methods will be introduced and studied in both a mathematical context and a physical context. Topics included will be selected from the following: classification of problems and the formulation of models, linear programming, network optimization, transportation problems, assignment problems, integer programming, nonlinear programming, inventory theory, and game theory. (MATH 0200 or waiver) DED (M. Olinick)

MATH 0323 Real Analysis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

An axiomatic treatment of the topology of the real line, real analysis, and calculus. Topics include neighborhoods, compactness, limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, and uniform convergence. (MATH 0223) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2019: S. Abbott; Spring 2020: F. Swenton)

MATH 0338 Fundamentals of Algebraic Geometry (Spring 2020)

Algebraic geometry is one of the oldest areas of mathematics, yet it is thoroughly modern and active. It is the study of geometric spaces locally defined by polynomial equations. The aim of this course is to introduce students to some basic notions and ideas in algebraic geometry. We will study affine and projective spaces, affine and projective curves, singularities, intersection theory, Hilbert’s Nullstellensatz, Bezout’s Theorem, and the arithmetic of elliptic curves. There will be an emphasis on examples and problem solving. (MATH 302) 3 hrs. lect. DED (D. Dorman)

MATH 0345 Combinatorics (Spring 2020)

Combinatorics is the “art of counting.” Given a finite set of objects and a set of rules placed upon these objects, we will ask two questions. Does there exist an arrangement of the objects satisfying the rules? If so, how many are there? These are the questions of existence and enumeration. As such, we will study the following combinatorial objects and counting techniques: permutations, combinations, the generalized pigeonhole principle, binomial coefficients, the principle of inclusion-exclusion, recurrence relations, and some basic combinatorial designs. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (J. Schmitt)

MATH 0500 Advanced Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Individual study for qualified students in more advanced topics in algebra, number theory, real or complex analysis, topology. Particularly suited for those who enter with advanced standing. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

MATH 0701 Galois Theory (Spring 2020)

This course is a tutorial in Galois theory for students who have completed Abstract Algebra. Starting from the concept of a ring, we will develop the theory of polynomial rings over fields, and use this to carry out an in-depth investigation of field extensions. Our work together will culminate in proving the fundamental theorem of Galois theory. Working independently and in small groups, students will explore related areas of algebra and communicate their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. This course fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (MATH 0302) 3 hrs. sem. DED (E. Proctor)

MATH 0703 Finite Fields Seminar (Spring 2020)

This course is a tutorial in the theory and applications of finite fields, which lie in the intersection of algebra and number theory. Working in small groups, students will study the fundamental structure and properties of finite fields (also known as Galois fields). They will then work independently, exploring applications in cryptography, coding theory, or other areas. Students will gain experience reading advanced sources and communicating their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. This course fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (MATH 0241 or MATH 0302; Approval required) 3 hrs. Sem (P. Bremser)

MATH 0710 Advanced Probability Seminar (Spring 2020)

This course is a tutorial in Probability Theory for students who have completed work in Probability and Real Analysis. Starting from elementary results about random walks, we will explore the fundamental mathematical ideas underlying measure theoretic probability, martingales, the Weiner process, and the Itô stochastic calculus. Working independently and in small groups, students will gain experience reading advanced sources and communicating their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. This course fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (MATH 0310, MATH 0323, and by approval). 3 hrs. sem. (W. Peterson)

MATH 0715 Advanced Mathematical Modeling Seminar (Fall 2019)

A tutorial on advanced mathematical model building and analysis for students who have completed work in Differential Equations and Probability. We will study deterministic and stochastic models of interacting populations with a focus on mathematical ecology and epidemiology. Working independently and in small groups, students will gain experience reading advanced sources and communicating their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. Fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (Approval Only) 3 hrs. Sem. DED (M. Olinick)

MATH 0741 Advanced Number Theory (Fall 2019)

A senior tutorial on some topics in advanced elementary number theory and an introduction to analytic number theory. In this course we will review key areas of elementary number theory and abstract algebra followed by the study of integer partitions, continued fractions, rational approximations of irrationals, primes and primality testing, the average order of magnitude of several number theoretic functions, the Basel problem, Bernoulli numbers, and the Riemann zeta function. (MATH 0241 or MATH 0302) 3 hrs. sem. DED (P. Schumer)
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Molecular Biology & Biochemistry

Students matriculating Fall 2018 or later must follow these requirements.  Students matriculated prior to Fall 2018 will need to follow the previous requirements, which can be found on the MBBC webpage.

Required for the Major: The requirements for the major in molecular biology and biochemistry provide a multidisciplinary yet integrated approach to examining life at the macromolecular, cellular, and organismal levels. The major is composed of 15 required courses including foundation courses, advanced courses, and four electives selected among three thematic suites. Required foundation courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology establish a strong, broad understanding of the science necessary for advanced study. Required advanced courses in the core areas of molecular biology and biological chemistry build on this foundation. Finally, elective courses offer advanced opportunities to explore a wide variety of specific topics including neurobiology, developmental biology, computational biology, data science, molecular genetics, and biochemical mechanisms. Students may engage in mentored independent research in these areas.
      Placement Exams and Transfer Credit:
Students may be able to bypass introductory courses in chemistry, mathematics, or physics on the basis of AP credit or proficiency exams. Those who bypass CHEM 0103 may begin with CHEM 0104 (fall or spring) or CHEM 0107 (fall only). AP Statistics will not satisfy the statistics requirement (BIOL 0211 or MATH 0116). Those students with AP Statistics credit will be required to enroll in BIOL 0211. Those students interested in the health professions or graduate study may wish to take a full two semesters of calculus and physics in order to meet professional school entrance requirements. Students considering taking summer courses or courses abroad must get approval in advance from the program director. Students should consult with their adviser for assistance with the process of transferring credit from another institution.

Required Background Courses:
MATH 0121 Calculus I
PHYS 0109 Newtonian Physics
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution
BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis or MATH 116 Introduction to Statistical Science
CHEM 0103 or CHEM 0107 General Chemistry I or Adv. General Chemistry
CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 General Chemistry II or Adv. General Chemistry
CHEM 0203 Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity
CHEM 0204 Organic Chemistry II: Synthesis and Spectroscopy

Required Advanced Courses:
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics
CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules

Required Elective Suite Courses:

A list of appropriate electives is provided within each suite.  However, not all listed courses are offered every year.  Also, as other appropriate courses may become available on campus, there may be additional course options within each suite.  Majors will be kept informed of currently available courses that fit within each of the three elective suites. 

Students may not count a single course in more than one elective category requirement.

1. Quantitative Suite (students must take 1 class in this suite)
        CHEM 0355 Thermodynamics and Kinetics*
        CSCI 0201 Data Structures*
        CSCI 0321 Bioinformatics Algorithms*
        MATH 0200 Linear Algebra
        MATH 0223 Multivariable Calculus*
        MATH 0216 Introduction to Data Science
        MATH 0217 Elements of Mathematical Biology and Ecology
        MATH 0315 Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences*

2. Advanced Laboratory Suite- Lecture and Independent Research (students must take 1 class in this suite)
        BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology
        BIOL 0310 Microbiology
        BIOL 0324 Genomics
        BIOL 0331 The Genetics of Cancer
        BIOL 0365 Molecular Microbial Ecology

3.  Advanced Non-Laboratory Suite (students must take 2 classes in this suite)
        BIOL 0280 Immunology
        BIOL 0330 Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis
        BIOL 0350 Endocrinology
        BIOL 0420 Neurogenetics
        BIOL 0425 Human Genetics
        BIOL 0449 Extremophiles: conquering Earth's Extreme Environments
        BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine
        BIOL 0475 Neuroplasticity*
        CHEM 0303 Chemical Biology
        CHEM 0355 Thermodynamics and Kinetics*
        CHEM 0425 Biochemistry of Metabolism
        CSCI 0321 Bioinformatics Algorithms*
        PHYS 0241 Biomedical Imaging*

*Courses with pre-requisites other than courses already required of the MBBC major (or by waiver for some).
 

Note: Independent Study courses (CHEM/BIOL/MBBC 0500/0700/0701) cannot be used to fulfill elective credit.
    
There is no minor in molecular biology and biochemistry.

The recommended progression through the required courses of the MBBC major is shown below. While there can be some deviation to this schedule, it is highly recommended that the students complete their introductory chemistry requirements (CHEM0103 and CHEM 0104 or, with advanced placement, CHEM 0107/CHEM 0104) by the end of the first year and their introductory biology requirements (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) by the end of their third semester. The decision to start the introductory biology sequence in the first semester along with introductory chemistry and calculus should be made with consultation with the students FYSE advisor and/or the MBBC Program Director. CHEM 0204 may be taken either concurrently with CHEM 0322, or afterwards. All mathematics, physics, introductory chemistry and biology, and organic chemistry courses should be completed by the end of the second year. A college writing (CW) course should be completed by the end of the third year. BIOL 0331 or BIOL 0310 are appropriate courses which have sections that fulfill the CW requirement.

First Year Fall
CHEM 0103 General Chemistry I OR (if satisfied) CHEM 0104 General Chemistry II OR (if satisfied) CHEM 0107 Advanced General Chemistry
MATH 0121 Calculus I
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (for students who have taken or placed out of CHEM 0103)

First Year Spring
CHEM 104 General Chemistry II (if not taken previously)
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (for students who have taken or placed out of CHEM 0103)

Second Year Fall
CHEM 0203 Organic Structure and Reactivity
PHYS 0109 Newtonian Physics OR BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis OR MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (for students who have taken or placed out of CHEM 0103)- (if not taken previously)

Second Year Winter Term
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis (if BIOL 0211 or MATH 0116 not taken previously) OR Elective

Second Year Spring
CHEM 0204 Organic Synthesis and Spectroscopy or CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis OR MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science (if not taken previously)
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics

Third Year
CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules or CHEM 0204 Organic Synthesis and Spectroscopy (if not taken previoulsy)
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics (if not taken previously)
Electives

Fourth Year
Electives
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics (if not taken previously)
Senior Thesis Research

Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Research: Research is an important component of a well-rounded academic pursuit; it contributes to the development of independence and creativity, as well as to the depth of knowledge needed to become an active contributor to the scientific community. Majors may undertake independent research with a faculty mentor in MBBC or in other Departments and Programs, provided the research falls within the mission of the major. Any major is eligible to perform an independent study research project (BIOL 0500, CHEM 0400, NSCI 0500, or BIOL/CHEM/NSCI/MBBC 0700) with the consent of a mentor.
     Requirements for HonorsSenior thesis research may be initiated by any junior with the consent of a mentor. Students considering senior thesis research are urged to begin conversations with faculty early in their junior year (certainly by winter term) because many thesis projects begin during the summer preceding the senior year. Those eligible for high honors or honors in molecular biology and biochemistry will: (1) complete at least two semesters of research, which may include winter term; (2) enroll in MBBC 0701 for their final semester of research; (3) graduate with a minimum GPA of 3.3 for all courses counting towards the major; (4) present a public seminar describing the significance, methodology, results, and conclusions of their research; (5) successfully defend their thesis before a committee of three faculty, two of whom must be affiliated with the MBBC program; and (6) earn a grade of at least B+ for MBBC 0701, as determined by the members of the MBBC program, with the grade based on their research performance, their written thesis, their thesis presentation and their thesis defense.


MBBC 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Seniors conducting independent study in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry should register for MBBC 0700 unless they are completing a thesis project in which case they should register for MBBC 0701. (Approval required).

MBBC 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Students conducting independent thesis research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry must register for MBBC 0701 while completing research projects initiated in BIOL 0500, MBBC 0700, or CHEM 0400. Students will organize and lead regular discussions of their research and research methods, and attend weekly meetings with their designated laboratory group to foster understanding of their special area, and practice the stylistic and technical aspects of scientific writing needed to write their thesis. (CHEM 0400 or BIOL 0500 or MBBC 0700) (Approval required).
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Department of Music

Required for the Major: Majors are required to take MUSC 0101; MUSC 0209; MUSC 0260-0261; MUSC 0333; MUSC 0334; a performance elective such as MUSC 0240, 0243, 0244, or 0500; two 0200-level or above elective music courses; and MUSC 0400 senior seminar.

Demonstrated proficiencies: Music majors will be required to demonstrate basic piano and sight-singing proficiencies in the semester at the end of Theory II (MUSC 0260). If preparation is needed, music majors are required to take a semester of  keyboard harmony, arranged through the music office.

In addition to the curricular requirements, majors are required to participate for three semesters in at least one departmentally-approved ensemble: African Music and Dance Ensemble, Afropop Ensemble, Middlebury College Orchestra, Middlebury College Choir, Middlebury College Community Chorus, The Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble, or Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble.

Required for the Joint Major: Joint Majors are required to take MUSC 0101; MUSC 0260-0261; MUSC 0333; MUSC 0334; two 0200-level or above elective music courses; and MUSC 0704 (senior work that combines both majors and is agreed upon by the advisers and department or program chair)

Required for the Minor: Students who pursue the minor in music are required to complete five music courses, two of which may be general introductory courses (0100 level) and three other courses at the 0200-0400 levels.

Music Theory Placement Exam: Students may test into MUSC 0209 (Composition I) and MUSC 0260 (Music Theory II) by taking a placement exam rather than taking the pre-requisite MUSC 0160 (Theory I). Incoming students must take the placement exam before classes begin and only at the designated time at orientation. Current students must send an email to Professor Matthew Taylor at matthewt@middlebury.edu to schedule the exam. Note: Placement tests should be arranged by November 1, and April 1, for the following semesters.

Departmental Honors: Departmental honors in music reflect a student's overall achievement in and contribution to the department, as well as demonstrated excellence in MUSC 0704 (Senior Work). To take MUSC 0704, students must have at least B+ grade average in music courses; and must submit a proposal for senior work (of one or two semesters in length) by April 1 of the junior year. Of note: MUSC 0704 (Senior Work) does not count as a course toward fulfillment of the music major. Grade averages of B+ in senior work and B+ in departmental courses will be eligible for honors; A- in senior work and A- in departmental courses will be eligible for high honors; A in senior work and A in departmental courses will be eligible for highest honors.

Ensembles:

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is the core of MUSC 0244, for which enrolled students earn one (1) credit. The Ensemble gives students (with or without a musical background) a rich, hands-on experience with numerous East African (Ugandan) music and dance cultures through regular rehearsals and end-of-semester concerts. See course listing of MUSC 0244. (D. Kafumbe).

The following ensembles require two semesters of enrollment to earn (1) credit.

Afropop is a dynamic and diverse blend of traditional African music with R&B, rock, pop, reggae, hip hop, funk, EDM, and many other Western and Afro-diasporic styles. Students learn songs by ear and create their own arrangement—most songs use three or four chords and pentatonic melodies. There are no prerequisites. The ability to read music is not required. See course listing MUSC 0205. (D. Kafumbe)

Middlebury College Orchestra auditions for instrumentalists at the beginning of the semester. Twice-weekly rehearsals take place in Robison Hall in preparation for performances featuring music from all periods. See course listing for MUSC 0205. (E. Bennett).

Middlebury College Choir performs concerts each fall and spring, participates in Baccalaureate and other College functions, and tours or engages in other projects annually. Audition required, with attention to sight-reading, listening skills, and vocal production. Intent to participate full year/multiple semesters strongly encouraged. Open to all students without prerequisite. See course listing of MUSC 0205. (J. Buettner).

College Community Chorus performs concerts each fall and spring, usually including a major choral work for chorus and organ or orchestra. Open to all without audition; rehearsals focus on developing choral musicianship. See course listing of MUSC 0205. (J. Rehbach).

The Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble uses traditional big-band instrumentation, playing the best of contemporary jazz arrangements as well as classic charts from the 75 years of swing and jazz band history. The ensemble also features student compositions and arrangements when available. An active performance schedule is typical. See course listing of MUSC 0205. (D. Forman).

Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble is an off-campus community ensemble that students are invited to join that features woodwind, brass, and percussion; no auditions necessary. There are two performances each semester. Rehearsals take place at Middlebury Union High School. (M. McHugh).

Other Chamber Ensembles: String quartets, woodwind and brass ensembles can be formed and coached for interested students. Independent projects (MUSC 0500) can be arranged for these groups.

Private Music Lessons: Musical instrument and voice lessons are available through the department. Register online at go/musiclessons during the first week of fall and spring terms (winter term lessons registration takes place the last week of classes in the fall term). Academic credit is not given for lessons, and an additional fee is applied to the student’s college bill. There are ten 45-minute music lessons per semester (four during winter term). Students will sign contracts at the first lesson and are binding. No rebate is allowed for lessons missed except in the case of injury or continued illness. Members of music department ensembles are entitled to half-price lessons for the instruments they play in the ensemble (or voice for choir and community chorus). The fee is waived for students who are music majors and music joint majors, (limit two lesson series per semester), or are enrolled in performance-related courses(varies by semester), and MUSC 0500 or MUSC 0704 projects. Contact the department at extension 5221 for information.

 

MUSC 0101 Introduction to Music (Fall 2019)

In this course we will develop critical listening skills through guided study of selected works of Western classical, popular, and folk music, as well as a sampling of music from non-Western cultures. Students will examine how music uses basic sound materials—such as rhythm, melody, timbre, texture, and harmony—to create meaning and expression, how those uses have changed over time from the Middle Ages to the present, and how music relates to its social and historical context and to the other arts. Previous musical training is not required. 3 hrs. ART, CMP, EUR, HIS (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 0134 What in the World is Music? (Spring 2020)

In this course we will explore global musical cultures in order to better understand both those musical cultures and our own in relation to one another. The course has two goals: to introduce students to unfamiliar ways of listening to and thinking about different elements of music (including – but not limited to – rhythm, melody, timbre, texture, harmony, and form); and to develop skills for appreciating cultural significances of these elements. We will achieve these goals through readings, lectures, discussions, film screenings, listening sessions, workshops, concerts, and hands-on activities. 3 hrs. lect. ART, CMP (D. Kafumbe)

MUSC 0160 Music Theory I: Fundamentals (Spring 2020)

This course is an introduction to the basic elements and theoretical concepts of Western music. We will focus on such topics as basic keyboard skills, sight singing, musical notation, rhythm, and harmony and form. Theoretical work and drills will be combined with compositional and performance projects. The goal of the course is to expand students’ musical intuition and skill and to provide the technical basis for further music study. No prior musical experience is required. (Students who wish to take upper-level composition or music theory courses must either complete this course or pass a theory and musicianship test administered by the department to demonstrate equivalent experience.) (Formerly MUSC 0109). 2.5 hrs. lect. ART (J. Buettner)

MUSC 0205 Performance Lab (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Credit can be conferred for performance in faculty-supervised ensembles: (see listing of "Ensembles" in the requirements section). One unit of credit to accrue over two semesters (spring then fall only). The appropriate supervising faculty will give grades, based on attendance and quality of performance. A student should inform the ensemble director of intent to sign up for this course before starting, and should actually register for MUSC 0205 only the SECOND of the two terms by adding it as a fifth course. MUSC 0205 does not fulfill any major course requirements and may not be taken more than once. (Approval required) ART (E. Bennett, J. Buettner, J. Rehbach, J. Forman, D. Kafumbe)

MUSC 0209 Music I (Fall 2019)

Music I focuses on the materials and grammar of music through compositional exercises. As part of these explorations, we will examine the elements of harmony (scales, triads and seventh chords), notation, rhythm, polyrhythm, binary and ternary forms, two-voice counterpoint, variation, transposition, as well as skills in conducting, analysis, ear-training, and sight-singing. Students will write short pieces for a variety of instruments and ensembles, notate their pieces, and rehearse and perform them, thereby learning about music through discovery and observation. The assignments are designed for students with or without compositional experience. (Ability to play an instrument or sing; MUSC 0160, or passing score on the MUSC 0160 placement exam) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. ART (M. Taylor)

MUSC 0210 Music II (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of MUSC 0209. While using the same format, including composing and labs, as in MUSC 0209, the course covers elements of modality (western and non-western), functional harmony, heterophony, fugal processes, strophic forms, melodic analysis, serial processes, and extensions of tonality and atonality. (MUSC 0209 or by permission) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. ART (M. Taylor)

MUSC 0244 African Music and Dance Performance (Fall 2019)

This course will introduce students to various techniques of performing East African (primarily Ugandan) musical and dance traditions through regular rehearsals, culminating in an end-of-semester concert. As an ensemble, we will learn and master how to play and sing/dance to bow-harps, thumb-pianos, xylophones, tube-fiddles, bowl-lyres, gourd shakers, struck gourds, reed-box rattles, ankle bells, leg rattles, and various types of drums. Some background in performing music is recommended, but prior knowledge of performing African music and dance is not required. 3 hrs. lect./lab AAL, ART, SAF (D. Kafumbe)
Cross-listed as: DANC 0244

MUSC 0245 Collaborative Improvisation: All-Arts Ensemble (Spring 2020)

In this course/ensemble we will open dialogues of performance, improvisation, and social interaction across disciplines in the arts. How do the various disciplines relate to each other in a performance environment? It may be easy to see points of commonality between music and dance or writing and theater, but what about the act of painting and the process of musical improvisation? Through the work of Ornette Coleman, Del Close, John Cage, Pauline Oliveros, and others, students will explore improvisation in music, theater, dance, and visual art. The class will culminate in a performance. All students are welcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (M. Taylor)

MUSC 0246 A Cappella Ensemble Performance (Spring 2020)

Unaccompanied vocal music is rich in cultural expression and artistic beauty. Singing in an unaccompanied vocal ensemble enhances creativity, musicianship, and communication skills. This course affords an opportunity to develop analytical and ensemble skills that contribute to creative and informed performance. Through study of scores and source readings, students will explore vocal technique, performance, and cultural context in European art music, North American folk songs, and styles of improvisation. This course will conclude with a public performance and may include additional performances off campus. Music reading is required, prior singing experience is not. A preview of the reading requirement is available at go/Ensemble246. ART, CMP (J. Buettner)

MUSC 0260 Music Theory II: Diatonic Theory (Fall 2019)

This course is an in-depth technical study of the materials of music, a study which expands one’s ability to analyze and create music and to understand different musical styles. We will cover harmonic materials, introduce musical form, and work with traditional compositional skills. These techniques are applied to the analysis of classical music, jazz and popular music. (MUSC 0160 or passing score on the MUSC 0160 placement exam.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (P. Hamlin)

MUSC 0261 Music Theory III: Chromatic Theory (Spring 2020)

This course is a continuation of MUSC 0260. Students will study more advanced harmonic devices including modulation and chromaticism, jazz harmony, and post-tonal techniques. In-depth analysis of classical music, jazz, and popular music supports a more advanced study of musical form. (MUSC 0260) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (P. Hamlin)

MUSC 0309 Advanced Composition (Fall 2019)

In this course we will focus on writing for string quartet, brass quintet, a cappella singing, piano, or performance art and involve issues of technique, style, and practical considerations, as well as study of selected elements of the literature. The course will culminate with a reading of student works by a professional ensemble or solo performer. This semester we focus on composing for the string quartet. We will discuss a variety of string techniques as well as issues of form and orchestration. We will listen to important works for that medium and discuss the styles from the Classical period to this century. (MUSC 0209 and 0210 or approval of instructor). 3 hrs. lect./disc. (M. Taylor)

MUSC 0333 Music in Western Cultures (Fall 2019)

In this course we will develop skills for assessing music’s social, economic, and political importance in Western societies. Through a series of units focusing on various aspects of music (such as composition, performance, dissemination, and reception) and on various eras from ancient Greece to the present, students will engage with the principal questions and methods of historical musicology. (MUSC 0101) 3 hrs. lect. ART, CMP, CW, HIS (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 0334 Music in World Cultures (Spring 2020)

In this course students will develop skills for analyzing a wide range of music styles and appreciating their social, economic, and political importance. We will explore selected case studies through readings, lectures, discussions, film screenings, listening sessions, workshops, concerts, and hands-on activities. (MUSC 0209 or MUSC 0261) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, CMP (D. Kafumbe)

MUSC 0400 Senior Seminar: Analysis and Engagement (Fall 2019)

In this course senior music majors will develop a deeper understanding of music by coupling accumulated knowledge with new study, to challenge and expand our definitions of structure and tonality in music. Students will analyze music aurally, from printed scores, and with visual elements including dance and recorded performances. Students will produce written assignments, engage in seminar discussions, and develop analytical presentations for public or department events on and off campus (to be determined each semester). Repertoire includes music since 1913, with emphasis on 21st century compositions; earlier music may also be included. Students may include a topic in their senior work in music for analysis and presentation. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (J. Buettner)

MUSC 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Admission by approval. Please consult published departmental guidelines and paragraph below.

MUSC 0704 Senior Work (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Senior work is not required of all music majors and joint majors. However, students interested in and eligible for departmental honors (see guideline above, in "Departmental Honors" section) may propose one or two-semester Senior Work projects. Projects may be in history, composition, theory, ethnomusicology, performance, or electronic music, and should culminate in a written presentation, a public performance, or a combination of the two. MUSC0704 does not count as a course toward fulfillment of the music major.

Project and budget proposals for Independent Study and Senior Work should be submitted by the previous April 1 for fall and winter term projects, and the previous October 15 for spring term projects. Budget proposals will not be considered after those dates. Project proposals will be considered after the deadline but are more likely not to be approved due to previous commitments of faculty advisors or other scheduling reasons.
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Program in Neuroscience

Required for the major: The major includes required background and foundations courses, electives, and senior work. Required background courses in biology, psychology, and chemistry, establish a foundation in science necessary for upper-level study. Foundation courses teach students to approach neuroscience from three intellectually different, but related directions. Elective courses offer opportunities to explore a wide variety of neuroscience related areas. Senior work requires all majors to integrate their specific training through research or a senior seminar.  Students may be exempt from some introductory courses through placement or bypass exams. For more information on placing out of a specific course, contact the chairperson of the relevant department.

Required Background Courses:
PSYC 0105 Introduction to Psychology
BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
CHEM 0103 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1
Either PSYC 0201 Psychological Statistics or BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis (if available)

NOTE: PSYC 0105 & BIOL 0145 are pre-requisite to NSCI 0251 and should be taken in the first year.

We strongly recommend CHEM 0103 & either PSYC 0201 or BIOL 0211 be taken by the end of the second year.

Foundations Courses: (all three are required)
NSCI 0251 Fundamentals of Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (Not open to juniors or seniors) 

NSCI 0252 Fundamentals of Behavioral Neuroscience (Currently only open to NSCI Majors with the prerequisite of NSCI 0251) (Completed by the end of junior year)

Fundamentals of Philosophical Neuroscience—Students must take one of the following:   
PHIL 0252 Philosophy of Mind
PHIL 0358 Rationality and Cognition
PHIL 0360 Consciousness

Electives:
Majors must take three electives chosen from within or across the Biological, Psychological, or Philosophical groupings below:

Biological Studies of Neuroscience
BIOL 0216 Animal Behavior
BIOL 0235 Sexual Selection
BIOL 0270 Neural Disorders
BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology
BIOL 0350 Endocrinology
BIOL 0370 Animal Physiology
NSCI 0200 Pioneers of the Brain
NSCI 0225 Brain Evolution
NSCI 0345 Neurodevelopment

Psychological Studies of Neuroscience
PSYC 0202 Research Methods
PSYC/NSCI 0206 Brain Plasticity
PSYC/NSCI 0227 Cognitive Psychology
PSYC/NSCI 0302 Conditioning and Learning
PSYC/NSCI 0303 Sensation and Perception
PSYC/NSCI 0309 Psychopharmacology
PSYC/NSCI 0317 Biobehavioral Addiction
RELI/PSYC 0209 Mindfulness and Psychology
LNGT 0226 Phonetics & Phonology

Philosophical Studies of Neuroscience
PHIL 0214 Science and Society
PHIL 0216 Science and the Quest for Truth
PHIL 0220 Knowledge and Reality
*PHIL 0252 Philosophy of Mind
PHIL 0280 Logic & Formal Semantics
PHIL 0310 Moral Psychology
PHIL 0316 Philosophy of Science
PHIL/LNGT 0354 Philosophy of Language
*PHIL 0358 Rationality and Cognition
*PHIL 0360 Consciousness
RELI/PHIL 0320 Yogacara Depth Psychology and Philosophy of Mind 

* If not taken already to satisfy the Fundamentals of Philosophical Neuroscience requirement

Senior Work: A senior seminar in a neuroscience area, approved by the program. Offerings vary year by year, but possible courses include: 

BIOL/NSCI 0420 Neurogenetics
BIOL 0475 Neuroplasticity
BIOL/NSCI 0480 Neurobiology
NSCI 0410 Neural Coding
NSCI 0425 Methods in Neuroscience
PSYC 0408 Family in Psychology
PSYC/NSCI 0414 Rhythms of the Brain
PSYC/NSCI 0418 Psychobio & Sex Diff. Critique
PSYC/NSCI 0430 Memory: A User's Guide
PSYC/NSCI 0434 Genes, Brain and Behavior
PSYC/NSCI 0437 Social/Emotional Brain
PSYC/NSCI 0438 Lenses on Sex and Gender
or a NSCI relevant BIOL, PSYC or PHIL 0400 level course approved in advance by the NSCI Program) OR senior research (NSCI 0500, NSCI 0700 and NSCI 0701).

During winter term and as course offerings change there may be others that are available for NSCI seminar credit.  Seniors can do research with any faculty in the program, or with certain faculty in other departments provided the research project is approved by the neuroscience faculty and the project is related to understanding the nervous system and the mind.
Independent Research and Program Honors: Majors are encouraged to undertake independent research (NSCI 0500, NSCI 0700, NSCI 0701) with any faculty member in the program. Students considering any senior research should begin conversations with faculty early in their junior year. Those eligible for high honors in neuroscience must (1) complete at least two semesters of thesis-related research (one term of NSCI 0500 or NSCI 0700 and one term of NSCI 0701); (2) have a minimum GPA of 3.3 in major courses (excluding NSCI 0500/0700/0701); (3) present a public seminar describing the background, methodology, results, and greater significance of their research; (4) submit a written thesis and (5) successfully defend their thesis before a committee comprised of at least two Neuroscience faculty members, plus others as needed who may recommend High Honors after considering these five components of a thesis.
Study Abroad: Study abroad can be a valuable experience that is encouraged, though majors must consult with the Office of Off-Campus Study and their advisor about the advisability of specific programs. Because the requirements for the NSCI major are complex, we recommend that students study abroad for a single term rather than an entire year. It is expected that the required courses listed for the major specifically by number (i.e. PSYC 0105, BIOL 0145, PSYC 0201 or BIOL 0211, NSCI 0251, NSCI 0252, and PHIL 0252, PHIL 0360, or PHIL 0358) would be completed at Middlebury. However, NSCI electives may be taken abroad if they are determined to satisfy program requirements and are approved by the advisor and program director. Students generally receive major credit for a maximum of two courses taken abroad. The NSCI program does not grant major credit for Independent Study projects completed abroad.
Advanced Placement:
Psychology AP Exam and IB: Students with a score of 4 or 5 on the Psychology AP Exam, or a score of 6 or 7 on the IB (International Baccalaureate) Higher Level psychology exam, may bypass PSYC 0105Students matriculating Fall 2016 or later will need to take an additional elective to fulfill their Neuroscience Requirements.  Students matriculating prior to Fall 2016 do not need an additional course for the major.
Psychology Department placement exam: Students who receive a passing score on the Psychology Department placement exam may bypass PSYC 0105, however they will need to take an additional elective to fulfill their Neuroscience Requirements.  (More details can be found on the Psychology Requirements page.)
Statistics AP Exam:  Students matriculating Fall 2016 or later may not use the Statistics AP Examination in place of taking PSYC 0201 (Psychological Statistics) or BIOL 0211 (Biostats).  Credit for PSYC 0201 is given to students matriculating prior to Fall 2016 who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Statistics AP Examination.  These students do not need to take an additional course for the major.  
Chemistry AP and Placement ExamStudents with a score of 4 or 5 on the Chemistry AP Exam, or who pass the Chemistry Department Placement Exam, may bypass CHEM 0103 and do not need an additional course for the major.

 

 

NSCI 0200 Pioneers of the Brain (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

The field of neuroscience emerged from the collective efforts of anatomists, physiologists, chemists, and psychologists all striving to understand the immense complexity of the nervous system. In this course we will investigate a selection of pioneering researchers in the history of neuroscience, focusing especially from the mid-19th century to the present day. Utilizing a historical framework, we will examine their hypotheses, methodologies, conclusions, and how their work was received (or derided) by contemporaries. Topics will range from molecular mechanisms of neuronal function to animal behavior. (BIOL 0145 or PSYC 0105 or CHEM 0103, or equivalent; open to non-seniors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (C. Cave)

NSCI 0206 Brain Plasticity (Spring 2020)

Starting in early development and continuing throughout your lifespan, your experiences will restructure your brain and thereby change who you are! We will explore the foundations of brain plasticity through the investigation of brain development, memory and memory systems, and the neurobiology of memory. Our understanding of brain plasticity will be applied to better understand how plasticity can be harnessed to improve cognition and alleviate a variety of brain disorders. Our exploration will be informed by authors, and artists portrayals of memory, scientific literature, and clinical case studies. (PSYC 0105 or any BIOL course; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (M. Dash)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0206 *

NSCI 0251 Fundamentals of Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Neurons are the building blocks of complex circuits that underlie perception and behavior. In this course we will examine the molecular and cellular basis of neuron structure and function. The topics include the molecular and cellular basis of action potential propagation, the molecular biology of synaptic transmission, the molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, and the molecular mechanisms of sensory transduction. Laboratory exercises will train students in commonly used neurobiology techniques and engage students in novel investigations. (BIOL 0145 or CHEM 0103 or CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 and PSYC 0105; Open to neuroscience majors, nonmajors by waiver; Not open to juniors or seniors). 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2019: G. Ernstrom, N. Coe; Spring 2020: C. Cave)

NSCI 0252 Fundamentals of Behavioral Neuroscience (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Behavioral neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field that combines approaches and knowledge from psychology, biology, and chemistry to further our understanding of human and non-human animal behavior. In this course, you will study the interrelationships among elements of the nervous systems, co-functioning bodily systems, and behavioral output such as emotions, sex, memory, consciousness, sleep, and language. You will be given an opportunity to apply your knowledge from NSCI 0251 of the nervous system at the micro and macro levels and will revisit the basic concepts of behavioral genetics and psychopharmacology. This cumulative knowledge base will serve as your foundation for advanced study of neural systems and their relative roles in progressively more complex behaviors such as basic reflexes, motivation, rational thought, neural disorders, and therapeutic efficacy. (NSCI 0251; open to NSCI majors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2019: C. Parker; Spring 2020: Z. Zhai)

NSCI 0303 Sensation and Perception (Fall 2019)

Remarkably, using just five basic senses, our brains translate simple external stimuli (e.g. light and sound waves) into unique and vivid perceptual experiences enabling us to interact with our surrounding physical reality. Focusing primarily on the underlying mechanisms of vision and audition, we will explore how our brains construct detailed representations of our world. Throughout these explorations, we will identify perceptual limitations and investigate how mental processes such as attention and emotion affect our perceptions. We will review recent scientific articles and conduct experiments. (PSYC 0105 or any BIOL course; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI (M. Dash)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0303 *

NSCI 0309 Psychopharmacology (Spring 2020)

This course will examine ways in which drugs act on the brain to influence behavior. Students will learn the basics of brain function, will learn basic properties of drug action, and will learn how legal and illegal drugs, including drugs used to treat psychological disorders, alter the brain function and behavior of humans and experimental animals. (PSYC 0226 or PSYC 0301 or PSYC 0303 or BIOL 0370 or NSCI 0252; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (M. Collaer)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0309 *

NSCI 0317 Biobehavioral Addiction (Fall 2019)

Addiction is a pervasive disorder affecting society on a global scale. To understand this complex disorder, addictions are studied from the basic neural mechanisms, such as how neurons respond to addictive substances, to psychological factors and how they protect or increase risk. In this course we will examine the principles of substance addictions, emerging behavioral addictions (internet/gaming, problem-gambling), and underlying mechanisms that drive addiction. Topics include neural pathways of addictive substances, brain functional and structural changes, theories of motivation, neuropsychological risk factors, and modern prevention and treatment. Psychology and neuroscience students will bring their relative expertise to the class for thoughtful review of the literature.(PSYC 0105; not open to first year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (Z. Zhai)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0317 *

NSCI 0345 Neurodevelopment (Fall 2019)

The generation of the nervous system is an intricate, stepwise process involving the coordinated action of progenitor cells, organizing centers, and signaling pathways. Drawing examples from vertebrate and invertebrate neurodevelopment, we will examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in generating a healthy, functioning nervous system. Topics will range from early embryonic events (neural induction, patterning) through mid-gestation (neurogenesis, gliogenesis) and later stage processes (axon guidance, synaptogenesis). Students will also gain an appreciation for the emerging role of activity-dependent plasticity in neurodevelopment and how developmental processes become compromised in disease. (NSCI 251; open to NSCI majors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (C. Cave)

NSCI 0414 Rhythms of the Brain (Spring 2020)

How do the ~86 billion neurons of the human brain coordinate their activity to produce complex cognition and behavior? In this course we will explore how rhythmic oscillations in neuronal activity may provide a unified mechanism that contributes to diverse brain functions including attention, learning and memory, motor coordination, sleep, respiration, and perhaps even consciousness itself. Through background lectures and class discussion of primary scientific literature, students will develop their understanding of the relationships between ongoing neuronal activity, cognition, and behavior. (PSYC 0301 or PSYC 0303 or NSCI 0100 or NSCI 0252; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. SCI (M. Dash)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0414 *

NSCI 0418 Psychobiology and Sex Differences: Perils, Problems, and Contributions (Fall 2019)

Men and women differ reproductively, in hormonal patterns, in average height, and in muscle mass. Biology is accepted as contributing to these differences. Do biological contributions stop at the neck? Or might biology also contribute to neural and behavioral development in human as well as nonhuman species? We will examine evidence both for and against a potential role for psychobiological factors, such as hormones and chromosomes, in behavior and psychological states. These may include play behavior, cognition, sexual orientation, pain perception, addiction tendencies, and vulnerability to psychological disorders. We will also explore potential contributions of social and experiential factors because these may provide alternative, sometimes stronger, explanations, and because of potent reciprocal interrelationships between them. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201; Open to junior and senior neuroscience and psychology majors only, others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (M. Collaer)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0418 *

NSCI 0420 Neurogenetics (Spring 2020)

In this course we will examine how genetic analysis can be used to probe the structure and function of nervous systems. Instead of focusing broadly across many fields in neuroscience, as a class we will select a few topics and delve deeply into understanding the controversies and technological advances associated with a particular topic in neurogenetics. We will examine the strengths and limitations of different types of genetic analyses as they are applied to studying neurobiology such as gene knock-outs, CRISPR genome editing, RNA interference, genetic mutant screens, and genome-wide association studies. Class time will primarily be spent discussing the primary literature. A final project will consist of research grant proposal similar to one that would be submitted to the National Institutes of Health or National Science Foundation by a professional scientist. (BIOL 0314 or waiver. Open to juniors and seniors only.) 3 hrs. lect./disc SCI (G. Ernstrom)
Cross-listed as: BIOL 0420 *

NSCI 0434 Genes, Brain, and Behavior (Fall 2019)

What we experience—and how we experience it—is influenced by our unique combination of genes. For better or worse, the gene variants we inherit from our parents contribute to our predispositions to psychological disorders, our personalities, and even the way in which we perceive the world around us. To be clear, anything that you can do or think is in some way influenced by your genes. However, this statement comes with a large caveat: except in the case of (relatively) rare single gene mutations, your genes do not determine but rather contribute to who you are. Working within the field of behavior genetics, we will cover topics such as social behavior, sexual promiscuity, drug abuse, language, intelligence, and psychopathology. (PSYC 0226 or BIOL 0145 or NSCI 0251; Open to junior and senior psychology or neuroscience majors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. SCI (C. Parker)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0434 *

NSCI 0500 Independent Research (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Students enrolled in NSCI 0500 complete individual research projects involving laboratory or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and approved in advance by a NSCI faculty advisor. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in NSCI 0700. (Approval required)

NSCI 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

This course is for senior NSCI majors who plan to conduct one or more semesters of independent research, or who plan to complete preparatory work toward a senior thesis, such as researching and writing a thesis proposal as well as, if appropriate, collecting data that will form the basis for a senior thesis. Senior NSCI majors who plan to complete a senior thesis should register initially for NSCI 0700. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (Approval required, open to seniors only)

NSCI 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Senior NSCI majors who have completed one or more terms of NSCI 0700, who have a GPA of 3.3 in their major courses, and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for NSCI 0701 for the final semester of the senior thesis process. Students enrolled in NSCI 0701 write a thesis, give a public presentation of their research, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least two Neuroscience faculty members. Faculty may recommend High honors in Neuroscience after considering the quality of these components of a student’s thesis and the student’s GPA in major courses. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (NSCI 0700, Approval required)
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Department of Philosophy

A.  Requirements for students who entered the College prior to Fall 2015

Required for the Major: Majors must complete no fewer than 10 courses in the department, to include:
1. Logic Requirement: PHIL 0180
2. History Requirement:
    a) PHIL 0201 or CLAS/PHIL 0275
    b) PHIL 0250
3. Distribution Requirement:
    a) one course in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy (ESP)
    b) one course in Epistemology, Language, Metaphysics, Mind and Science (ELMMS)
4. Seminar Requirement: two 0400-level seminars (see below)
5. Electives: three courses
 
Additionally, it is highly recommended that students take either PHIL 0150 or PHIL 0151, preferably early in the program. PHIL 0180 must be completed by the end of the sophomore year. For students going abroad in their junior year, the history requirement should be completed prior to departure. Cognate courses may be substituted for no more than two departmental electives, but will not satisfy the departmental distribution requirement; such substitutions require the prior approval of a major's departmental adviser, and must be at the 0200-level or above. No more than one term of thesis work may count towards the 10 course requirement.
 
Seminar Requirement: Majors must take two department seminars (0400-level courses on advanced topics in philosophy). Junior majors should take the seminar currently offered in the spring term; seniors should take the seminar currently offered in the fall term. Students who are abroad during the spring of the junior year must take both seminars in their senior year. This requirement will not be waived for students doing departmental honors. These seminars will not normally satisfy the departmental distribution requirement, but may in exceptional cases by permission of the Chair.
 
Departmental Honors: Majors with at least a B+ average in philosophy courses may apply to the Chair to become candidates for departmental honors. To apply, a student must find a faculty member willing to supervise the project and then submit a proposal to that faculty member in writing. If (and only if) the proposal is accepted, the student should then register for two successive terms of PHIL 0700 (normally during the winter and spring terms of their senior year). To receive honors, students must complete a two-term project resulting in a thesis or a set of thematically related papers, give an oral defense (according to departmental regulations), and receive for their work a minimum grade of B+. In addition, they must maintain their B+ average in courses in the department.
 
Required for the Joint Major: For the philosophy component of a joint major, students must (1) take eight philosophy courses, including (a) PHIL 0180, to be taken by the end of the sophomore year; (b) one 0400-level seminar to be taken in the last three semesters; (c) One course from the history requirement; and (d) one course from the distribution requirement (ESP or ELMMS). Either PHIL 0150 or PHIL 0151 is also highly recommended, and, like PHIL 0180, should be taken early in the program whenever possible. In addition, students must (2) give evidence of having used the training in both major fields, usually in an independent project or thesis, but sometimes in a seminar paper. Joint majors are eligible for department honors, if they do a two-term thesis.
 
Required for the Minor: A total of six courses in philosophy, including PHIL 0180 and at least one course at the 0300 or 0400 level. Minors wishing to take a 0400-level seminar must have completed three other philosophy courses first. Enrollment priority in 0400-level seminars will be given to majors. Students electing the philosophy minor should arrange to have an adviser in the philosophy department.

B.  Requirements for students entering the College in Fall 2015 or after

Required for the Major: Majors must complete no fewer than eleven courses in the department, to include:

  1. Logic Requirement: PHIL 0180 (to be taken by the end of the sophomore year)
  2. History Requirement (to be taken by the end of the junior year; students going abroad in their junior year should complete the History Requirement prior to departure):
    a. PHIL 0201 or CLAS/PHIL 0275 and
    b. PHIL 0250
  3. Distribution Requirement:
    a. one course in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy (ESP); and
    b. one course in Epistemology, Language, Metaphysics, Mind and Science (ELMMS).
  4. Upper-level Course Requirement:  Three courses at the 0300 or 0400 level, at least one of which must be a 0400-level course. (Students may count only one cross-listed 300-level course taught by faculty outside the Philosophy Department towards their upper-level course requirement. 0400-level courses will not normally satisfy the distribution requirement. Courses taken while abroad will not generally be allowed to substitute for the required 0400-level course.)
  5. Senior Independent Research Requirement
  6. At least two other philosophy courses, in order to fulfill the eleven-course requirement. 

Cognate courses may be substituted for no more than two departmental electives, but will not satisfy the departmental distribution requirement; such substitutions require the prior approval of a major's departmental adviser, and must be at the 0200-level or above.

Senior Independent Research Requirement: Majors must complete a one-semester independent research project (PHIL 0710) in the fall of their senior year. Topics and advisers will be decided through consultation with members of the department. PHIL 0710 includes participation in the senior project workshop held for all students completing their independent work.

Departmental Honors:  Students will be awarded departmental honors if and only if they receive a) at least an A- average in courses counted toward the major, and b) an A- on their senior project.  Students will be awarded high honors if and only if they receive a) at least an A- average in courses counted toward the major, and b) an A on their senior project. 
 
Required for the Joint Major:  For the philosophy component of a joint major, students must take nine philosophy courses, including

1.   PHIL 0180, to be taken by the end of the sophomore year;
2.   One 0400-level seminar to be taken in the last three semesters;
3.   Three of the following:

a.  PHIL 0201 or CLAS/PHIL 0275
b.  PHIL 0250
c.  one course in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy (ESP) and
d.  one course in Epistemology, Language, Metaphysics, Mind and Science (ELMMS)

4.  A course in which the student completes a senior independent project that shows evidence of having integrated the training of both major fields.  (Normally this course will be PHIL 0710, though other models may be appropriate.)  The topic and scope of the independent project is to be determined in consultation with both major advisers. 
5.  At least three other philosophy courses, in order to fulfill the nine-course requirement. 

Required for the Minor: A total of six courses in philosophy, including PHIL 0180 and at least one course at the 0300 or 0400 level. Minors wishing to take a 0400-level seminar must have completed three other philosophy courses first. Enrollment priority in 0400-level seminars will be given to majors. Students electing the philosophy minor are encouraged to consult with faculty members in the Philosophy Department about course planning.

PHIL 0156 Contemporary Moral Issues (Fall 2019)

We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc. PHL (L. Besser)
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0198 *

PHIL 0170 Introduction to World Philosophy (Fall 2019)

This course will offer a comparative introduction to a number of world philosophical traditions, including those of Europe and America, India, China, and Africa. We will consider central debates within these traditions, including: How should we live? What is the ultimate nature of reality, and how can we come to know it? What is the nature of the self, and how does it relate to society? We will also investigate the broader question of whether truth and morality are relative to culture. Central readings will include works by Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Lao Tzu, Confucius, and contemporary African philosophers, as well as Hindu and Buddhist texts. 2 hrs. lect,1 hr. disc. CMP, PHL (J. Spackman)

PHIL 0180 Introduction to Modern Logic (Fall 2019, Spring 2020)

Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. DED (Fall 2019: P. Tan; Spring 2020: H. Grasswick)

PHIL 0198 Privilege and Poverty: the Ethics of Economic Inequality (Spring 2020)

In this course we will study the ethical implications of domestic and global economic inequality. Drawing from history, economics, sociology, philosophy, theology, and other disciplines, we will examine the causes and consequences of inequality, critically evaluate our usage of the terms “privilege” and “poverty,” and consider the range of moral responses individuals and society might have to inequality. We will ask whether it is unfair, unfortunate, or necessary that some citizens live with significantly less material wealth than others, and whether those who experience “privilege” have any moral responsibility to those who exist in “poverty.” (not open to students who have taken RELI/INTD 0298) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. PHL, SOC (S. Viner)
Cross-listed as: INTD 0198 PHIL 0156

PHIL 0208 Morality & War (Fall 2019)

Are there any Just Wars? What would make a war a Just War? In the first part of this course we will investigate the historical origins of Just War Theory. In the second part, we will analyze contemporary moral perspectives on whether war can be morally justified and if so, what actions in war are morally justified or prohibited. In the final part, we will read articles concerning war and humanitarian intervention and on what actions, e.g. punishment, are morally permissible or demanded after war. Authors will include Augustine, Grotius, Nagel, Walzer, Luban. 3 hrs. lect. PHL (S. Viner)

PHIL 0219 Religion, Metaphysics, and Epistemology (Spring 2020)

In this course we will see how the tools of contemporary metaphysics and epistemology can advance central debates in the philosophy of religion: Does God exist? Can religious beliefs ever be justified? If God exists, do we still have free will? Our emphasis will be on carefully developing and refining contemporary and historical arguments for the primary positions in these debates. Readings will be a selection of contemporary articles. 3 hrs sem. PHL (P. Tan)

PHIL 0234 Philosophy and Feminism (Fall 2019)

This course will examine the contributions of various feminists and feminist philosophers to some of the central problems of philosophical methodology, epistemology, philosophy of science, metaphysics, and ethics. Are there gendered assumptions in operation in the way particular philosophical problems are framed? For example, do the politics of gender contribute to accounts of objective knowledge and rationality? Are some philosophical perspectives better suited to the goals of feminism than others? We will also examine the general relationship between feminism and philosophy, and we will reflect on the relevance of theorizing and philosophizing for feminist political practice. CMP, PHL (H. Grasswick)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0234

PHIL 0237 Chinese Philosophy (Fall 2019)

A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, NOA, PHL