Middlebury

Course Catalog - Middlebury College - Fall 2018, Spring 2019

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African American Studies Minor

Professors: William Nash (American studies and English and American literature) Ellen Oxfeld (sociology/anthropology), James Ralph (history); Associate Professors: William Hart (history); Jessyka Finley (American Studies); Program Coordinator: Renée Brown

This program offers a minor in African American studies to students who complete the following requirements:
(1) The following core courses, designed to offer theoretical perspectives and broad background:
* HIST 0225 African American History
* AMST 0224 Race and Ethnicity in the US
 (2) Two of the following courses, which are more focused explorations of a part of the African American experience:
* AMST 0310 Livin for the City
* ENAM/AMST 0252 African American Literature
* HIST/AMST 0226 The Civil Rights Revolution
*AMST 0107 Intro to African American Culture
*AMST/GSFS 0204 Black Comic Cultures
*AMST/GSFS 0208 Unruly Bodies: Black Womanhood in Popular Culture
*AMST 0345 Black Lives Matter
*AMST/SOAN 0348 Black Ethnography
AMST 0259 Re-Presenting Slavery
(3) One advanced, relevant 0400 level course or an independent 0500-level project.
Other appropriate courses offered during the fall and spring semesters, or during the winter term, may be substituted for courses in category 2 at the discretion of the program director. The director or minor advisor will also approve courses to count in category 3.

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African Studies Minor

Professors: Armelle Crouzieres-Ingenthron (French), Jacob Tropp (history); Associate Professors: Nadia Horning (political science), Damascus Kafumbe (music), Michael Sheridan (sociology/anthropology); Assistant Professor: Obie Porteous (economics)

This program offers a minor in African Studies to students who complete the following requirements:

(1) Two of the following courses which focus primarily on Africa:

DANC 0163 From Africa to America: Moving from Our Core
ECON 0234 Economics of Africa
ECON 0327 Economic Development in Africa
FREN 0395 Women's Voices from the Francophone World
FREN 0396 (Re) Constructing Identities in Francophone Colonial and Postcolonial Fiction
FREN 0398 Children and Civil War in Francophone African Literature
FREN/PSCI 0399 Of Power & Pen: Francophone Africa
FREN 0492 Denunciation and Literature: The Awakening of the Maghreb
HIST 0113 History of Africa to 1800
HIST 0114 History of Modern Africa
HIST 0315 Health and Healing in African History
HIST 0317 South Africa in the World
HIST 0375 Struggles in Southern Africa
HIST 0441 Readings in African History: Environmental History of Africa
HIST 0442 Popular Culture and History in Africa
HIST/GSFS 0443 Readings in African History: Women and Gender in African History
INTD 1152 Introduction to Swahili and East African Cultures
MUSC 0236 African Soundscapes
MUSC 0244 African Music and Dance Performance
IGST/PSCI0428 Dictators and Democrats
PSCI 0321 Anglophone Vs. Francophone Africa (CW)
PSCI 0202 African Politics
PSCI 0431 African Government
SOAN 0232 Anthropology of Continuity and Change in Sub-Saharan Africa
SOAN/IGST 1080 Swahili and East African Cultures II

(2) Two additional courses, either chosen from group (1) above or from the following courses, which include significant materials on Africa and/or the African Diaspora. When given the option to pursue independent research projects in these courses, students are expected to choose Africa-related topics to contribute to their minor:

ECON 0328 Economics of Global Health
ECON 0352 Structuralist Macroeconomics: Theory and Policy for Developing Countries
ECON 0415 Macroeconomics of Development
ECON 0466 Environment and Development
ECON 0425 Seminar on Economic Development
ECON 0465 Special Topics in Environmental Economics
FREN 0394 Black and Beur Expression
HIST 0105 The Atlantic World: 1492-1900
HIST 0109 History of Islam and the Middle East, Since 1453
HIST 0225 African American History
HIST 0263 Religion and Politics in Islamic History
HIST 0427 Diaspora and Exile
HIST/GSFS 0438 Readings in Middle Eastern History: Women and Islam
MUSC 1066 The History of the American Negro Spiritual
PGSE 0330 Aesthetics of Urban Poverty in Literature, Film, and Music
PGSE 0375 Colonial Discourse and the "Lusophone World"
PSCI 0209 Local Green Politics
PSCI 0258 The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
PSCI 0330 Comparative Development Strategies
RELI 0150 The Islamic Tradition
RELI 0272 African American Religious History
RELI 0359 Issues in Islamic Law and Ethics: Questions of Life and Death
SOAN 0211 Human Ecology
SOAN 0267 Global Health
SOAN 0468 Success and Failure in Global Health and Development Projects
SOAN 0340 The Anthropology of Human Rights
SOAN/RELI 0353 Islam in Practice: Anthropology of Muslim Cultures

*Courses offered during the winter term may apply to the minor.

(3) One advanced seminar course (0300- or 0400-level, depending on the department), or a relevant, independent 0500-level project (at the discretion of the program director).
Other courses offered during the fall, winter, or spring terms, or at affiliated institutions abroad, may be substituted for the above listed courses at the discretion of the program director. As a general rule, no more than one course from a study abroad program will be counted towards the fulfillment of the minor.

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Program in American Studies

Requirements: A minimum of eleven courses including AMST 0209, AMST 0210, AMST 0400, three AMST electives, four courses in a concentration designed in consultation with a faculty advisor, and AMST 0705 (senior research tutorial).    Students writing honors theses will undertake an additional term of independent research and writing (AMST 0710).
Electives: Three AMST electives, two of which must be numbered 0200 or higher.  These courses must be listed or cross-listed as AMST courses in the course catalog.  Courses may not count toward both the elective and concentration requirements.
Junior Seminar (AMST 0400): Students should normally take this seminar in the Fall of their Junior year.  Where compelling circumstances make doing this impossible, arrangements to take the course as a senior may be made with the director of the American Studies program.
Senior Research Tutorial (AMST 0705): Seniors must complete either a one-credit research project and essay of approximately 30 pages, or, if otherwise qualified, a two-credit honors thesis of approximately 70 pages.  Equivalent work in other media may be possible. All AMST seniors must enroll in AMST 0705, the senior research tutorial, in the fall of their senior year.  This seminar will focus on the development of sophisticated research skills, the sharing with peers of research and writing in progress, and the completion of a substantial research project.  Those writing one-credit essays will complete their projects over the course of this tutorial.  Students writing two-credit honors theses will complete at least one chapter in the seminar and then continue work on the project over another term (AMST 0710) in consultation with a faculty adviser.  To qualify for the writing of an honors thesis, a student must have a GPA of at least 3.5 in courses taken for the major.  Faculty will make determinations on the awarding of honors after theses are completed. 
Concentrations: Concentrations must bring together coherent clusters of four courses that address particular themes, periods, movements, or modes of thought and expression. In consultation with an advisor and with approval of the program, students will develop an interdisciplinary concentration in one of these areas: 
Popular Culture: Students will study popular cultural forms, their reception, and the history of their production in the United States.  Courses will especially focus on the conflicts between popular culture as a site of creativity and democratic empowerment on the one hand, and as a product of dominant commercialized cultural industries on the other.
Race and Ethnicity: Students will examine specific groups in depth and in comparison, exploring racial and ethnic history, political struggles, creative and cultural practices, and individual and collective modes of identity formation.  By studying how and why racial and ethnic identities have evolved in the United States, students will understand their central place in the formation of the American nation.
Artistic and Intellectual Traditions: Students will focus on literary, religious, philosophical, and social thought and its expression in the United States.  They will be encouraged to examine particular currents of thought (e. g. evangelicalism, liberalism, romanticism, modernism, progressivism) or modes of expression (e.g. literature, visual art, or film) that have been important to American culture. 
Space and Place: Students will explore the importance of landscape and place in American culture.  Course work may include the study of American regional geography, the historical and aesthetic dimensions of the built environment, the impacts of urban growth, suburbanization, or the imagining of utopian spaces. 
Cultural Politics: Students will explore the relationship between culture, ideology, and the political system.  People create meaning about their personal and public lives through cultural practices, but those practices take place within institutional and ideological structures.  Relevant courses might explore ethics and religion; political parties and social movements; feminism and gender studies; and representation and visual culture.
Self-Designed Concentration: Self-designed concentrations must be built in close consultation with a faculty advisor and should focus on a cultural theme or interdisciplinary area of inquiry.  Potential topics might include: Gender & American Culture; American Environmentalism; Visual Culture; Industrialization of America; and Immigration and Cultural Exchanges.
Joint Major Requirements: Students may major in AMST jointly with another discipline or program. Students must discuss their rationale for doing so with their advisor in AMST and joint majors must be approved by the faculty in AMST. Required courses for a joint major in AMST are: AMST 0209, AMST 0210, AMST 0400, and AMST 0705, and 2 AMST electives.
Minor Requirements: Students may complete a minor in American Studies by taking the following courses: AMST 0210, AMST 0209, AMST 0400, three AMST electives.
Study Abroad for American Studies Majors: The faculty members of the Program in American Studies recognize the benefits of cross-cultural learning and encourage majors to take advantage of study abroad opportunities. Often students returning from study abroad undertake senior work that responds to their cultural learning while abroad. We encourage students to take courses in their study abroad program that focus on the host culture and thereby allow the best opportunity for cultural comparison.
American Studies majors normally take AMST 0400, a required seminar, in the fall semester of their junior year. Under compelling circumstances that leave only the fall available as an option for study abroad, majors may be able to take AMST 0400 in the fall semester of their senior year. Such arrangements must be discussed in advance with, and approved by, the director of the American Studies program. The American Studies program enjoys being host to exchange students from the American studies programs at the Universities of East Anglia and Nottingham in Great Britain.

 

 

AMST 0101 Intro to American Studies: American Representations of Crime and Violence (Fall 2018)

In this course we will offer an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture and identity. Integrating a range of sources and methods, we will examine myths, symbols, values, and social changes that have been used to create and contest ideas of "Americanness." Sources for the course will include movies, fiction, political and religious tracts, advertising, TV shows, video games, music, and journalism. This year, we will focus on American portrayals of crime and violence in a wide range of texts and cultural artifacts that provide us with a larger sense of how these representations function in the formation of categories of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, ethics and religion, as well as socio-economic class in American society. Texts and films will range from True Crime to Pulp Fiction and from street photography to pictures of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC (R. Lint Sagarena)

AMST 0104 Television and American Culture (Spring 2019)

This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. AMR, NOR, SOC
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0104 *

AMST 0175 Immigrant America (Fall 2018)

In this course we will trace American immigration history from the late 19th to the turn of the 21st century, and examine the essential place immigration has occupied in the making of modern America and American culture. The central themes of this course will be industrialization and labor migrations, aftermaths of wars and refugees, constructions of racial categories and ethnic community identities, legal defining of "aliens" and citizenship, and diversity in immigrant experiences. To explore these themes, we will engage a range of sources including memoirs, novels, oral histories, and films. AMR, HIS, NOR (R. Joo)

AMST 0206 Nineteenth-Century American Literature (Spring 2019)

This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0206 *

AMST 0209 American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (Fall 2018)

A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR (D. Evans)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0209

AMST 0210 Formation of Modern American Culture I: 1830-1919 (Spring 2019)

An introduction to the study of American culture from 1830 through World War I with an emphasis on the changing shape of popular, mass, and elite cultural forms. We will explore a widely-accepted scholarly notion that a new, distinctively national and modern culture emerged during this period and that particular ideas of social formation (race, class, gender, sexuality, etc.) came with it. We will practice the interdisciplinary interpretation of American culture by exploring a wide range of subjects and media: economic change, social class, biography and autobiography, politics, photo-journalism, novels, architecture, painting, and photography. Required of all American studies majors. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, HIS, NOR

AMST 0216 History of the American West (Fall 2018)

This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374) HIS, NOR, SOC (K. Morse)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0216 *

AMST 0224 Formations of Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. (Spring 2019)

Historical memories, everyday experiences, and possible futures are powerfully shaped by racial and ethnic differences. Categories of race and ethnicity structure social relationships and cultural meanings in the United States and beyond. In this course we will track the theoretical and historical bases of ideas of race and ethnicity in modern America. We will investigate how race and ethnicity intersect at particular historical moments with other forms of difference including gender, sexuality, nation, and class. The course offers an approach informed by critical studies of race including texts in history, political theory, cultural studies, and anthropology. (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0224

AMST 0227 Asian Americas (Spring 2019)

In this course we will investigate cultural transformations, cultural politics, and the cultural productions of and about Asian Americans. The themes of immigration, nation, and citizenship are central to the construction of the U.S. racial category of Asian. Those addressed within the category are highly diverse and differentiated along class, gender, and generational lines, yet the racial category structures particular kinds of experiences and possibilities for subjects. Historical transformations and contemporary issues in a variety of Asian American contexts will be investigated through a variety of texts including historical accounts, cultural studies, anthropological studies, autobiography, and fiction. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC

AMST 0231 See the U.S.A.: The History of Tourism in American Culture (Fall 2018)

In this course, we will explore the history and evolution of American tourism, beginning in the 1820s, when middle-class tourists first journeyed up the Hudson River valley, and ending with our contemporary and continuing obsession with iconic destinations such as Graceland, Gettysburg, and the Grand Canyon. We will explore how the growth of national transportation systems, the development of advertising, and the rise of a middle class with money and time to spend on leisure shaped the evolution of tourism. Along the way, we will study various types of tourism (such as historical, cultural, ethnic, eco-, and 'disaster' tourism) and look at the creative processes by which places are transformed into 'destinations'. Our texts will come from visual art, travel literature, material culture, and film and television. We will consider their cultural meaning and reflect on our own motivations and responses as tourists, and by so doing contemplate why tourism was-and still is-such an important part of American life. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CW, HIS, NOR (D. Evans)

AMST 0232 Music in the United States (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine folk, classical, and popular music in the United States from the 17th century to the present. We will use historical and analytical approaches to gain insight into the music, the musicians, and the social and cultural forces that have shaped them. Students will explore music’s relation to historical events, other artistic movements, technological changes, and questions of national identity and ethnicity. Topics will include music in the British colonies, minstrelsy, American opera and orchestras, jazz, popular music, and the experimentalist composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Music reading skills are useful but not required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART, NOR
Cross-listed as: MUSC 0232 *

AMST 0234 American Consumer Culture (Fall 2018)

For many Americans in the 20th century, consumer goods came to embody the promise of the "good life." Yet mass consumption also fostered economic, political, and social inequalities and engendered anti-consumerist activism. In this course we will pursue an interdisciplinary approach to American consumer culture, focusing on the rise of commercialized leisure and advertising; the role of radio, television, and film in shaping consumer practices; and the relationship of consumerism to social inequality and democratic citizenship. Readings will include works by Veblen, Marcuse, Bordieu, Marchand, Cohen, and Schor. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR (H. Allen)

AMST 0245 American Landscape: 1825-1865 (Fall 2018)

This course will explore American landscape painting through an interdisciplinary approach, employing art, literature, religion, and history. In studying the landscape paintings of Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, and Frederic Church, we will also consider the commercial growth of New York City; the myths and legends of the Catskill Mountains; the writings of James Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving, and Henry David Thoreau; the opening of the Erie Canal; and the design and construction of Central Park. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, ART, HIS, NOR (C. Wilson)

AMST 0253 Science Fiction (Fall 2018)

Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0253

AMST 0260 American Disability Studies: History, Meanings, and Cultures (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine the history, meanings, and realities of disability in the United States. We will analyze the social, political, economic, environmental, and material factors that shape the meanings of "disability," examining changes and continuities over time. Students will draw critical attention to the connections between disability, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, and age in American and transnational contexts. Diverse sources, including films and television shows, music, advertising, fiction, memoirs, and material objects, encourage inter and multi-disciplinary approaches to disability. Central themes we consider include language, privilege, community, citizenship, education, medicine and technology, and representation. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (S. Burch)

AMST 0262 Class, Culture, and Representation (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine the contested meanings of social class in U.S. culture from 1930 to the present. We will ask the following: How have workers, the workplace, and economic inequality been imagined in U.S. film, art, and popular culture? How have categories such as race, gender, and sexuality informed ideas about class? And how do the realities of economic inequality mesh with civic narratives of meritocracy and the “American Dream”? Readings will include works by Barbara Ehrenreich, Studs Terkel, Tillie Olsen, and Helena Maria Vilamontes. Films, music, and other media will supplement written materials. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR

AMST 0263 American Psycho: Disease, Doctors, and Discontents (II) (AL) (Pre-1900 AL) (Spring 2019)

What constitutes a pathological response to the pressures of modernity? How do pathological protagonists drive readers toward the precariousness of their own physical and mental health? The readings for this class center on the provisional nature of sanity and the challenges to bodily health in a world of modern commerce, media, and medical diagnoses. We will begin with 19th century texts and their engagement with seemingly "diseased" responses to urbanization, new forms of work, and new structures of the family and end with contemporary fictional psychopaths engaged in attacks on the world of images we inhabit in the present. Nineteenth century texts will likely include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Later 20th-century works will likely include Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Thomas Harris, The Silence of the Lambs, Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted, and Bret Easton Ellis, American Psycho. AMR, LIT, NOR
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0263 *

AMST 0269 Beyond Intersectionality: Developing Anti-Racist and Anti-Capitalist Feminisms (Spring 2019)

Nearly thirty years ago, Kimberlé Crenshaw published the theory of “intersectionality,” in which she argued that racism and sexism collide to make black women’s marginalization distinct from those of both white women and black men (1989). Today, the terms “intersectionality” and “intersectional feminism” are ubiquitous, utilized by scholars, activists, artists, and our students. In this course, we will consider how discourses of and ideas about intersectionality move between and among spaces of dissent. Starting from the position that it is more epistemologically and politically powerful to state that our feminism is anti-racist and anti-capitalist than to say it is “intersectional,” we will address the following questions: What are the benefits and limits of the original theory of intersectionality? How are academic and activist approaches alike both emboldened and limited by intersectionality? What does it mean to be socially and politically conscious, and how do we move from consciousness to action in ways that are not siloed? Texts may include Crenshaw’s “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women” (1989) and Ange-Marie Hancock’s Intersectionality: An Intellectual History (2016). 3 hrs. lect. (Critical Race Feminisms) AMR, NOR, SOC
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0269

AMST 0284 The Computerized Society: A Cultural History of the Computer Since WWII (Fall 2018)

What theorist Jean-Francois Lyotard called “the computerized society” turns out to be about far more than just machines. Technological developments are inextricably linked to other factors: culture, politics, economics, war, identity, race, class, gender, the law, region. In this course we will take an American studies approach to the evolution of the modern computer to grasp its history—and therefore its present significance. Students will encounter a wide range of sources and complete three analytic essays that begin with creative prompts to generate compelling historical interpretations of technology and its contextualized importance in America and the world. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (M. Kramer)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0284

AMST 0304 The Graphic Novel (Spring 2019)

In this course we will study some of the most widely respected graphic novels produced in the last thirty years. Our purpose will be to understand how the form works and is structured by its dual, but sometimes competing, interests in the verbal and the visual, and to think about distinct styles of illustration. We will also think about how landmark examples have shaped the form. Working with software designed for the purpose, students will use photographs to produce short comics of their own. Possible texts include: Alan Moore, Watchmen; Art Spiegelman, Maus; Chris Ware, Jimmy Corrigan; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home.3 hrs. lect. AMR, LIT, NOR
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0304

AMST 0307 Issues in Critical Disability Studies: U.S. and the World (Spring 2019)

Disability as a category and as lived experience plays an important but often overlooked role in national, transnational, and global contexts. In this course we will explore disability’s changing meanings in the United States and around the World. Comparative and transnational approaches will draw our attention to disability’s many meanings across wide-ranging historical, cultural, and geographical settings. Foundational concepts and principles, including ableism and Universal Design, shape our critical inquiry. Key themes frame the course: access, language, power, violence, normalcy, identity, community, institutions, and rights and justice. We will engage with diverse primary sources, from memoirs and documentary films to advertisements, material objects, and oral histories. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, HIS, NOR, SOC

AMST 0325 American Misogyny (Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore the place of misogyny in U.S. media and politics. Early topics will include film noir, Cold War gender scapegoating, and lesbian pulp fiction. Subsequent topics will include the backlash against second-wave feminism, the rise of “post-feminism,” and the impact of reality TV and social media on feminist and antifeminist expression. We will conclude by examining how misogyny informs U.S. culture and politics in the Trump era. Throughout the course, we will consider how discourses of misogyny are inflected by white, cisgender, ableist, ageist, and class privilege. 3 hrs. lect. (National/Transnational Feminisms) AMR, HIS, NOR
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0325

AMST 0349 Toni Morrison and American Culture (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore how Toni Morrison has helped shape and been shaped by ongoing American conversations about race and identity. Beginning with The Origin of Others, her recent collection of essays, and ranging through her fiction from The Bluest Eye to Beloved to Home, we will assess her work in the contexts of the cultural moments in which the novels appeared, using commentary from Black cultural critics like Ta-Nehisi Coates, bell hooks, Shaun King, and James Baldwin to inform our readings. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, HIS, LIT, NOR (W. Nash)

AMST 0400 Theory and Method in American Studies (Junior Year) (Fall 2018)

A reading of influential secondary texts that have defined the field of American Studies during the past fifty years. Particular attention will be paid to the methodologies adopted by American Studies scholars, and the relevance these approaches have for the writing of senior essays and theses. (Open to junior American studies majors only.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (H. Allen)

AMST 0408 American Art in Context: Art and Life of Winslow Homer (Fall 2018)

Although generally regarded as a popular painter of American life, Winslow Homer often provides a penetrating and sometimes disturbing view of post-Civil War America. Among the topics to be considered: Homer's paintings of the Civil War; his illustrations of leisure and recreation; and his depictions of women and children in the Gilded Age. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to Homer's landscape paintings of the Adirondacks, the Caribbean and the Maine coast, as well as his seascapes of the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, ART, HIS, NOR (C. Wilson)

AMST 0445 Vermont Life’s Vermont: A Collaborative Web Project (Fall 2018)

Students in this course will work collaboratively to build an online history project aimed at a wide audience. Since 1946, Vermont Life magazine has created particular images of the landscape, culture, and recreational possibilities in the state. Our goal will be to construct a website that examines the evolution of these images and the meaning of the state over time, paying particular attention to consumerism, the environment, tourism, urban-rural contrasts, local food movements, and the ways that race, class, and gender influence all of these. The course is open to all students and requires collaborative work but not any pre-existing technological expertise. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, HIS, NOR (K. Morse, M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0445 *

AMST 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Select project advisor prior to registration.

AMST 0705 Senior Research Tutorial (Fall 2018)

This seminar will focus on the development of sophisticated research skills, the sharing with peers of research and writing in progress, and the completion of a substantial research project. Those writing one-credit essays will complete their projects over the course of this tutorial. (S. Burch)

AMST 0710 Honors Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

For students who have completed AMST 0705, and qualify to write two-credit interdisciplinary honors thesis. on some aspect of American culture. The thesis may be completed on a fall/winter schedule or a fall/spring schedule. (Select a thesis advisor prior to registration)
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Department of Arabic

The Arabic major requires four years of language study or their equivalent.  Majors must also choose one disciplinary concentration: Arabic literature, Arabic linguistics, or a well-defined course of study with a focus on the Arab world.  Each disciplinary concentration requires the completion of at least three content courses, including one introductory methods course specific to the chosen discipline. Majors  are also required to prepare a project or a thesis for their senior capstone experience.

Major in Arabic: (Minimum number of courses: 13, including required senior work)

Students majoring in Arabic must take:

1)      Arabic language through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent: ARBC 0101, ARBC 0102, ARBC 0103, ARBC 0201, ARBC 0202, ARBC 0301, ARBC 0302;

2)      Two courses in Arabic at the 0400-level, at least one of which is taken at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus. Arabic 0400-level courses taken at a Middlebury school abroad site require departmental approval of the syllabus and a dossier of all written work (normally consisting of at least two exams and eight typed pages of Arabic);

3)      One of the following:

a.       ENAM 0205, plus two additional courses in Arabic literature taken at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus (for students pursuing senior work in literature);

or

b.      One of LNGT 0101, LNGT 0102 or  LNGT 0109, plus two additional courses in Arabic linguistics taken at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus (for students pursuing senior work in linguistics);

or

c. Students may structure their own disciplinary focus within the Arabic major in consultation with their major advisor by providing a well-defined course of study that must include (i) one introductory methods course specific to the chosen discipline (in English); and (ii) two disciplinary electives bearing the ARBC prefix (in Arabic or English), taken at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus.

4)      Students must spend at least one semester at a Middlebury school abroad site. The Arabic Department strongly recommends that students spend a full year abroad. Students studying abroad for a full academic year may count at most one course taken abroad towards the disciplinary elective requirements, subject to prior approval of their major advisor and contingent upon submission of the syllabus and a dossier of all written work (normally consisting of at least two exams and six typed pages of Arabic).

A major may count 400-level courses towards the fulfillment of the disciplinary electives once the 400-level language course requirement in #2 is complete.

Senior Work: Majors  are required to prepare a one-term senior project (ARBC 0700), or a two-term thesis (ARBC 0700/0701, taken in Fall and Winter or Winter and Spring). Senior projects and theses may be written in English, but must demonstrate significant use of Arabic sources.  Senior theses will include a 2000-word summary in Arabic.

Departmental honors are determined by a combination of thesis grade and grade point average in courses taken at the Arabic Program at Middlebury College, the Middlebury summer Arabic School, and Middlebury College’s study abroad sites.

Joint Major: Joint majors with other departments must: 1) complete Arabic language coursework through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent prior to the commencement of senior work, 2) take, at Middlebury College’s Vermont campus, two courses related to Arabic literature, Arabic linguistics, or another well-defined disciplinary focus in consultation with their Arabic advisor, and 3) complete a senior project that explicitly engages the scholarly methodologies of both departments.

Minors in Arabic: The Arabic Department offers two minors.

(a) The Arabic Minor requires 1) studying Arabic language through ARBC 0302 or the equivalent; and 2) taking two other courses related to Arab culture (cinema, literature, pop-culture, etc.) or Arabic linguistics. Only one of the two courses on Arab culture or Arabic linguistics may be taken abroad. (See above for guidelines regarding courses taken at schools abroad and at the summer Language Schools.)

(b) The Minor in Arabic Studies requires taking five courses with the ARBC prefix, excluding ARBC 0101, 0102, 0103, 0201, 0202, 0301, and 0302.

ARBC 0101 Beginning Arabic I (Fall 2018)

The goal of this course is to begin developing reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. This course stresses written and oral communication, using both formal Arabic and some Egyptian dialect. Emphasis is also placed on reading authentic texts from Arabic media sources, listening to and watching audio and video materials, and developing students' understanding of Arab culture. 6 hrs lect/disc. LNG (R. Greeley, U. Soltan)

ARBC 0103 Beginning Arabic III (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of ARBC 0102. 6 hrs. lect/disc (ARBC 0102 or equivalent) LNG

ARBC 0201 Intermediate Arabic I (Fall 2018)

This course is a continuation of ARBC 0103. Emphasis is placed on reading authentic materials from Arabic media, expanding students' vocabulary, listening to and watching audio and video materials, and developing students' understanding of Arab culture and communicative competence. (ARBC 0103 or equivalent) 6 hrs. lect/disc LNG (D. Ayoub, E. Saylor)

ARBC 0202 Intermediate Arabic II (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of Arabic 0201. Fifth in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. This course stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. (ARBC 0201 or equivalent). 6 hrs. lect/disc LNG

ARBC 0227 Arabic Sociolinguistics (taught in English) (Spring 2019)

In this course we will focus on the inter-relationships between the way Arabic is used by native speakers and the various social contexts affecting that usage. In particular, we will discuss the phenomenon of diglossia in Arabic speech communities (that is, the co-existence of Modern Standard Arabic with the vernacular Arabic dialects of today); aspects of linguistic variation and change in the Arab world; the relation between register and language; as well as the relation between language and such sociological variables as education, social status, political discourse, and gender. Readings are primarily drawn from sociolinguists' studies in the Arab world. (ARBC 0101 or instructor's approval) AAL, MDE, SOC
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0227

ARBC 0301 Advanced Arabic 1 (Fall 2018)

A continuation of Arabic 0202. This course aims to help students reach an intermediate-high level of proficiency in reading, speaking, writing, listening, and culture. Readings include articles on cultural, social, historical, political and literary topics. (ARBC 0202 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect/disc LNG (E. Saylor)

ARBC 0302 Advanced Arabic II (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of Arabic 0301. It aims to help students reach an advanced level of proficiency in reading, speaking, and writing Arabic, as well as to develop further an understanding of Arab culture. Readings include articles on cultural, social, historical, political, and literary topics. Course will be conducted entirely in Arabic. (ARBC 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect/disc. LNG

ARBC 0335 Gender and Migration in Modern Arabic Literature and Cinema (Fall 2018)

The study of migration and gender as intersecting areas of inquiry offers multiple possibilities for exploring modern Arabic literature and cinema. The modern Arab world is shaped by steady flows of migration and displacement, heavily influencing the literary and visual expression of the twentieth and twenty-first century. In this course we will attend to the formation of “gender” as a category of study, while also paying attention to class and religion as these center on and inform migration flows and displacement in the modern Arab world. We will study a number of novels and films that focus on the ways in which the “modern” in the Arab world is shaped and produced by migrations flows, displacement, and diasporas.(National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT, MDE (D. Ayoub)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0335

ARBC 0411 Music and Identity in the Contemporary Arab World (Spring 2019)

In this course we will approach traditional and contemporary musical cultures from the Middle East and North Africa as cultural expressions that are invested with social, artistic, economic, and political meanings. Music is a powerful agent of social change that shapes politics, race, religion, and identity in the Arabic-speaking world. Through an examination of a range of artistic genres, including literature, poetry, dance, film, video, and audio recordings, students will strengthen and maintain advanced proficiency in Arabic. As part of this course, students will also have the opportunity to produce and host a live radio show on WRMC 91.1 FM. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LIT, LNG, MDE

ARBC 0435 Arabic Diglossia: A Linguistic Approach (Fall 2018)

Diglossia is an intricate sociolinguistic situation in which two related varieties of the same language co-exist within the same speech community. In this course we will focus on the study of diglossia as manifested in Arabic-speaking communities, where Modern Standard Arabic is used side by side with Vernacular Arabic. In particular, we will discuss the linguistic differences between the two varieties, their distinct and overlapping functions, their status in society, and code-switching between them in various contexts of language use. Course materials will be drawn from a variety of sources, including articles and book chapters, print and non-print media, political and religious discourse, and literary texts. The language of instruction is exclusively Arabic. (ARBC 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, LNG, MDE, SOC (U. Soltan)

ARBC 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

ARBC 0600 Senior Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(S. Liebhaber, D. Ayoub, R. Greeley)

ARBC 0700 Senior Thesis I (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Approval required.

ARBC 0701 Senior Thesis II (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Approval required.
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Department of Biology

Requirements for the Biology Major: Requirements for the biology major encourage both breadth across the subdisciplines of biology as well as depth in at least one subdiscipline. The introductory sequence includes two courses, BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution and BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics, both of which are designed for students in their first year at the college who are considering a major in the life sciences, or for whom an in-depth coverage of the life sciences is of interest.

Requirements for the twelve course biology major are as follows:

BIOL 0140 Ecology  and Evolution
BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis

Two organismal courses from among BIOL 0201 Invertebrate Biology, BIOL 0202 Comparative Vertebrate Biology, BIOL 0203 Biology of Plants, BIOL 0302 Vertebrate Natural History, and BIOL 0310 Microbiology.

A college-level chemistry course with laboratory [NOTE: AP credit in chemistry or a bypass examination cannot be used to satisfy this requirement].

Six biology electives from the 0200-0701 level, with the following restrictions: (a) at least two electives must include a laboratory section; and(b) no more than one semester of independent research (BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, or BIOL 0701) may count as elective credit toward the major.

Guidelines and Restrictions Relevant to the Selection of Courses for the Major:
It is expected that the core courses (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) will be completed by the end of the third semester. BIOL 0140 is not open to seniors & second semester juniors in the Fall.

Except for transfer students, BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 must be taken at Middlebury College.

The course in experimental design and data analysis (BIOL 0211) should be taken by the end of the sophomore year.

Departmental courses offered with laboratories must be taken with the laboratory to satisfy major or joint major requirements.

Electives may include only one semester of independent research (BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, or BIOL 0701), and two winter term courses designated for major credit (not including BIOL 0211).

A maximum of three courses taken off campus may be credited toward completion of the major or joint major. This includes courses taken at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole. No BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, or BIOL 0701 will be granted for independent study projects conducted during off-campus study programs.

Except for transfer students, off-campus biology courses must be beyond the introductory level.

When a course is offered at Middlebury with a lab or prerequisites, an equivalent off-campus course must also include a lab or prerequisites.

Requirements for a Minor in Biology: BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145, and three elective courses from 0200-, 0300-, and 0400-level courses in the department.  One of the electives must be an organismal course (BIOL 0201, 0202, 0203, 0302, or 0310), AND one of which must be at the 0300 or 0400 level.

Guidelines and Restrictions for the Minor:
Except for transfer students, BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 must be taken at Middlebury College.

The three electives need to be related thematically.

When a course is offered at Middlebury with a lab or prerequisites, an equivalent off-campus course must also include a lab or prerequisites.

Transfer credit for a course will be given only after the department chair reviews the course material upon a student's return to campus. (See guidelines for transfer credit.)

Joint Major: The Department of Biology does not offer a joint major other than the joint major in Biology and Environmental Studies described below.

Requirements for the Molecular Biology and Biochemistry Major: See the listing for the Program in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry for a description of this major.

Requirements for the Neuroscience Major: See the listing for the Program in Neuroscience for a description of this major.

Requirements for the Joint Major with Environmental Studies: See the listing for the conservation biology focus under the Program in Environmental Studies.

Graduate or Professional Training: Students considering graduate or professional school in the life sciences should note that many programs require a year of introductory chemistry, a year of organic chemistry, a year of physics, and a year of calculus for admission. Students are therefore strongly encouraged to meet with their faculty advisors early in their undergraduate career so the advantages of taking additional courses in the natural sciences can be discussed.

Departmental Honors: Students with an average of 3.5 or higher in departmental courses other than BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, and BIOL 0701 are eligible for departmental honors, for which successful completion of BIOL 0701 is also required (see below). The Biology Department awards two levels of honors: honors and high honors.

Criteria for Honors: Students with an average of 3.5 or higher in departmental courses (other than BIOL 0500, BIOL 0700, and BIOL 0701) and a grade of A- or above on their thesis will be awarded honors. 

Criteria for High Honors: High honors will be awarded to students who meet all of the criteria for honors and who, in addition, have completed theses of exceptionally high quality.  Determination of honors or high honors is based on a formal recommendation from the thesis committee, and requires the approval of the Biology Department faculty. 

The thesis process is described in detail in the “Student & Faculty Research” portion of the departmental website, and all students interested in conducting thesis research should read that section of the website in detail. Normally, research for thesis projects begins during the first term of a student's senior year (or during the preceding summer). Students interested in field research should talk with a faculty member by winter term of their junior year. All other prospective thesis students should consult with prospective advisors concerning possible thesis projects by spring term of their junior year. Thesis projects must be of at least two terms' duration (one term of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and one of BIOL 0701) and result in the production of a written thesis, a public presentation of the thesis research, and an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members, two of whom must be Biology faculty. With instructor approval, independent research conducted during the summer may be considered as a substitute for the first term of the project. In such cases, the off-campus work would satisfy the BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 prerequisite for enrollment in BIOL 0701, but would not itself be credit-bearing. The thesis grade reflects performance in all aspects of the thesis process.  Note that although completion of a thesis is one prerequisite for receiving honors, students may undertake a thesis regardless of whether they meet the other criteria for honors.

Advanced Placement Credit: Middlebury College grants one college credit for a score of 5 on the biology advanced placement exam. However, because the biology department does not offer any introductory course that is the equivalent of an AP biology course, advanced placement credit does not exempt a student from any of the published requirements for the major, minor, or joint majors, nor can it satisfy the college's distribution requirement.  

Off-Campus Study: Students interested in taking biology courses off campus are strongly encouraged to discuss their plans with their advisor early in their college careers. Students should see the "Guidelines and Restrictions" section under the requirements heading for the biology major to learn more about obtaining transfer credit. Students seeking approval for biology courses taken off campus should be prepared, upon their return, to document course content with syllabi and class notes.

BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this introduction to ecology and evolutionary biology we will cover the topics of interspecific interactions (competition, predation, mutualism), demography and life-history patterns, succession and disturbance in natural communities, species diversity, stability and complexity, causes of evolutionary change, speciation, phylogenetic reconstruction, and population genetics. The laboratory component will examine lecture topics in detail (such as measuring the evolutionary response of bacteria, adaptations of stream invertebrates to life in moving water, invasive species and their patterns of spread). We will emphasize experimental design, data collection in the field and in the laboratory, data analysis, and writing skills. This course is not open to seniors and second semester juniors in the Fall. 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (Fall 2018: D. Allen)

BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this introduction to modern cellular, genetic, and molecular biology we will explore life science concepts with an emphasis on their integral nature and evolutionary relationships. Topics covered will include cell membrane structure and function, metabolism, cell motility and division, genome structure and replication, the regulation of gene expression and protein production, genotype to phenotype relationship, and basic principles of inheritance. Major concepts will be illustrated using a broad range of examples from plants, animals, and microorganisms. Current topics in biology will be integrated into the course as they arise. (Effective Fall 2019: CHEM 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (Fall 2018: G. Spatafora)

BIOL 0201 Invertebrate Biology (Fall 2018)

The study of invertebrate animals, which comprise more than 90 percent of all animal species and represent the most diverse approaches to life on earth. A wide variety of protozoans, cnidarians, echinoderms, mollusks, crustaceans, arachnids and insects are examined. Animals are studied both in the field and the lab.. Emphasis is upon their taxonomy, phylogeny, ecology, behavior, and adaptations to various habitats. . Specialized topics include regeneration, parasitology, agricultural and medical applications, and invertebrates in the arts and literature. Oral and written reports are required. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (T. Root)

BIOL 0202 Comparative Vertebrate Biology (Spring 2019)

This course will explore the evolution of the vertebrate classes and the adaptations that allow them to live in almost every habitat on Earth. We will study the phylogeny, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of the major extinct and extant taxa of vertebrates and discuss how each group solves the problems of finding food, finding mates, and avoiding predators. Laboratory exercises will focus on the comparative anatomy of a cartilaginous fish (the dogfish shark) and a mammal (the cat). Students will learn to identify the anatomical structures of the vertebrate body and observe the evolutionary homologies. Occasional field trips will introduce the local vertebrate fauna in their natural habitat. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI

BIOL 0203 Biology of Plants (Fall 2018)

An introduction to plants, their life cycles, and their relationships to each other, as well as to the animals that pollinate them, disperse their fruits, and eat them. We will discuss morphology, physiology, evolution, and natural history of plants (mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, angiosperms). The laboratory will emphasize plant identification, various aspects of plant ecology and physiology, plant morphology, and plant use by humans. Students will complete a Community Service component, such as completing a forest inventory for a local forest, assisting with the campus tree map, or help with seed-saving measures at the College Organic Garden. Field trips will be the norm early in the semester. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (K. Deane-Coe)

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis (Fall 2018)

Experimental design is one of the most important parts of doing science, but it is difficult to do well. How do you randomize mice? How many replicate petri plates should be inoculated? If I am measuring temperature in a forest, where do I put the thermometer? In this course students will design experiments across the sub-areas of biology. We will run student designed experiments, and then learn ways to analyze the data, and communicate the results. Students planning to do independent research are encouraged to take this course. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145). DED (D. Allen)

BIOL 0216 Animal Behavior (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

The behavior of animals primarily from an ethological perspective, with respect to genetics, physiology, evolution, and other biological factors. The course follows the history and methods of studying individual and social behaviors like feeding, courtship, mating, parental care, defense, predation, and migration. We examine live animals in the field and lab to illustrate such processes as instinct, learning, and communication. Discussion topics address recent research, and students design their own research projects. Oral, and written reports are required. (BIOL 0140 or BIOL 0145) 2.5 hrs. lect./1 hr. video screen./3 hrs. lab SCI (Fall 2018: M. Spritzer)

BIOL 0230 Global Change Biology (Fall 2018)

We will examine the effects of global climate change on the earth system. Our emphasis will be on exploring what we know about the impacts of climate change on ecosystems, and how we know it: how do biologists study processes on a global scale? How accurately can we predict future changes in ecosystem distribution and function? We will also delve into how changing ecosystem processes are likely to affect humans, through impacts on ecosystem services, for example. The course will culminate with an examination of science communication, and students will engage in independent projects to practice the art of effective science communication. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (A. Lloyd)

BIOL 0302 Vertebrate Natural History (Fall 2018)

This course deals with the natural history of vertebrates in the context of the forests, fields, wetlands, and rivers of western Vermont. We will explore in depth the taxonomy of the local vertebrate fauna; techniques for capturing and handling live animals, particularly birds, mammals, and fish; and address experimentally specific questions about the distribution and abundance of vertebrates in a range of natural plant communities. Topics considered will include conservation biology, population and community ecology, and behavior. Field work will involve several early morning and weekend trips. (BIOL 0140) 6+ hrs. lab/field. SCI (S. Trombulak)

BIOL 0304 Aquatic Ecology (Fall 2018)

This field course will introduce students to the freshwater aquatic ecosystems of the northeastern U.S., including lakes, streams, rivers, and wetlands. We will explore the ecological processes that dominate these systems, the organisms that inhabit them, and the ecological techniques central to their study. Field exercises will include trips to many aquatic ecosystems in the region; experience with sampling techniques for measurement of physical, chemical, and biological features; and experimental design for answering questions about the relationships among species and between species and their environment. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. CW (5 seats), SCI (S. Sheldon)

BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology (Fall 2018)

Have you ever wondered how an embryo develops from a simple fertilized egg to a complex adult? This course explores this question, examining the preparation and initiation of development (gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavages, and gastrulation), the formation of embryonic structure (morphogenesis), the creation of embryonic pattern (pattern formation), and the control of gene expression during embryogenesis. In lab, students will design and carry out experiments at the cutting edge of developmental biology, incorporating modern cellular, molecular, and genetic techniques with classical embryological approaches. Fundamental mysteries of development will be investigated in model organisms that best illustrate each process. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab SCI (C. Combelles)

BIOL 0310 Microbiology (Fall 2018)

The microbiological principles emphasized in this class will provide students with a foundation for advanced study in many areas of contemporary biology. The course will integrate basic and applied aspects of microbiology into a study of the prokaryotic microorganisms. General principles of bacterial cell structure, function, and the role of microorganisms in industry, agriculture, biotechnology, and disease will be discussed. An independent laboratory project will stress basic microbiological techniques as applied to the isolation, characterization, and identification of microorganisms from the natural environment. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 and CHEM 0203) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab. CW (5 seats), SCI (E. Eggleston)

BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course will focus on the structure and function of nucleic acids in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Lectures will center on molecular mechanisms of mutation, transposition, and recombination, the regulation of gene expression, and gene control in development, immune diversity and carcinogenesis. Readings from the primary literature will complement the textbook and classroom discussions. The laboratory will provide training in both classic and contemporary molecular-genetic techniques including nucleic acid isolation and purification, cloning, electroporation, nick-translation, Southern/Northern blotting, DNA sequencing, PCR and RT-PCR. (BIOL or MBBC majors, or by waiver. BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab./1 hr. prelab. SCI (Fall 2018: J. Ward)

BIOL 0323 Plant Community Ecology (Spring 2019)

This course will explore the structure and dynamics of plant communities, with a particular emphasis on temperate forest communities. We will investigate patterns in community diversity and structure, explore how plant populations and plant communities respond to environmental disturbances, and investigate the effects of anthropogenic influences (climate change, introduced species, habitat conversion) on plant communities. Labs will emphasize fieldwork at local research sites, and will provide exposure to techniques of experimental design in plant ecology and basic approaches to describing plant community structure and dynamics. (BIOL 0140) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI

BIOL 0324 Genomics (Spring 2019)

Genomics is a quickly evolving field that analyzes and contextualizes genome sequencing data and high-throughput techniques. Genomics is the study of the nucleic acid content of organisms. In this course students will use national repositories of genomic information, databases, and open-source bioinformatics tools to visualize and manipulate genomic data. We will also explore genomics’ larger social context, particularly as it relates to the environment and medical informatics. In the laboratory we will explore and use the methodology used in genomics to develop and interpret large datasets (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107,and BIOL 0145 and BIOL0140, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab DED, SCI

BIOL 0350 Endocrinology (Spring 2019)

Endocrinology is a branch of animal physiology devoted to the study of hormones and the endocrine glands that produce them. Hormones are essential for maintaining homeostasis and coordinating biological functions such as growth, reproduction, metabolism, and reaction to stress. This course will cover the diverse mechanisms that hormones use to influence physiology and behavior. We will consider hormone function from comparative, clinical, and environmental perspectives with an emphasis on the behavioral response to hormones. Lectures will describe the cellular and molecular basis of endocrine regulation and consider the function of each of the major hormone groups produced by the body, such as hypothalamic, pituitary, adrenal, and sex steroids. Weekly journal article discussions will focus on current topics in endocrinology. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) 3 hrs. lect. SCI

BIOL 0365 Molecular Microbial Ecology (Spring 2019)

Molecular microbial ecology (MME) uses leading-edge molecular tools to study the interactions and diversity of microorganisms in the natural environment. MME covers topics ranging from ancient polar microbes, the human microbiome, and possibly life beyond Earth. This course will discuss papers that highlight modern technical approaches and form the current theoretical framework in microbial ecology. The laboratory will examine the structure (who is there) and function (what are they doing) of microbial communities in environmental samples. We will cultivate novel microorganisms and analyze nucleic acids via community fingerprinting, functional gene analysis, and the computational exploration of metagenomic datasets.  (BIOL 0140, BIOL 0145 and CHEM 0103 or 0104 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI

BIOL 0370 Animal Physiology (Spring 2019)

This course examines the body functions of animals and humans using general physiological principles and a comparative approach. Lectures will cover the function of each of the major physiological systems (nervous, endocrine, muscular, etc.) and will describe how animal physiology has been shaped by evolution to allow animals to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. Lectures will focus mainly on physiological processes occurring at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Occasional journal article discussions will provide case studies of current topics in animal physiology. Laboratory exercises, reports and oral presentations emphasize experimental design, analysis and independent study using various methodological approaches including electrophysiology, neurotransmitter manipulations, nutritional analysis, and exercise physiology. (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145). 3 hrs. lect/disc., 3 hrs. lab. SCI

BIOL 0392 Conservation Biology (Spring 2019)

This course will focus on advanced topics in applied ecology and population genetics as they relate to the protection and restoration of biological integrity in the natural world. Emphasis will be placed on in-depth exploration of current issues, such as the design of nature reserves, genetic and demographic factors associated with population decline, metapopulation analysis, connectivity, and large-scale ecological processes. This course will involve reading from the primary literature, discussion, computer modeling, and writing assignments, and will build upon the information presented in the prerequisite courses. (BIOL 0140) SCI

BIOL 0449 Extremophiles: conquering Earth’s Extreme Environments (Spring 2019)

Even the most extreme environments are teeming with microbial life. From highly acidic streams to hydrothermal vents with temperatures exceeding 120ºC, microorganisms manage to not only grow, but thrive. How? We will utilize biogeochemistry and cellular biology to characterize these unique microbial processes, and their impact on ecosystems, through critical reading and robust discussion of primary literature. Student-driven research will provide opportunities for advanced oral and written communication skill development. (BIOL0310 or BIOL0365, or by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. SCI

BIOL 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0500, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in BIOL 0700, Senior Independent Study. (BIOL 0211. Approval required) 3 hrs. disc.

BIOL 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory and/or field research or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for BIOL 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a member of the Biology Department faculty. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. (BIOL 0211. Approval required; open only to seniors) 3 hrs. disc.

BIOL 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Seniors majoring in Biology who have completed one or more semesters of BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 and who plan to complete a thesis should register for BIOL 0701. In this course students will produce a written thesis, deliver a public presentation of the research on which it is based, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. Additional requirements include attendance at all Biology Department seminars and participation in any scheduled meetings with disciplinary sub-groups and lab groups. Open to Biology and joint Biology/Environmental Studies majors. (BIOL 0211 and BIOL 0500 or BIOL 0700 or waiver; instructor approval required for all students) 3 hrs. disc
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Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

I. Majors: Students can elect to major in chemistry, biochemistry, environmental chemistry (joint major), or molecular biology and biochemistry.

II. Course Requirements:

   Chemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 0204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, and either CHEM 0351 or CHEM 0355, and two electives chosen, with an advisor’s approval, from 0200-, 0300- or 0400- courses the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department or GEOL 0323. Independent study courses (CHEM 0400, CHEM 0500, CHEM 0700, or CHEM 0701) cannot count as electives.
     Honors in Chemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, CHEM 0312, CHEM 0351, CHEM 0355, CHEM 0431, CHEM 0400, CHEM 0701.
     Biochemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111, CHEM 0103*,CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0313, CHEM 0322, and two electives chosen, with an advisor’s approval, from 0200-,0300- or 0400-level courses in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department or BIOL 0314. Independent study courses (CHEM 0400, CHEM 0500, CHEM 0700, or CHEM 0701) cannot count as electives.
     Honors in Biochemistry: MATH 0121*, MATH 0122*, PHYS 0109*, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111, CHEM 0103*, CHEM 0104 (or CHEM 0107), CHEM 0203 (or CHEM 0241), CHEM 204 (or CHEM 0242), CHEM 0311, CHEM 0313, CHEM 0322, CHEM 0355, CHEM 0425, CHEM 0400, CHEM 0701.
     Environmental Chemistry: See the listing for the Environmental Chemistry focus under the Program in Environmental Studies. http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/es/requirements

     Molecular Biology and Biochemistry: See Program in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/mbb

     *Students may receive credit for courses indicated by an asterisk with a satisfactory score on the advanced placement examination for that subject. Students who have scored a 4 or 5 on the advanced placement examination in chemistry are awarded a course credit for CHEM 0103 and may enroll in CHEM 0107 (strongly encouraged) or CHEM 0104. Students who do not have an AP score of 4 or 5, but have a strong background in chemistry should take the department’s online placement examination to determine if they are prepared for CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107. Those students who achieve a satisfactory score on the placement examination will be encouraged to register for CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, but will not receive credit for CHEM 0103.

III. Independent Research and Senior Thesis Program: Many students participate in independent research (CHEM 0500 or CHEM 0700) or complete senior thesis projects (CHEM 0400 and CHEM 0701). Students who are interested in completing a senior thesis project should meet with their academic advisor for guidance in seeking a research advisor no later than winter term of their junior year. Although required for departmental honors, students may also participate the senior thesis program without pursuing honors and the associated coursework.

IV. Eligibility for Honors in Chemistry or Biochemistry: Students who successfully complete the honors coursework—including the senior thesis program—with a minimum grade point average of 3.20 are awarded departmental honors.  High Honors may be awarded at the discretion of the department and the thesis committee to students who demonstrate exceptional achievement in both the thesis program and departmental course work.

V. Recommended Programs of Study: Several coursework options for students considering chemistry or biochemistry as a major are shown below. Although students may deviate from these guides, it is strongly recommended that all prospective majors complete CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 by the end of their first year and the calculus (MATH 0121 and 0122) and physics (PHYS 0109 and 0110 or 0111) courses by the end of their second year. Completing CHEM 0203 as early as possible provides the maximum flexibility both within the major and for other academic interests, including study abroad.

Chemistry 
  First Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
  Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122 
  OR
  Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
  Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

  Sophomore Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
  Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111

  Junior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351*
  Spring: *(OR CHEM 0355)

  Senior Year:
  Fall: elective
  Spring: elective

Biochemistry 
  First Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
  Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122
  OR
  Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
  Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

Sophomore Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
  Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111

  Junior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0322
  Spring: CHEM 0313

  Senior Year:
  Fall: elective
  Spring: elective

Chemistry with honors 
  First Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
  Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122
  OR
  Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
  Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

  Sophomore Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
  Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111

  Junior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351
  Spring: CHEM 0312, CHEM 0355

  Senior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0400, CHEM 0431
  Spring: CHEM 0701

  Biochemistry with honors
  First Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0103, MATH 0121
  Spring: CHEM 0104, MATH 0122
  OR
  Fall: CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107, MATH 0121
  Spring: MATH 0122 (consider CHEM 0203)

  Sophomore Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0203, PHYS 0109
  Spring: CHEM 0204, PHYS 0110 or PHYS 0111

  Junior Year: 
  Fall: CHEM 0311, CHEM 0322
  Spring: CHEM 0313, CHEM 0355

  Senior Year:
  Fall: CHEM 0400, CHEM 0425
  Spring: CHEM 0701

CHEM 0101 World of Chemistry (Spring 2019)

The goal of this course is to investigate how chemistry impacts our daily lives in both common and extraordinary ways. After learning basic concepts of elements, atoms, and molecules, we will explore topics in energy (petroleum, nuclear, batteries, and solar), environment (global warming and the ozone hole), health (food and drug), and art (color, conservation, and forgery detection). We will perform occasional hands-on activities. SCI

CHEM 0103 General Chemistry I (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Major topics will include atomic theory and atomic structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; introduction to chemical thermodynamics. States of matter; solutions and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work deals with testing of theories by various quantitative methods. Students with strong secondary school preparation are encouraged to consult the department chair for permission to elect CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 in place of this course. CHEM 0103 is also an appropriate course for a student with little or no prior preparation in chemistry who would like to learn about basic chemical principles while fulfilling the SCI or DED distribution requirement. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc. DED, SCI (Fall 2018: J. Byers)

CHEM 0104 General Chemistry II (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry, and coordination chemistry. Lab work includes inorganic synthesis, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis in kinetics, acid-base and redox chemistry. (CHEM 0103 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. disc. DED, SCI (Fall 2018: J. Larrabee)

CHEM 0107 Advanced General Chemistry (Fall 2018)

This course is a one-semester alternative to one year of general chemistry (CHEM 0103 and CHEM 0104). It is open to all students who have received a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement test in Chemistry. Students who have two or more years of high school chemistry without AP credit may enroll with permission of the instructor. Topics will be drawn from the traditional general chemistry curriculum, but discussed in greater detail with a more thorough mathematical treatment. Special emphasis will be placed on chemical bonding, coordination chemistry, and real world research in chemistry. (AP Chemistry or equivalent.) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr dis. DED, SCI (S. Choi)

CHEM 0203 Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course will provide students with an introduction to the structure and reactivity of organic molecules sufficient to continue directly to study of biochemistry (CHEM 0322). Topics covered will include models of chemical bonding, acid-base relationships, three-dimensional molecular structure (conformations and stereochemistry), reaction mechanisms and energy diagrams, substitution and elimination reactions, carbonyl reactions (additions, reductions, interconversions, and alpha-reactivity), and the fundamentals of biological molecules (carbohydrates, DNA, and RNA). Laboratory experiments will include purification techniques (recrystallization, distillation, extraction, and chromatography) as well as microscale organic reactions that complement the lecture portion of the course. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. prelab. SCI (Fall 2018: R. Bunt)

CHEM 0204 Organic Chemistry II: Synthesis and Spectroscopy (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore the ways that organic molecules are made and their structures identified. The study of organic reactions will continue from CHEM 0203 with radical reactions, alkene and alkyne additions, aromatic reactions, oxidations and reductions, and additional carbonyl reactions. Emphasis in this course will be placed on using reactions in sequences to synthesize larger and more complex molecules. The theory and practice of mass spectrometry and UV-Vis, IR, and NMR spectroscopy will be studied as a means to elucidate the exact structures of organic molecules. Laboratory experiments will focus on synthetic techniques that complement the lecture portion of the course and the identification of complex unknowns via GC-MS, IR, and NMR. (CHEM 0203) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab, 1 hr. prelab. (Fall 2018: L. Repka)

CHEM 0230 Inorganic Chemistry (Spring 2019)

Have you ever wondered how a lithium ion battery or a solar cell works? Do you know why a ruby is red, an emerald is green, a sapphire is blue, but the sapphire in your watch crystal is colorless? What is nanoscience? Why do multivitamin tablets contain iron, zinc, cobalt, and calcium? These questions and many others fall in the realm of inorganic chemistry – the chemistry of materials that do not contain carbon. This course is an introduction to the major subfields of inorganic chemistry including solid state, main group, transition metal, organometallic, and bioinorganic chemistry. The physical and structural properties of these materials will be explored using simple bonding theories and symmetry. The chemical properties of these materials will be investigated using basic kinetic and thermodynamic principles. (CHEM 0104 or 0107) 3 hrs. lect. SCI

CHEM 0270 Environmental Chemistry & Health (Spring 2019)

In this interdisciplinary course we will integrate organic, physical, and analytical chemistry to understand relationships between the molecular structure of environmental organic contaminants and their behavior in natural and built environments. We will examine human and wildlife exposure to toxins and foundational principles of environmental toxicology and endocrine disruption in order to assess the health implications of environmental pollution. Laboratory projects will familiarize students with methods of monitoring pollution, predicting chemical behavior, and assessing toxicity. (CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab SCI

CHEM 0311 Instrumental Analysis (Fall 2018)

This course introduces fundamental concepts of analytical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and scientific writing. Lecture topics include experimental design and quality control; sample collection and preparation; calibration, error, and data analysis; statistics; and the theory and operation of chemical instrumentation. Multi-week laboratory projects provide hands-on experience in qualitative and quantitative analysis using a variety of research-quality instrumentation (e.g., graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectrometry, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, circular dichroism spectroscopy, high pressure liquid chromatography). Writing workshops promote professional scientific writing skills through guided practice in writing analysis, peer review, and revision. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242) 3 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW (R. Bunt, M. Costanza-Robinson)

CHEM 0312 Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Laboratory (Spring 2019)

In this course students will carry out experiments in the field of inorganic and physical chemistry and write journal-style reports based on their results. In the first half of the semester students will conduct a multi-step synthesis and characterization of a Mo-Mo complex with a quadruple bond. Students will learn inert atmosphere synthetic techniques and how to use a glove box. The synthesized Mo-Mo complex will be characterized by UV-Vis, IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, and cyclic voltammetry. In the second half of the semester students will conduct two physical chemistry experiments. First students will carry out a kinetic study of the isomerization of the Mo-Mo (alpha to beta or beta to alpha) complex by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Finally, students will obtain the high-resolution IR spectra of acetylene and deuterated acetylene and analyze the rotation-vibration spectra using statistical and quantum mechanics to obtain structural data and interpret the peak intensities. In addition to the laboratory activities, there will be lectures on metal quadruple bonds, principles of UV-Vis , IR, 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopies, cyclic voltammetry, and statistical mechanics. (CHEM 0311, CHEM 0351, and CHEM 0355. CHEM 0355 can be taken concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect. 3 hrs. lab

CHEM 0313 Biochemistry Laboratory (Spring 2019)

Experimental biochemistry emphasizing the isolation, purification and characterization of enzymes and the cloning of genes and expression of recombinant protein. Traditional biochemical techniques such as UV-VIS spectroscopy, gel filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoblotting will be used in the investigation of several enzymes. Specific experiments will emphasize enzyme purification, enzyme kinetics, and enzyme characterization by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Major techniques in molecular biology will be introduced through an extended experiment that will include DNA purification, polymerase chain reaction, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing, and the expression, purification, and characterization of the recombinant protein. Class discussions emphasize the underlying principles of the biochemical and molecular techniques employed in the course, and how these experimental tools are improved for particular applications. Laboratory reports stress experimental design, data presentation, and interpretation of results. (CHEM 0322) 2 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. CW

CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is an introduction to biochemistry that focuses on the chemical and physical properties of amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Specific topics include the structure and function of proteins, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, how carbohydrates and lipids contribute to vital cellular and organismal functions, and informational biochemistry (DNA, RNA, and specific enzymes and processes leading to the production of regulatory RNA and proteins). Specific topics from the primary literature will be explored to illustrate how particular techniques and experimental approaches are used to gain a new understanding of biochemistry and molecular biology. (CHEM 0203 or CHEM 0242) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (Fall 2018: L. Repka)

CHEM 0351 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy (Fall 2018)

Quantum theory is developed and applied to atomic structure and molecular bonding. Spectroscopy is examined as an application of quantum theory. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0241, MATH 0122 and PHYS 0110, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. (S. Choi)

CHEM 0355 Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Chemical and Biological Sciences (Spring 2019)

In this course students will learn the central ideas that frame thermodynamics and kinetics. The application of these ideas to chemical, biological, and the environmental processes will be covered using examples such as refrigerators, heat pumps, fuel cells, bioenergetics, lipid membranes, and catalysts (including enzymes). (PHYS 0109 or PHYS 0110 and MATH 0122 and CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242) 3 hrs lect., 1 hr disc.

CHEM 0400 Seminar in Chemical Research (Fall 2018)

This seminar provides students with experiences to support the preparation of a senior thesis. As the course involves participation in a mentored laboratory project and the intent to complete a senior thesis, students must make arrangements to work with a faculty advisor prior to gaining approval for course registration. The classroom portion of this seminar focuses on reading the scientific literature, giving effective oral presentations, and writing the thesis introduction. Particular emphasis will be given to computer and technology issues related to oral and written presentations. Participation will normally be followed by registration for CHEM 0500 or CHEM 0700 (winter term and spring). (Senior standing; Approval only) 2 hrs. sem., 12 hrs. lab. (J. Byers)

CHEM 0425 Biochemistry of Metabolism (Fall 2018)

A living organism requires thousands of coordinated individual chemical reactions for life. In this course we will survey the major integrated metabolic pathways of living cells and whole organisms, with particular attention to enzyme mechanisms, as well as the regulation, and integration of metabolism from the molecular to the whole organism level. The synthesis and degradation of carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides are investigated, along with the mechanisms of energy flow and cell-to-cell communication. While common metabolic processes are emphasized, unique aspects of metabolism that permit cells to function in unusual niches will also be considered. Mechanistic and regulatory aspects of metabolic processes will be reinforced through an investigation of inborn errors and organic defects that lead to disease. (CHEM 0322) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. (R. Cluss)

CHEM 0431 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (Fall 2018)

Atomic structure, bonding theories, and properties applicable to inorganic and organometallic compounds will be developed in depth. Specific topics will include valence bond theory, molecular orbital theory, ligand field theory, applications of group theory, and reaction mechanisms. (CHEM 0351) 3 hrs. lect. (J. Larrabee)

CHEM 0442 Advanced Organic Chemistry (Spring 2019)

This course covers advanced topics in organic chemistry, with the goal of bringing students to the point where they have the knowledge necessary to become lifelong learners of organic chemistry through primary literature, rather than reliance on textbooks. With this goal in mind, the course will cover qualitative molecular orbital theory and reactive intermediates beyond the anion and cation chemistry which form the main body of the introductory organic chemistry sequence. More advanced techniques in NMR spectroscopy, stereochemistry, and conformational analysis will also be covered, and the course will culminate in literature examples of total synthesis of natural products, and a final project involving authoring a Wikipedia page on a topic of interest relating to organic chemistry. (CHEM 0204 or CHEM 0242)

CHEM 0500 Independent Study Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Individual study for qualified students. (Approval required)

CHEM 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course students complete individual projects involving laboratory research on a topic chosen by the student and a faculty advisor. Prior to registering for CHEM 0700, a student must have discussed and agreed upon a project topic with a faculty member in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (Approval required; open only to seniors)

CHEM 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students who have initiated research projects in CHEM 0400 and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for CHEM 0701. Students are required to write a thesis, give a public presentation, and defend their thesis before a committee of at least three faculty members. The final grade will be determined by the department. Attendance at all Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seminars is expected. (CHEM 0400; approval required)
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Greenberg-Starr Department of Chinese Language & Literature

Full Major:
I. Required Courses:

  • CHNS 0101 through CHNS 0302 (or equivalent)
  • Four additional courses from among: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0331 (formally CHNS 0330), CHNS 0340, CHNS 0350, CHNS 0370 (At least one of the four must be in pre-modern literature and at least one must be in modern literature or culture. At least one of the four must be at 0300 level course in literature in translation, which ideally should be done before the thesis is completed)
  • CHNS 0411 (The equivalent may be taken during study abroad)
  • CHNS 0425, CHNS 0426, or CHNS 0412 (the equivalent to CHNS 0412 may be taken at the Middlebury Chinese School, or during study abroad)
  • CHNS 0475
  • Either CHNS 0700 or CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702

II. Senior Work:
Full majors in Chinese are required to complete either CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 (Senior Honors Thesis) or CHNS 0700 (Senior Essay or Translation Project). CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 is a one-semester plus J-term sequence that should normally be taken during the fall and J-term. CHNS 0700 is a one-semester course that may be taken during the fall or winter. The Chinese department discourages students from postponing completion of senior work until the final semester of full-time study.
     Joint majors in Chinese are encouraged but not required to do a senior thesis (CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702) or project (CHNS 0700). A joint thesis or project should, when feasible, combine the two fields of study of the joint major.
     All senior work, whether CHNS 0700 or CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702, must include a major focus on work with primary sources in Chinese. All senior work should focus on Chinese literature; qualified students may petition the Chair for permission to do senior work on other aspects of Chinese culture (e.g., film or linguistics).
     Senior Honors Thesis: To be eligible for the CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 Senior Honors Thesis, students majoring in Chinese (full, double or joint) must have completed language study through at least CHNS 0302 (or equivalent), taken at least two Chinese literature/culture courses, and maintained an average of B+ or better in Chinese department courses. Complete guidelines for the completion of the CHNS 0701 and CHNS 0702 thesis (and the CHNS 0700 project) are available from the Chinese Department.
     Departmental Honors: Both full and joint majors may qualify for honors. Eligibility for departmental honors in Chinese requires completion of a senior honors thesis graded B+ or better and a grade point average of B+ (3.35) or higher in all courses taken that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major as listed above (full) and below (joint), including courses taken in the summer in the Chinese School and/or during study abroad. Only courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy major requirements count toward honors (i.e., courses taken abroad that do not fall into this category do not count) and all such courses count (e.g., if more than four courses toward major requirement {b} are taken, all count). The department may award honors for completion of an exceptionally impressive senior essay or translation project that is graded A if the student has an average of B+ or higher in all qualifying courses (as defined above). High honors will be awarded for a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in all qualifying courses (as define above) and a senior thesis of A- or better. Highest honors are reserved for students who earn a grade of A on the senior thesis and who have an average of 3.75 or higher in all qualifying courses (as defined above).

Joint Major:
I. Required Courses:

  • CHNS 0101 through CHNS 0302 (or equivalent);
  • Either CHNS 0411 (the equivalent may be taken in the summer at the Middlebury Chinese School or, with prior approval, during study abroad) or CHNS 0425;
  • Four additional courses from among: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0331 (formally CHNS 0330), CHNS 0340, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0426, CHNS 0475, at least one of which must be at the 0300or 0400 level.

Minor:
I. Required Courses:

  • Four courses from among CHNS 0101 or CHNS 0102 (not both), CHNS 0103, CHNS 0201, CHNS 0202, CHNS 0301, CHNS 0302, CHNS 0400, CHNS 0411, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0425, CHNS 0426, and CHNS 0475 (in this way, all students increase their language proficiency, regardless of the level at which they start their study).
  • Plus three courses from among CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS 0250, CHNS 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0331 (formally CHNS 0330), CHNS 0340, CHNS 0350, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0411, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0425, CHNS 0426, and CHNS 0475. One course must be in literature in either Chinese or English (the following are literature courses: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0331 (formally CHNS 0330), CHNS 0340, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0412, and CHNS 0475).
  • A single course may be counted toward only one category.
  • The equivalent of CHNS 0411 and/or CHNS 0412 may be taken abroad. A "one-on-one" course in literature or culture taken abroad may count toward the second category if approved by the Department Chair before study abroad. No other courses taken abroad may be counted toward the second category.

International and Global Studies Major with Chinese Language: Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies major section, the Chinese language component of an IGS major requires completion of the following: 1) completion of CHNS 0202 or the equivalent (students are strongly encouraged to complete CHNS 0302 or the equivalent before study abroad, preferably in the summer Chinese School); 2) one semester at one of the three C.V. Starr-Middlebury College Schools in China; 3) upon return from China, any two of the following: CHNS 0411, 0412, 0425, 0426, or 0475.

To specialize in the Chinese Literature/Culture discipline within the International and Global Studies major (an option only for students who will graduate in 2015 or 2016)students must take: any five of the following: CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, CHNS/FMMC 0250, CHNS/LNGT 0270, CHNS 0325, CHNS 0331 (formally CHNS 0330), CHNS 0340, CHNS 0350, CHNS 0370, CHNS 0412, CHNS 0475 (one literature course taken during study abroad may be counted toward this requirement).

CHNS 0101 Beginning Chinese (Fall 2018)

This course is an introduction to Mandarin (guoyu or putonghua). The course begins with simple words and phrases, the pronunciation and cadences of Mandarin, romanization, Chinese characters, and simple vocabulary items, all taught in the context of practical communication. Sentence patterns and other fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing will be taught, including both traditional characters (used everywhere before the 1950s and still used in Taiwan and Hong Kong) and simplified characters (used in China). Students should have achieved active command of more than 600 Chinese characters and more than 800 compounds by the end of the sequence CHNS 0101, CHNS 0102, and CHNS 0103. 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill LNG (H. Du, K. Wang)

CHNS 0103 Beginning Chinese (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with accelerated introduction of vocabulary, grammar, and sentence patterns designed to facilitate speaking and reading. Toward the end of this semester students will read Huarshang de meiren (Lady in the Painting), a short book written entirely in Chinese. (CHNS 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 2 hrs. drill LNG

CHNS 0201 Intermediate Chinese (Fall 2018)

This course is designed to enable the student to converse in everyday Chinese and to read simple texts in Chinese (both traditional and simplified characters). Discussion of assigned readings will be conducted primarily in Chinese. Familiarity with the vocabulary and grammar introduced in CHNS 0101, CHNS 0102, and CHNS 0103 is assumed. Grammatical explanations, written exercises, dictation quizzes, sentence patterns, oral drill, and CD's will accompany assignments. By the completion of CHNS 0202, which follows CHNS 0201 directly, students should be able to read and write approximately 1,200 characters. (CHNS 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill LNG (T. Moran, X. Zhang)

CHNS 0202 Intermediate Chinese (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of the first term's work, with the class conducted primarily in Chinese. (CHNS 0201) 5 hrs. lect., 1 hr. drill LNG

CHNS 0219 The Chinese Literary Tradition (in translation) (Spring 2019)

This course, an introduction to the works of literature that formed the basis of traditional Chinese culture, is a discussion-based seminar. It focuses first on texts written in classical Chinese from the earliest times up through the Song dynasty, including selections from early poetry and history, Daoist classics, stories of the strange, and Tang Dynasty poetry by Wang Wei, Li Bai and Du Fu. These texts shaped the traditional Chinese understanding of the world, and provided models of what was perceived to be powerful, beautiful language. In the second part of the course we will explore narratives written in the vernacular language, focusing on the literary significance and aesthetic value of drama, stories and novels long treasured by the Chinese. Students will gain a better understanding of traditional Chinese literary values, as well as Chinese society and worldviews. This class is not intended for native Chinese students who have studied Chinese literature in high school classes in China. (No background in Chinese culture or language needed.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, NOA

CHNS 0220 Modern China through Literature (in translation) (Fall 2018)

This course, taught in English, is a discussion-based seminar on some of the most significant works of short fiction, novellas, and novels that tell the story of China and the Chinese from the end of the Qing dynasty to the present. Students will gain a better understanding of the history of modern China by studying the works of literature that inspired readers and provoked debate during one hundred years of social reform, revolution, war, civil war, reconstruction, cultural revolution, cultural revival, and economic growth. Our reading will include work by authors such as Lu Xun (Diary of a Madman, 1918), Zhang Ailing (Love in a Fallen City, 1944), Ah Cheng (The Chess King, 1984), Yu Hua (To Live, 1993), and, from Taiwan, Zhu Tianwen (Notes of a Desolate Man, 1999). We will consider the mainstream (socially engaged realism), the avant-garde (varieties of modernism), and popular genres (romance and martial arts), and we will look for answers to the following questions: what has been the place of fiction in China in the modern era and what vision of modern China do we find in its fiction? (No prerequisites) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, NOA (H. Xu)

CHNS 0270 Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English) (Spring 2019)

Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver) AAL, NOA, SOC
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0270

CHNS 0301 Advanced Chinese (Modern Chinese) (Fall 2018)

This course aims at further development of overall language proficiency through extensive reading of selected texts representing a wide variety of subjects and styles. Classes will be conducted entirely in Chinese except for occasional recourse to English by the instructor to provide a quick solution to problems of definition. The main text will be All Things Considered with supplementary readings selected to help students both continue to work toward competence in conversational Chinese and also begin to master a more sophisticated register of language. 4 hrs. lect. LNG (K. Wang, H. Xu)

CHNS 0302 Advanced Chinese (Modern Chinese) (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of CHNS 0301 with continued practice in conversational Chinese and a greater emphasis on reading works of a literary nature. (CHNS 0301 or equivalent) 4 hrs. lect. LNG

CHNS 0331 Clouds and Rain: Love and Sexuality in Traditional Chinese Literature (in translation) (Spring 2019)

This seminar explores a spectrum of traditional attitudes toward romantic love, sexualities, men and women seen through the prism of classical Chinese literature. Fiction and drama will be the main focus with due attention to poetry. Texts to be analyzed include, e.g., pre-6th-century B.C. and subsequent poems; 3rd and 4th-century and later stories of strange romances; the remarkable 7th-century tale of the Dwelling of Playful Goddesses and early 9th-century love story of “Yingying”; the marvelous late 16th-century romantic drama, the Peony Pavilion; the hilarious late 17th-century erotic novella, the Carnal Prayer Mat; and selected chapters from novelistic masterworks such as the late 16th-century and early 17th-century, Jin Ping Mei, and the 18th-century, The Story of the Stone (also known as Dream of the Red Chamber). (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, NOA
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0331

CHNS 0350 Documentary Film in Contemporary China (Spring 2019)

In China since the 1980s, new political and socio-economic realities, along with new technologies, created conditions for the emergence of the New Documentary Movement, the collective achievement of a group of artists with new ideas about what the form and function of nonfiction film should be. We will screen and discuss select contemporary Chinese documentary films, place these films in the context of global documentary film history, and learn methods for the analysis of nonfiction film. We will “read” each film closely, and also study secondary sources to learn about the Chinese realities that each film documents. 3 hrs. lect./screening AAL, ART, NOA

CHNS 0370 Traditional Chinese Novels (in translation) (Fall 2018)

This seminar focuses on pre-modern Chinese full-length novels, which rose and matured during the Ming-Qing period. Students will read the "masterworks" of this genre, including Three Kingdoms (the epic deeds of heroes of the Chinese civil war of the second and third centuries), Outlaws of the Marsh (picaresque tales of Chinese Robin Hoods, as it were), The Journey to the West (a comic Buddhist-Daoist allegory better known in English as Monkey), The Plum in the Golden Vase (an erotic novel of manners), The Scholars (a social satire), and The Story of the Stone-The Dream of the Red Chamber (widely recognized as a masterpiece of world literature); all are beloved and long treasured by the Chinese. We will not only trace the evolution of classical Chinese novels and consider their literary significance and artistic value; the course will also aim to provide a richer and deeper understanding of traditional China, her history, society, culture, worldviews, beliefs, sense of humor, etc. (CHNS 0219, CHNS 0220, or CHNS 0250, or two Middlebury literature courses, or by approval of the instructor. CHNS 0219 strongly recommended.) AAL, CW (5 seats), LIT, NOA (W. Xu)

CHNS 0400 Advanced Readings, Conversation, and Writing (Modern Chinese) (in Chinese) (Fall 2018)

This course is designed to improve students' competency in highly pragmatic Chinese, spoken and written. Readings and discussion will cover a wide variety of contemporary materials with an emphasis on linguistic preparation for study in China. (CHNS 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. LNG (X. Zhang)

CHNS 0411 Classical Chinese I (in Chinese) (Fall 2018)

This course is an introduction to wenyan, the written language of traditional China. In this course we will emphasize comprehension of the literal and metaphorical meanings of short wenyan texts. Our approach will include grammatical analysis and baihua translation (i.e., from the Classical Chinese into modern Chinese); discussion will be conducted entirely in baihua. This course begins the two-semester sequence of Classical Chinese, which not only introduces students to wenyan but also provides a vital learning experience for any student seeking to attain a high level of linguistic and cultural proficiency in Chinese, including modern written discourse. (CHNS 0302 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. LNG (W. Xu)

CHNS 0412 Classical Chinese II (in Chinese) (Spring 2019)

A continuation of CHNS 0411. In this course students will read a wide selection of wenyan texts that sample the classics of ancient Chinese thought, including Confucius' Analects, the Daoist texts Laozi and Zhuangzi, Mohist arguments against war, Sunzi's The Art of War, and Legalist writings on law. Students will also learn to punctuate wenyan texts (which were originally unpunctuated) and compose sentences or short paragraphs in wenyan. All class discussion will be conducted in modern Chinese. (CHNS 0411 or the equivalent) 3 hrs. lect. LNG

CHNS 0425 Contemporary Social Issues in China: Advanced Readings (in Chinese) (Fall 2018)

A survey of materials written in modern expository Chinese (academic, journalistic and polemical) that focus on the cultural, political, economic, and social issues of contemporary China. This advanced readings course is designed primarily for seniors who have already spent a semester or more studying and living in China or Taiwan. Emphasis will be given to further developing students' ability to read, analyze, and discuss complex issues in Mandarin while also advancing proficiency in writing and in oral comprehension. Oral reports and written compositions will be integral to the course's requirements. (Approval Required) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LNG, NOA (H. Du)

CHNS 0426 Politics and Business in China: Advanced Readings and Discussion (in Chinese) (Spring 2019)

The capstone course for those students who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. The goal of this course is to help students improve their ability to read, write, and talk about politics and business in China. Most of this course will focus on recent and current debate and discussion in China over domestic political programs and policies, international relations, and business trends. Discussion will also touch upon the political and economic history of the People's Republic of China and Taiwan. We will read articles intended for popular audiences in the Chinese-speaking world. 3 hrs. lect. (CHNS 0425 or CHNS 0411 or study abroad in China) AAL, LNG, NOA

CHNS 0475 Senior Seminar on Modern Chinese Literature (in Chinese) (Spring 2019)

A capstone course for all Chinese majors and for others who have attained a high level of Chinese language proficiency. Students will read and critique works by major Chinese fiction writers (and sometimes playwrights) and may also see and discuss a film or films from mainland China, Hong Kong, and/or Taiwan. All reading, discussion, and critical writing will be in Chinese. (CHNS 0412 or CHNS 0425) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT, LNG, NOA

CHNS 0500 Senior Essay (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

CHNS 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required)

CHNS 0701 Senior Thesis Proposal (Fall 2018)

(Approval Required)
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Eve Adler Department of Classics and Program in Classical Studies

Required for the major in Classics:
A. Ten courses in two languages: Greek and Latin (normally six in one language and four in the other) including one senior seminar (CLAS 0420). 
B. CLAS 0150 Ancient Epic Poetry
C. Two additional courses in classics in translation, one from each of the following categories:
1. CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece or CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature or CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates
2. CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome or CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome or CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic or CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy
D. CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature: General Examination for Classics/Classical Studies Majors
Optional: CLAS 0700 Senior Essay (fall/winter or winter/spring), CLAS 0505 Independent Senior Project (fall or spring). (Note: Students who wish to do an optional senior essay or independent senior project must secure the sponsorship of a member of the classics department in the semester before the essay or project is to be undertaken.)
Honors: B+ average or better in courses taken for the major (excluding senior work). B+ or better in the General Examination (CLAS 0701) and in the Senior Seminar (CLAS 0420). (Note: A student who does an optional senior essay or independent senior project may arrange with the chair, in the semester prior to undertaking the project, to offer that grade in lieu of the grade for CLAS 0420 for the calculation of departmental honors.)
Joint Major: Students interested in a joint major in Classics and another discipline should consult the chair. The joint major in Classics typically requires ten courses in Greek and Latin (normally six in one language and four in the other); CLAS 0701, and senior work that combines Classics with the other major.

Required for the Minor in Classics: The minor in classics may be configured in one of the following four ways:
1. Latin CLLA: Five courses in Latin
2. Greek CLGR: Five courses in Greek
3. Classical Civilization CLCC: Five courses, as follows: three or more courses chosen from    CLAS/HIST 0131, CLAS/HIST 0132, CLAS 0140, CLAS 0143, CLAS 0144, CLAS 0149, CLAS0150, CLAS 0151, CLAS 0152, CLAS 0190, CLAS/LITP 0230, INTD 0250, CLAS/RELI 0262, CLAS/PHIL 0275, CLAS/PHIL 0276, CLAS/HIST 0331, CLAS/HIST 0332, or CLAS/HIST 0337; and CLAS 0420 or CLAS 0450 (or both).
4. Classical Language and Civilization CLCL: Five courses, as follows: two or more courses in Latin or Greek; one or more courses chosen from CLAS/HIST 0131, CLAS/HIST 0132, CLAS 0140, CLAS 0143, CLAS 0144, CLAS 0149, CLAS/CMLT 0150, CLAS 0151, CLAS 0152, CLAS/CMLT 0190, CLAS/LITP 0230, CLAS/RELI 0262, INTD 0250, CLAS/PHIL 0275 or CLAS 0276; and one or more courses chosen from CLAS/HIST 0331, CLAS/HIST 0332, CLAS/HIST 0337, CLAS 0420, or CLAS/CMLT 0450.
AP credit policy: One course credit toward graduation, not toward the major or minor, will be granted for one AP exam in Latin under the following conditions: a) The student has received a grade of 4 or 5 on the AP exam, and b) The student has completed an advanced course (LATN 0201 or above) in Latin at Middlebury with a grade of B+ or above. (Note: No more than one course credit will be granted, whether the student presents one or two AP exams.)
Study Abroad Guidelines: Study abroad in the Mediterranean can enrich our majors' experience of the ancient world, because it affords them the opportunity to see the places that they have been learning about in the classroom. Students also find it stimulating to be surrounded by people with similar interests from other institutions. Thus, while our curriculum does not in any way necessitate study abroad, the faculty is happy to work with students who wish to pursue it as part of their Middlebury degree in classics or classical studies.
For those students who want to go abroad, we strongly recommend a semester rather than a year. The three programs we endorse are the ICCS (the Inter-Collegiate Consortium for Classical Studies in Rome), CYA (College Year in Athens), and Arcadia (also in Athens), all of which offer semester-long programs. Admission to the ICCS in particular, however, is highly competitive, and students may have a compelling academic rationale for studying elsewhere. Accordingly, we have also approved students who wished to study for a semester at foreign universities with strong classics departments. These have included Trinity College Dublin, the University of Edinburgh, Cambridge University, and the University of Vienna. For some students, a rewarding alternative to study abroad during the academic year has been participation in a summertime archaeological excavation.
We discourage students from going abroad before they have had at least three semesters of whichever ancient language(s) they are learning. As part of their program of study abroad, students normally take at least one course in each ancient language of study, and select additional courses that are appropriate substitutes for courses in the major. In order to be fully prepared for senior work, however, students will need to have completed a significant portion of the courses required for the major, in particular CLAS 0150, before going abroad.
Generally speaking, we are as flexible as we can be in helping majors to identify courses in programs abroad that allow them to stay in step with their cohort in Middlebury and to be prepared for senior work. Unless we are familiar with the institution, the instruction, and the content of the courses, we rarely grant credit to non-majors for classics courses taken away from Middlebury. In all cases (majors, non-majors, potential majors, and minors), students must consult with a member of the classics department before leaving Middlebury to plan and receive approval for work done at other institutions.

Required for the major in Classical Studies (CLST):

A. The following:

 1. CLAS/CMLT 0150 Ancient Epic Poetry

 2. CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece or CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature or CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy or CLAS/CMLT 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates

 3. CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome or CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome or CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic or CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire or CLAS 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy or CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy

 

B. Three additional courses in Classical Studies chosen from the following:

CLAS/HIST 0131 Archaic and Classical Greece

CLAS/HIST 0132 History of Rome

CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome

CLAS 0143 The Rise and Fall of the Roman Republic

CLAS 0144 Literature of the Roman Empire

CLAS 0149 Rhetoric and Politics from Ancient Greece and Rome to the Present

CLAS 0151 Introduction to Ancient Greek Literature

CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy

CLAS/CMLT 0190 Greek and Roman Comedy

CLAS/LITP 0230 Myth and Contemporary Experience

CLAS/HARC 0234 Ancient Roman City: Pompeii and BeyondCLAS/HARC 0236 Cities of Vesuvius

CLAS/PHIL 0275 Greek Philosophy: The Problem of Socrates

CLAS/PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy

CLAS/HIST 0331 Sparta and Athens

CLAS/HIST 0332 Roman Law

CLAS/HIST 0337 From Alexander to Rome

HARC 0213 Roman Art and Architecture

HARC 0221 Greek Art and Archaeology

HARC 0223 The Classical Tradition in Architecture: A History

HARC 0312 Of Gods, Mortals, and Myths: Greek and Roman Painting

HARC 0320 Hands-on Archaeology: Theory and Practice

CLAS/THEA 0250 Greek Drama in Performance

MATH 0261 History of Mathematics

PHIL 0201 Ancient Greek Philosophy

PHIL 0302 Philosophy of Plato

PHIL 0303 Philosophy of Aristotle

RELI 0381/CLAS 0308 Seminar in the New Testament

PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Science

PSCI 0317 Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy

PSCI 0409 Seminar in Political Philosophy

RELI/CLAS 0162 The Formation of Judaism in Antiquity

RELI 0287 Greco-Roman Religions

RELI 0387 Seminar on the Religions of Rome

 C. Four courses in Greek or four courses in Latin chosen from:

 GREK 0101 Beginning Greek I

GREK 0102 Beginning Greek II

GREK 0201 Intermediate Greek: Prose

GREK 0202 Intermediate Greek: Poetry

GREK 0301 Readings in Greek Literature I

GREK 0302 Readings in Greek Literature II

GREK 0401 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature I

GREK 0402 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature II

LATN 0101 Beginning Latin I

LATN 0102 Beginning Latin II

LATN 0110 Introduction to College Latin

LATN 0201 Intermediate Latin: Prose

LATN 0202 Intermediate Latin: Poetry

LATN 0301 Readings in Latin Literature I

LATN 0302 Readings in Latin Literature II

LATN 0401 Advanced Readings in Latin I

LATN 0402 Advanced Readings in Latin II

 D. CLAS 0420 Seminar in Classical Literature

 E. CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature: General Examination for Classics/Classical Studies Majors

 Optional: CLAS 0700 Senior Essay (fall/ winter/spring); CLAS 0500 Independent Senior Project (fall/winter/spring). (Note: Students who wish to do an optional senior essay or independent senior project must secure the sponsorship of a member of the classics department in the semester before the essay or project is to be undertaken.)

 For complete descriptions of the courses listed above, see listings under the appropriate departments.

 Honors: B+ average or better in courses taken for the major (excluding senior work). B+ or better in the General Examination (CLAS 0701) and in the Senior Seminar (CLAS 0420). (Note: A student who does an optional senior essay or independent senior project may arrange with the chair, in the semester prior to undertaking the project, to offer that grade in lieu of the grade for CLAS 0420 for the calculation of departmental honors.)

 Joint Major: Students interested in a joint major in Classical Studies and another discipline should consult the chair. The joint major in Classical Studies typically requires four semesters of either Greek or Latin; CLAS 0150; one course from section A2 and one course from A3 under the requirements for the major; CLAS 0701, and senior work that combines Classical Studies with the other major.

 

CLAS 0132 History of Rome (Fall 2018)

This course is an introductory survey of Roman history, from the emergence of the Republic to the influence of Rome on the western world. In the first half of the course we will study the origins of Rome's rise to dominance, the conquest of the Mediterranean and its effect on Roman society, and the crumbling of political structures under the weight of imperial expansion. In the second half, we will study the empire more broadly, starting with the emperors and moving out to the daily lives of people around the Mediterranean. The course will end with the importance of Rome for the Founding Fathers. We will read from authors including Polybius, Plutarch, Appian, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus, Juvenal, and Pliny. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS, LIT (J. Chaplin)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0132

CLAS 0140 Augustus and the World of Rome (Spring 2019)

In 44 B.C., Julius Caesar was assassinated. Within two months his adoptive son, Augustus, still in his teens, traveled to Rome, soon extorted the highest office of the Roman Republic, and after 13 years of civil war became the state's first emperor. The resulting "Augustan Age" (31 B.C. to A.D. 14) produced a period of political change and cultural achievement unparalleled in Rome's long history. In this course we will examine the literature, art, history, and politics of this era, evaluate the nature of Augustus's accomplishments, and explore the Roman world. Readings include: Augustus, Vergil, Suetonius, and I, Claudius. 2 hrs. lect. EUR, HIS, LIT

CLAS 0150 Greek and Roman Epic Poetry (Fall 2018)

Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. CMP, CW (10 seats), EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Witkin)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0150

CLAS 0151 The Golden Age of Athens: History and Literature (Spring 2019)

In this course we will trace the unprecedented intellectual innovation that begins with Greece’s triumph over the Persian invasions in 490 and 480-479 BC, continues through the emergence of radical democracy and imperialism at Athens, and culminates in the Peloponnesian War and Athens’ defeat in 404 BC by her former ally, Sparta. Through intensive study of selected works of historiography (Herodotus, Thucydides), tragedy (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), comedy (Aristophanes), and philosophy (Plato), we will explore the central concerns of 5th-century Athenians: freedom and power, knowledge and virtue, law and nature, and the place of the divine in the human world. 3 hr. lect., 1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS, LIT

CLAS 0234 Ancient Roman City: Pompeii and Beyond (Fall 2018)

The ancient Classical city reached its highest expression during the Roman Empire, when monumental public and private buildings created an elaborate stage for the enactment of civic life. In this course we will study the layout and architecture of Roman cities, 200 BCE - 500 CE, including the form and function of numerous building types. We will discuss political, religious, commercial, and private institutions, and analyze their influence on the built environment. We will focus on influential emperors such as Augustus, Hadrian, and Constantine, and on links between ancient and modern urbanism. Sites of study will include Pompeii, Rome, Ostia, Leptis Magna, Antioch, and Constantinople. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (I. Sutherland)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0234

CLAS 0276 Roman Philosophy (Fall 2018)

In this course we will seek to answer the question of what is Roman philosophy - philosophia togata. Is it simply Greek philosophy in Roman dress? Or, while based in its Greek origins, does it grow to have a distinctive and rigorous character of its own, designed and developed to focus on uniquely "Roman" questions and problems, in particular, ethical, social, and political questions? We will investigate how some of the main schools of Hellenistic Greek thought came to be developed in Latin: Epicureanism (Lucretius), Academic Skepticism (Cicero), and Stoicism (Seneca). As we read we will investigate how each school offers different answers to crucial questions such as what is the goal of life? What is the highest good? Should one take part in politics or not? What is the nature of the soul? What is the nature of Nature itself? Is there an afterlife? Can we ever have a certain answer to any of these questions? 3 hrs. lect. EUR, PHL (C. Star)
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0276

CLAS 0321 Apocalypse When? Reason and Revelation in the Ancient World (Spring 2019)

Apocalypse: why does this word, originally meaning “revelation,” hold such power today? In this class we will investigate the origins of apocalyptic and eschatological thought in order to understand Greek, Roman, Jewish, and Christian ideas about the end of the world in their historical context and to see how they shape contemporary visions of the end. We will read and discuss a wide range of texts, including Hesiod, Plato, Lucretius, Cicero, Seneca, and Daniel and Revelation from the Bible. The ways in which globalization and political leaders have shaped apocalyptic thought from ancient times to today will be an area of particular focus. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, EUR, PHL

CLAS 0332 Roman Law (Spring 2019)

The Romans' codification of civil law is often considered their greatest intellectual achievement and most original and influential contribution to the world. This course treats the four main divisions of Roman law (persons, property, obligations, and succession). Great emphasis is placed on the role of law in Roman society. How did the law influence the lives of Roman citizens living under it? How did ordinary Roman citizens shape the law? Students will come to understand the principles of Roman law through actual cases. Designed for students with some background in Roman history and/or literature. 2 hrs. lect./1 disc. EUR, HIS
Cross-listed as: HIST 0332

CLAS 0450 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2018)

A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701 below) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0450

CLAS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required)

CLAS 0505 Ind Senior Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required) (Fall 2018: J. Chaplin, M. Witkin, R. Ganiban, P. Sfyroeras, C. Star; Spring 2019: J. Chaplin, R. Ganiban, P. Sfyroeras, C. Star)

CLAS 0700 Senior Essay for Classics/Classical Studies Majors (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required)

CLAS 0701 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2018)

A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)

GREK 0201 Intermediate Greek: Prose (Fall 2018)

Intermediate Greek: Attic Prose-Lysias & Plato *
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.
EUR, LNG (M. Witkin)

GREK 0202 Intermediate Greek (Spring 2019)

Readings in majors authors. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LNG

HEBR 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018)

Approval required.

LATN 0102 Beginning Latin II (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of the introductory winter term course (LATN 0101). After completing the fundamentals of Latin grammar, students translate selections from authors such as Cicero and Ovid. 3 hrs. lect. LNG

LATN 0110 Introduction to College Latin (Fall 2018)

This course is designed for students with one to four years of high school Latin who are interested in continuing their study of the language. The course combines review of grammar and practice in translation; the aim is to improve reading skills and understanding of the language. Students may expect to join a 0200- or 0300-level Latin course the following spring. We will use both a textbook and readings from authors such as Cicero and Livy. (Prerequisites: Students should have had some formal study of Latin and should consult with the instructor during orientation week or the first week of classes to determine whether or not the class is at the appropriate level.) 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LNG (C. Star)

LATN 0301 Readings in Latin Literature I (Fall 2018)

Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect. LIT, LNG (J. Chaplin)

LATN 0302 Readings Latin Literature II (Spring 2019)

Readings in Latin Literature II: Vergil’s Aeneid*
Readings in major authors. 3 hrs. lect.
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Program in Comparative Literature

The Comparative Literature curriculum emphasizes foreign language learning as the basis for the study of literary texts. During their course of study, students of Comparative Literature will also become familiar with current comparative methodologies as well as relevant cultural and critical theories. These methodological skills support students’ work as they pursue a flexible and individualized pathway through their program of study, which culminates in an article-length comparative essay. The program is designed to accommodate students at all levels of language proficiency.

 Majors in Comparative Literature will develop a plan of study with the guidance of a faculty advisor with expertise in the student’s chosen primary language and literature and the Director of the Comparative Literature Program.

 The basic structure of the program is as follows:

1. One primary foreign language AND

2. One year of a secondary foreign language OR English/American Literatures

Requirements:

1. CMLT 0101;

2. Three content courses in the primary foreign language, including two literary classes and one cultural course (e.g. cinema, politics). The choice of particular classes requires the approval of the student’s primary language advisor and the Program Director. Students will also need approval for inclusion of study abroad classes in this category.*

3. Four courses in a secondary language.

 OR

 4 ENAM courses, including at least one course pre 1800.

(Courses in this requirement may double-count in the electives section.)

4. One course in literary theory (suggested for sophomore year);

5. Study abroad required for all students studying a foreign language. Up to 4 courses in literature taken abroad may be counted toward the major, subject to the pre-approval of the Director of the program. All students studying abroad must take one class in their foreign language after their return;

6 .Two electives explicitly comparative in nature. These literature courses may be taught in English. Examples: CLAS/CMLT 0150; CMLT/RELI 0238; CMLT/CLAS 0450; ENAM/CMLT 0305; GRMN/CMLT 0333; ITAL/CMLT 0299. Suitable classes will be cross-listed and bear the prefix CMLT.

7. One senior/advanced seminar in literature in the student’s primary or secondary language; 

8. Senior Work: During Fall and Winter–Term or Winter–Term and Spring, students will write a 35-page (article length) comparative essay (advised independently). Students are responsible to choose their advisor and the members of their committee no later than the last week of classes in the preceding term. To be eligible for honors students must have a departmental GPA of 3.7 and a B+ or above on their essay.

 *In the case of students whose primary language is Arabic, Chinese, Russian, or Japanese, some of these three content courses MAY be taught in English, depending on the availability of suitable courses in the language. Students should be aware that policies regarding acceptance of study abroad courses to satisfy requirements vary widely from department to department.

 

CMLT 0101 Introduction to World Literature (Spring 2019)

This course is an introduction to the critical analysis of imaginative literature of the world, the dissemination of themes and myths, and the role of translation as the medium for reaching different cultures. Through the careful reading of selected classic texts from a range of Western and non-Western cultures, students will deepen their understanding and appreciation of the particular texts under consideration, while developing a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about these texts, both as unique artistic achievements of individual and empathetic imagination and as works affected by, but also transcending their historical periods. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, CW, LIT

CMLT 0123 Adventures in Literary Romance (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the literary genre of romance. Today, “romance” often refers to courtship—only one aspect of this ancient genre. Other aspects include adventure, magic, wonder, multiple plots, multiple authors, an affinity for sequels. Romance’s associations with every genre—tragedy, comedy, epic, novel, lyric poetry—and its reputation for escapism have made it an epitome of the very idea of literature, as conceived by attackers and defenders. Its welcoming of female readers and protagonists and its marketing of the exotic have raised issues of gender and ethnicity. We will discuss all such aspects and implications of romance, and we may also explore how romance has shaped modern television and film. No papers or exams; there will be quizzes daily on the reading, and students will be expected to participate thoughtfully in class discussions. Readings from texts such as: Daphnis and Chloe, Ethiopian Romance, The Gospel of Luke, The Golden Ass, Arthurian romances by various authors, Orlando Inamorato, Orlando Furioso, The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia, The Merchant of Venice, The Winter’s Tale, Don Quixote,/ Waverly/, Madame Bovary, Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Time Quintet. 3 hrs. lect. LIT (J. Berg)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0123 *

CMLT 0150 Greek and Roman Epic Poetry (Fall 2018)

Would Achilles and Hector have risked their lives and sacred honor had they understood human life and the Olympian gods as Homer portrays them in the Iliad? Why do those gods decide to withdraw from men altogether following the Trojan War, and why is Odysseus the man Athena chooses to help her carry out that project? And why, according to the Roman poet Vergil, do these gods command Aeneas, a defeated Trojan, to found an Italian town that will ultimately conquer the Greek cities that conquered Troy, replacing the Greek polis with a universal empire that will end all wars of human freedom? Through close study of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, and Vergil's Aeneid, we explore how the epic tradition helped shape Greece and Rome, and define their contributions to European civilization. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. CMP, CW (10 seats), EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Witkin)
Cross-listed as: CLAS 0150 *

CMLT 0205 Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce multiple interpretations of a given literary work. The approaches covered may include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Race Theory and Multicultural Criticism, Feminism, Post-Colonial Criticism, Queer Studies, Eco-Criticism, Post-Structuralism, and others. These theories will be applied to various works of fiction, poetry, and drama. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc. EUR (Fall 2018), LIT (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: A. Baldridge)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0205 *

CMLT 0238 Literature and the Mystical Experience (Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore how narrative art articulates spiritual perception by examining selected works of 20th century writers such as Miguel De Unamuno, Nikos Kazantzakis, J. D. Salinger, Charles Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Merton, Alice Munroe, Marilynne Robinson, and Annie Dillard. Drawing on theology and philosophy as an interpretative mode, we will consider the following questions: How does literature illuminate selfhood and interiority? How do contemplation and ascetic practice guide the self to divine knowledge and cosmic unification? How do language, imagery and symbols shape the unitive experience as a tool for empathy and understanding of the other? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AMR, LIT, NOR, PHL
Cross-listed as: RELI 0238 *

CMLT 0248 Human Rights and World Literature (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the idiom of human rights in law, literature, and political culture. We will place literary representations of human rights violations (genocide, torture, detention and forced labor, environmental devastation, police violence) in dialogue with official human rights treaties and declarations in order to historicize and critique the assumptions of human rights discourse. Who qualifies as a “human” deserving of humanitarian intervention? How do human rights rehearse a colonial dynamic based on racial and geo-political privilege? To answer these questions we will turn to some of the most controversial voices in global fiction and poetry. 3 hrs. lect. (not open to students who have taken ENAM 0230)
(Diversity)/
CMP, LIT, SOC (B. Graves)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0248 *

CMLT 0263 Representation in Modern Hebrew Literature: Nation and Identities (Fall 2018)

Modern Hebrew literature, in its relatively short history, presents exceptional richness. In this course we will explore the theme of nation and identity in modern Hebrew literature: we will visit the personal lyricism of Bialik and his circle, the encyclopedic prose of Agnon, the troubled stream of consciousness of Gnessin, the stark realism of Brenner, the symbolism of Alterman, and the deliberately thin post-modern prose of Keret. We will meet modern Hebrew literature’s remarkable achievements as well as its points of crisis. We will also explore its deep historical roots which make modern Hebrew literature so unique. All readings in the course will be in English. 3 hrs. lect./disc AAL, CMP, LIT, MDE (O. Aloni)
Cross-listed as: HEBM 0263 *

CMLT 0286 Philosophy & Literature (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the border both separating and joining philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning? Beginning with Greek tragedy, we investigate Plato’s “quarrel” with, and Aristotle’s defense of, poetry. Then we will turn to modern works, mostly European, on topics such as: tragedy and ethics; style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings after Sophocles will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Tolstoy, and Woolf. Philosophical readings after Plato and Aristotle will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Ricoeur, and Nussbaum. Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 1014. CW, EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Woodruff)
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0286 *

CMLT 0299 Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English) (Spring 2019)

This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. EUR, LIT
Cross-listed as: ITAL 0299 *

CMLT 0373 The Novel and the City (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447) CMP, CW, LIT, SOC
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0373 *

CMLT 0375 Colonial Discourse and the “Lusophone World” (Spring 2019)

In this course we will analyze how European colonialism and imperial endeavors produced meaning, particularly in the interconnected realms of culture, race, language, gender, sexuality, and place. In addition to studying the colonial period, we will pay particular attention to the role and manifestations of colonial discourse more contemporarily in the contexts of nationhood, globalization, sports, and cultural consumption. In doing so, we will address the problematics of the concept of “Lusophone,” starting with the historical legacies and cultural implications of such a transnational entity. Course materials will include critical theory, literary texts, primary historical sources, visual media, and music from Brazil, Lusophone Africa, Lusophone Asia, and Portugal. (PGSE 0215 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, LNG, SOC
Cross-listed as: PGSE 0375 *

CMLT 0450 History of Classical Literature (Fall 2018)

A comprehensive overview of the major literary, historical, and philosophical works of Greece and Rome. Greek authors studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Aristophanes, Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. Roman authors include Lucretius, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Petronius, and Tacitus. Required of senior majors in Classics/Classical Studies (see CLAS 0701) and open to all interested students with some background in Greek and Roman literature, history, or philosophy. 3 hrs. lect. (R. Ganiban)
Cross-listed as: CLAS 0450 *

CMLT 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Approval Required

CMLT 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Approval required.
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Department of Computer Science

Computer Science is a rich and dynamic discipline that seeks to understand and use effectively the great potential of computing. The Department of Computer Science offers a wide variety of courses that integrate computer science into the liberal arts curriculum. The major can be completed through two tracks. The traditional track provides students with a solid background in algorithmic reasoning, problem solving, design and organization of modern computers and programming languages, and the ability to apply computational thinking to different applications and problem domains. The interdisciplinary track first provides a solid background in computer science including algorithms and data structures, and then allows students to apply this knowledge to specific problem domains in related disciplines and to forge interdisciplinary connections.

Required for the Major in Computer Science, traditional track (11 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level; CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202, CSCI 0301, CSCI 0302, four CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above, and CSCI 0701. One elective can be substituted with MATH 0200 or MATH 0228.

Required for the Major in Computer Science, interdisciplinary track (11 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level; CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202, CSCI 0302, CSCI 0701; and five electives, two or three of them from disciplines outside computer science. These interdisciplinary courses should be cohesive in theme and should have computational content and/or technical depth comparable to CSCI electives.  For double majors, these courses may not come from the other major. The remaining electives can be chosen from any CSCI courses at the 0300-level or above. In consultation with computer science faculty, students will develop a proposed set of courses to count towards the interdisciplinary major, and will submit their proposed list to the department chair by the end of their third semester for approval by the CS faculty.

Departmental Honors: Required for honors are: 1. A grade of "B" or higher in the senior seminar CSCI 701, which contains a significant independent project; 2. An extra CSCI course in addition to the 11 courses required for the major; 3. participation in department extra-curricular or service activities such as tutoring, grading, sys-admin work, student-faculty research, or programming competitions; and 4. a major GPA of at least 3.5 for honors, 3.7 for high honors, and 3.9 for highest honors. The required extra course can be any CSCI elective at the 0300-level or above for regular honors, while high and highest honors require the senior thesis CSCI 0702.

Required for the Minor in Computer Science (6 courses): One CSCI course at the 0100-level; CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202, and two CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above.

Joint Majors: The computer science component of a joint major requires: One CSCI course at the 0100-level, CSCI 0200, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0202; one course from CSCI 0301 and CSCI 0302; two CSCI electives at the 0300-level or above; and CSCI 0701.

Advanced Placement and Waivers: First-year students whose secondary preparation indicates they can bypass one or more beginning courses should speak to a faculty member to determine the appropriate first course. College credit is given to students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the AP computer science A exam. CSCI 0200 may be waived for students who have completed MATH 0310 or MATH 0318 or both MATH 0200 and MATH 0247, or in consultation with the department chair.

CSCI 0101 Introduction to Computing (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will provide a broad introductory overview of the discipline of computer science, with no prerequisites or assumed prior knowledge of computers or programming. A significant component of the course is an introduction to algorithmic concepts and to programming using Python; programming assignments will explore algorithmic strategies such as selection, iteration, divide-and-conquer, and recursion, as well as introducing the Python programming language. Additional topics will include: the structure and organization of computers, the Internet and World Wide Web, abstraction as a means of managing complexity, social and ethical computing issues, and the question "What is computation?" (Seniors by waiver) 3 hr. lect./lab DED (Fall 2018: J. Grant, R. Gilbert)

CSCI 0150 Computing for the Sciences (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will provide an introduction to the field of computer science geared towards students interested in mathematics and the natural sciences. We will study problem-solving approaches and computational techniques utilized in a variety of domains including biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering. Students will learn how to program in Python and other languages, how to extract information from large data sets, and how to utilize a variety of tools employed in scientific computation. The course has no prerequisites and assumes no prior experience with programming or computer science. 3 hrs. lect./l1 hr. lab DED (Fall 2018: M. Linderman)

CSCI 0200 Mathematical Foundations of Computing (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will provide an introduction to the mathematical foundations of computer science, with an emphasis on formal reasoning. Topics will include propositional and predicate logic, sets, functions, and relations; basic number theory; mathematical induction and other proof methods; combinatorics, probability, and recurrence relations; graph theory; and models of computation. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2018: A. Briggs)

CSCI 0201 Data Structures (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will study the ideas and structures helpful in designing algorithms and writing programs for solving large, complex problems. The Java programming language and object-oriented paradigm are introduced in the context of important abstract data types (ADTs) such as stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. We will study efficient implementations of these ADTs, and learn classic algorithms to manipulate these structures for tasks such as sorting and searching. Prior programming experience is expected, but prior familiarity with the Java programming language is not assumed. (One CSCI course at the 0100-level) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2018: D. Scharstein)

CSCI 0202 Computer Architecture (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A detailed study of the hardware and software that make up a computer system. Topics include assembly language programming, digital logic design, microarchitecture, pipelines, caches, and RISC vs. CISC. The goal of the course is teach students how computers are built, how they work at the lowest level, and how this knowledge can be used to write better programs. (CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (Fall 2018: C. Andrews)

CSCI 0301 Theory of Computation (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course explores the nature of computation and what it means to compute. We study important models of computation (finite automata, push-down automata, and Turing machines) and investigate their fundamental computational power. We examine various problems and try to determine the computational power needed to solve them. Topics include deterministic versus non-deterministic computation, and a theoretical basis for the study of NP-completeness. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2018: A. Briggs)

CSCI 0302 Algorithms and Complexity (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course focuses on the development of correct and efficient algorithmic solutions to computational problems, and on the underlying data structures to support these algorithms. Topics include computational complexity, analysis of algorithms, proof of algorithm correctness, advanced data structures such as balanced search trees, and also important algorithmic techniques including greedy and dynamic programming. The course complements the treatment of NP-completeness in CSCI 0301. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2018: M. Dickerson)

CSCI 0312 Software Development (Spring 2019)

This course examines the process of developing larger-scale software systems. Laboratory assignments emphasize sound programming practices, tools that facilitate the development process, and teamwork. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201) 3 hrs. lect./lab

CSCI 0315 Systems Programming (Fall 2018)

Students will become intimately acquainted with the low-level software services that applications often take for granted. Through a broad, project-based survey of core system libraries and UNIX system calls, students will explore process management, memory management, linking and loading, threading, synchronization, filesystem operations, and inter-process communication (networking). In each area, students will build software using these building blocks, gaining an understanding of the behavior and efficiency of the tools at their disposal. Students will also gain experience building larger, more complex systems upon which applications can be built. This course is ideal for students who wish to understand and construct the software infrastructure upon which user-level software depends. (CSCI 0202) 3 hrs. lect DED (P. Johnson)

CSCI 0321 Bioinformatics Algorithms (Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore and implement algorithmic solutions to modern biology questions. Students will be introduced to motivating biological questions—such as, “How do we compare DNA sequences?”—and then implement solutions to those problems using dynamic programming, graph, randomized, combinatorial and/or other algorithmic approaches. At the completion of the course students will be able to precisely define computational biology problems, design an algorithmic solution and implement that solution in software. No biology background is assumed, but students are expected to be able to implement sophisticated algorithms in Python or another language of their choice. (CSCI 201) 3 hrs. lect./lab. DED

CSCI 0414 Advanced Operating Systems (Spring 2019)

An operating system manages the complex resources of modern computers and provides an interface between the user and the hardware. In this course, we will explore the key concepts of operating systems, including process, memory, and storage management; synchronization and deadlock; protection and security; and distributed systems. (not open to students who have taken CSCI 0314) (CSCI 315) 3 hrs lect. DED

CSCI 0451 Machine Learning (Fall 2018)

Machine Learning is the study and design of computational systems that automatically improve their performance through experience. This course introduces the theory and practice of machine learning and its application to tasks such as database mining, pattern recognition, and strategic game-playing. Possible topics include decision-tree methods, neural networks, Bayesian and statistical methods, genetic algorithms, and reinforcement learning. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 0201 and MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect./lab DED (D. Scharstein)

CSCI 0452 Image Processing (Fall 2018)

In this course students will learn basic image processing concepts and explore practical cross-disciplinary case studies in teams. They will use open-source tools to tackle real-world image and video analysis problems ranging from enhancing and denoising to tracking and extracting information from images and videos. Collaboratively, students will get to apply these tools to a problem of their choice in a semester-long project. (CSCI 0200 and CSCI 201) 3 hrs. lect./lab. DED (A. Vaccari)

CSCI 0465 Information Visualization (Fall 2018)

Information visualization is used to reveal patterns, trends, and outliers within abstract data. In this course we will cover topics such as the transformation of data to visual representations, common approaches to dealing with different types of data, perceptual issues that govern how visualizations are interpreted, and the development of interactive visualization tools. This course will culminate in a significant final visualization project. (CSCI 0201) DED (C. Andrews)

CSCI 0500 Advanced Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Individual study for qualified students in more advanced topics in computer science theory, systems, or application areas. Particularly suited for students who enter with advanced standing. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect.

CSCI 0701 Senior Seminar (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This senior seminar provides a capstone experience for computer science majors at Middlebury College. Through lectures, readings, and a series of two to three week individual and group assignments, we will introduce important concepts in research and experimental methods in computation. Examples will include: reading research papers; identifying research problems; dealing with big data; experimental design, testing and analysis; and technical writing in computer science. (Approval only). (M. Linderman, A. Vaccari)

CSCI 0702 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

The senior thesis is required for all CSCI majors who wish to be considered for high and highest departmental honors, and is recommended for students interested in pursuing graduate study in computer science. Students will spend the semester researching and writing, and developing and experimenting as appropriate for their topic. All students will be expected to report on their work in the form of a written thesis, a poster, and an oral presentation at the end of the semester. In addition, throughout the semester, students will meet as a group to discuss research and writing, and will be expected to attend talks in the Computer Science lecture series. Before approval to join the class is granted, students are expected to have chosen a thesis adviser from the CSCI faculty, and determined a thesis topic with the guidance and approval of that adviser. (CSCI 0701 and approval required) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (D. Scharstein)
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Program in Dance

Consistent with its liberal arts mission, the Dance Program offers a rich set of eight foundational courses required of all Dance majors.  Beyond these shared foundational courses, students take additional courses specific to one of three tracks: Choreography and Performance, Production and Technology, and Theory and Aesthetics.  The complete requirements for each track (foundational courses plus track-specific courses) are as follows:

Choreography & Performance Track
1.  0116 (Creative Process)
2.  0260 (Advanced Beginning Dance)                                
3.  0261 (Introduction to Improvisation)
4.  0284 (Dance History)
5.  0360 (Intermediate/Advanced Dance)
6.  0370 (Production Workshop) or 0361 (Movement and Media)
7.  0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology)                                                
8.  0460 (Advanced Dance)
9.  0500 (Production Seminar)
10.  0700 (Senior Work)
11.  Z-Lab (0470)

     This track represents the core curriculum of the dance program for students primarily focused on contemporary approaches to technique, composition and performance. The culminating senior work in this track will take the form a formal concert work and written thesis.

 Production & Technology Track
1.  0116 (Creative Process)
2.  0260 (Advanced Beginning Dance)
3.  0261 (Introduction to Improvisation)
4.  0284 (Dance History)
5.  0361 (Movement & Media)
6.  0370 (Production Workshop)
7.  0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology)                                                       
8.  0460 (Advanced Dance) - Design Focused
9.  0700 (Senior Work) - Design & Production
10. 2 other Elective Courses from the Following Disciplines: (by advisor approval)

  • Studio Art
  • Architecture Studies
  • Theatre
  • Film and Media Culture

     This track represents a directed course of study for students primarily focused on the skills and methods of dance production and media, digital representations of the body, and current innovations and aesthetic models presented by the confluence of dance and the digital age. The culminating senior work in this track will involve all elements of the production of a design-focused concert work and a written thesis.

Dance Studies Track (Theory & Aesthetics)
1.  0116 (Creative Process)
2.  0260 (Advanced Beginning Dance)                                         
3.  0261 (Introduction to Improvisation)
4.  0284 (Dance History)
5.  0360 (Intermediate/Advanced Dance)                                   
6.  0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology)
7.  0460 (Advanced Dance)
8.  0500 (Production Seminar)
9.  0700 (Senior Work)
10. 2 other elective courses from the following disciplines: (by advisor approval)

  • English and American Literature
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology/Anthropology

     This track represents a directed course of study for students interested in dance as a focus for scholarly work and theoretical inquiry by developing the ability to articulate the interdisciplinary and intercultural aspects of dance, as well as write about the potential of the moving body to both reflect and impact culture. The culminating senior work in this track will take the form a public lecture and written thesis.

Joint Major Requirements
1.  ARDV 0116 (Creative Process) 
2.  DANC 0284 (Dance History)                             
3.  DANC 0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology)  
4. Three semesters of technique and choreography at or above the 0200 level
5.  DANC 0700 (Senior Work)

Minor Requirements
1.  ARDV 0116 (Creative Process) 
2.  DANC 0284 (Dance History)                                 
3.  DANC 0376 (Anatomy & Kinesiology) 
4.  Two semesters of technique and choreography at or above the 0200 level​

Honors-Dance: Honors, high honors, or highest honors are awarded to graduating seniors in the dance program based upon a grade point average of A- or better in department and cognate courses, a grade of A- or better on the DANC 0700 Senior Independent Project, and overall distinction in the program. Normally only full majors will be eligible for highest honors.

ARDV 0116 The Creative Process (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course, students will have the opportunity to dig deeply into their own creativity and explore the processes by which ideas emerge and are given shape in the arts. The experiential nature of this course integrates cognition and action, mind and body. Students will engage a range of modes of discovering, knowing, and communicating, which are designed to push them beyond their present state of awareness and level of confidence in their creative power. Practical work will be closely accompanied by readings and journaling, culminating with the creation and performance of a short project. (First- and second-year students only; Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1364) 3 hrs. lect. ART (Fall 2018: M. Biancosino)

DANC 0160 Introduction to Dance (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This entry-level dance course introduces movement techniques, improvisation/composition, performance, experiential anatomy, and history of 20th century American modern dance. Students develop flexibility, strength, coordination, rhythm, and vocabulary in the modern idiom. Concepts of time, space, energy, and choreographic form are presented through improvisation and become the basis for a final choreographic project. Readings, research, and reflective and critical writing about dance performance round out the experience. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (Fall 2018: C. Brown)

DANC 0260 Advanced Beginning Dance I (Spring 2019)

This is the first course in the studio sequence for students entering Middlebury with significant previous dance experience. It is also the course sequence for those continuing on from DANC 0160 or DANC 0161 and provides grounding in the craft of modern dance needed to proceed to more advanced levels. Modern dance movement techniques are strengthened to support an emerging individual vocabulary and facility with composition. Students regularly create and revise movement studies that focus on the basic elements of choreography and the relationship of music and dance. Readings, journals, and formal critiques of video and live performance contribute to the exploration of dance aesthetics and develop critical expertise. (DANC 0160 or by approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE

DANC 0261 Improvisational Practices (Fall 2018)

In this course students will gain an embodied understanding of the practices and techniques needed to proceed to advanced improvisational work. Research into forms such as partnering, ensemble work, text, musical exercises, compositions, and scores/projects will focus on mapping the moving body in the moment. Readings, journals, and responses to video viewings and live performances contribute to the exploration of historical contexts, aesthetics, and cultural improvisations. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE (L. Winfield)

DANC 0277 Body and Earth (Spring 2019)

This course has been designed for students with an interest in the dialogue between the science of body and the science of place. Its goals are to enhance movement efficiency through experiential anatomy and to heighten participants' sensitivity to natural processes and forms in the Vermont bioregion. Weekly movement sessions, essays by nature writers, and writing assignments about place encourage synthesis of personal experience with factual information. Beyond the exams and formal writing assignments, members of the class will present a final research project and maintain an exploratory journal. 3 hrs. lect. 1 hr. lab. AMR, ART, CW (5 seats), NOR, PE

DANC 0284 Modern Dance History in the United States: Early Influences to Postmodern Transformations (Fall 2018)

In this seminar we will focus on the emergence and development of 20th century American concert dance--especially modern and postmodern dance forms--from the confluence of European folk and court dance, African and Caribbean influences, and other American cultural dynamics. We will look at ways in which dance reflects, responds to, and creates its cultural milieu, with special attention to issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class. Readings, video, and live performance illuminate the artistic products and processes of choreographers whose works mark particular periods or turning points in this unfolding story. Our study is intended to support informed critical articulations and an understanding of the complexity of dance as art. 3 hrs. lect./2 hrs. screen. AMR, ART, CW, HIS, NOR (K. Borni)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0284

DANC 0360 Intermediate/Advanced Dance I (Spring 2019)

This course involves concentrated intermediate-advanced level work in contemporary dance technique and choreography culminating in production. Theoretical issues of importance to the dancer/choreographer are addressed through readings, writings and practice. (DANC 0261 or by waiver; this course may be taken in any sequence with DANC 0361, DANC 0460, DANC 0461) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, PE

DANC 0370 Production Workshop (Fall 2018)

In preparing two fully produced dance productions for the stage, students will participate in and be exposed to professional production practices in all areas of dance technical design, including sets, costumes, props, lights, and sound. Students will be involved in planning, building, operating, lighting, documenting, striking, and publicizing fully produced dance program concerts. (6 hrs. lab) ART, PE (J. Ponder)

DANC 0375 Dance and Design (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine the relationship between light, space, costume design, and movement. Through readings, writings, screenings, physical embodiment and acquired technical skills, students will be engaged in a learning process that integrates diverse aspects of dance and design. With hands on projects we will explore the influence of the physical environment, on the generation of ideas, cultivation of movement vocabulary, and the process of fostering choreographic philosophy and aesthetics. This course will culminate in a final performance of works created during the term. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. labs ART

DANC 0376 Anatomy and Kinesiology (Fall 2018)

This course offers an in-depth experiential study of skeletal structure, and includes aspects of the muscular, organ, endocrine, nervous, and fluid systems of the human body. The goal is to enhance efficiency of movement and alignment through laboratory sessions, supported by assigned readings, exams, and written projects. (Not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. ART, PE (L. Jenkins)

DANC 0380 Dance Company of Middlebury (Fall 2018)

Dancers work with the artistic director and guest choreographers as part of a dance company, learning, interpreting, rehearsing, and performing dances created for performance and tour. Those receiving credit can expect four to six rehearsals weekly. Appropriate written work, concert and film viewing, and attendance in departmental technique classes are required. Auditions for company members are held in the fall semester for the year. One credit will be given for two terms of participation. Performances and tour are scheduled in January. (Limited to sophomores through seniors, by audition.) (DANC 0260; Approval required) 4 hrs. lect./4 hrs. lab ART, PE (L. Winfield)

DANC 0460 Intermediate/Advanced Dance III: The Place of Dance (Fall 2018)

In this course we will investigate three aspects of place in relation to dance: where we source movement, the relevance of dance in culture, and the effects of place on the moving dancing body. Material covered will include body systems dance technique at the intermediate/advanced level, improvisation and composition toward choreography and site specific work, readings and reflective writing, and performance viewing. The course culminates in formal and informal showings of performance work. The emergence of a personal philosophy and dance aesthetic will be engaged and formally articulated in writing. (DANC 0261; this course may be taken in any sequence with DANC 0360, DANC 0361, DANC 0461) 4.5 hrs. lect./2 hrs. lab. ART, PE (L. Jenkins)

DANC 0461 Intermediate/Advanced Dance IV: Advanced Dance Improvisation (Spring 2019)

Students will gain rigorous training in the simultaneous conception, composition, and performance of dance works. This will include units in techniques such as contact improvisation, performance improvisation, site specific work, musical collaboration, and elemental integration. The body will be developed as an articulate, responsive instrument while the mind is honed toward quick, clear perception of potential form with a willingness to act and react. Personal philosophy and dance aesthetics will be cultivated and formally articulated in writing. Musicians proficient with their instrument and interested in improvisation are strongly encouraged to seek admission. (Required for dancers: DANC 0261 or by waiver; this course may be taken in any sequence with DANC 0360, DANC 0361, DANC 0460) 6 hrs lect. ART, PE

DANC 0470 Technique Workshop (Spring 2019)

This advanced physical and theoretical study of a variety of movement techniques will further prepare dance majors and minors for the rigors of performance, technical craft, and physical research. Exercises and discussions will revolve around increased subtlety, strength, flexibility, musicality, and dynamics with the goal of heightening the communicative range of the moving body. Rotating movement aesthetics taught by dance faculty. (Approval required) ART, PE

DANC 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

DANC 0700 Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required) (Fall 2018: G. Forestieri, C. Brown)
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Department of Economics

I. Required for the Major
The economics major consists of a minimum of 11 approved courses in four sequences.

Introductory Sequence: ECON 0150 and ECON 0155. Neither ECON 0150 nor ECON 0155 assumes any prior exposure to economics, but both courses presume a thorough working knowledge of algebra. Note: Students must pass ECON 0150 and ECON 0155 with at least a C- to be admitted into ECON 0250 and ECON 0255 respectively without a waiver.
Quantitative Sequence: The quantitative sequence in economics consists of two courses. The first course can be ECON 0210, MATH 0116, MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201. (ECON 0210 may not be taken concurrently with MATH 0116, MATH 0310 or PSYC 0201. Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, MATH 0310 or PSYC 0201.) Students with strong mathematical background wanting to take MATH 0410 (Stochastic Processes) should take MATH 0310 rather than MATH 0116 or ECON 0210, since MATH 0310 is a prerequisite for MATH 0410. The second course in the sequence is ECON 0211. Students must pass ECON 0210 with at least a C- to be admitted into ECON 0211 without a waiver.
Intermediate Theory Sequence: ECON 0250; ECON 0255; and one of ECON 0212, ECON 0229, or ECON 0280.
Note: It is important, especially for those planning to study abroad for a full year that the above three sequences be completed by the end of the sophomore year.
Elective Sequence: Majors are required to take at least four electives, two of which must either be at the 0400-level or a combination of one 0400-level and the ECON 0701/0702 senior workshop sequence. The other two electives may be 0200-, 0300-, or 0400-level courses.
All majors must take at least six economics courses approved in the major at Middlebury, including two 400-level or one 0400-level and the 0701/0702 sequence. The 0400-level courses are seminars that typically enroll no more than 16 students, have intermediate theory as a prerequisite, and serve as a capstone experience for the major. Emphasis is placed on reading, writing, and discussion of economics at an advanced level. The 0701/0702 workshops are seminars that typically enroll eight students, have intermediate theory and a field course as a prerequisite, and involve writing an independent research paper. The difference between an ECON 0400-level seminar and an ECON 0701/0702 workshop is the degree of independence the student has and the level of sophistication expected in the paper. Courses that do not count towards the major: ECON 0240 does not count towards the major requirements. ECON 0500 does not count towards the major requirements. Economics electives taken during the winter term will count towards the major requirements only if so designated in the winter term catalog.
Honors: To be eligible for honors in economics, students must take the Senior Research sequence (ECON 0701 and ECON 0702) during their senior year. The purpose of this two-semester sequence is to foster independent student research, culminating in a research paper in the style of an economics journal article. Prior to enrolling in ECON 0701, students must have taken a minimum of six economics courses at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. Each course in the sequence will have no more than eight students who will work on their projects for two semesters (either fall/winter or winter/spring) and will include both individual meetings and group meetings to develop new techniques and present and discuss research. Students who have prearranged a research topic with the professor will be given priority in admission to the seminar. Also, because of limited resources for guiding senior work, students with a single major in economics will be given priority over double majors who will do senior work in other departments. Students interested in pursuing departmental honors must take the Senior Research Workshop sequence (ECON 0701 and ECON 0702) during their senior year. To receive departmental honors the student must receive a minimum grade of A- in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and have a 3.5 or higher GPA in all economics courses taken at Middlebury approved to count towards the major requirements. For more detailed information on how the economics GPA is calculated, please contact the department coordinator. High Honors requires a minimum grade of A in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and a 3.75 or higher economics GPA. Highest Honors requires a minimum grade of A in ECON 0701 and ECON 0702, and a 3.9 or higher economics GPA.
Joint Majors: The Department of Economics does not offer a joint major.

International Politics and Economics Major: Please refer to the International Politics and Economics section of the catalog for details about the major or visit the International Politics & Economics website for the most current information.
International and Global Studies Major: Please refer to the International and Global Studies section of the catalog for details about the major or visit the International and Global Studies website for the most current information.
AP Credit Policy: To obtain credit, students will need to submit their official scores to the Registrar's Office and obtain approval from the department chair. Students who score a 5 on the Advanced Placement exam in Macroeconomics or Microeconomics will receive credit for Introductory Macroeconomics (ECON 0150) or Introductory Microeconomics (ECON 0155) respectively and cannot enroll in these courses at Middlebury. Students who score a 5 on the advanced placement exam in statistics are strongly encouraged to enroll in Economic Statistics (ECON 0210) but they may choose to use their AP credit instead. Note: Students may not receive AP credit and course credit for the same course.
Students who score a 4 on the advanced placement exam in Macroeconomics, Microeconomics or Statistics must earn a B- or better grade in the corresponding intermediate-level course ECON 0250, ECON 0255, or ECON 0211, respectively, to receive college credit for the AP course. Note: Students are required to complete an additional elective for each of these courses when a grade of B- or higher is not earned in the corresponding intermediate-level course.
International Baccalaureate/A-Levels: Students who have completed an International Baccalaureate and have earned a score of 7 on IB Economics or a grade of A on A-Level Economics should begin their studies of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics with ECON 0250 and ECON 0255. These students will be given one course credit toward the economics major, and will be prohibited from enrolling in ECON 0150 or ECON 0155. Students who have earned a score of 6 on IB economics or a grade of B on A-Level economics are encouraged to begin their studies of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics with ECON 0250 and ECON 0255, but they may elect to enroll in ECON 0150 or ECON 0155. Students majoring in Economics will need to replace the other introductory course with an ECON elective. Students who have completed a statistics course with a score of 6 or higher on IB Statistics, or a grade of B or better on A-Level Statistics may begin their course of study of economics statistics with ECON 0211 or MATH 0310. If they choose to start with ECON 0211 or MATH 0310, they will need to replace the ECON 0210 credit with an ECON elective. The same rules apply where ECON courses are requirements for other majors.
Transfer of Credit: Students may take economics courses in approved programs (abroad and domestic) and have those courses count towards the major and/or the general graduation requirement. Summer school courses will not generally be given credit for the major unless there is an overriding reason to take a summer school course. Any summer school course must meet a minimum of six weeks and have at least 36 hours of class time. Students planning to take courses off-campus should discuss the proposed course(s) with their advisor and get pre-approval from the department chair. Upon completion of the course(s), students should submit their course material and a copy of their transcript along with a Transfer Credit Application Form to the department chair for departmental approval. After receiving departmental approval, students must submit their forms to the Registrar’s Office for final approval by the director of off-campus study. Note: Transfer Credit Forms are not required for courses listed in the Course Information Data base (CID) as approved to count towards the major. However, students must notify the Registrar’s Office of any transferred courses approved in the CID that they wish to be counted towards their major requirements. Courses having a BU (Business) or MGMT (Management) prefix will not normally be considered the equivalent of an economics course. No credit will be given for business courses taken over the summer. A maximum of one general credit will be given for a business course taken through a junior year abroad business program. Business courses taken in a non-business program will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Those that match the department's offerings, and have strong liberal arts content, have the best chance of receiving credit.

II. Post-Graduate Preparation
Graduate programs in economics or finance [other than a Masters of Business Administration (MBA)] generally require a high degree of mathematical sophistication. Students thinking of continuing in such a program are encouraged to: (i) take MATH 0310 in place of ECON 0210; (ii) select economics electives with significant mathematically and statistically rigorous content [recommended courses fulfilling the elective requirements of the economics major include: ECON 0229, ECON 0280, ECON 0390, and ECON 0411]; (iii) take a number of additional courses in mathematics and computer science [recommended courses include: CSCI 0101, MATH 0315, MATH 0318, MATH 0323, MATH 0410, and MATH 0423]. Good training for graduate school might include being a statistics tutor or having worked as a research assistant at Middlebury College or at a Federal Reserve Bank, or as an intern at a research institute or NGO. Students thinking about this option should discuss their plans with their advisor and other faculty members.. Masters of Business Administration (MBA) programs look for students who have taken a wide range of courses across the curriculum rather than for students who have narrowly focused on economics and math. Thus, it is not necessary for someone planning to go on in business or to an MBA program to have majored in economics. MBA programs normally expect that students have worked for a couple of years in business, government, or similar organization before they begin the MBA program. The appropriate coursework for these MBA programs is a wide range of liberal arts courses.

III. Minor in Economics
The Department of Economics does not offer a minor.

ECON 0150 Introductory Macroeconomics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

An introduction to macroeconomics: a consideration of macroeconomic problems such as unemployment and inflation. Theories and policy proposals of Keynesian and classical economists are contrasted. Topics considered include: banking, financial institutions, monetary policy, taxation, government spending, fiscal policy, tradeoffs between inflation and unemployment in both the short run and the long run, and wage-price spirals. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (Fall 2018: E. Wolcott, D. Munro, C. Craven)

ECON 0155 Introductory Microeconomics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

An introduction to the analysis of such microeconomic problems as price formation (the forces behind demand and supply), market structures from competitive to oligopolistic, distribution of income, and public policy options bearing on these problems. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (Fall 2018: J. Isham, P. Wunnava, S. Pecsok)

ECON 0200 Health Economics and Policy (Fall 2018)

In this course we will focus on the health care system of the United States. We will apply standard microeconomic tools to the problems of health and health care markets. The course provides the fundamental tools with which to understand how the health care market is different from the markets for other goods. For example, students will learn about the dominant presence of uncertainty at all levels of health care, the government's unusually large presence in the market, the pronounced difference in knowledge between doctors and patients, and the prevalence of situations where the actions of some impose costs or benefits on others (e.g., vaccinations, drug research). (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (J. Holmes)

ECON 0210 Economic Statistics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Basic methods and concepts of statistical inference with an emphasis on economic applications. Topics include probability distributions, random variables, simple linear regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and contingency table analysis. A weekly one-hour lab is part of this course in addition to three hours of class meetings per week. Credit is not given for ECON 0210 if the student has taken MATH 0116, or MATH 0310, or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab DED (Fall 2018: P. Sommers, A. Gregg)

ECON 0211 Introduction to Regression Analysis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course regression analysis is introduced. The major focus is on quantifying relationships between economic variables. Multiple regression identifies the effect of several exogenous variables on an endogenous variable. After exploring the classical regression model, fundamental assumptions underlying this model will be relaxed, and further new techniques will be introduced. Methods for testing hypotheses about the regression coefficients are developed throughout the course. Both theoretical principles and practical applications will be emphasized. The course goal is for each student to employ regression analysis as a research tool and to justify and defend the techniques used. (MATH 0121; and ECON 0150 or ECON 0155; and ECON 0210; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab DED (Fall 2018: J. Maluccio, C. Myers)

ECON 0212 Empirical Research Methods in Economics (Fall 2018)

In this course we will provide students with the tools to conceptualize, design, and carry out a research project in economics. Topics will include survey design, sampling and power, experimental design (in and out of the lab), natural experiments, and other approaches to identifying causal relationships. Drawing from several sub-disciplines in economics, students will examine, replicate, and critique various studies. Emphasis will be placed on the formulation of valid, feasible research questions, and on the description and interpretation of results. (ECON 0211) 3 hrs. lect. (E. Gong)

ECON 0222 Economics of Happiness (Spring 2019)

We will explore the economics of happiness in both the micro and macro realm. We start with the neoclassical model of rational individuals who know with great precision what makes them happy. Next we explore behaviorist challenges to that model, including issues of regret, altruism, fairness, and gender. On the macro side, we investigate the puzzle of why, though most of us like more income, a growing GDP does not seem to make societies happier; we examine the impact of the macroeconomic environment on individual happiness. Finally we touch on current policy issues such as quantitative happiness indicators that have been adopted around the world, “paternalistic” policy measures to increase happiness, and the no-growth movement. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

ECON 0228 Economics of Agricultural Transition (Fall 2018)

In 1860 farmers made up over half the population of this country and fed about 30 million people. Today they number 2% of the population and produce more than enough to feed 300 million people. In this course we will look at the history, causes, and results of this incredible transformation. While studying the economic forces behind the changing farming structure, we will examine farm production, resources, technology, and agricultural policy. Field trips to local farms and screenings of farm-related videos and movies will incorporate the viewpoint of those engaged in agriculture. (ECON 0150 or ECON 0155) 2hrs. lect., 2 hrs. lab AMR, NOR, SOC (S. Pecsok)

ECON 0229 Economic History and History of Economic Thought (Fall 2018)

This course will provide an introduction to economic history and the history of economic thought. We will investigate and understand the causes and consequences of important historical events and trends, such as industrialization and globalization, from an economic perspective. We devote considerable attention to the dissemination throughout Europe of new industrial and agricultural practices originating in Britain. Along the way, we evaluate how prominent economists perceived and analyzed the events of their time. (ECON 0150, ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. EUR, HIS, SOC (A. Gregg)

ECON 0232 The Chinese Economy (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the economic development of China up until the present day, giving particular attention to the socialist era and the post-1978 reforms. Specific topics to be covered will include growth and structural change, the urban-rural divide, the state’s ongoing role in the economy, demography, and the country’s integration into the global economy. (ECON 0150 orECON 0155; or by approval) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, NOA, SOC (W. Pyle)

ECON 0234 Economics of Africa (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to some of the poorest and some of the fastest growing economies in the world. In this course, we will explore the opportunities for sustained, inclusive economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa, the challenges that must be overcome in realizing these opportunities, and the policy options for overcoming these challenges. Topics may include demography, institutions, infrastructure, agriculture, urbanization, climate change, health, natural resources, mobile technology, trade, and regional integration. Students will be exposed to relevant economic theory and recent empirical economic research on Africa. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155; or by approval) This course counts as elective credit towards the Economics major and IPEC major. AAL, CW (Fall 2018), SAF, SOC (Fall 2018: O. Porteous)

ECON 0240 International Economics: Theory and Policy (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course provides an overview of international trade and finance. We will use economic theory to help us understand how and why countries interact in the global economy and evaluate the effects of different trade, exchange rate, and macroeconomic policies. Topics covered will include the reasons for trade, the winners and losers from trade, trade policies, trade agreements, exchange rates, the balance of payments, causes of and solutions to financial crises, and the role of the WTO and IMF. ECON 0240 does not count towards the ECON major or minor requirements. (ECON 0150 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2018: O. Porteous)

ECON 0250 Macroeconomic Theory (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Macroeconomic theory analyzes whether the market effectively coordinates individuals' decisions so that they lead to acceptable results. It considers the effectiveness of monetary, fiscal, and other policies in achieving desirable levels of unemployment, inflation, and growth. The theories held by various schools of economic thought such as Keynesians, monetarists, and new classicals are considered along with their proposed policies. (MATH 0121 and ECON 0150) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2018: P. Matthews, J. de Souza, K. Sargent)

ECON 0255 Microeconomic Theory (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Microeconomic theory concentrates on the study of the determination of relative prices and their importance in shaping the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in an economy. We will study the optimizing behavior of households in a variety of settings: buying goods and services, saving, and labor supply decisions. We will also examine the behavior of firms in different market structures. Together, the theories of household and firm behavior help illumine contemporary economic issues (discrimination in labor markets, mergers in the corporate world, positive and negative externalities, for example). (MATH 0121 and ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2018: M. Abel, W. Pyle)

ECON 0265 Environmental Economics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is dedicated to the proposition that economic reasoning is critical for analyzing the persistence of environmental damage and for designing cost-effective environmental policies. The objectives of the course are that each student (a) understands the economic approach to the environment; (b) can use microeconomics to illustrate the theory of environmental policy; and (c) comprehends and can critically evaluate: alternative environmental standards, benefits and costs of environmental protection, and incentive-based environmental policies. (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. CW (Spring 2019) (Fall 2018: J. Berazneva)

ECON 0275 Urban Economics (Spring 2019)

If economics is the study of the allocation of scarce resources, then urban economics is the study of one scarce resource in particular: space. This course will introduce students to new ways of thinking about the causes and consequences of the locational decisions made by firms and households. We will explore how and why cities form, grow and decline, and how they occupy horizontal and vertical spaces. Along the way we will use the tools of economics to discuss a variety of urban issues such as sprawl, transportation, big box stores and malls, the housing bubble, racial segregation, and neighborhood effects. (ECON 0155) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

ECON 0280 Game Theory (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Game theory is general in scope and has been used to provide theoretical foundations for phenomena in most of the social and behavioral sciences. Economic examples include market organization, bargaining, and the provision of public goods. Examples from other behavioral sciences include social dilemmas and population dynamics. In this course students will learn the basics of what constitutes a game and how games are solved. (ECON 0155 and MATH 0121 required; ECON 0255 recommended) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2018: J. Carpenter)

ECON 0301 CSPW: Economic Journalism (Spring 2019)

Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Economic Journalism*
Drawing on core courses in the major, students will strengthen their understanding of economic analysis and develop their writing skills by addressing contemporary economic issues in a journalistic format. In a series of weekly assignments, including book reviews, op-eds, and coverage of recent research articles, students will translate the language of formal economics into pieces that are both interesting and accessible to educated non-economists. Most class sessions will be organized as workshops devoted to critiquing the economic and expository content of student work. (ECON 211 and ECON 250 and ECON 255) 3 hr. sem.
CW, SOC

ECON 0329 Theory and Measurement in Economic History (Spring 2019)

Economic historians study past events, employing diverse methodologies to understand technology adoption, market integration, and the effect of institutions on performance. In this course we will focus on strategies economists use to learn about the past itself and to use past events to understand how all economies function. We will ponder especially conflicts and complementarities between theoretical and empirical reasoning. Each student will complete a research proposal that justifies applying a set of tools to address an economic history question. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0255; or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, CW, HIS, SOC

ECON 0352 Structuralist Macroeconomics: Theory and Policies for Developing Countries (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine key macroeconomics challenges faced by developing countries . In contrast to the senior seminar in Macroeconomics of Development, which focuses on long-run growth, this course focuses on short-run and medium-run macroeconomic issues; as such, it builds more closely on the Macroeconomic Theory core course. The topics covered include structural constraints on aggregate demand, fiscal and monetary policies, distributive conflict, and debt. We will examine these topics through a combination of formal theoretical models and real-world applications. (MATH 0121 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, CW, SAF

ECON 0370 Introduction to Public Economics (Spring 2019)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the government's role in modern market economies. In particular, we will explore the design and impact of government expenditure programs and taxation systems on the welfare and behavior of its citizens. We will consider the following questions: When is government intervention in the economy appropriate? What is the most effective form of intervention? What effects do government policies have on incentives for firms, individuals, and others in the private sector? In this course we will cover a wide range of issues in public economics with a primary focus on current policy debates in the United States, employing standard empirical and theoretical tools used in public economic research. Selected topics include: income taxation, social security, regulation of pollution and other externalities, public goods such as national defense and education spending, welfare programs, inequality, health insurance and other social insurance programs, redistribution, the indirect consequences of taxation, tax evasion, as well as applications of behavioral and experimental economics to these areas. (ECON 0255) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

ECON 0399 Introduction to Behavioral and Experimental Economics (Fall 2018)

This course surveys research incorporating psychological and other experimental evidence into economics. Topics will include: attitudes towards risk (e.g., prospect theory) and time (e.g., self-control); judgment and decision-making biases; fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions; bargaining and financial market anomalies; incentives (e.g., performance pay and nudges). (ECON 0255 required; ECON 0280 recommended) 3 hrs. lect. (J. Carpenter)

ECON 0401 Poverty, Inequality and Distributive Justice (Fall 2018)

This seminar will explore recent theoretical and empirical research on socioeconomic inequality. The definitions, causes and consequences of inequality at both the individual (micro) and national and international (macro) levels will be considered. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Matthews)

ECON 0405 Economics of Discrimination (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this seminar we will explore the economics of discrimination from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. After reviewing the main theoretical frameworks, we will discuss recent empirical studies on issues of discrimination associated with race, ethnicity, gender, or nationality, focusing on applications in the labor market. We will then investigate to what extent inter-group contact or policies such as quotas or affirmative action can address discrimination. Students will explore a specific topic of interest (e.g., police violence, sexual orientation, sport, education, etc.) in more detail and develop a research proposal. (ECON 0255 and ECON 0211 or ECON 0240) 3 hrs. sem. CMP (Fall 2018: M. Abel)

ECON 0411 Applied Econometrics (Fall 2018)

This course is designed to further students' understanding of parameter estimation, inference, and hypothesis testing for single and multiple equation systems. Emphasis will be placed on specification, estimation, and testing of micro/macro econometric models and using such models for policy analysis and forecasting. Large cross-sectional as well as panel data sets will be used for estimation purposes. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0250 and ECON 0255; or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Wunnava)

ECON 0415 The Macroeconomics of Economic Development (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine macroeconomic aspects of economic development. We will explore theoretical models combining insights from growth theory, classical development theory, and structuralist macroeconomics. Topics include dualism, surplus labor, increasing returns, poverty traps, and the role of external and demand constraints in the growth process. We will also review applied work and case studies, in order to understand how these theories illuminate concrete issues that have faced developing countries (ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. (J. de Souza)

ECON 0420 Globalization and US Inequality (Spring 2019)

Does globalization increase inequality in the United States? In this course we will study how trade, automation, immigration, and financial integration relate to the distribution of income, wealth, and employment in the US over the last century. In the first part of the course we will study theoretical frameworks to shed light on this question. In the second part, we will turn to the data and read peer-reviewed articles, discussing evidence for and against globalization increasing US inequality. Lastly, we will debate policy prescriptions, to address these issues. (ECON 0211 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. AMR, NOR

ECON 0430 The Post-Communist Economic Transition (Spring 2019)

This seminar will use the “natural experiment” of the post-communist transition to better understand the origin and consequences of various economic and political institutions. Drawing on research related to China and Russia as well as other formerly communist economies in Europe and Asia, we will explore such themes as property rights reform, the finance-growth nexus, contract enforcement institutions, and the economic consequences of corruption and different political regimes. (ECON 0210 or MATH 0310 or MATH 0311 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0250, or by approval) CMP

ECON 0431 Economics of the European Union (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course will introduce students to the major economies of Western Europe and also the economic functions and structure of the institutions of the European Union. The course aims to familiarize students with the theoretical economic and policy issues that are currently of concern in the European Union. Moreover, the course aims to analyze economic problems that are of particular relevance to the member states of the European Union, such as the coordination of policies within an intergovernmental supranational framework and how to sustain the integration dynamic. (ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. EUR (Fall 2018: K. Sargent)

ECON 0445 International Finance (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

An analysis of the world's financial system and the consequences for open economies of macroeconomic interdependence. Particular topics include: exchange rate determination, balance of payments adjustments, and monetary and fiscal policies in open economies. Special attention is paid to the issues and problems of the European Economic Community and European integration and debt in developing countries. (ECON 0240 or ECON 0250) 3 hrs. sem. (Fall 2018: D. Munro)

ECON 0465 Special Topics in Environmental Economics (Spring 2019)

The objective of this seminar is that each student achieves fluency in a set of advanced concepts in environmental economics. The seminar is divided into two main sections. First, we introduce the core theory and policy implications of environmental economics. These include the theory of externalities and public goods; the Coase theorem; and policy instrument choice. Empirical methods used to measure the costs and benefits of environmental policies are also introduced. Second, we study some selected topics: the economics of local air pollution and greenhouse gases; the design of market-based environmental policies; the economics of non-renewable resources, including fossil fuels and old-growth forests; and the management of renewable resources, including fisheries and second-growth forest resources. (ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON 0466 Environment and Development (Fall 2018)

Climate change, air pollution, tropical deforestation: there is little doubt that economic development affects, and is affected by, the global and local environment and natural resources. In this course we will explore the complex relationship between environment and development using the theoretical and empirical tools of applied economic analysis. We will begin with pioneering research papers on the empirics of economic growth, examine the macroeconomic evidence, and then move to the micro foundations of the poverty-environment nexus. Major topics will include the resource curse and environmental Kuznets curve hypotheses, approaches for understanding responses to climate variability and disasters in poor communities, management of natural resources in smallholder agriculture, choosing policy instruments for pollution reduction, conservation, and environmental protection, and relationships between human health and the environment. We will conclude with a number of selected topics and issues of contemporary policy relevance. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0240 or ECON 0255; or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. SOC (J. Berazneva)

ECON 0485 The Economics of Sports (Spring 2019)

This is a survey course of topics illustrating how microeconomic principles apply to the sports industry. Topics covered will include the industrial organization of the sports industry (notably, issues of competitive balance and the implications of monopoly power), the public finance of sports (notably, the impact teams have on host municipalities), and labor issues related to sports (including player worth and discrimination). The prerequisites for this course are meant to ensure that students can both understand fundamental economic concepts and present the results of econometric research as they apply to the sports industry. (ECON 0210 and ECON 0211 and ECON 0255) 3 hrs. sem.

ECON 0499 Research in Behavioral and Experimental Economics (Fall 2018)

In this seminar we will consider current research topics in behavioral and experimental economics. Although the theme for the course is likely to change from semester to semester, all students will design their own study, gather decision-making data, and write a research paper summarizing their main findings. (ECON 0255 and one of the following: ECON 0280 or ECON 0399) 3 hrs. sem. (A. Robbett)

ECON 0500 Individual Special Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

If you choose to pursue an area that we do not offer or go in depth in an area already covered, we recommend the Individual Special Project option. These ECON 0500 proposals MUST be passed by the entire department and are to be submitted to the chair by the first Friday of fall and spring semester, respectively. The proposals should contain a specific description of the course contents, its goals, and the mechanisms by which goals are to be realized. It should also include a bibliography. According to the College Handbook, ECON 0500 projects are a privilege open to those students with advanced preparation and superior records in their fields. A student needs to have a 3.5 or higher G.P.A. in Economics courses taken at Middlebury in order to pursue an Individual Special Project. ECON 0500 does not count towards the major or minor requirements.

ECON 0701 Senior Research Workshop I (Fall 2018)

In this first semester, students will design and begin their projects. Emphasis will be on designing a novel research question (while making the case for its importance) and an appropriate strategy for answering it. This requires immersion in the academic literature on the topic. General research principles and tools will be taught in class, as a group, while those specific to individual projects will be covered in one-on-one meetings. By the end of the term, students will outline their plan for completing the project, including demonstrating that it is a feasible research question for which the necessary information (e.g., data or source materials) is available or can be generated by the student (e.g., lab or other experiment). (Approval required) (A. Robbett, E. Gong)

ECON 0702 Senior Research Workshop II (Spring 2019)

In this second semester of the senior research workshop sequence, the focus is on the execution of the research plan developed in ECON 0701. Most instruction is now one-on-one but the workshop will still meet as a group to discuss and practice the presentation of results in various formats (seminars, poster sessions, et cetera) to the rest of the workshop and others in the college and broader communities. Feedback and critiques from such presentations will be incorporated into the project, which will culminate in a research paper in the style of an economics journal article. (ECON 0701; Approval required) (C. Myers, A. Robbett)
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Program in Education Studies

The study of Education necessitates an understanding of the reasons for the deep inequities that characterize education in the USA and other countries of the world.   Through the investigation of educational theory, policy, research and practice from a variety of disciplinary perspectives students learn to think critically and creatively about the processes of teaching and learning and about the place of education in society.  Effective fall 2017, Education Studies offers a double-major for those students who seek teacher licensure in either elementary (EDEL) or secondary (EDSL) education and a minor in general education (EDGW) for those who are interested in the field of education, but who do not seek teacher licensure. [Students may not choose to major in Education Studies as a stand-alone major. The double major option is available only to those students seeking teacher licensure.] Students who matriculated to Middlebury prior to fall 2017 should speak to the Program Director about maintaining their current program of study.

Requirements for the Double Major in Teacher Licensure
Students interested in earning a Vermont teaching license should meet with the Director of the Education Studies Program as soon as possible in their course of study. The four, state-required elements that must be satisfactorily completed in order to be recommended for Vermont initial educator licensure are: (i) Relevant coursework that satisfies the content requirements of the endorsement, (ii) Professional Semester, (iii) Vermont Licensure Portfolio, and (iv) state required examinations such as Praxis. The specific requirements for elementary and secondary teacher licensure are as follows:

Elementary Licensure
Required for major, Elementary Licensure
: A major in another discipline. EDST 0115A (Education in the USA), EDST 0215 (Culturally Responsive Pedagogy), EDST 0300 (Models of Inclusive Education), EDST 0305 (Elementary Literacy and Social Studies Methods), EDST 0306 (Elementary Science Methods), EDST 0307 (Elementary Math Methods), EDST 0317 (Children and the Arts) or approved art internship, Professional Semester (see below). PSYC 0225 (Child Development), PSYC 0327 (Educational Psychology).

  • Elementary licensure students must complete both the SCI and DED Distribution Requirements.

Secondary Licensure
Required for major, Secondary Licensure
: A major in the endorsement area. EDST 0115A (Education in the USA), EDST 0215 (Culturally Responsive Pedagogy), EDST 0300 (Models of Inclusive Education), EDST 0327 (Field Experience in Secondary and Special Education); EDST 0505 (Independent Study Secondary Methods taken twice with different placements) and the Professional Semester (see below). PSYC 0216 (Adolescence); PSYC 0327(Educational Psychology).

  • Middlebury College is authorized to recommend licensure in the following subject areas for secondary education (7-12): Modern and Classical Languages: French, German, Russian, Spanish; Computer Science; English; Mathematics; Science; Social Studies. Art (preK-12).
  •  In order for secondary licensure candidates to be recommended for licensure they must meet Vermont content endorsement requirements. Generally, this means that students should select their second major in the content area they wish to teach.

Professional Semester
(Fall semester only; by application and approval): Students who elect to pursue licensure either in Elementary (K-6) or Secondary (7-12) education must apply to the Education Studies program for acceptance into the Professional Semester. The Professional Semester is a four credit, full-time, student teaching experience in a local school, with a master teacher, and under the supervision of a college designated supervisor.  Upon acceptance to the Professional Semester, students complete EDST 0410 (the student teaching seminar) and either EDST 0405-7 (elementary) or EDST 0415-17(secondary). Education Studies faculty, in consultation with the student and prospective master teacher, make the final decision regarding where and with whom a student is placed for the Professional Semester.  Students may elect to complete the Professional Semester in either their senior year or post graduation in a ninth semester.

Requirements for the minor in Education Studies (EDGW)
Students interested in completing a minor in Education Studies should meet with a professor in the Education Studies Program to organize a thoughtful course of study. The Education Studies minor consists of five courses two of which are required and three of which are selected at the discretion of the student under consultation with an EDST faculty advisor. There is no option for a major in general Education Studies.

  1. Required (2 courses):
  • EDST 0115     (Education in the USA) Prerequisite for all EDST courses.
  • EDST 0430     (Senior Seminar in Education Studies).

Students must complete three of the 5 required courses prior to enrolling in the Senior Seminar. Required for all students who matriculate fall 2017 and after.

  1. Electives (3 courses):
  • Any three other EDST courses (see course listing).
  • One of the following three PSYC courses may count towards the minor: PYSC 0216 (Adolescence), PSYC 0225 (Child Development), PSYC 0327 (Educational Psychology).
  • One of the following three SOAN courses may count towards the minor: SOAN 0215 (Sociology of Education), SOAN 0351 (Education and Social Policy), SOAN 0430 (Higher Education and Society).

Students may seek to include a course that is not listed above, a course to be taken abroad or a Winter Term internship as one of the five courses.  In each instance, students must secure prior approval from Education Studies faculty for such a course to fulfill the requirements for the minor.

EDST 0115 Education in the USA (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

What are schools for? What makes education in a democracy unique? What counts as evidence of that uniqueness? What roles do schools play in educating citizens in a democracy for a democracy? In this course, we will engage these questions while investigating education as a social, cultural, political, and economic process. We will develop new understandings of current policy disputes regarding a broad range or educational issues by examining the familiar through different ideological and disciplinary lenses. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AMR, NOR, SOC (Fall 2018: T. Affolter, S. Hoffman)

EDST 0206 Environmental Education (Fall 2018)

In this interdisciplinary course students will learn foundational principles and practices in environmental education. Topics include ecological citizenship, environmental literacy, place-based education, learning theories, nature pedagogy, school gardens, and forest schools. Most class sessions will be held outdoors, where students will apply and extend their learning, develop lessons, and practice teaching. This course is appropriate for students interested in outdoor environmental education in formal or non-formal settings with any age between early childhood and high school. Field experiences with community partners occur outside of class. (EDST 0115 or by approval) 3hrs. lect. (T. Weston)

EDST 0210 Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP (Fall 2018), CW (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: J. Miller-Lane, T. Lilburn, R. Schine)
Cross-listed as: INTD 0210 *

EDST 0213 Understanding Educational Testing (Spring 2019)

Achievement testing is now a cornerstone of education policy. It is also complex and routinely misunderstood by educators, policymakers, and the media. In this course students will use statistical methods to explore and address testing issues that arise in both policy and practice. We will examine the uses and abuses of educational assessment. We will examine and interrogate trends and group differences in achievement. And we will broaden our understanding of essential concepts of measurement, such as reliability, validity, and bias, by analyzing both large and small datasets. Prior experience with the statistical package “R” is not required, as learning this package will be part of the course. 3 hrs. lect. DED, SOC

EDST 0215 Culturally Responsive Policy and Pedagogy (Fall 2018)

Building on the work of Gloria Ladson-Billings’ culturally relevant pedagogy, Django Paris developed a theory of culturally sustaining pedagogy that “seeks to perpetuate and foster—to sustain linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism,” for students in schools (Paris, 2012). In this course we examine how teachers might sustain and support students in classrooms and how educational policy might better address and respond to the rich diversity in our schools and communities. This is a required course for all students seeking a Vermont teaching licensure. (EDST 0115) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC (T. Affolter)

EDST 0243 How Languages are Learned: Theories and Implications (Spring 2019)

In this course we will develop a nuanced understanding of the cognitive, social, and educational factors that enable humans to acquire second languages. What is the difference between first and second language acquisition? How can instruction and curriculum be optimized to help learners? How are languages acquired in naturalistic settings? What is the impact of technology on language education? How do ideologies impact bilingual education in the United States and beyond? 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0243

EDST 0300 Models of Inclusive Education (Spring 2019)

In this course we will focus on strategies and techniques for including students with diverse learning styles in general education environments. Legal, theoretical, philosophical, and programmatic changes leading toward inclusive models of education will be approached through a historical overview of special education for students with disabilities. Additionally, the course works to expand notions of inclusion such that students' multiple identities are incorporated into all learning. Emphasis is given to the active learning models and differentiated curriculum and instruction to accommodate a range of learners with diverse disabilities, abilities, and identities. (EDST 0115 or SOAN 0215 or AMST 0105). AMR, NOR, SOC

EDST 0305 Reading & Writing the World: Teaching Literacy and Social Studies in the Elementary School (Fall 2018)

In this course, we examine what it means to be literate in the 21st century and ways in which all students can be empowered by the texts and teaching they encounter in schools. Students will develop their ability to enact literacy instruction based on current research about how children learn to read and write. We will take a critical look at texts—fiction, nonfiction, and historical—to consider the ways that texts read and write the world, develop abilities to select texts that empower all learners, and analyze retellings of historical events/persons to take into account multiple perspectives. Many class sessions occur onsite at a local elementary school to provide consistent practice and supportive feedback on authentic components of teaching (transportation provided). In addition to class sessions, students will complete field experiences in a K-6 classroom in the Middlebury area to see the workings of an entire class. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. (T. Weston)

EDST 0307 Elementary Math Methods (Spring 2019)

In this course we will approach mathematics as the construction of ideas rather than the memorization of facts and rules. We will investigate children’s mathematical reasoning, how to construct learning experiences to advance conceptual development, and how a social justice stance enables math to be a source of empowerment for children. Many class sessions occur at a local elementary school (transportation provided) so students can ground their thinking about course topics within a school, and consistently practice and receive feedback on authentic components of teaching. Students will also complete field experiences in a local K-6 classroom and Vermont licensure requirements. (EDST 0306) 3 hrs. lect./1 hrs. disc

EDST 0405 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (Fall 2018)

A semester-long practicum in a local elementary school under the direct supervision of an experienced cooperating teacher. (Corequisite: EDST 0410) (Approval required) non-standard grade (C. Cooper)

EDST 0406 Student Teaching in Elementary School (Fall 2018)

See EDST 0405. (Approval required) non-standard grade (C. Cooper)

EDST 0407 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (Fall 2018)

See EDST 0405. (Approval required) non-standard grade (C. Cooper)

EDST 0410 Student Teaching Seminar (Fall 2018)

Concurrent with student teaching, this course is designed to provide guidance in curriculum development and its implementation in the classroom, and to explore issues related to the teaching process and the profession. Students will construct a Teaching Licensure Portfolio as well as exchange ideas about their student teaching experiences. Topics including technology, classroom management, special education, and assessment will be featured. The Vermont Framework of Standards and Learning Opportunities, the five Standards for Vermont Educators, the Principles for Vermont Educators, and ROPA-R will guide the development of the Teacher Licensure Portfolio. (Corequisite: EDST 0405, EDST 0406, EDST 0407 or EDST 0415, EDST 0416 EDST 0417) (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect. CW (T. Weston)

EDST 0415 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2018)

A semester-long practicum in a local middle or high school under the direct supervision of an experienced cooperating teacher. (Corequisite: EDST 0410) (Approval required) non-standard grade (J. Miller-Lane)

EDST 0416 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2018)

See EDST 0415. (Approval required) non-standard grade (J. Miller-Lane)

EDST 0417 Student Teaching in the Middle School/High School (Fall 2018)

See EDST 0415. (Approval required) non-standard grade (J. Miller-Lane)

EDST 0430 Senior Seminar in Education Studies (Fall 2018)

In this capstone seminar for General Education minors, students will engage, analyze, and offer solutions to real world problems in the current landscape of education. We will read extensively in the field, consider multiple research methods and approaches, and enlist community experts. Working across disciplines and collaboratively, students will create final projects that integrate and apply what they have learned in their coursework, developing and enhancing skills for creative problem solving and leadership in the field. Final projects will vary; all students will make oral presentations. (three of five required courses for the general EDST minor.) 3 hrs. Sem. SOC (C. Cooper)

EDST 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

EDST 0505 Independent Study - Secondary Methods (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is for students who are pursuing a VT teaching license in a Secondary content area. Students are required to commit to a school placement under the guidance and supervision of a certified, secondary VT teacher. The content of the course will be developed collaboratively by the EDST professor overseeing the independent student, the VT secondary teacher who is overseeing the school placement, and the student. Regular meetings involving all three will take place throughout the semester. The exact meeting schedule will be determined on a case by case basis. Students will complete assignments that address the requirements of the VT Educator Portfolio. (EDST0115, EDST0225 and relevant courses in Psychology). By Approval only. Interested students must meet with the Director of Education Studies. (Fall 2018: J. Miller-Lane, T. Affolter, S. Hoffman; Spring 2019: J. Miller-Lane)
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Department of English & American Literatures

All students declaring an ENAM major, joint major, or minor beginning Fall 2015 will adopt the following requirements.  Students who declared their major prior to Fall 2015 may choose whether to adopt these requirements or to complete their study following the old requirements (see below).   

Requirements for the Major: Students majoring in English and American Literatures will take a total of 12 classes in the ENAM department (transfer credits from other institutions must be approved). Of these, three are required classes: 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0205; 3) ENAM 0700 or CRWR 0701* (Senior Thesis). Students will then choose nine electives from the available course offerings, making sure that these courses satisfy the following distribution requirements. A single course may fulfill more than one distribution requirement.

  • at least three will be devoted to literature (English, British, and/or American) before 1800, and only one of the three used to meet this requirement may be a Shakespeare course. These courses will bear the “(Pre-1800)” designation.
  • At least one will be a junior seminar. All 04XX courses in ENAM are junior seminars.
  • at least one will be devoted to American Literature before 1900.  These courses will bear the “(Pre-1900 AL)” designation.
  • at least one will expose students to cultural diversity in Literatures in English.  Such courses are centrally concerned with material and approaches attending to differences in race, ethnicity, class, gender, and/or sexuality. These courses will bear the departmental “(Diversity)” designation.

     These requirements are intended to offer students broad and historically grounded training in the discipline as well as a range of different pathways through the major.  Students should confer closely with their advisers concerning their choices of electives.
     With the exception of CRWR 0701, which fulfills the senior work requirement for the ENAM major, creative writing classes do not fulfill ENAM major requirements. LITS 0705, Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies, may be used to fulfill the Junior Seminar requirement in ENAM. Students should plan to complete a Junior Seminar prior to beginning a critical senior thesis project.
     *Students wishing to complete a CRWR 0701 senior thesis will first need to complete one introductory (0100-level) CRWR workshop and two advanced (0300-level) workshops prior to beginning the thesis.    
     Requirements for the Joint Major: A joint major in English and American Literatures requires a minimum of eight ENAM courses, including three required courses: 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0205; 3) *ENAM 0700 or CRWR 0701, a joint thesis project that integrates both parts of the major. In addition, students will choose at least five electives from the available offerings, making sure that these courses satisfy the following distribution requirements.  A single course may fulfill more than one distribution requirement:

  • At least one course will be devoted to literature (English, British, and/or American) before 1800. These courses will bear the “(Pre-1800)” designation.
  • At least one will be a junior seminar. All ENAM 04XX classes are junior seminars.
  • At least one will be devoted to American Literature before 1900. These courses will bear the “(Pre-1900 AL)” designation.
  • At least one will expose students to cultural diversity in Literatures in English.  Such courses are centrally concerned with material and approaches attending to differences in race, ethnicity, class, gender, and/or sexuality. These courses will bear the departmental “(Diversity)” designation.

*Students wishing to undertake a joint major in ENAM and Theatre should be advised that senior work will normally consist of two full-credit classes, ENAM 0708 and THEA 0708.  We strongly recommend that these classes be taken in the same semester, with the understanding that a central goal of the joint major is the thorough integration of both aspects of the joint major. A single-credit, single-semester joint project remains an option for those who wish to pursue a joint thesis that does not include a practical component such as acting or directing.

**Students wishing to undertake a joint major in ENAM and Film and Media Culture (FMMC) should follow the joint major requirements listed above. Such students may also wish to take FMMC electives such as FMMC 0257-Storytelling in Film and Media and FMMC 0279-Film in Literature. Students wishing to write a joint creative senior thesis must also take 3 CRWR workshops, and those wishing to write a screenplay for their joint thesis must take specifically FMMC/CRWR 106-Writing for the Screen, and FMMC/CRWR 341-Writing for the Screen II—prior to beginning the thesis. Such projects must be on topics approved by advisors in both departments.

***Students writing a joint thesis in HIST or HARC should register for HIST 700 and HIST 711 or HARC 710 and HARC 711, and attend the required thesis workshops in both departments.


     Requirements for the Minor: Students minoring in English and American Literatures will take a minimum of six courses, including ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101 and five electives, chosen carefully to satisfy the following distribution requirements.  A single course may fulfill more than one distribution requirement:

  • At least one course will be devoted to literature (English, British, and/or American) before 1800. These courses will bear the “(Pre-1800)” designation.
  • At least one will be a junior seminar.  All ENAM 04XX classes are junior seminars.
  • At least one will be devoted to American Literature before 1900.  These classes will bear the “(Pre-1900 AL)” designation.
  • At least one will expose students to cultural diversity in Literatures in English.  Such courses are centrally concerned with material and approaches attending to differences in race, ethnicity, class, gender, and/or sexuality. These courses will bear   the departmental “(Diversity)” designation.

 OLD Requirements

Requirements for the Major: Twelve courses are required of all students majoring in English and American Literatures. 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0201 or 0204; 3) ENAM 0205; 4-5) two courses concerning literature written prior to the year 1700 (Period I); 6-7) two courses concerning literature written between 1700 and 1910 (Period II), at least one of which must concern American Literature (AL); 8-10) three ENAM electives; 11) an ENAM Junior Seminar (4xx); and 12) a senior thesis. In addition, students wishing to write a creative senior thesis must complete three workshop courses (one at the 0100-level and two at the advanced level) prior to beginning the senior project. Creative writing workshops may NOT be used to fulfill other ENAM major requirements. LITS 0705, Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies can also be used to fulfill the Junior Seminar requirement in ENAM. Students should complete a Junior Seminar prior to beginning a critical senior thesis project.

     Joint Major: A joint major in English and American Literatures requires a minimum of seven ENAM courses, including the following: 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0201 or 0204; 3) one ENAM course concerning literature written prior to the year 1700 (Period I); 4) one ENAM course concerning literature written between 1700 and 1910 (Period II); 5) one ENAM elective; and 6) an ENAM junior seminar (4xx). Of 3-6 above, at least one course must concern American literature (AL). Joint majors must also design a senior thesis project that brings together aspects of the two majors. Joint majors must be approved by the chairs of both departments or programs involved.
     Students wishing to undertake a joint major in ENAM and Theatre should be advised that senior work will normally comprise two full-credit classes, ENAM 0708 and THEA 0708.  We strongly recommend that these classes be taken in the same semester, with the understanding that a central goal of the joint major is the thorough integration of both aspects of the joint major. A single-credit, single-semester joint project remains an option for those who wish to pursue a joint thesis that does not include a practical component such as acting or directing, and also for all students graduating in March 2015 or in May 2015, regardless of the kind of project, under the former requirements.

     Minor: A minor in English and American Literatures requires six courses: 1) ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; 2) ENAM 0201 or 0204; 3) Four ENAM courses, at least one of which must concern literature written prior to the year 1700 (Period I), and one must concern American literature (AL).

     Senior Program: The ENAM senior program consists of a required one-semester creative or critical thesis of 30-35 pages in length (ENAM 0700, CRWR 0701). CRWR 0701 requires the prior completion of one 0100-level CRWR workshop and two 0300-level CRWR workshops and a grade of at least B+ in both 0300-level courses before undertaking a thesis.  Students writing a critical thesis must enroll concurrently in the thesis workshop (ENAM 0710 or CRWR 0711). All students will participate in an oral defense of their work with the adviser and second reader of the project. Students are encouraged to complete their Junior Seminar requirement before embarking on their senior work.    
     
     Honors
: Departmental honors will be awarded to those students who achieve a departmental GPA of 3.85 and above. In determining the numerical average of course grades, all courses designated ENAM will be counted, as will all other courses that fulfill requirements for the major. Joint majors are eligible to receive honors. In determining joint honors, all courses that fulfill requirements for both majors will be counted.

     Courses for Non-Majors: The Department of English and American Literatures offers a wide variety of courses in literature that are open without prerequisite to all students in the college. These include most 0100 and 0200-level courses and some 0300-level courses. The ENAM 0103/CMLT 0101, 0201/0204 sequence is intended for declared or potential majors and minors. The 0100 level courses are recommended for students, primarily in their first or second years, with interests in comparative, thematic, and theoretical approaches to literature. They are especially suitable for meeting the colleges Literature (LIT) distribution requirement.

 

 

 

CRWR 0106 Writing for the Screen I (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem. ART (I. Uricaru)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0106 *

CRWR 0170 Writing: Poetry, Fiction, NonFiction (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

An introduction to the writing of poetry, short fiction, and nonfiction through analysis of writings by modern and contemporary poets and prose writers and regular discussion of student writing. Different instructors may choose to emphasize one literary form or another in a given semester. Workshops will focus on composition and revision, with particular attention to the basics of form and craft. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0380, CRWR 0385, CRWR 0370, and CRWR 0375. (This course is not a college writing course.) (Formerly ENAM 0170) 3 hrs. sem. ART (Fall 2018: R. Cohen, K. Kramer, S. Ulmer)

CRWR 0173 Environmental Literature: Reading & Writing Workshop (Fall 2018)

This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of environmental literature. We will analyze classic and contemporary model works in prose and poetry, in nonfiction and fiction, all directed at human interaction with the natural world. Our writing assignments will explore this theme in personal essays, poems, literary reportage, poetry, and fiction. Workshops will focus on inspiration, form, craft, and thematic issues associated with the environment. This course is a prerequisite to CRWR 0370, CRWR 0375, CRWR 0380, and CRWR 0385. ART, LIT (D. Bain)

CRWR 0175 The Structure of Poetry (Fall 2018)

This course is a workshop for beginning students in the field of creative writing. Students will read a selection of poems each week and write their own poems, producing a portfolio of their work at the end of the term. There will be an emphasis on revision. Students will be introduced to a range of forms as well, including prose poems, epistles, the tanka, the long poem, and the sonnet. ART (K. Gottshall)

CRWR 0218 Playwriting I: Beginning (Spring 2019)

The purpose of the course is to gain a theoretical and practical understanding of writing for the stage. Students will read, watch, and analyze published plays, as well as work by their peers, but the focus throughout will remain on the writing and development of original work. (Formerly THEA/ENAM 0218) ART, CW
Cross-listed as: THEA 0218 *

CRWR 0334 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (Fall 2018)

The reading and online writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives for a new online magazine on American popular culture. This magazine will have been created by students in Writing on Contemporary Issues. Narratives about self and society will therefore lean towards aspects of American popular culture. 3 hrs sem. AMR, CW, LIT, NOR, SOC (H. Vila)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0334 *

CRWR 0341 Writing for the Screen II (Spring 2019)

Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen. ART
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0341 *

CRWR 0360 Fiction in Practice and Theory (Fall 2018)

This literature/writing course will emphasize the practice and theory of formal elements in fiction. It will be a craft-level investigation of both traditional fictional forms (including epistolary, monologue, and collage) and texts conscious of themselves as texts. Readings will include examples of traditional forms as well as experimental works by literary groups such as OULIPO, the surrealists, minimalists, post-modernists, and hypertextualists. This course may replace one of the 0300-level requirements for students doing a Creative Writing concentration, but is open to all. ART (K. Kramer)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0360

CRWR 0363 Science Writing for the Public (Fall 2018)

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers and for online publication. Students will publish in our online magazine (constructed Spring 2017). In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. Students will also learn to manipulate images and how to use digital storytelling. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert; we will also read from The Best Science and Nature Writing (Amy Stewart, ed, 2016). 3 hrs. Sem. AMR, CW, LIT, NOR (H. Vila)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0363 *

CRWR 0370 Workshop: Fiction (Spring 2019)

Study and practice in techniques of fiction writing through workshops and readings in short fiction and novels. Class discussions will be based on student manuscripts and published model works. Emphasis will be placed on composition and revision. (ENAM/CRWR 0170, ENAM/CRWR 0175, or ENAM/CRWR 0185) (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms or at the Department office) (Formerly ENAM 0370) (This course is not a college writing course) 3 hrs. sem. ART

CRWR 0375 Advanced Poetry Workshop: The Walk of a Poem (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

As Lyn Hejinian writes, “Language makes tracks.” Poets from Chaucer to Whitman to O’Hara have used walking as a poetic method, thematic subject, narrative device, and pedestrian act. The walk is literal and imaginary, metrical and meandering; it traverses urban grids and bucolic landscapes, junctions of space, time, and lexis. In this workshop we will read the topographies of poems, focusing on lyrical cities from Paris to Harlem, Thoreauvian ambles through woods and field, and other literary wanderings and linguistic itinerancies, in order to examine how language gets made and mirrored in the act of moving through place. Students will also set out on walks through the local landscape as they produce their own work. Students will address crucial questions and challenges focused on the craft of poetry through rigorous readings, in-class writing exercises, critical discussions, collaborations, and the development of a portfolio of writing, including drafts and revisions. By the end of the course, students will have engaged deeply with the practice of poetry, established a writing discipline, honed their skills, generated new work, explored by foot, and extended their sense of the possibilities of a poem. (Approval required; please apply online at http://www.middlebury.edu/academics/enam/resources/forms ) ART (Fall 2018: J. Parini)

CRWR 0560 Special Project: Creative Writing (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Approval Required. (Fall 2018: D. Evans, D. Price, C. Shaw, J. Berg, J. Bertolini, D. Brayton, K. Kramer, M. Newbury, E. Napier, T. Billings, A. Baldridge, J. Parini, Y. Siddiqi, M. Bertolini, C. Cooper, R. Cohen, M. Wells, C. Wright, K. Gottshall, A. Losano, D. Bain, B. Graves, B. Millier, W. Nash; Spring 2019: D. Evans, D. Price, K. Kramer, J. Berg, J. Bertolini, D. Brayton, M. Newbury, E. Napier, B. Graves, A. Baldridge, J. Parini, Y. Siddiqi, M. Bertolini, W. Nash, R. Cohen, M. Wells, C. Wright, C. Cooper, K. Gottshall, A. Losano, T. Billings, D. Bain, B. Millier, P. Lourie)

CRWR 0701 Senior Thesis: Creative Writing (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Discussions, workshops, tutorials for those undertaking one-term projects in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction.

ENAM 0103 Reading Literature (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Fall 2018

Section A
Reading Literature: Poetry, Drama, Fiction
This course will help students develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussions of and writing about three literary genres: poetry, drama, and fiction. The goal of the course is the development of a literary-critical sensibility vital to further coursework in the major. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
CW, LIT (E. Napier)
Section B
Reading Literature: Transforming Identities
This course is designed to develop techniques for reading and writing effectively and sensitively about literary works. We will read works across temporal, generic, and national boundaries, exploring the different critical methods of interpretation available to us. The course’s organizing theme is the representation of identity(transgressive, mysterious, transforming, etc.) in literary works, and readings will be structured to allow us simultaneously to develop—and interweave--both the thematic and critical axes of our reading practices. Both aspects of the course will culminate in a reading of James Joyce's The Dead in the context of several different--and sometimes contradictory--critical approaches. From this vantage point at the end of the course we will be able to survey the different historical, cultural, and linguistic methods of interpreting literature. Texts may also include: The Shorter Norton Anthology of Poetry, David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus. 3 hrs. lect./disc
CW, LIT (M. Wells)

Spring 2019

Section A
Reading Literature
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. At the instructor's discretion, the texts employed in this class may share a particular thematic concern or historical kinship. 3 hrs. lect./disc
CW, LIT
Section B
Reading Literature: The Art of Cultural Appropriation
This course will be an introduction to literature in English from a variety of genres, eras, and perspectives, with a focus on how writers retell old tales and reshape cultural formations. The goal of the course is for students to gain fluency in formal, historical, ideological, and linguistic methods of literary inquiry by reading and discussing a sampling of plays, poems, stories, and novels. Doing so will sharpen our intellectual tools so we can become better readers, writers, and thinkers. Texts will include the Beowulf; Grendel, by John Gardner; The God of Small Things, by Arundhati Roy; The Bloody Chamber, by Angela Carter; The Winter’s Tale, by William Shakespeare; Wit, by Margaret Edson; and an assortment of poems by various authors. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
CW, LIT
Section C
Reading Literature: Literature by Women
This course seeks to develop skills for the close reading of literature through discussion of and writing about selected poems, plays, and short stories. A basic vocabulary of literary terms and an introductory palette of critical methods will also be covered, and the course's ultimate goal will be to enable students to attain the literary-critical sensibility vital to further course work in the major. This particular section places emphasis on women’s writing and the representation of gender and sexuality. 3 hrs. lect./disc.
CW, LIT

ENAM 0123 Adventures in Literary Romance (Pre-1800) (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the literary genre of romance. Today, “romance” often refers to courtship—only one aspect of this ancient genre. Other aspects include adventure, magic, wonder, multiple plots, multiple authors, an affinity for sequels. Romance’s associations with every genre—tragedy, comedy, epic, novel, lyric poetry—and its reputation for escapism have made it an epitome of the very idea of literature, as conceived by attackers and defenders. Its welcoming of female readers and protagonists and its marketing of the exotic have raised issues of gender and ethnicity. We will discuss all such aspects and implications of romance, and we may also explore how romance has shaped modern television and film. No papers or exams; there will be quizzes daily on the reading, and students will be expected to participate thoughtfully in class discussions. Readings from texts such as: Daphnis and Chloe, Ethiopian Romance, The Gospel of Luke, The Golden Ass, Arthurian romances by various authors, Orlando Inamorato, Orlando Furioso, The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia, The Merchant of Venice, The Winter’s Tale, Don Quixote,/ Waverly/, Madame Bovary, Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Time Quintet. 3 hrs. lect. LIT (J. Berg)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0123

ENAM 0180 An Introduction to Biblical Literature (Fall 2018)

This course is a general introduction to biblical history, literature, and interpretation. It aims to acquaint students with the major characters, narratives, and poetry of the Jewish and Christian scriptures, with special emphasis on the ways scripture has been used and interpreted in Western culture. Students interested in more detailed analysis of the material should enroll in RELI 0280 and RELI 0281. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. LIT, PHL (O. Yarbrough)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0180 *

ENAM 0201 British Literature and Culture: The Court and the Wild (I) (Pre-1800) (Fall 2018)

This course will offer a broad overview of the rich and varied British literature written roughly between 1400 and 1700. Reading a diverse body of material (romance, epic, lyric), we will explore competing notions of subjectivity within the courtly context. As we interrogate the relationship between the court and the social/mythical concept of “wilderness,” we will consider ways in which the apparent opposition between the refined courtier/knight and the “wild man” often belies a complex mutual dependence. Within this context we will also examine the ways in which notions of sexuality and gender contribute to polarized readings of female conduct as “chaste” or “wild.” Texts may include: Beowulf, Gawain and the Green Knight, Lais of Marie de France, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, and Shakespeare’s As You Like It. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (M. Wells)

ENAM 0204 Foundations of English Literature (I) (Pre-1800) (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students will study Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as other foundational works of English literature that may include Shakespeare, non-Shakespearean Elizabethan drama, the poetry of Donne, and other 16th- and 17th-century poetry. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT (Fall 2018: E. Napier)

ENAM 0205 Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will introduce several major schools of contemporary literary theory. By reading theoretical texts in close conjunction with works of literature, we will illuminate the ways in which these theoretical stances can produce multiple interpretations of a given literary work. The approaches covered may include New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Marxism and Cultural Criticism, Race Theory and Multicultural Criticism, Feminism, Post-Colonial Criticism, Queer Studies, Eco-Criticism, Post-Structuralism, and others. These theories will be applied to various works of fiction, poetry, and drama. The goal will be to make students critically aware of the fundamental literary, cultural, political, and moral assumptions underlying every act of interpretation they perform. 3 hrs. lect/disc. EUR, LIT (Fall 2018: A. Baldridge)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0205

ENAM 0206 Nineteenth-Century American Literature (II, AL) (Pre-1900 AL) (Spring 2019)

This course will examine major developments in the literary world of 19th century America. Specific topics to be addressed might include the transition from Romanticism to Regionalism and Realism, the origins and evolution of the novel in the United States, and the tensions arising from the emergence of a commercial marketplace for literature. Attention will also be paid to the rise of women as literary professionals in America and the persistent problematizing of race and slavery. Among others, authors may include J. F. Cooper, Emerson, Melville, Douglass, Chopin, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Wharton, and James. . 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR
Cross-listed as: AMST 0206

ENAM 0208 English Literary Landscapes, 1700-1900 (II) (Pre-1800) (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine literary and related works that take as their focus the natural world and man's relationship to it. We will consider transformations of taste in representations of landscape in England in the 18th and 19th centuries. Works to be discussed will include poems, gardening tracts, philosophical treatises, notebooks, letters, travel accounts, natural histories, and novels. Pope, Crabbe, Wordsworth, Tennyson, Clare, Hopkins, and Hardy will be central figures in this course. EUR, LIT

ENAM 0209 American Literature and Culture: Origins-1830 (II, AL) (Pre-1900 AL) (Fall 2018)

A study of literary and other cultural forms in early America, including gravestones, architecture, furniture and visual art. We will consider how writing and these other forms gave life to ideas about religion, diversity, civic obligation and individual rights that dominated not only colonial life but that continue to influence notions of "Americanness" into the present day. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, LIT, NOR (D. Evans)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0209 *

ENAM 0236 Contemporary American Playwrights (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore through discussion and in-class dramatic presentations the plays of a selection of contemporary American writers since 1974. Students will give one oral presentation and submit a concluding essay. Authors read will include Sam Shepard, August Wilson, John Patrick Shanley, Marsha Norman, Tracey Letts, Miguel Pinero, and Ntozake Shange. (Formerly THEA/AMLT 0216) 3 hrs. lect. (Dramatic Literature)/ AMR, ART, LIT, NOR (R. Romagnoli)
Cross-listed as: THEA 0236 *

ENAM 0241 Nineteenth Century British Literature (II) (Spring 2019)

The 19th century is the era of “peak novel,” for never before or since has the genre exhibited such confidence in its ability to tell the truth about both the teeming world and the private life. But far from merely reflecting social reality, the novelists and poets of the period played an active part in constructing their readers' ideas about gender and sexuality, imperialism and colonialism, class, religion, and technology, insisting that literature be relevant and revelatory in a time of swift and sometimes frightening cultural and intellectual innovation. Works to be covered will include novels by Emily Bronte, Dickens, George Eliot, and Hardy, and the poetry of Tennyson, Browning, and Christina Rossetti. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT

ENAM 0244 Twentieth-Century English Novel (Spring 2019)

This course will explore the development of the novel in this century, with a primary focus on writers of the modernist period and later attention to more contemporary works. We will examine questions of formal experimentation, the development of character, uses of the narrator, and the problem of history, both personal and political, in a novelistic context. Readings will include novels by Conrad, Joyce, Forster, Woolf, and others. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT

ENAM 0248 Human Rights and World Literature (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the idiom of human rights in law, literature, and political culture. We will place literary representations of human rights violations (genocide, torture, detention and forced labor, environmental devastation, police violence) in dialogue with official human rights treaties and declarations in order to historicize and critique the assumptions of human rights discourse. Who qualifies as a “human” deserving of humanitarian intervention? How do human rights rehearse a colonial dynamic based on racial and geo-political privilege? To answer these questions we will turn to some of the most controversial voices in global fiction and poetry. 3 hrs. lect. (not open to students who have taken ENAM 0230)
(Diversity)/
CMP, LIT, SOC (B. Graves)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0248

ENAM 0253 Science Fiction (Fall 2018)

Time travel, aliens, androids, robots, corporate and political domination, reimaginings of race, gender, sexuality and the human body--these concerns have dominated science fiction over the last 150 years. But for all of its interest in the future, science fiction tends to focus on technologies and social problems relevant to the period in which it is written. In this course, we'll work to understand both the way that authors imagine technology's role in society and how those imaginings create meanings for science and its objects of study and transformation. Some likely reading and films include Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, H. G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Ridley Scott, Blade Runner, and works by William Gibson, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler and other contemporary writers. (Students who have taken FYSE 1162 are not eligible to register for this course). 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT (M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0253 *

ENAM 0254 American Women Poets (Spring 2019)

We will examine the rich tradition of lyric poetry by women in the U.S. Beginning with the Puritan Anne Bradstreet, one of the New World's earliest published poets, we continue to the 19th century and Emily Dickinson, along with the formidable line of "poetesses" who dominated the popular poetry press in that era. We examine the female contribution to the Modernist aesthetic in figures like Millay, Moore, H.D. and Gertrude Stein; the transformation of modernist ideals by Bishop, Plath, Sexton, and Rich; and, among the postmodernists, Lyn Hejinian and Susan Howe. 3 hrs. lect. (National/Transnational Feminisms) AMR, LIT, NOR
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0254

ENAM 0263 American Psycho: Disease, Doctors, and Discontents (II) (AL) (Pre-1900 AL) (Spring 2019)

What constitutes a pathological response to the pressures of modernity? How do pathological protagonists drive readers toward the precariousness of their own physical and mental health? The readings for this class center on the provisional nature of sanity and the challenges to bodily health in a world of modern commerce, media, and medical diagnoses. We will begin with 19th century texts and their engagement with seemingly "diseased" responses to urbanization, new forms of work, and new structures of the family and end with contemporary fictional psychopaths engaged in attacks on the world of images we inhabit in the present. Nineteenth century texts will likely include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Later 20th-century works will likely include Ken Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Thomas Harris, The Silence of the Lambs, Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted, and Bret Easton Ellis, American Psycho. AMR, LIT, NOR
Cross-listed as: AMST 0263

ENAM 0270 Postcolonial Literature from South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean (Fall 2018)

In the last decades, writers from postcolonial South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean have come into their own, winning international prizes and garnering attention because of the literary quality of their work as well as their nuanced engagement with important issues of our age--issues such as imperialism, orientalism, colonial rule, political resistance, subaltern studies, nationalism, economic development, gender and sexuality, immigration, diaspora, and globalization. We will discuss a range of works by writers such as Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, J. M. Coetzee, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Assia Djebar, Frantz Fanon, Hanif Kureishi, Nadine Gordimer, C.L.R. James, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, Rohinton Mistry, Arundhati Roy, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said, Zadie Smith, and Wole Soyinka. Texts will vary from semester to semester. 3 hrs. lect/disc. (Diversity)/ AAL, CMP, LIT, SOA (Y. Siddiqi)

ENAM 0281 Film and Literature (Spring 2019)

The most common approach to the study of film and literature focuses on cinematic adaptations of literary works, but in this course we will broaden that tack, expanding to more of a comparative approach and considering topics relevant to both forms. We will explore how the cinema developed a formal language equivalent to the novel, as well as how fiction writing has been influenced by film. We will also consider how cinema's position as the equivalent of the novel has been usurped by television. Films screened will include A Day in the Country; Le Plaisir; Blow-Up; the recent BBC series Sherlock; and others. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101) (Formerly FMMC 0276 & FMMC 0279) ART, EUR, LIT
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0281

ENAM 0303 William Shakespeare, Nature Poet (Pre-1800) (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the works of William Shakespeare through an ecocritical lens, paying particular attention to the representation of the natural world in a sampling of the plays and poems. Topics will include the European culture of early modern natural history and natural philosophy, the boundary between humans and beasts, the transformative power of the forest, the alterity of the sea, the dialectic of pastoral and georgic, the malleability of gender, and the complexity of sexual identities. Readings will include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Macbeth, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, and several of the sonnets and narrative poems. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (D. Brayton)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0303

ENAM 0304 The Graphic Novel (Spring 2019)

In this course we will study some of the most widely respected graphic novels produced in the last thirty years. Our purpose will be to understand how the form works and is structured by its dual, but sometimes competing, interests in the verbal and the visual, and to think about distinct styles of illustration. We will also think about how landmark examples have shaped the form. Working with software designed for the purpose, students will use photographs to produce short comics of their own. Possible texts include: Alan Moore, Watchmen; Art Spiegelman, Maus; Chris Ware, Jimmy Corrigan; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, LIT, NOR
Cross-listed as: AMST 0304 *

ENAM 0312 Modern Poetry (Spring 2019)

This course will examine the nature and achievement of the major modern poets of Britain and America during the modern period, beginning with the origins of poetic modernism in the work of Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman. The central figures to be studied are William Butler Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, and W.H. Auden. The course will conclude with a look at some after-echoes of modernism in the work of Elizabeth Bishop and others. Two papers, one exam, with occasional oral presentations in class 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT

ENAM 0316 Poetry and the Spiritual Tradition (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine the long and intimate connection between poetry and spirituality, looking especially at the influence of Christian thinking on such English and American poets as John Donne, George Herbert, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and T.S. Eliot. The course will begin with a study of the King James Version of the Book of Psalms, which deeply affected later British and American poetry. We will also read early Taoist and Islamic poets, including Lao Tse and Rumi. The course will conclude with a look at the work of several contemporary poets: Charles Wright, Louis Glück, and Mary Oliver. CMP, LIT, PHL (J. Parini)

ENAM 0331 Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances (I) (Pre-1800) (Spring 2019)

In this course we will appreciate and closely analyze the development of Shakespeare’s comic vision which distinguishes itself from the tragic vision by insisting that the most important thing about human beings is not that we die but that we fall in love, marry, and have children. We will move from the early Comedies, The Comedy of Errors, The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and The Merchant of Venice, through the major comedies, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, and Much Ado About Nothing, (and a Problem Play, Measure for Measure) to the final Romances, Pericles, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, where Shakespeare searches for a way to reconcile the tragic and the comic visions by asking how life can be understandable when it presents us both with the joy of new birth and with the pain of loss and death. EUR, LIT

ENAM 0360 Fiction in Practice and Theory (Fall 2018)

This literature/writing course will emphasize the practice and theory of formal elements in fiction. It will be a craft-level investigation of both traditional fictional forms (including epistolary, monologue, and collage) and texts conscious of themselves as texts. Readings will include examples of traditional forms as well as experimental works by literary groups such as OULIPO, the surrealists, minimalists, post-modernists, and hypertextualists. This course may replace one of the 0300-level requirements for students doing a Creative Writing concentration, but is open to all. ART (K. Kramer)
Cross-listed as: CRWR 0360 *

ENAM 0373 The Novel and the City (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine a number of novels from the 20th and 21st centuries that are about life in the city, taking a global and trans-national approach. We will explore formations of urban life alongside transformations in the novel as a genre. We will put these novels of city life in dialogue with critical theory—that is, theories of culture and society that have as their aim human emancipation (for example, Marxism, feminism, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies). The novels we read will reflect important literary movements such as realism, modernism, and postmodernism. (Not open to students who have taken ENAM 0447) (Diversity)/ CMP, CW (5 seats), LIT, SOC
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0373

ENAM 0417 Pulling Reality’s Hair: Truth and Other Fictions (Fall 2018)

We will, in this seminar, occupy ourselves with works that straddle or blur or occasionally just flat out ignore the aesthetic divide between fiction and non-fiction, in the hopes of getting a better grip on the relation between self and other, word and world, narrative strategy and fidelity to truths both large and small. Hence readings will include biographical and autobiographical novels, novelistic treatments of biography and autobiography, and a number of hybrid composites that cannot be classified, though we will surely try. Readings will include Nabokov, Proust, Henry Adams, J.M. Coetzee, W.G. Sebald, Lydia Davis, Joan Didion, Gregoire Bouillier, Art Spiegelman, and Spalding Gray. In addition we will view films by Ross McElwee, Andre Gregory, and Charlie Kaufman. This course is not open to students who have taken ENAM 0307. (3 hrs. sem.) (R. Cohen)

ENAM 0443 Writing in Blood: Literature’s Body (Spring 2019)

To what extent is our condition defined and our destiny determined by the physical bodies that envelop us? In this course we will accompany novelists, playwrights, and poets as they investigate the ecstasies, agonies, ambiguities, and transformations that flesh imposes upon our daily lives. Simultaneously, we will consider their various attempts to transcend our bodily limitations, whether by means of religion, imagination, sexuality, or pharmaceuticals. Along the way, we will collaborate with our writers as they scrutinize the human form as a biological fact, social segregator, philosophical conundrum, and undiscovered country. Authors will include Mary Shelley, Dickinson, Kafka, Beckett, Silko, and Coetzee. 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LIT

ENAM 0450 Faulkner and His Influence (AL) (Fall 2018)

William Faulkner was extreme: the most radical formal innovator among the American Modernist novelists and an outrageous (and subtle) thinker about the complex social and racial history of the American south. In this course we will read Faulkner’s major works (As I Lay Dying; The Sound and the Fury; Light in August; Absalom, Absalom!; and Go Down, Moses) and works by Flannery O'Connor, Charles Johnson, and others influenced by Faulkner's style and vision. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, LIT, NOR (B. Millier)

ENAM 0461 Animals, In Theory (Spring 2019)

Animals, wrote anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss, are “good to think with.” In this course we will explore the various ways humans have “thought” with and through animals. We will explore a range of issues including the intersection of animals and race/gender; the fragile line humans continually draw between ourselves and animals; the ethics of our use and treatment of animals; and the metaphorical role animals play in our literary, spiritual, and cultural traditions. We will read a wide variety of fiction, poetry, sociology, cultural theory, history, and philosophy from multiple historical periods. (not open to students who have taken ENAM 0108 or FYSE 1517) 3 hrs. sem. LIT

ENAM 0500 Special Project: Literature (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Approval Required.

ENAM 0700 Senior Thesis: Critical Writing (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Individual guidance and seminar (discussions, workshops, tutorials) for those undertaking one-term projects in literary criticism or analysis. All critical thesis writers also take the Senior Thesis Workshop (ENAM 700Z) in either Fall or Spring Term.

ENAM 0705 Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies (Fall 2018)

Although it is required of all Literary Studies senior majors, this course is intended for students working in any discipline who seek a close encounter with some of the greatest achievements of the literary imagination. In addition to being understood as distinctive artistic and philosophical accomplishments, the six major works which constitute the reading list will also be seen as engaged in a vital, overarching cultural conversation across temporal and geographical boundaries that might otherwise seem insurmountable. The texts for this semester are: Homer, The Odyssey; Gogol, Dead Souls; Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishmen/t; Kafka, /The Trial; Pirandello, Six Characters in Search of an Author and Henry IV/; Borges, Ficciones. (Open to non-majors with the approval of the instructor.) 3 hrs., seminar. (M. Katz)
Cross-listed as: LITS 0705 *

ENAM 0708 Senior Work: Joint Majors in English & American Literatures and Theatre (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Approval required.
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Program in Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies Requirements

Students matriculating Fall 2018 or later must follow these requirements. Students matriculated prior to Fall 2018 have the option to follow these requirement or the [previous requirements].

Minor in Environmental Studies: The minor in environmental studies consists of five courses: three environmental studies core courses to be completed by the end of the sixth semester: ENVS 0112; ENVS or ENVS/PSCI 0211; and ENVS or ENVS/ENAM 0215; one course selected from among: ART 0309, DANC 0277, ECON 0265, ENAM 0227, ENVS 0209, ENVS 0210, ENVS 0385, ENVS 0395, GEOG 0207, HARC 0231, HIST 0222, PHIL 0356, PSCI 0214, PSYC 0233/0333, or SOAN 0211; and one course from among: BIOL 0140, CHEM 0270, ENVS/GEOG 150, GEOL 0112, GEOL 0161, or GEOL 0323. Except for transfer students, the environmental studies core courses must be taken at Middlebury College. With the approval of the Environmental Studies program director, a maximum of one course taken off campus may be credited toward completion of other (e.g., non-core course) minor requirements.

Joint Majors: Environmental studies majors who focus in architecture, biology, chemistry, geology, geography, or sociology/anthropology automatically qualify as joint majors. Students may pursue a joint major between environmental studies and other majors. The other major usually overlaps the student's focus and represents additional coursework in the focus. Students interested in completing such a “non-automatic” joint major should consult with the chair of their focus department about joint majors. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the environmental studies major, there is no reduction in course requirements for the environmental studies component of a joint major.

Major in Environmental Studies: The environmental studies major is composed of course work in four areas: four environmental studies core courses; 7-8 courses in a focus area; two environmental cognate courses; and an integrative capstone experience. Except for transfer students, the core courses and capstone experience must be Middlebury College courses, which for the purposes of the Environmental Studies major are defined as those offered by the undergraduate college during fall, winter, spring, and summer terms. The student's advisor must approve any non-Middlebury College courses within the focus area; the ES Director must approve any non-Middlebury College courses within the rest of the major. A maximum of three non-Middlebury College courses may be credited toward completion of the major.

I. Core Course Requirements
All majors are required to complete four core courses: ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and either ENVS/GEOG 0120 (recommended for students focusing in the social sciences, humanities or arts) or ENVS/GEOG 0150 (recommended for students focusing in the natural sciences).

ENVS 0112 should be completed by the end of the sophomore year; all core courses must be completed by the end of the junior year. Only those students who have completed the core courses are eligible to enroll in advanced integrative work.

II. Focus Course Requirements
Majors must complete the 7-8 course requirements for one of 16 established foci. Foci fall into one of four academic divisions: arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. These divisions govern which cognate courses a student may take. Courses taken within the focus that are not specified must be approved by the student's advisor. As indicated, some foci automatically qualify the student for joint major status.

 Arts Foci

Environmental Dance: ARDV 0116; DANC 0160; DANC 260; DANC 0277 or       
DANC 1025; DANC 0284; DANC 0376; DANC 0700.

Environmental Studies-Architecture joint major: HARC 0100; HARC 0130; HARC 0230; HARC 0231 (prerequisite for HARC 0731); HARC 0330 (or approved substitute); one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; HARC 0731 and HARC 0732, to be taken sequentially. Note: This joint major does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Students wishing to pursue graduate study in architecture are advised to take additional science and math courses and should consult with their advisor.

Environmental Studio Art: One 100- or 200-level drawing course; HARC 0327 (strongly suggested) or other approved substitute in the history of art-practice; ART 0309; four electives in studio art, three of which must be at the 300-level; ART 0700.

Environmental Theatre: ARDV 0116 or THEA 0101; THEA 0102; THEA 0208; DANC 0277; THEA 0235 or a THEA literature course chosen in consultation with advisor; two THEA electives of which only one may be a Production Studio course; and completing a crew requirement. The crew requirement must be completed by the end of the 5th term and will normally be satisfied by undertaking a running crew assignment on a for-credit production; the requirement may also be fulfilled by stage managing a faculty show, or by completing THEA 0119 or THEA 0129.

Humanities Foci

Environmental History: HIST 0222; three 100-300-level HIST courses; one 400-level HIST course or equivalent approved by adviser; HIST 0600 or equivalent approved by adviser; one additional course from the ENVS humanities cognate list or an approved substitute.

Environmental Literature: ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; ENAM 0205; three approved environmental literature courses (see full list) of which one must be at the 100-200 level, one must be at the 300-400 level, and one must carry ENAM’s diversity (DIV) tag; two terms of senior independent work, typically two terms of ENAM 0700 or, upon approval, a senior thesis, typically ENAM 0700/ENVS 0701.

Environmental Writing: ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101; CRWR 0170 or CRWR 0175; two approved environmental literature courses (see full list) of which one must be at the 100-200 level and one must be at the 300-400 level; two 300-level writing workshops; one term of senior independent writing, typically ENAM 0701.

Religion, Philosophy, and the Environment: RELI 0295; ENVS 0395 or PHIL 0356; at least one introductory level course from among RELI 0110, RELI 0120, RELI 0190, PHIL 0150, or any additional 0100 or 0200-level RELI or PHIL course with approval of the advisor; an additional four courses from among PHIL 0205, PHIL 0206, GEOG 0207, and any 0300-0400-level course in PHIL or RELI with approval of the advisor; at least one term of independent study related to the focus, typically ENVS 0500 or ENVS 0700.

Natural Science Foci

Conservation Biology (Environmental Studies-Biology joint major): BIOL 0140; BIOL 0145; BIOL 0392; two field methods courses chosen from BIOL 0302, BIOL 0304, and BIOL 0323; one organismal course chosen from among BIOL 0201, BIOL 0202, BIOL 0203, BIOL 0302, and BIOL 0310; and two BIOL electives chosen from the 0200-0700 level (only one of which can be BIOL 0500 or higher). Notes: BIOL 0302 may count toward the field methods or the organismal requirement but not towards both; Winter Term courses offered through the Biology Department can be used to satisfy one of the elective courses; BIOL 0211 is a prerequisite for independent study in Biology (BIOL 0500 and higher). ENVS 0401 or, if approved, an integrative senior thesis, satisfies the required joint work for ENVS-BIOL joint majors.

Environmental Studies-Chemistry joint major: CHEM 0103; CHEM 0104 or 0107; CHEM 0203, CHEM 0204; CHEM 0270; CHEM 0311; and at least one term of senior independent study focusing on chemistry and the environment, typically CHEM 0700 (one-term senior project) or CHEM 0400/0700/0701 (multi-term senior thesis). Students wishing to pursue graduate study in chemistry are advised to take additional science and math courses and should consult with their advisor.

Environmental Studies-Geology joint major: One introductory course chosen from among: GEOL 0112 (preferred), GEOL 0161, and GEOL 0170; one course from among GEOL/GEOG 0251, GEOL/GEOG 0255, and GEOL/GEOG 0257; one course from among GEOL 0201, GEOL 0211, and GEOL 0281; three electives, two of which must be at the GEOL 0300-level; and two-term senior thesis focusing on geology and the environment: GEOL 0400/0700. Students wishing to pursue graduate study in geology are advised to take additional science and math courses and should consult with their advisor.

Social Science Foci

Conservation Psychology: PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201; PSYC 0202; PSYC 0233/0333; PSYC 0416; two additional courses to be determined in consultation with the student's advisor.

Environmental Economics: MATH 0121 or MATH 0122; ECON 0155; ECON 0210; ECON 0211, ECON 0255; ECON 0265; ECON 0465; one course from among ECON 0228, ECON 0275, ECON 0425, ECON 0428, and ECON 0466.

Environmental Policy: ECON 0155; ECON 0265; ECON 0210 or MATH 0116 or PSYC 0201; PSCI 0214 or ENVS 0385; PSCI 0421 or PSCI 0452; two courses from among ENVS 0209, GEOG 0207, and any PSCI courses at the 0200-0300 level.

Environmental Studies-Geography joint major: GEOG 0100; four elective courses at the 0200- or 0300-level, at least one of which must be at the 0200 and one at the 0300 level; and one 0400-level seminar. The electives and seminar must be selected in consultation with, and approved by, the student’s Geography advisor. ENVS 0401 or, if approved, an integrative senior thesis, satisfies the required joint work for ENVS-GEOG joint majors.

Environmental Studies-Sociology/Anthropology joint major. Through selection of courses, including electives, students may focus in combined Sociology/Anthropology or may specialize in ES-Sociology or ES-Anthropology. SOAN 0103 or SOAN 0105; SOAN 0211; SOAN 0301 or SOAN 0302; SOAN 0305 or SOAN 0306; SOAN 0700 or SOAN 0710; and three electives related to the topic of human ecology to be selected from the Sociology/Anthropology curriculum or ENVS 0210 in consultation with the student’s advisor. No more than one elective may be taken outside of the regular fall and spring semesters at Middlebury (e.g., as a winter term course or transfer credit). Students wishing to focus in combined Sociology/Anthropology should take both introductory courses (SOAN 0103 and SOAN 0105), with the second introductory course replacing one of the required electives. Any departures from this program must be approved by the SOAN department chair.

Other Environmental Perspectives
For students interested in studying the environment from perspectives for which there is not an established focus (e.g., international environmental studies, food studies, environmental justice), we recommend that students select the established focus that most closely meets their goals, select cognates that complement these goals, and, when possible, select topics on course assignments and projects that complement their goals and interests. Students are also encouraged to consider the possibility for intersecting study abroad opportunities with their goals and interests. Finally, students might consider completing a minor in environmental studies alongside a major of their choice. Students are encouraged to meet with the ES Director or with faculty advisors who advise for foci related to their interests to discuss their options.

III. Cognate Course Requirements
Two cognate courses must be selected from the approved list of cognates, subject to the following:

  • cognates must represent an academic division outside the division of the student’s chosen focus (see academic division for each focus above (section II));
  • for students focusing outside the natural sciences, at least one cognate must be an approved natural science cognate with a laboratory;
  • one cognate may be integrative (representing two or more academic divisions).

Because integrative courses represent more than one academic division, they inherently represent an academic division outside the division of the student’s focus; therefore, all integrative courses can be counted by all majors toward completion of the cognate requirement, subject to the rules above. Not all approved cognates are offered each semester. Please check with relevant departments regarding course offerings.

IV. Advanced Integrative Capstone Requirement
After completing the required core courses, majors must complete one of two options for an advanced integrative capstone experience: either the community-engaged environmental studies practicum (ENVS 0401, open to juniors and seniors) or, with program consultation and approval, a multi-term integrative senior thesis (typically ENVS 0700/0703).

Senior Work in Environmental Studies
ENVS does not universally require senior independent work; however, some foci within ENVS do. With program consultation and approval, required senior work in a focus may be expanded to meet the criteria for a multi-term integrative senior thesis, thereby simultaneously fulfilling the senior work requirement in the focus and the advanced integrative capstone requirement. In other cases, majors must complete the required senior independent work in the focus and, in addition, complete ENVS 0401 as their required advanced integrative capstone experience.

Majors who are not required to complete independent senior work in their focus may, in consultation and approval of an advisor, apply to complete (optional) senior independent work in ENVS. Senior work in ENVS may be carried out as a one-term senior project (ENVS 0700); as a multi-term senior thesis (ENVS 0700/0701); or as a multi-term integrative senior thesis (ENVS 0700/703). Whereas a multi-term integrative senior thesis satisfies the advanced integrative capstone requirement of the major, other types of senior work do not.

All senior independent work carried out in ENVS or toward honors eligibility (i.e., carried out in a focus department) in Environmental Studies must be on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and environment; be supervised by at least one faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the environmental studies program; and must be presented publicly. In consultation with the thesis committee, students may present as part of the Spring Research Symposium or as a separate event arranged with the committee and ES Program.

To qualify as an integrative senior thesis, the multi-term work must also meaningfully and substantially integrate perspectives, lenses, or methodologies from the academic division of the student’s focus and typically at least one other division; and be supervised by at least two faculty advisors typically from different academic divisions, at least one of whom is appointed in or affiliated with the environmental studies program.

For additional important details regarding the integrative capstone requirement and/or senior work options, please visit the senior work page.

Environmental Studies Program Honors
Program honors will be awarded to majors who complete a multi-term senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment and meet the following requirements: the thesis must be supervised by a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the environmental studies program; the work must be presented publicly, orally defended before their committee, and be of superior quality (B+ or higher); the student must achieve an average GPA of B+ or higher in courses taken toward completion of the major. Courses counting toward the GPA in the major include core courses, courses taken in fulfillment of focus with the exception of senior thesis courses (i.e., 700-level courses are excluded), cognates, and ENVS 0401 (if taken). If extra cognates or courses within the focus were taken, those with the highest grades will be applied toward completion of the major and toward the GPA calculation for honors eligibility.

ENVS 0112 Natural Science and the Environment (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

We will explore in detail a series of current environmental issues in order to learn how principles of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as interdisciplinary scientific approaches, help us to identify and understand challenges to environmental sustainability. In lecture, we will examine global environmental issues, including climate change, water and energy resources, biodiversity and ecosystem services, human population growth, and world food production, as well as the application of science in forging effective, sustainable solutions. In the laboratory and field, we will explore local manifestations of global issues via experiential and hands-on approaches. 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2018: M. Costanza-Robinson)

ENVS 0120 Spatial Thinking with Geographic Information Systems (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course applies spatial thinking (integrating spatial concepts, spatial representations, and spatial reasoning) using geographic information systems (computer systems for processing location-based data). Students will learn to frame and solve a sequence of applied problems with GIS across a wide range of topics, including environmental planning, biogeography and conservation biology, environmental justice, political geography, and urban geography. Fundamental concepts and methods of GIS will include raster and vector data structures and operations, geographic frameworks, error and uncertainty, and principles of cartographic design. (First semester first year students and second semester seniors by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED (Fall 2018), SOC (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: J. Holler)
Cross-listed as: GEOG 0120 *

ENVS 0150 Environmental Geography with GIS (Spring 2019)

How do geographers study spatial interactions between humans and the natural world? How do patterns and processes of climate, hydrology, biogeography, geology, and geomorphology interact with human societies? How can geographic information systems (GIS) help geographers describe, understand, and explain these spatial interactions? In this course we will study applications of GIS in environmental geography from local to global scales. Case studies will introduce methods for using elevation models, remotely sensed imagery, and environmental data for inquiries of environmental change, environmental hazards, and natural resource conservation. Students will learn how to gather geographic data, perform spatial analyses, critically interpret results, and communicate findings with cartographic layouts. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED
Cross-listed as: GEOG 0150

ENVS 0208 Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene (Fall 2018)

We live in a moment defined by environmental change. Yet the causes and consequences of these transformations are profoundly uneven. Across race, class, gender, and other forms of difference, “environmental problems” manifest in radically unequal ways, disproportionately burdening some while benefiting others. In this class we will dwell on this central tension in thinking about present socio-environmental crises and what to do about them, from toxic landscapes and biodiversity loss to global hunger and a warming climate. Certainly, these problems pose urgent, even existential problems that demand intervention. Yet common refrains about ‘how to save the environment’ always come with baggage. They have deep histories and hidden assumptions about causes and solutions, justice and inequality, politics and social change, which we will wrestle with together in this course. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (D. Suarez)

ENVS 0210 Social Class and the Environment (Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore the consequence of growth, technological development, and the evolution of ecological sacrifice zones. Texts will serve as the theoretical framework for in-the-field investigations, classroom work, and real-world experience. The Struggle for Environmental Justice outlines resistance models; Shadow Cities provides lessons from the squatters movement; Ben Hewitt's The Town that Food Saved describes economy of scale solutions, and David Owen's The Conundrum challenges environmentalism. Texts will guide discussions, serve as lenses for in-the-field investigations, and the basis for writing. We will also travel to Hardwick and Putney, Vermont, to explore new economic-environmental models. (Not open to students who have taken ENVS/WRPR 1014) AMR, NOR, SOC
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0210

ENVS 0211 Conservation and Environmental Policy (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (crosslisted with PSCI 0211 Fall 2018 only) AMR, NOR, SOC (Fall 2018: C. Klyza)
Cross-listed as: PSCI 0211

ENVS 0215 Contested Grounds: U.S. Cultures and Environments (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Throughout the history of the United States, Americans have created a complex set of meanings pertaining to the environments (wild, pastoral, urban, marine) in which they live. From European-Native contact to the present, Americans’ various identities, cultures, and beliefs about the bio-physical world have shaped the stories they tell about “nature,” stories that sometimes share common ground, but often create conflicting and contested understandings of human-environment relationships. In this course we will investigate these varied and contested stories from multi-disciplinary perspectives in the humanities—history, literature, and religion--and will include attention to race, class, gender, and environmental justice. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, NOR (Fall 2018: R. Gould)

ENVS 0303 William Shakespeare, Nature Poet (Pre-1800) (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the works of William Shakespeare through an ecocritical lens, paying particular attention to the representation of the natural world in a sampling of the plays and poems. Topics will include the European culture of early modern natural history and natural philosophy, the boundary between humans and beasts, the transformative power of the forest, the alterity of the sea, the dialectic of pastoral and georgic, the malleability of gender, and the complexity of sexual identities. Readings will include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Macbeth, The Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest, and several of the sonnets and narrative poems. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, LIT (D. Brayton)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0303 *

ENVS 0330 Conserving Endangered Species (Fall 2018)

The planet is in the midst of the sixth mass extinction event. In this course we will examine the science of species endangerment and recovery and how human society, through its political and legal systems, seeks to conserve endangered species. We will explore several case studies, primarily focused on species recovery efforts in the United States. The course will culminate in a student group project. (BIOL 0140 or ENVS 0112 or ENVS 0211) 3 hrs. sem. (C. Klyza, S. Trombulak)

ENVS 0332 The Perennial Turn in Ag and Culture (Fall 2018)

Can new forms of thinking help shift humanity from destructive and unjust practices to compatible partnerships with all life? Blending insights from physics, philosophy, and life sciences with ancient and indigenous understandings, we will explore an emerging story of thinking more like a prairie than a plow. We start by discussing old ways of thinking we have inherited--surplus, power hierarchies, mechanistic worldviews, separation from a creative sacred Earth--that have wrought negative impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems and cultures. Then we will deepen our exploration of perennialism by engaging with community groups to develop teaching modules that will help create new options and opportunities for both agriculture and society. 3 hrs. sem PHL (M. Lapin)

ENVS 0385 Global Political Ecology (Spring 2019)

In this course we will draw on theories of social and political change to understand the systematic causes of inequality and environmental degradation around the world. Using a political ecology lens, we will look at both proximate as well as ultimate drivers of environmental conflict focusing on the relations between production and consumption, representation and regulation, rights and responsibilities, and information and norms. We will compare the disproportionate distribution of environmental benefits and burdens across communities and nations. We will also study prospective solutions, focusing on the role of individuals and organizations in achieving these solutions. (ENVS 0211 or PSCI 0214) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, SOC

ENVS 0401 Community-Engaged Environmental Studies Practicum (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course students work in small groups with one of a variety of partners and organizations to complete a semester-long, community-engaged project. Project themes vary by term and typically focus on local and regional environmental issues that have broader application. Projects rely on students’ creativity, interdisciplinary perspectives, skills, and knowledge developed through their previous work. The project is guided by a faculty member and carried out with a high degree of independence by the students. Students will prepare for and direct their project work through readings and discussion, independent research, collaboration with project partners, and consultation with external experts. The course may also include workshops focused on developing key skills (e.g., interviewing, public speaking, video editing). The project culminates in a public presentation of students’ final products, which may various forms such as written reports, policy white papers, podcasts, or outreach materials. (Open to Juniors and Seniors) (ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0150) 3 hrs. sem./3 hrs. lab (Fall 2018: D. Suarez, D. Munroe)

ENVS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course, students (non-seniors) carry out an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member with related expertise who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, must involve a significant amount of independent research and analysis. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0500 no more than twice for a given project. (Approval only)

ENVS 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course, seniors complete an independent research or creative project on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. During the term prior to enrolling in ENVS 0700, a student must discuss and agree upon a project topic with a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program and submit a brief project proposal to the Director of Environmental Studies for Approval. The expectations and any associated final products will be defined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Students may enroll in ENVS 0700 as a one-term independent study OR up to twice as part of a multi-term project, including as a lead-up to ENVS 0701 (ES Senior Thesis). (Senior standing; Approval only)

ENVS 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is the culminating term of a multi-term independent project, resulting in a senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment. Approval to enroll is contingent on successful completion of at least one term (and up to two) of ENVS 0700 and the approval of the student’s thesis committee. The project, carried out under the supervision of a faculty advisor who is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, will result in a substantial piece of scholarly work that will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum and defended before the thesis committee. (Senior standing; ENVS major; ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, GEOG 0120, and ENVS 0700; Approval only)

ENVS 0703 Senior Integrated Thesis (Fall 2018)

This course is the culminating term of a multi-term independent project, resulting in a senior thesis on a topic pertinent to the relationship between humans and the environment and that meaningfully integrates perspectives, methodologies, and/or approaches from multiple academic divisions (e.g., humanities/arts, natural sciences, social sciences). Approval to enroll is contingent on successful completion of at least one term (and up to two) of ENVS 0700 and approval of the Environmental Studies Program. The project, carried out under the co-supervision of two faculty advisors from different academic divisions of whom at least one is appointed in or affiliated with the Environmental Studies Program, will result in a substantial piece of scholarly work that will be presented to other ENVS faculty and students in a public forum and defended before the thesis committee. (Open to Senior ENVS majors) (Approval Only)
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Department of Film & Media Culture

Major Requirements: Students must complete ten courses to satisfy the requirements for a major in Film and Media Culture. Before declaring a Film and Media Culture major, the student must have completed or be currently enrolled in one of the basic core courses. Those courses are as follows:
     Basic Core Course Requirements: FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image; FMMC 0102 Film History; FMMC 0104 TV and American Culture; and one production course - either FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound or FMMC 0106 Writing for the Screen I. The basic core courses should be completed by the end of the junior year.
     Required Advanced Courses: One 0300 level course in theory -- FMMC 0354, FMMC 0355, FMMC/GSFS 0358, FMMC 0360, or another approved 0300 level course -- typically to be completed during junior year; and FMMC 0700 Film and Media Senior Tutorial.
     Electives: Four additional FMMC courses, with at least two of these being critical studies or history courses. With the prior permission of a student's academic advisor, one winter term FMMC course may be counted as an elective. Independent study courses will typically not count as an elective unless approved by the department chair for exceptional circumstances. Students taking courses focused on film and media taught in a foreign language, either at Middlebury or abroad, may request major elective credit from their advisor. Note that courses may not count toward both FMMC and another department's major or minor. Courses transferred from other institutions will normally count only as an elective toward the FMMC major, not to fulfill core requirements.
     Minor: Three required courses - FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image, FMMC 0102 Film History, FMMC 0104 TV and American Culture. In addition, minors must take three additional courses that are listed or cross-listed as FMMC. At least one of the three electives must be at the 0300 or 0400-level. At least one of the three electives must be a critical studies or history course.
     Joint Major: The joint major with FMMC is a combination of two disciplines, culminating in a joint senior project; the plan for joint majors is negotiated between the student and the two departments in which the joint program of study is pursued at the time of declaring the joint major. The senior project must combine aspects of both majors and in most cases will require approval, supervision, and evaluation from either departments or programs. The Film and Media Culture part of the joint major requires a minimum of seven courses, including four 100-level FMMC core courses, a 300-level theory course, FMMC 0700 Film and Media Senior Tutorial (or the equivalent senior project course in the other department), and any courses required or appropriate prior to undertaking the joint senior project. FMMC supports a concentration in American Studies, as detailed on its page.
     Joint Major with ENAM: A common joint major is ENAM/FMMC, combining an interest in storytelling in both literary and visual forms. Joint ENAM/FMMC majors are required to fulfill the basic Joint requirements for FMMC as listed above, and are encouraged to take the relevant electives FMMC 0257 Storytelling in Film & Media and FMMC 0279 Film & Literature if possible. Students who wish to write a screenplay for their joint senior project are required to take FMMC 0106 Writing for the Screen I and FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II; additionally, their screenwriting project must be tied to literary topics or issues (including adaptation).
     Honors:
The faculty of Film and Media Culture will award honors to select students based on their overall excellence in film and media coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.7, and on the merit of their senior project.

FMMC 0101 Aesthetics of the Moving Image (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

How do films convey meaning, generate emotions, and work as an art form? What aspects of film are shared by television and videogames? This course is designed to improve your ability to watch, reflect on, and write about moving images. The course will be grounded in the analysis of cinema (feature films, documentaries, avant-garde, and animation) with special focus on film style and storytelling techniques. Study will extend to new audio-visual media as well, and will be considered from formal, cultural, and theoretical perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen ART (Fall 2018: C. Keathley)

FMMC 0102 Film History (Fall 2018)

This course will survey the development of the cinema from 1895 to present. Our study will emphasize film as an evolving art, while bearing in mind the influence of technology, economic institutions, and the political and social contexts in which the films were produced and received. Screenings will include celebrated works from Hollywood and international cinema. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen ART, HIS (A. Grindon)

FMMC 0104 Television and American Culture (Spring 2019)

This course explores American life in the last six decades through an analysis of our central medium: television. Spanning a history of television from its origins in radio to its future in digital convergence, we will consider television's role in both reflecting and constituting American society through a variety of approaches. Our topical exploration will consider the economics of the television industry, television's role within American democracy, the formal attributes of a variety of television genres, television as a site of gender and racial identity formation, television's role in everyday life, and the medium's technological and social impacts. 2 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen AMR, NOR, SOC
Cross-listed as: AMST 0104

FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound I (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course students will gain a theoretical understanding of the ways moving images and sounds communicate, as well as practical experience creating time-based work. We will study examples of moving images as we use cameras, sound recorders, and non-linear editing software to produce our own series of short works. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the possibilities of the medium through experimentation, analysis, and detailed feedback while exploring different facets of cinematic communication. (FMMC 0101, or FMMC 0102, or approval of instructor) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART (Fall 2018: N. Ngaiza)

FMMC 0106 Writing for the Screen I (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine the fundamental elements of dramatic narrative as they relate to visual storytelling. We will emphasize the process of generating original story material and learning the craft of screenwriting, including topics such as story, outline, scene structure, subtext, character objectives, formatting standards, and narrative strategies. Weekly writing assignments will emphasize visual storytelling techniques, tone and atmosphere, character relationships, and dialogue. Students will be required to complete two short screenplays. Required readings will inform and accompany close study of selected screenplays and films. (FMMC 0101 OR CRWR 0170 or approval of instructor) (Formerly FMMC/ENAM 0106) 3 hrs. sem. ART (I. Uricaru)
Cross-listed as: CRWR 0106

FMMC 0175 Anime: Masterworks of Japanese Animation (Fall 2018)

How did anime emerge as a distinctive national genre in global popular culture at the turn of the 21st century? What social conditions in Japan promoted adaptations of manga (graphic novels) into feature-length films for adult audiences? In this course students will address these questions by analyzing the forms and contexts of ten masterworks by the most prominent directors of Japanese animation. We will study the relation of anime to classic Disney films, live-action Hollywood cinema, and Japanese aesthetic traditions. Students will probe the political and ethical questions anime raises about the atomic bombings of World War II, individual identity, consciousness and the body, and the human impact on the natural environment. We will study several directors and give special attention to Miyazaki as an anime auteur. Films include Grave of the Fireflies, Akira, Ghost in the Shell, Perfect Blue, My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away, and The Wind Rises. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, NOA (C. Cavanaugh)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0175 *

FMMC 0204 Hollywood Renaissance, 1967-76 (Fall 2018)

In this course we will study the transition in American film history from the classical studio based production system to contemporary practice, sometimes known as "the Hollywood Renaissance". We will explore numerous changes marking this transition, including the influence of the European "art" cinema, the shift from the Production Code to the current ratings system, the impact of a young generation of filmmakers trained in the academy, developments in film technology, and the social and political changes influencing American culture during this era. Not open to students who have taken FMMC 0330. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or by approval) 3 hrs. seminar/3 hr. screen AMR, ART, NOR (A. Grindon)

FMMC 0215 3D Computer Animation (Fall 2018)

3D computer animation has revolutionized animation, graphics, and special effects. In this course students will explore basic 3D modeling techniques, virtual material and texture creation, digital lighting, rendering, and animation. Every workshop will be hands on and fully immersed in this rapidly evolving technology. Students will leave with a strong conceptual understanding of the 3D graphics pipeline, a fundamental 3D skill set, options for further study, and an independent final animation project. 3 hrs. workshop ART (D. Houghton)
Cross-listed as: INTD 0215 *

FMMC 0216 3D Environment Design (Spring 2019)

From the grounds of an ancient ruin to the inside of a biological cell to the stage of a theatrical production to the corridors of the international space station, in this course we will use digital 3d modeling, texturing, and lighting tools to visualize locations into beautifully rendered, three dimensional, interactive virtual environments. We will ask critical questions about how every design choice affects the audience’s understanding of the space. No prior experience is necessary for this hands-on introductory course. 3 hrs. lect/lab. ART
Cross-listed as: INTD 0216

FMMC 0228 HBO’s Game of Thrones: A Global Cultural Phenomenon (Spring 2019)

In this course we will study the HBO series Game of Thrones as a global cultural phenomenon. We’ll explore the series’ development from a straightforward television adaptation to a transmedia narrative set in a recognizable visual universe. We will examine how the series reinvents the fantasy genre within the changing media landscape and how issues of race, class, and gender affect the production and reception of the series on a global scale. We will also consider the material ways in which the series’ fans engage with the universe of the show through the consumption and creation of merchandising, cosplay, fanfiction, and blogs. 3 hrs. lect.

FMMC 0238 Film Noir (Spring 2019)

A series of urban crime films and melodramas made in Hollywood between 1940-1960, but concentrated in the decade immediately after World War II, have been understood by critics to constitute the movement of film noir. This course will study prominent films from this group as well as contemporary films influenced by them, and the critical literature they have elicited in order to understand the cultural sources, the stylistic attributes, the social significance, and the long-term influence attributed to film noir. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. AMR, ART, NOR

FMMC 0240 Guns and Swords: Violence and Masculinity in Japanese and American Films (Fall 2018)

Cowboys, samurai, gangsters, and yakuza are fabled figures embodying national myths of honor and resistance in American and Japanese films. Swordfight and gunfight genres grapple with the issue of lethal weapons in the hands of individuals when the power of the state is absent, corrupt, or ineffectual. Familiar motifs, archetypal characters, and straightforward plots uphold traditional aspirations threatened by the forces of modernity. Japanese and American directors have exploited these conventions to create cinematic masterpieces about questions of violence, righteousness, and masculinity. In this course we will explore cross-cultural influences between swordfight and gunfight genres as we compare their heroes, antiheroes, conflicts, and codes. Films for study include Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, The Tale of Zatoichi, The Searchers, High Noon, Unforgiven, Pale Flower, Tokyo Drifter, Branded to Kill, White Heat, The Godfather, and Goodfellas. 3hrs. lect/disc. AAL, ART, CMP, NOA (C. Cavanaugh)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0240 *

FMMC 0242 Film Comedy (Spring 2019)

A survey of American film comedy from the silent era to contemporary productions. The course will focus on various approaches such as clown comedy, romantic comedy, and satirical comedy. In addition, the course will explore screen comedy in the context of various theories of comedy, including the narrative design, the social dynamics, and the psychological understanding of humor. The filmmakers will include: Chaplin, Keaton, Lubitsch, Wilder, Woody Allen, among others. Screenings, readings and written assignments. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. screen. AMR, ART, NOR

FMMC 0249 Introduction to Podcasting (Fall 2018)

In this course we will immerse ourselves in the rich world of podcasting as listeners and producers. Students will become acquainted with the wide variety of podcast work including, but not limited to: serial narrative, daily news features, audio fiction, talk, comedy, and interview podcast programming. We will record and produce our own original podcast segments with a focus on non-fiction features. Students can expect to walk away with a foundational understanding of the variety of podcast formats and production techniques including recording, sourcing, and editing sound. (Not open to students who have taken FMMC 1134) 3 hrs lect. (E. Davis)

FMMC 0281 Film and Literature (Spring 2019)

The most common approach to the study of film and literature focuses on cinematic adaptations of literary works, but in this course we will broaden that tack, expanding to more of a comparative approach and considering topics relevant to both forms. We will explore how the cinema developed a formal language equivalent to the novel, as well as how fiction writing has been influenced by film. We will also consider how cinema's position as the equivalent of the novel has been usurped by television. Films screened will include A Day in the Country; Le Plaisir; Blow-Up; the recent BBC series Sherlock; and others. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or ENAM 0103 or CMLT 0101) (Formerly FMMC 0276 & FMMC 0279) ART, EUR, LIT
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0281

FMMC 0284 The Computerized Society: A Cultural History of the Computer Since WWII (Fall 2018)

What theorist Jean-Francois Lyotard called “the computerized society” turns out to be about far more than just machines. Technological developments are inextricably linked to other factors: culture, politics, economics, war, identity, race, class, gender, the law, region. In this course we will take an American studies approach to the evolution of the modern computer to grasp its history—and therefore its present significance. Students will encounter a wide range of sources and complete three analytic essays that begin with creative prompts to generate compelling historical interpretations of technology and its contextualized importance in America and the world. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (M. Kramer)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0284 *

FMMC 0332 Filmmaking for Change (Spring 2019)

The art of cinema has the potential to reach audiences not only aesthetically but also at the level of ideas and moral principles. Filmmakers have the power to raise questions, challenge the status quo, mobilize dissent; they can bear witness, hold up a revealing mirror to reality and sometimes catalyze real change in the world. How can cinema perform these tasks while upholding its artistic value and not sliding into propaganda, didacticism or ideological advocacy? In this class we will watch and discuss films such as Z/ (Costa Gavras, 1968), /All the Presidents’ Men (Alan J Pakula, 1976), Dekalog (K. Kieslowski 1989). Each student will write and produce/direct a short film with a theme about which they want to raise consciousness and stir debate. (FMMC 105, or FMMC 0106, or instructor approval). 3hrs sem, 3 hrs screen. ART

FMMC 0335 Sight and Sound II (Fall 2018)

In this course students will work in teams to produce several short films, having the opportunity to take turns at fulfilling all the essential crew positions: director, producer, cinematographer, production sound mixer, editor, and sound designer. We will emphasize thorough pre-production planning, scene design, cinematography, working with actors, and post production —including color correction and sound mixing. The critical dialogue established in FMMC 0105 Sight and Sound I will be extended and augmented with readings and screenings of outstanding independently produced work. (FMMC 0105) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART (I. Uricaru)

FMMC 0341 Writing for the Screen II (Spring 2019)

Building on the skills acquired in Writing for the Screen I, students will complete the first drafts of their feature-length screenplay. Class discussion will focus on feature screenplay structure and theme development using feature films and screenplays. Each participant in the class will practice pitching, writing coverage, and outlining, culminating in a draft of a feature length script. (Approval required, obtain application on the FMMC website and submit prior to spring registration) 3 hrs. sem/3 hrs. screen. ART
Cross-listed as: CRWR 0341

FMMC 0358 Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore a range of theoretical approaches to the study of spectatorship and media audiences. How has the viewer been theorized throughout the history of film, television, and digital media? How have theoretical understandings of the relationship between viewer and media changed in the digital age? How have gender, class, and race informed cultural notions of media audiences from silent cinema to today? We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying spectators, viewers, audiences, fans, and anti-fans across the history of the moving image. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0254) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen. AMR, ART, CW, NOR, SOC (L. Stein)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0358

FMMC 0507 Advanced Independent work in Film and Media Culture (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Guidelines for submitting proposals are available on the Film & Media Culture web site along with a list of prerequisites. (Fall 2018: I. Uricaru, A. Grindon, D. Miranda Hardy, L. Stein, C. Keathley, J. Mittell, N. Ngaiza; Spring 2019: J. Mittell, L. Stein, I. Uricaru, A. Grindon, N. Ngaiza)

FMMC 0700 Film and Media Senior Tutorial (Spring 2019)

All FMMC majors must complete this course, in which they undertake a critical essay, a screenplay, or a video. The following prerequisite courses are required: for a video project: FMMC 0105, FMMC 0335, FMMC/CRWR 0106; for a screenwriting project: FMMC 0105, FMMC/CRWR 0106, FMMC/CRWR 0341; for a research essay: demonstrated knowledge in the topic of the essay, as determined in consultation with the project advisor, and coursework relevant to the topic as available. (A. Grindon, I. Uricaru)
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Lois ’51 and J. Harvey Watson Department of French and Francophone Studies

Required for the Major in French and Francophone Studies: Total of no fewer than 10 courses. All courses for the major must be taught in French.

I. Two introductory-level courses in reading and culture: FREN 0209, FREN 0210, FREN 0220-0229, or specified courses in France (Paris, Poitiers, Bordeaux), or Cameroon; or equivalent in the Middlebury summer French School when offered.
II. One course in contemporary French or Francophone studies: FREN 0230-0239, courses on contemporary France, or specified French or Francophone studies in France (Paris, Poitiers, Bordeaux), or Cameroon; or equivalent in the Middlebury summer French School when offered.
III. One course on the history of France or a Francophone region or country.
IV. Three advanced courses in French or Francophone studies (FREN 0300 level).
V.  One unit of senior work, usually a senior seminar (FREN 0400 level. Honors candidates may fulfill the senior work requirement by writing an Honors essay (FREN 0700) or Honors thesis (FREN 0701).

During their senior year, majors must take at least one advanced course (Category IV) in French at Middlebury in addition to the senior seminar.

     Other courses counting for the major include:

(1) At the Vermont campus: FREN 0205, FREN 0255, among others; certain advanced courses offered during the winter term (with permission of the chair); certain summer courses at the 0300 (intermediate) or 0400 (advanced) level; and,

(2) In France and Cameroon: language and linguistics courses; comparative literature (with a major French or Francophone component); French or Francophone arts, theatre, cinema, television, or politics.

     All majors study abroad for a semester or a year in a French-speaking country. The year program carries nine units of credit; the semester program carries four or five units of credit. In order to ensure that students are exposed to a variety of disciplines, no more than five units (full-year program) or three units (semester program) may be counted toward the French and Francophone Studies major. Most courses in France will be at the advanced level.
     The French and Francophone Studies Department does not offer a joint major.

     Required for a Minor in French and Francophone Studies: Minimum of five courses, FREN 0205 and above, including at least two introductory courses (FREN 0209, FREN 0210, FREN 0220-0239) and at least one course at the advanced level (Category IV) to be taken during the student’s final two semesters. The minor may include courses taken at the Middlebury School in France or the School in Cameroon (maximum of two from the semester program, three from the full-year program).  Students electing the French minor are encouraged to consult with faculty members in the French Department about course planning.

     Students with a College Board AP score of 4 or 5 will receive one unit of credit toward graduation if the first course successfully completed at Middlebury is FREN 0209 or above in accordance with placement and departmental advising. AP credits may not be counted toward the major or minor.

     Senior Work: Upon completing at least two 0300-level courses in French or Francophone studies, majors are required to complete senior work consisting of a significant research paper in the context of a senior seminar (0400-level).

     Honors: Exceptional students with a grade point average in French and Francophone Studies of 3.8 or higher may petition the department to pursue an independent project for honors in French and Francophone Studies. Candidates for honors may propose a one-semester senior honors essay (FREN 0700) or a senior honors thesis (FREN 0701, one semester and winter term). Eligible students should consult the departmental guidelines and present their proposals well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be started. The department will determine whether to award honors, high honors, or highest honors on the basis of a student's work in the department and performance on the senior honors project.
       International and Global Studies Major with French Language: Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies Major section, completion of the French language component requires: (1) proficiency in French (a minimum of two of (FREN 0209, FREN 0210, FREN 0220-0239) or work in the French summer school at the 0300 level or above); (2) at least one semester, and preferably a year, at the Middlebury College School in France, or in Cameroon, or in another French-speaking country; and (3) one or more courses at the 0300 or 0400-level upon return from abroad.

     International and Global Studies Major, European Studies Track:
[For Classes of 2015.5 and 2016 only. New rules, available in the International and Global Studies section, apply to the Class of 2017]
(1) Language proficiency: see above; (2) regional specialization: choose from FREN 0230 and courses at the 0300-level, or others (Vermont campus), in consultation with the track director; courses in French or Francophone studies at Middlebury in France or in another French-speaking country; (3) disciplinary specialization: two courses from (FREN 0209, FREN 0210, FREN 0220-0239); three advanced French or Francophone studies courses at Middlebury or one of the Middlebury Schools in France; (4) at least one semester, and preferably a year, at the Middlebury College School in France or in another French-speaking country; and (5) one or more courses at the 0300 or 0400 level, or senior independent work in French, upon return from abroad.

     Study Abroad in France and in Cameroon: Middlebury offers both year and semester abroad programs in France (Paris, Poitiers and Bordeaux) and in Cameroon.  Students planning to study in France or Cameroon must have completed two full years of college credit by the time they undertake their study abroad; they must have successfully completed at least one course beyond FREN 0209 (previously FREN 0210)  by the time they arrive abroad; and they must have an average in French of at least B. We expect all applicants to demonstrate their commitment to French and maintain their fluency by continuous study of French from the time of their enrollment at Middlebury and to maintain their academic level if they are accepted to study abroad.  They are required to take a French course in the semester before study abroad. Students may count three courses from the semester program, five from the full year program toward a major in French; two courses from the semester program and three from the full year program toward a minor in French.

It should be noted that while students wishing to attend one of our programs in France or in Cameroon must demonstrate a level of proficiency in the language that will allow them to function successfully in the French or Cameroonian university setting, they need not be French majors: the C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in France (Paris, Poitiers, and Bordeaux) offers students the opportunity to take courses in history, history of art, economics, cinema, political science, psychology, sociology, studio art, the natural sciences, and the environment, among other disciplines, in addition to courses in languages and literature. Students interested in studying abroad should speak to someone in the Office of International Programs & Off-Campus Study, Sunderland Language Center, well in advance of applying. They will need to seek prior approval of School in France and School in Cameroon courses from the appropriate department chairs if they wish course work to count toward a specific minor or major. The Office of Off-Campus Study will provide information about the program and application forms.

FREN 0101 Intensive Beginning French (Fall 2018)

For students who have not previously studied French, an introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French, providing the syntactic and semantic foundation of the French language in a concentrated program of grammar presentation, drills, laboratory work, and discussion. Primary emphasis will be placed on the student's active use of the language, and weekly attendance at the French language table will be required. This course does not fulfill the foreign language distribution requirement. Students are expected to continue with FREN 0102 in the winter term after successfully completing FREN 0101, and with FREN 0201in the spring. 6 hrs. lect./disc. (E. Dessein, A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron)

FREN 0201 Intermediate French I (Spring 2019)

Emphasis on increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Readings and film enlarge the student's view of French life and culture. (FREN 0102 or by placement) 5 hrs. lect./disc. LNG

FREN 0203 Intermediate French II (Fall 2018)

An active and intensive review of French grammar for students having had good beginning-level training in French. We will work not only to perfect mastery of the structures of the language with practice of writing and reading, but also to develop oral comprehension and production skills. (FREN 0103 or FREN 0105 or placement) 5 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (C. Nunley, W. Poulin-Deltour)

FREN 0205 Toward Liberated Expression (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A course designed to increase and perfect the ability to express oneself in spoken and written French. Emphasis on precision, variety, and vocabulary acquisition. Sections limited to 15 students. (FREN 0203 or placement) This requirement for the major and the minor may be satisfied by placement at a higher level. 3 hrs. lect./disc. LNG (Fall 2018: J. Weber, P. Schwartz)

FREN 0209 Self and Society: Effective Writing in French (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course, students will deepen their knowledge of the French language and French-speaking cultures while developing their reading and writing skills through examination of a variety of texts and media. This course facilitates the transition from language-oriented courses (FREN 0205) to content-oriented courses (such as FREN 0220 and FREN 0230) by introducing students to strategies for interpretation and discussion, with a focus on effective writing. Course materials may include essays/articles, theater, fiction, poetry, videos, and films. (FREN 0205 or by placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LNG (Fall 2018: C. Nunley, L. Sainte-Claire)

FREN 0221 From Romanticism to Modernism (Spring 2019)

The 19th and 20th centuries were marked by social and political revolutions and by literary and artistic movements that changed our attitudes to art and to ourselves, including romanticism, realism, symbolism, surrealism, and existentialism. We will study literary texts, artistic and philosophical movements, and the social circumstances that conditioned them. Close readings of the texts (including prose, drama, and poetry) will develop critical vocabulary and writing skills. Authors may include Hugo, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Gide, Camus, Sartre, and Francophone writers. (FREN 0209 or 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT, LNG

FREN 0222 Criminal Minds in Literature written in French (Fall 2018)

How does one become a criminal? What causes a person to commit a crime? What triggers a criminal act? Which sorts of thought-processes lead to crime? These questions will be central to this course in which we will analyze the writing techniques that various Francophone authors have used to explore and portray criminals, both male and female. We will read literary texts—short stories and novels— from the Francophone world, including France, and watch some film adaptations. We will investigate the connections between realism, romanticism, and naturalism; attempt to disentangle reality from the imaginary; and interpret and extract meaning from stream-of-consciousness narratives. (FREN 0209 or 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, CW (3 seats), EUR, LIT (A. Crouzieres-Ingenthron)

FREN 0224 Travelers and Migrants in French and Francophone Literature (Fall 2018)

Multiple forms of traveling emerged with the expansion of the French empire, from colonial ventures to forced migration. In this course we will study how writers represent such experiences. We will discuss fictions that focus on mobility, passages, and border-crossing, and question what these fictions reveal about the cultures in contact. How do travel and migration narratives reconfigure the relation between here and there, self and other, the individual and the community? Studying literary texts in their historical contexts will allow us to discuss varied topics, such as nationhood, slavery, exoticism, identity, and difference, as well as to explore several artistic movements that have shaped French and Francophone culture. Writers will include Montesquieu, Balzac, Baudelaire, Madame de Staël, Gide, Césaire, Glissant, and Sinha. (FREN 0209 or 0210 or placement) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, CW (3 seats), EUR, LIT (J. Weber)

FREN 0230 Introduction to Contemporary France (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this interdisciplinary course we will examine the evolving social and political landscape of France in the 21st century. How is French society reconciling contemporary challenges with deeply entrenched institutions and values? How does everyday life reflect the evolution of long-term trends? How are immigration, growing inequalities, and membership in the European Union challenging French identity and the notion of “Frenchness”? We will focus our attention on demography and the family, the educational system, politics, and the French social model or welfare state. Emphasis will be on oral expression and the acquisition of specialized vocabulary. Sources will include articles from the French and American press, documents, and film. This course is recommended for all students planning to study in France. (FREN 0209 or 0210 or placement); open to first-semester first-year students with permission.) EUR, LNG, SOC (Fall 2018: P. Schwartz)

FREN 0316 Animal Encounters in French Literature (Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore representations of animals in French literature. Animals have played an important role in literature, yet, in post-Darwinian modernity their depiction became increasingly tied to a questioning of the human/animal divide. What are the recurrent motifs and concerns that shape depictions of animals in 19th and 20th century French literature? What ethical and social questions do they raise? We will study fictional works of animal metamorphosis, and literary accounts of zoos and animal spectacles, as well as ways in which animals have been used as a rhetorical device to de-humanize "Others"—women and foreigners, in particular. We will read texts by Baudelaire, Balzac, Maupassant, Flaubert, Colette, Vercors, and Darrieussecq. (FREN 0220-0229 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LIT, LNG

FREN 0332 Body Politics in Francophone Fictions (Fall 2018)

How do political, social, and cultural forces shape women’s experience of and beliefs about their own bodies? In this course we will analyze the social construction of women’s bodies through the very intimate lens of the family in contemporary Francophone fictions. We will see that personal power weighs as much as institutional and disciplinary powers on the degree of control young women retain over their bodies. Students will also learn to define and analyze the historical, political and socio-cultural conditions surrounding these representations. Authors will include Duras, Beti, Condé, Lahens, and Marouane. (FREN 0220-0230 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, LIT, LNG (L. Sainte-Claire)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0332

FREN 0346 Food And Culture (Spring 2019)

"I eat - therefore I am", Food and Culture in France*
What's in a meal? Historians and anthropologists have long shown food and eating practices to be a function of culture. In France in particular, food and cuisine are fundamental elements of national heritage and cultural identity. What does the organization of the eating ritual say about the French? What do food and eating have to do with class and gender, time and space? How are eating and drinking unique forms of political expression? Works from a range of interdisciplinary perspectives will inform our study of French society through its singular approach to the culture of the table. Readings will include works by Brillat-Savarin, Barthes, Zola, and others. (FREN 0221 or FREN 0230 or by waiver). 3 hrs. lect./disc.
EUR, LNG, SOC

FREN 0352 From Citizenship to Social Mobility: The Shifting Role of Public Education in France (Fall 2018)

Since the establishment of a free, compulsory, and secular school system in the early 1880s, the position of public education in French society has evolved significantly. Designed originally to create an "educated" citizenry, its function has increasingly been interpreted as one of promoting social mobility and "equal opportunity" within that citizenry. Over the course of this shift, education has become a site of fierce debate in France. We will take a historical and sociological approach to explore the contours of this debate, covering such topics as: primary school teachers' role in forging national identity during the Third Republic; efforts after World War II to democratize the system; and current attempts to diversify elite institutions of higher education. Authors will include Baudelot, Bourdieu, Dubet, Ozouf, and Prost. (FREN 0220-0230 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, LNG (W. Poulin-Deltour)

FREN 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Qualified students may be permitted to undertake a special project in reading and research under the direction of a member of the department. Students should seek an advisor and submit a proposal to the department well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken. (Approval required)

FREN 0700 Senior Honors Essay (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required).

FREN 0701 Senior Honors Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Qualified senior majors who wish to be considered for Honors in French must submit a proposal well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken. (Approval required; see requirements above.)
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Program in Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies

Program in Gender, Sexuality, & Feminist Studies

All students declaring a GSFS major, joint major, or minor beginning Fall 2017 will adopt the following requirements. Students who declared their major prior to Fall 2017 may choose whether to adopt these requirements or to complete their study following the old requirements (see below). 

The major requires a minimum of ten courses and comprises several discrete aspects, as outlined below
Major requirements (10 courses):

  • GSFS/SOAN 0191   
  • GSFS 0200  
  • GSFS 0289  
  • GSFS 0320  
  • GSFS 0435  

Breadth Requirements: 2 courses, one in each

  a. Critical Race Feminisms
  b. National/Transnational Feminism

  • Electives (2 courses) bearing the GSFS prefix
  • Senior Work (one-semester capstone or two-semester thesis)

Breadth Requirements (two courses): To ensure that students are conversant with and have some in-depth knowledge of the key concerns animating the field, they must take at least one course each from two breadth requirements. Courses meeting the breadth requirement can be found on the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies webpage.

Senior Work:  All majors must enroll in GSFS 0700, a one-semester capstone, where they will complete a portfolio and an essay critically engaging with their accumulated knowledge about gender, sexuality and feminism. With permission, some majors may extend this to a two-semester thesis (GSFS 0710), conducting original research. In GSFS 0710, students produce a formal written document, but also have the flexibility to produce a multi-media project such as a movie, or a creative activity such as a performance or an installation project. 

 Senior work provides one of the primary means through which students demonstrate their critical thinking skills and their ability to communicate complex ideas effectively and persuasively. This is the primary means through which the program’s learning goals will be assessed; advisors will provide their assessment in writing to the students.  A public presentation is part of the senior work requirements.

Joint Major: The joint major is comprised of seven (7) courses each in the two disciplines/programs. For GSFS, the requirement includes:

  • GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0289
  • GSFS 0200
  • GSFS 0320
  • Breadth Requirements, 2 courses, one each in:

          a. Critical Race Feminisms

          b. National/Transnational Feminisms

  • One elective bearing the GSFS prefix
  • Senior Work that combines both majors and is agreed upon by the advisers and department or program chairs (or designees) involved.
    Minor Requirements: The minor comprises five courses including:
  • Two of the following courses: GSFS 0191, 0200, 0289
  • GSFS 0320
  • Two additional GSFS courses at least one of which fulfills the Critical Race Feminisms  breadth requirement

Requirements prior to Fall 2017:

The major requires a minimum of ten courses and comprises several discrete aspects, as outlined below. Some of the courses can be double-counted if they fulfill different requirements within the major.

Major requirements (10 courses):

  • SOAN/GSFS 0191
  • One introductory course from the humanities, such as GSFS 0102, or GSFS 0234, or approved by the director
  • GSFS 0200
  • GSFS 0320
  • Two courses to fulfill the Breadth Requirements (explained below)
  • Three electives bearing the GSFS prefix, one of which must be at the 0300-level or higher and one that must be at the 0400-level or higher
  • Senior Work (one-semester senior essay or multi-semester thesis)

Joint Major: The joint major is comprised of 7 courses each in the two disciplines. For GSFS, the requirement includes:

  • SOAN/GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0189/0289
  • GSFS 0200
  • GSFS 0320
  • Breadth requirement 1
  • Breadth requirement 2
  • One elective
  • Senior Work

Breadth Requirements (two courses): To ensure that students are conversant with and have some in-depth knowledge of the key concerns animating the field, they must take at least one course each from two of three breadth requirements. Courses meeting the breadth requirement can be found on the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies webpage.

  • Intersectionality/Critical Race
  • Critical Sexuality Studies
  • Gender in National/Transnational Contexts

Senior Work: Majors are required to complete an independent project that applies feminist theory and methodology. The project may be either a one-semester senior essay or other creative work (GSFS 0700), or a multi-semester senior thesis (GSFS 0710).

Minor Requirements: The minor comprises five courses including:

  • one introductory course from among SOAN/GSFS 0191, ENAM/GSFS 0102, or PHIL/GSFS 0234
  • GSFS 0200
  • GSFS 0320
  • two electives bearing the GSFS prefix

GSFS 0172 Writing Gender and Sexuality (Fall 2018)

In this course we will read, discuss, and write creative works that explore issues of gender and sexuality. Readings will include stories, poems, and essays by James Baldwin, Ana Castillo, Peggy Munson, Eli Clare, Junot Diaz, Audre Lorde, Michelle Tea, Alison Bechdel, and others. The course will include writing workshops with peers and individual meetings with the instructor. Every student will revise a range of pieces across genres and produce a final portfolio. We will do some contemplative work and will engage with a visiting choreographer to explore movement in conversation with writing, gender, and sex. 3 hrs. lect. ART (C. Wright)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0172

GSFS 0191 Gender and the Body (Fall 2018)

What is your gender and how do you know? In order to answer this question, we need to consider how gender is known through biology, psychology, consumer capitalism, and our everyday embodiment. We will also look at how the meaning and performance of gender have changed over time from Classical Greece to Victorian England to the contemporary U.S. Throughout, we will consider how gender does not operate along, but is always entangled with, race, class, sexuality, nationality, and ability. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (L. Essig)
Cross-listed as: SOAN 0191

GSFS 0200 Feminist Foundations (Fall 2018)

This course provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Focusing on the histories of feminism in the U.S., from the nineteenth century to the present, the course reveals the importance of gender and sexuality as analytical categories to understand social reality and to comprehend important areas of culture. Examining gender and sexuality always in conjunction with the categories of race and class, the course foregrounds how inequalities are perpetuated in different fields of human activity and the creative ways in which feminist movements have resisted these processes. 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC (S. Moorti)

GSFS 0211 Trickery, Bodies, and Resistance: The Tradition(s) of Rhetoric (Spring 2019)

How do female-identifying subjects position themselves (and their bodies) rhetorically in a male-dominated society? How do Black and Latinx rhetorical traditions of call-and-response and code-switching connect with and resist classical traditions of oration and stylistics? In this course we will study the tradition(s) of rhetoric by moving from the trickery of sophists to budding works in feminist rhetorics and cultural rhetorics. Students in this class will learn to synthesize the various traditions of rhetoric in historical and contemporary terms and to critically understand cultural customs that exist outside the white, heteronormative Greco-Roman tradition. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, CW, SOC
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0211 *

GSFS 0223 Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Studies (Spring 2019)

This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of gay and lesbian studies. We will explore three topics: queer theory, the construction and representation of homosexuality in history, and queer culture before and after Stonewall. Readings will include works by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, George Chauncey, John Boswell, Lillian Faderman, Oscar Wilde, Radclyffe Hall, Michael Cunningham, and Tony Kushner. 3 hrs. lect./3 screen SOC

GSFS 0224 Formations of Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. (Spring 2019)

Historical memories, everyday experiences, and possible futures are powerfully shaped by racial and ethnic differences. Categories of race and ethnicity structure social relationships and cultural meanings in the United States and beyond. In this course we will track the theoretical and historical bases of ideas of race and ethnicity in modern America. We will investigate how race and ethnicity intersect at particular historical moments with other forms of difference including gender, sexuality, nation, and class. The course offers an approach informed by critical studies of race including texts in history, political theory, cultural studies, and anthropology. (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC
Cross-listed as: AMST 0224 *

GSFS 0250 Gender in Japan (in English) (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine changing ideas about gender and sexuality in Japan in the 10th through 20th centuries, with special attention to the modern period. Sources will include literary texts, films, and social/historical studies. We will discuss topics, including women's writing in classical Japan; the commercialization of sexuality in the 18th century; ideas of "homosexuality" in late-medieval and modern times; and women's social roles and political struggles in the 20th century. 3 hr. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, NOA (O. Milutin)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0250 *

GSFS 0254 American Women Poets (Spring 2019)

We will examine the rich tradition of lyric poetry by women in the U.S. Beginning with the Puritan Anne Bradstreet, one of the New World's earliest published poets, we continue to the 19th century and Emily Dickinson, along with the formidable line of "poetesses" who dominated the popular poetry press in that era. We examine the female contribution to the Modernist aesthetic in figures like Millay, Moore, H.D. and Gertrude Stein; the transformation of modernist ideals by Bishop, Plath, Sexton, and Rich; and, among the postmodernists, Lyn Hejinian and Susan Howe. 3 hrs. lect. (National/Transnational Feminisms) LIT, NOR
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0254 *

GSFS 0269 Beyond Intersectionality: Developing Anti-Racist and Anti-Capitalist Feminisms (Spring 2019)

Nearly thirty years ago, Kimberlé Crenshaw published the theory of “intersectionality,” in which she argued that racism and sexism collide to make black women’s marginalization distinct from those of both white women and black men (1989). Today, the terms “intersectionality” and “intersectional feminism” are ubiquitous, utilized by scholars, activists, artists, and our students. In this course, we will consider how discourses of and ideas about intersectionality move between and among spaces of dissent. Starting from the position that it is more epistemologically and politically powerful to state that our feminism is anti-racist and anti-capitalist than to say it is “intersectional,” we will address the following questions: What are the benefits and limits of the original theory of intersectionality? How are academic and activist approaches alike both emboldened and limited by intersectionality? What does it mean to be socially and politically conscious, and how do we move from consciousness to action in ways that are not siloed? Texts may include Crenshaw’s “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women” (1989) and Ange-Marie Hancock’s Intersectionality: An Intellectual History (2016). (Critical Race Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC
Cross-listed as: AMST 0269

GSFS 0284 Modern Dance History in the United States: Early Influences to Postmodern Transformations (Fall 2018)

In this seminar we will focus on the emergence and development of 20th century American concert dance--especially modern and postmodern dance forms--from the confluence of European folk and court dance, African and Caribbean influences, and other American cultural dynamics. We will look at ways in which dance reflects, responds to, and creates its cultural milieu, with special attention to issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class. Readings, video, and live performance illuminate the artistic products and processes of choreographers whose works mark particular periods or turning points in this unfolding story. Our study is intended to support informed critical articulations and an understanding of the complexity of dance as art. 3 hrs. lect./2 hrs. screen. AMR, ART, CW, HIS, NOR (K. Borni)
Cross-listed as: DANC 0284 *

GSFS 0289 Introduction to Queer Critique (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine what is meant by queer critique through exploring the concepts, issues, and debates central to queer theory and activism both in the U.S. and around the world. We will work to understand how queerness overlaps with and is distinct from other articulations of marginalized sexual subjectivity. We will consider how desires, identities, bodies, and experiences are constructed and represented, assessing the ways in which queer theory allows us to examine sexuality and its raced, classed, gendered, geographic, and (dis)abled dimensions. Through engaged projects, we will practice how to translate and produce queer critique. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC

GSFS 0303 Outlaw Women (Spring 2019)

In this course we will read and discuss literary texts that feature women who defy social norms: daring survivors, scholars, “whores,” queers, artists, servants, revolutionaries. Texts include Powell’s The Pagoda, Duras’s The Lover, Lorde’s Zami, and Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran. The course will take postcolonial and global approaches to desire and difference and to narratives of resistance, rescue and freedom. We will discuss rhetorical practices, such as écriture féminine, and readerships, such as women’s book groups, in national and global contexts. Students will develop their critical imaginations through discussion, contemplation, research, and analytical and creative writing. (Any one GSFS Course) 3 hrs. lect. CMP, CW, LIT, SOC
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0303

GSFS 0307 Human Sexuality (Fall 2018)

In this course we will discuss the biological, psychological, behavioral, and cultural aspects of human sexuality, starting with a review of anatomy, physiology and function. We will use current research findings to inform discussions of topics such as arousal and desire, relationships, sexual orientation, consent, pornography, and compulsive sexual behavior. We will look at how issues like contraception, sexuality, and sexually transmitted diseases have influenced and been influenced by their cultural context. (Two psychology courses; not open to first year students; open to Psychology and GSFS majors) 3 hrs. lect. (M. Seehuus)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0307 *

GSFS 0313 White People (Fall 2018)

White people are too often invisible when it comes to having a race. In this course we will examine the formation of whiteness as an always present if often ignored, racial category, that came ashore with the Pilgrims. We will explore how whiteness became a foundational category for citizenship after the Civil War, when the Color Line was drawn through legal, cultural, and spatial practices. Finally, we will look at the formation of whiteness as a site of privilege, aggrieved entitlement, and even a category of "trash" in the more recent past. We will also situate whiteness, like all racial categories, as entangled with class, gender, sexuality, and nationality. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1357) 3 hrs. sem. (Critical Race Feminisms) AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC (L. Essig)
Cross-listed as: SOAN 0313

GSFS 0320 Feminist Theory (Spring 2019)

The course offers an overview of key feminist texts and theories that have shaped the analysis of gender and sexuality. We will examine foundational theoretical texts that have animated the field of gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Working within a transnational perspective, the course encompasses texts which fall under the categories of critical race and critical sexuality studies. (GSFS 0200 or GSFS 0191 or GSFS 0289) 3 hr. lect. CMP, SOC

GSFS 0325 American Misogyny (Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore the place of misogyny in U.S. media and politics. Early topics will include film noir, Cold War gender scapegoating, and lesbian pulp fiction. Subsequent topics will include the backlash against second-wave feminism, the rise of “post-feminism,” and the impact of reality TV and social media on feminist and antifeminist expression. We will conclude by examining how misogyny informs U.S. culture and politics in the Trump era. Throughout the course, we will consider how discourses of misogyny are inflected by white, cisgender, ableist, ageist, and class privilege. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR
Cross-listed as: AMST 0325 *

GSFS 0329 The Politics of Reproduction: Sex, Abortion, and Motherhood (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine contemporary reproductive issues both in the United States and around the world. We will work to understand both how reproductive politics are informed by broader cultural ideas regarding gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, and geography and also how ideas about reproduction reinforce conceptions of these very identity markers and ways of experiencing the world. Because requirements for being considered a “good” woman are intimately tied to what it means to be a “good” mother, challenging dominant understandings of gender and sexuality requires critical engagement with ideas about reproduction. 3 hrs. lect. (Critical Race Feminisms, National/Transnational Feminisms)/ AMR, CMP, NOR, SOC (C. Thomsen)

GSFS 0331 Clouds and Rain: Love and Sexuality in Traditional Chinese Literature (in translation) (Spring 2019)

This seminar explores a spectrum of traditional attitudes toward romantic love, sexualities, men and women seen through the prism of classical Chinese literature. Fiction and drama will be the main focus with due attention to poetry. Texts to be analyzed include, e.g., pre-6th-century B.C. and subsequent poems; 3rd and 4th-century and later stories of strange romances; the remarkable 7th-century tale of the Dwelling of Playful Goddesses and early 9th-century love story of “Yingying”; the marvelous late 16th-century romantic drama, the Peony Pavilion; the hilarious late 17th-century erotic novella, the Carnal Prayer Mat; and selected chapters from novelistic masterworks such as the late 16th-century and early 17th-century, Jin Ping Mei, and the 18th-century, The Story of the Stone (also known as Dream of the Red Chamber). (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CW, LIT, NOA
Cross-listed as: CHNS 0331 *

GSFS 0332 Body Politics in Francophone Fictions (Fall 2018)

How do political, social, and cultural forces shape women’s experience of and beliefs about their own bodies? In this course we will analyze the social construction of women’s bodies through the very intimate lens of the family in contemporary Francophone fictions. We will see that personal power weighs as much as institutional and disciplinary powers on the degree of control young women retain over their bodies. Students will also learn to define and analyze the historical, political and socio-cultural conditions surrounding these representations. Authors will include Duras, Beti, Condé, Lahens, and Marouane. (FREN 0221) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, LIT, LNG (L. Sainte-Claire)
Cross-listed as: FREN 0332 *

GSFS 0333 Feminism and Food: Global, Local, and Everything in Between (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine food politics and food justice movements through the lenses of feminist and queer studies—considering how food illuminates broader raced, classed, gendered, sexual, and ablest ideologies. Throughout, we will center the global flows that make possible industrialized food systems, examining food politics in the U.S. as intimately connected to broader global issues. In so doing, we will grapple with the problems of industrialized food production as well as the limits of food justice movements. Topics include gendered labor of food production, embodiment and “excess,” migration, and food’s role in creating racialized and queer subcultures. (not open to students who have taken GSFS 0430). 3 hrs. lect. CMP, SOC

GSFS 0335 Gender and Migration in Modern Arabic Literature and Cinema (Fall 2018)

The study of migration and gender as intersecting areas of inquiry offers multiple possibilities for exploring modern Arabic literature and cinema. The modern Arab world is shaped by steady flows of migration and displacement, heavily influencing the literary and visual expression of the twentieth and twenty-first century. In this course we will attend to the formation of “gender” as a category of study, while also paying attention to class and religion as these center on and inform migration flows and displacement in the modern Arab world. We will study a number of novels and films that focus on the ways in which the “modern” in the Arab world is shaped and produced by migrations flows, displacement, and diasporas. (National/Transnational Feminisms) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, LIT, MDE (D. Ayoub)
Cross-listed as: ARBC 0335 *

GSFS 0338 Gender and the Making of Space (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will investigate the complex relationship between gender and architecture, examining how the design of the built environment (buildings, urban spaces, etc.) can reinforce or undermine ideas about the respective roles of women and men in society, from the creation of masculine and feminine spaces to the gendered nature of the architectural profession. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will also uncover how the social construction of gender roles and gendered spaces are, and continue to be, inflected by race, class, and sexuality. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1407. 3 hrs. sem. ART (Fall 2018), CMP (Fall 2018), HIS (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: E. Sassin)
Cross-listed as: HARC 0338 *

GSFS 0358 Theories of Spectatorship, Audience, and Fandom (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore a range of theoretical approaches to the study of spectatorship and media audiences. How has the viewer been theorized throughout the history of film, television, and digital media? How have theoretical understandings of the relationship between viewer and media changed in the digital age? How have gender, class, and race informed cultural notions of media audiences from silent cinema to today? We will consider key theoretical readings and approaches to studying spectators, viewers, audiences, fans, and anti-fans across the history of the moving image. (FMMC 0101 or FMMC 0102 or FMMC 0104 or FMMC 0254) 3 hrs. lect./disc./3 hrs. screen. AMR, ART, CW, NOR, SOC (L. Stein)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0358 *

GSFS 0372 Gender and International Relations (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ CMP (Fall 2018), SOC (Fall 2018)
Cross-listed as: PSCI 0372 *

GSFS 0373 History of American Women: 1869-1999 (Fall 2018)

This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc. AMR, CMP, HIS, NOR (L. Povitz)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0373 *

GSFS 0435 Feminist Engaged Research (Fall 2018)

What makes research feminist? How does one conduct feminist research? How has feminist research been useful to social movements and how have movements informed feminist research? What happens to feminist research when it moves to the public sphere? In this class students learn how to produce original feminist research—how to craft research questions, write a literature review, choose relevant methodologies, and collect and analyze qualitative data. In addition to writing a research paper, students will translate their research findings into an alternative (non-academic paper) format and for an audience beyond our classroom. (GSFS 0320 or instructor approval). 3 hrs. Sem. AMR, CW, NOR, SOC (C. Thomsen)

GSFS 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required)

GSFS 0700 Senior Essay (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required)

GSFS 0710 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required)
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Department of Geography

Required for the Major: The geography major consists of 10 courses. All students who elect to major in geography must complete: GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120; GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0170 or GEOG 0150; six elective courses at the 0200 or 0300 level, at least one of which must be at the 0200 and one at the 0300 level; one 0400-level seminar.  Only one of the 0200-level courses may be numbered 0250 or above.   The electives and the seminar must be selected in consultation with, and approved by, the major advisor. At least four of the electives must be semester-long courses completed on the Middlebury Campus
  Required for a Joint Major: The Geography Department frequently offers joint majors with Environmental Studies, Computer Science, and the History of Art and Architecture, and often students design joint majors with other departments and programs. The Geography Joint Major consists of 7 courses. All joint majors must complete: GEOG 0100; GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0150; four elective courses at the 0200 or 0300 level, at least one of which must be at the 0200 and one at the 0300 level; and one 0400 level seminar. All joint majors must complete joint senior work in Geography or an equivalent. ENVS 401 satisfies the required joint work for ENVS-GEOG joint majors. At least two of the electives must be semester-long courses completed on the Middlebury Campus. Students wishing to pursue a joint major with any department or program other than Environmental Studies must submit a formal proposal to their intended Geography advisor for departmental approval. The proposal must describe the proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken.  All electives and senior work must be approved by their advisor.
  Required for a Minor: The Geography minor consists of 5 courses: GEOG 0100, GEOG 0120 or GEOG 0150, and three additional Geography courses.
  Advanced Placement: One course credit will be awarded for an advanced placement (AP) score of 5 in human geography. Geography majors who receive a 5 on the AP exam may count this course credit as one 0200-level equivalent toward their major requirements, but are still required to complete GEOG 0100. The AP credit may not be used to satisfy joint major or minor requirements.
  Departmental Honors: Students who seek to earn honors are required to write a two-credit honors thesis. They must have at least a 3.3 GPA in the major when they propose the thesis and must have a 3.5 GPA in the major, not including the thesis grade, to be considered for honors upon graduation. In order to complete a senior thesis, students must have a proposal approved by a primary thesis advisor and a secondary departmental reader prior to registering for the first 0701 credit. Upon completion of the thesis, thesis students will present their work in a public lecture and defend the thesis in front of the departmental faculty. Thesis presentations and defenses will typically take place during the final week of classes or the examination period. Upon completion of the presentation and defense, the primary advisor and secondary departmental reader will be responsible for evaluating and grading the thesis. It is strongly encouraged that students considering a thesis discuss their ideas with an advisor during the semester prior to registering for formal thesis credits. Honors will be conferred or denied on the basis of an evaluation of the thesis by the faculty and the student’s GPA in the major, as explained above.

GEOG 0100 Place and Society: Local to Global (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is an introduction to how geographers view the world and contribute to our understanding of it. Where do the phenomena of human experience occur? Why are they there? What is the significance? These questions are fundamental for explaining the world at different scales from the global to the local. Throughout, we will focus on the spatial basis of society, its continual reorganization through time, and how various human and environmental problems can be usefully analyzed from a geographic perspective. (Open only to first-year students and sophomores) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SOC (Fall 2018: P. Nelson)

GEOG 0120 Human Geography with GIS (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

How do geographers study spatial interactions between people, society, and the environment? How do factors like race, ethnicity, age, and income relate to spatial cognition, movement, settlement, and social organization? How can geographic information systems (GIS) help geographers describe, understand, and explain these spatial patterns and processes? In this course we will study applications of GIS in human geography from local to global scales. Readings and case studies will introduce and contextualize methods for using mental maps, big data, regional statistics, and network models for inquiries of gerrymandering, gentrification, spatial justice, and other topics. Students will learn to gather geographic evidence, conduct analyses with GIS, and critically present results with cartographic layouts. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SOC (Fall 2018: J. Holler)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0120

GEOG 0150 Environmental Geography with GIS (Spring 2019)

How do geographers study spatial interactions between humans and the natural world? How do patterns and processes of climate, hydrology, biogeography, geology, and geomorphology interact with human societies? How can geographic information systems (GIS) help geographers describe, understand, and explain these spatial interactions? In this course we will study applications of GIS in environmental geography from local to global scales. Case studies will introduce methods for using elevation models, remotely sensed imagery, and environmental data for inquiries of environmental change, environmental hazards, and natural resource conservation. Students will learn how to gather geographic data, perform spatial analyses, critically interpret results, and communicate findings with cartographic layouts. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0150

GEOG 0208 Land and Livelihoods - From Local to Global (Fall 2018)

How do flows of money, people, materials, and ideas connect local livelihoods to distant sites and global processes? How do geographers study patterns of poverty and inequality at different scales? How do we define human development and wellbeing, how do we determine who participates, and why does it matter? In this course we will draw from perspectives in fields ranging from development geography and political ecology to post-colonial studies to examine livelihood dynamics in the Global South. We will use texts, interviews, writing assignments, problem sets, and mapping exercises to explore relationships between economy, identity, and place in an increasingly connected world. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, CMP, SOC (J. L'Roe)

GEOG 0209 Human Geography of Hazards (Fall 2018)

Why do storms, earthquakes, and other hazards result in disastrous loss of life in some places, and only minor losses in others? In this course we will study human geographies of population, economic development, politics, and culture to explain the diverse outcomes from biophysical hazards. We will compare hazard geographies at the global, regional, and local scales using diverse approaches, including quantitative analysis, geographic information systems (GIS), and comparative case studies. We will examine how geographic analysis and technologies are used in disaster planning and response. We will practice applying human geography theory and methods to hazards research through practical exercises, exams, and research projects. 3 hrs. lect./lab CMP, SOC (J. Holler)

GEOG 0212 Urban Geography (Spring 2019)

Urban landscapes are the expression of economic, political, and socio-cultural processes layered on top of each other in particular time-space contexts. In this course, students will theoretically and empirically examine the complex and dynamic urban landscape. Students will gain a theoretical understanding of the location of cities within a larger global economic system of cities, along with the internal organization of economic, cultural, and social functions within cities. We will also examine the processes behind contemporary urban issues such as homelessness, boosterism, urban renewal, gentrification, poverty, and crime. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, NOR, SOC

GEOG 0213 Population Geography (Spring 2019)

Through a combination of lectures, readings, and exercises, this course provides background and analytical experience in the spatial dimensions of population dynamics. Students will theoretically and empirically examine geographic variations in natural increase, domestic and international migration, infant mortality, disease, and hunger. Topics will include the intersection of settlement-environment-disease, circular migration systems, cultural influences on demographic processes, and linkages between international and domestic migration flows. We will also assess various policy options and their effectiveness in addressing important demographic issues. The exercises will expose students to the vast amount of population data publicly available and introduce them to techniques used to examine and assess population related issues. AMR, DED, NOR, SOC

GEOG 0215 Political Geography (Spring 2019)

Political relations within and between states do not occur in a vacuum. Rather, they are rooted in a specific and tangible geographic context. Political geography examines the interactions between this context and political processes at various geographic scales, ranging from the local to the global level. This course will focus primarily on the state and international level and will address issues such as the territorial exercise of power, state formation, nationalism, geopolitics, and international conflicts and cooperation. 3 hrs. lect. SOC

GEOG 0220 Geopolitics of the Middle East (Fall 2018)

This course examines the Middle East from a geographical perspective with emphasis on the historical and political underpinnings of the region. The Middle East, the cradle of civilization, has been, due to its geography, one of the major arenas for political and ideological conflicts. It has been subject to an unequal power relationship with the West, which, together with Islam, has affected the level of its political, social, and economic development. This course will provide an analytical introduction to the historical, political, social, and economic geography of the region and will analyze the major transitions this region has undergone. 3 hrs.lect. AAL, CMP, MDE, SOC (T. Mayer)

GEOG 0225 Environmental Change in Latin America (Spring 2019)

This course examines Latin America from a geographical perspective with emphasis on the social, political and ecological underpinnings of change in the region. Building upon the theme of global environmental change in the context of human-environment geography, we will explore urgent challenges linked to the agricultural and extractive industries, urban expansion, land grabs, land reform, indigenous rights, and rural and urban poverty. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, AMR, SOC

GEOG 0251 Geomorphology (Fall 2018)

In this course we will investigate processes that shape the Earth's surface, including weathering, mass movements, and the effects of water, wind, and ice. Students will examine how such processes govern the evolution of landforms in differing climatic, tectonic, and lithologic settings. Field and laboratory study will focus on the role of active surficial processes, as well as glaciation and other past events, in development of the landscape of west-central Vermont. We will also discuss implications for human activities and maintenance of natural systems. (GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (J. Munroe)
Cross-listed as: GEOL 0251 *

GEOG 0325 Cartographic Design (Spring 2019)

In this course we will study principles of cartographic design in the digital era. Major topics will include cartography before computing, reference map design, wayfinding, thematic map design, realism, 3D rendering, and interactive maps. Laboratory exercises will provide opportunities for students to use graphics software and geographic information systems to implement concepts from lectures. Through a series of independent projects and group critiques, students will learn to design cartographic products that facilitate spatial thinking and effectively communicate spatial information to specialist and lay audiences. (GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART, SOC

GEOG 0326 GIS Applications in Environmental Science and Management (Fall 2018)

GIS has become an important tool for supporting spatial decisions in environmental science and management. In this course we will explore applications of GIS related to current ecological and social issues such as biodiversity conservation, invasive species, and watershed management. Students will discuss articles highlighting the benefits and limitations of GIS in conducting meaningful scientific research to inform real-world management problems. Students will gain hands-on experience with GIS in the lab and in the field, collecting environmental data, conducting spatial analyses, and using results to test hypotheses and guide the decision-making process. The course will end with a student defined research project. (GEOG 0120) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI (L. Dreiss)

GEOG 0339 Practicing Human Geography (Spring 2019)

Asking and answering geographical questions often invokes a variety of specific spatial-analytical techniques and methodologies. In Practicing Human Geography, students will employ a variety of both quantitative and qualitative methodologies in specific research contexts. Through lectures, examples, and readings, students will learn the types of questions each technique is designed to answer, how it works, and how to interpret the results. During weekly discussion sections, students will gain hands on experience with various software packages and employ these techniques to complete a series of research exercises. These research exercises, participation, and a final exam will form the basis for evaluation. (GEOG 0100, and at least one 0200-level course in geography) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED

GEOG 0413 Seminar in Population Geography: Migration in the Twenty-first Century (Fall 2018)

On average, 20 percent of the U.S. population changes residence in any given year, yet the scale, geography, motivations, and impacts of these movements are highly variable, making migration an incredibly pervasive and complex phenomenon. Furthermore, international immigration continues to attract considerable academic, political, and media attention. This course will explore contemporary approaches to migration studies emphasizing the important insights and contributions of geographers. How have geographers examined migration, and how have geographical approaches changed over time? In what ways has technology influenced the motivations, frequency, and implications of migration behavior? What are the different impacts of migration on individuals, households, and communities? And, what are the new innovations in scholarly approaches to migration? Through a combination of readings from contemporary migration literature, discussions, and analyses, students in this seminar will gain an appreciation for and understanding of this incredibly rich and complex phenomena of migration. (Open to second semester juniors and seniors only; others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (P. Nelson)

GEOG 0428 Seminar in Geographies of Climate Change Adaptation and Development (Spring 2019)

Rapid anthropogenic climate change cannot be fully mitigated, requiring humans to adapt to changing climate conditions. How will developing countries with high sensitivity and few resources manage to adapt to a changing climate? Geography is uniquely suited to research social dimensions of climate change by integrating human and physical geography in the traditions of hazards, human-environment systems, and political ecology research. In this seminar we will contrast approaches to three related concepts: resilience, vulnerability, and adaptation. We will review their use in current academic research and literature, international climate negotiations, and adaptation planning and financing in least developed countries. We will culminate the seminar with independent research into a particular case of planned climate change adaptation in a least developed country. (Senior majors only, or by approval) AAL, CMP, SAF, SOC

GEOG 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A one-credit intensive research project developed under the direction of a faculty member. Junior majors only. (Approval Required) WTR (Spring 2019: 99 seats)

GEOG 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A one-credit intensive research project developed under the direction of a faculty member. Senior majors only. (Approval Required)

GEOG 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students with a departmental GPA of 3.3 or higher are eligible to complete a two-credit senior thesis. In order to complete a senior thesis, students must have a proposal approved by a primary thesis advisor and a secondary departmental reader prior to registering for the first 0701 credit. Upon completion of the thesis, thesis students will present their work in a public seminar and defend the thesis in front of the departmental faculty. Thesis presentations and defenses will typically take place during the final week of classes or the examination period. Upon completion of the presentation and defense, the primary advisor and secondary departmental reader will be responsible for evaluating and grading the thesis. It is strongly encouraged that students considering a thesis discuss their ideas with an advisor during the semester prior to registering for formal thesis credits. (Approval only)
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Department of Geology

Required for the Major:The program for a geology major consists of 11 courses within the department and two additional cognate courses. These courses must include:

(1) One 0100-level course (we strongly recommend Environmental Geology (GEOL 0112), Elements of Oceanography (GEOL 0161) or Dynamic Earth (GEOL 0170)).

(2) Four core courses: Bedrock Geology of Vermont (GEOL 0201), Mineralogy (GEOL 0211), and Structural Geology (GEOL 0281) are required, plus either Geomorphic Processes (GEOL 0251) or Surface and Ground Water (GEOL 0255).

(3) Four elective courses (GEOL 0200-level or higher) chosen from the Middlebury geology curriculum, at least two of which must be at the GEOL 0300-level.  A maximum of two electives (total) can be GEOL 0500, courses taken off campus (with approval of the Chair), or a combination of the two.

(4) Two cognate courses (any Biology, Chemistry, or Physics laboratory course, or Math 0116 or higher).

(5) Two Credits of Senior Work (GEOL 0400 and GEOL 0700)

The two course senior sequence (GEOL 0400 and 0700) is the culmination of the geology major and consists of original research based on field and/or laboratory investigations by the student. The requirements for the major listed above are considered to be minimal. We suggest students planning a career in geology or the earth sciences take additional courses in other sciences and mathematics, as well as additional geology courses. The requirements for the major allow for considerable flexibility and thus students should consult regularly with their geology department advisors for the selection of specific courses.
 
Geology Minor: A total of five courses is required. The minor shall consist of one introductory course (either GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170), plus four higher-level courses, which must include GEOL 0201 or GEOL 0211, and at least one 0300-level course. After completing an introductory geology course, students who intend to minor in geology should arrange specific 0200- and 0300-level courses with the geology chair or designate.  Only one GEOL 0500 or off-campus course can count toward the minor.
 
Departmental Honors in geology are based primarily on outstanding work in original research (GEOL 0700), and are related to course grades only in the context of guidelines in the College Handbook.

 

GEOL 0111 Natural Hazards (Spring 2019)

Despite increasing technological sophistication, modern civilization remains vulnerable to natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, flooding, landslides, extraterrestrial impacts, and other events. In this course we will consider the geologic mechanisms behind these hazards, the societal implications of these hazards, and approaches to reducing risk. Case studies will be combined with exploration of fundamental geologic concepts to provide students a foundation for understanding risk exposure and evaluating approaches to hazard management. (Not open to students who have taken GEOL 0112 or 0170) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI

GEOL 0112 Environmental Geology (Spring 2019)

Geological processes form the physical framework on which ecosystems operate. We require an understanding of the geological environment in order to minimize disruption of natural systems by human development and to avoid hazards such as floods and landslides. This course is an overview of basic tectonic, volcanic, and landscape-forming processes and systems, including earthquakes, rivers, soils, and groundwater. Environmental effects of energy, mineral, and water resource use, and waste disposal are also examined. Weekly field labs after spring break. Registration priority for first and second-year students. 3 hrs. lect./disc., 3 hrs. lab/field trips SCI

GEOL 0142 The Ocean Floor (Spring 2019)

Have you wanted to view the ocean floor from a submersible? It is a dark but dynamic place. The constant interchange between water and sediments has created sedimentary drifts and mudwaves over 500 feet high! Earthquakes cause underwater mud avalanches that travel over 60 m.p.h. Hydrothermal vents along the ocean ridges host a variety of unusual plant and animal life. This course will explore the ocean depths via the classroom and will introduce the development of ocean basins, their evolution, and processes occurring within them (Students who have completed GEOL 0170 are not permitted to register for GEOL 0142.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SCI

GEOL 0161 Elements of Oceanography (Fall 2018)

Oceanographic exploration is introduced through study of ocean basins and continental margins. The multidisciplinary nature of oceanography is emphasized by using principles of marine geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and biology to address contemporary problems. Techniques of data collection and analysis are taught aboard the College's research vessel, R/V Folger, located on Lake Champlain. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips DED, SCI (T. Manley)

GEOL 0170 The Dynamic Earth (Fall 2018)

Sea-floor spreading and continental drift, earthquakes and volcanoes, origin and evolution of mountain systems, and concepts of plate tectonics are viewed in light of the geology of ocean basins and continents. Modern processes such as river, coastal, wind, and glaciers will be studied and their effect on shaping the geologic landscape. Laboratory: field problems in Vermont geology; interpretation of geologic maps, regional tectonic synthesis. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab/field trips SCI (D. West)

GEOL 0201 Bedrock Geology of Vermont (Fall 2018)

This course explores the fascinating geology of Vermont. Students learn the geology through six field problems, involving extended trips around western Vermont. Lectures on the meaning of rocks support the fieldwork. The last few indoor labs are devoted to understanding the geologic map of Vermont. Emphasis is on descriptive writing and on use of data to interpret origin of rocks. Culminates in a written report on the geologic and plate tectonic evolution of Vermont. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips CW, SCI (K. Walowski)

GEOL 0211 Mineralogy (Spring 2019)

This course covers the nature, identification, composition, and meaning of minerals and mineral assemblages. Introduction to crystallography, hand-specimen identification, optical mineralogy, x-ray analysis, and electron microbeam analysis. Laboratory: study of minerals in hand-specimen and under the polarizing microscope; use of x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy in mineral analysis. (One geology course) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab SCI

GEOL 0221 The Geology of Climate Change (Spring 2019)

In this course we will discuss how external forces and internal feedbacks within the Earth system govern climate. Specific topics will include orbital variability, changes in ocean circulation, CO2 uptake in terrestrial ecosystems, and molecular vibrational controls on infrared absorption and Earth's heat budget. We will then examine climate change through Earth's history as evidenced by a number of geologic proxies including the sedimentary record, ice cores, isotopic records, glaciers, soils, and tree rings. Ultimately our improved understanding of past climates will provide a context within which to discuss future changes to come. (one Geology course) SCI

GEOL 0222 Remote Sensing in Environmental Science (Fall 2018)

In this course we will discuss fundamentals of air- and space-based remote sensing applied to geological and environmental problems. The core goal is to understand how different wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation interact with Earth's surface, and how images collected in these different wavelengths can be used to address questions in the Earth sciences. Lectures will present theory and basics of data collection as well as applications in hydrology, vegetation analysis, glaciology, tectonics, meteorology, oceanography, planetary exploration, and resource exploration. Labs will focus on commonly-used imagery and software to learn techniques for digital image processing, analysis and interpretation in Earth science. (A geology course or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs lab SCI (W. Amidon)

GEOL 0251 Geomorphology (Fall 2018)

In this course we will investigate processes that shape the Earth's surface, including weathering, mass movements, and the effects of water, wind, and ice. Students will examine how such processes govern the evolution of landforms in differing climatic, tectonic, and lithologic settings. Field and laboratory study will focus on the role of active surficial processes, as well as glaciation and other past events, in development of the landscape of west-central Vermont. We will also discuss implications for human activities and maintenance of natural systems. (GEOL 0112 or GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab DED, SCI (J. Munroe)
Cross-listed as: GEOG 0251

GEOL 0300 Introduction to Petrology (Spring 2019)

An introduction to processes involved in the formation of igneous and metamorphic rocks. The first half of the course includes inquiry into the classification, plate tectonic setting, and evolution of volcanic and plutonic igneous rocks. The second half includes study of progressive metamorphism, the pressure-temperature- time history of metamorphic rocks, and the relation between metamorphism and plate tectonics. Labs will include thin section studies of igneous and metamorphic rocks, as well as field trips in Vermont and the Adirondacks. (GEOL 0211) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab/field trips

GEOL 0342 Marine Geology (Fall 2018)

The oceans cover over 70 percent of the Earth's surface, but only in the last few decades has extensive investigation of the geology of the Earth beneath the sea been possible. This course will present the results of these continuing investigations. Although the whole field of marine geology will be reviewed, the emphasis will be on marine sediments and sedimentary processes and paleoceangraphy. Laboratory: synthesis of geological and geophysical data concerning a selected region of the ocean, with special emphasis on the results of the Deep Sea Drilling Project. (GEOL 0161 or GEOL 0170) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab (P. Manley)

GEOL 0400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (Fall 2018)

This seminar will focus on methods and strategies for completing advanced geological research and provides a springboard for senior thesis research. Topics will include field and laboratory techniques, primary literature review, and scientific writing. Students taking this course are expected to be simultaneously working on the early stages of their senior thesis research. During the semester students will present a thesis proposal and the seminar will culminate with each student completing a draft of the first chapter of their senior thesis. GEOL 0400 is required of all geology majors. 3 hrs. disc. or lab (D. West)

GEOL 0500 Readings and Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Individual or group independent study, laboratory or field research projects, readings and discussion of timely topics in earth and environmental science. (Approval only)

GEOL 0700 Senior Thesis Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Upon completion of GEOL 0400, all senior geology majors will continue their independent senior thesis research by taking one unit of GEOL 0700. This research will culminate in a written thesis which must be orally defended. (Approval only)
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Department of German

Requirements for the Major: Students are normally required to complete eight courses in German, above GRMN 0299, including at least one advanced level seminar (above GRMN 0399) or a 0700 level honors thesis during the senior year. Where appropriate, one course may be taken in English. At the beginning of each term a placement test is administered for incoming students to determine which course would be most suitable for their level of competence. The department expects that majors will spend at least one semester of study in a German-speaking country before graduating. Normally, they will spend one or two semesters at the Freie Universität in Berlin and/or the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität in Mainz. Before enrolling in one of our Schools in Germany, students must complete two courses at the 0300-level. For more information, please consult Study in Germany.
     Honors: To be a candidate for honors, students must have an average of at least B+ in German. Honors work (a senior thesis or project) is normally done during a student's last year at Middlebury.
     Minor in German: The German minor consists of a sequence of five courses, taught in German, starting at or above the 0200-level. At least three of those courses must be at the 0300-level or higher. First-year students who place above the 0200-level in the placement test must take at least one 0400-level course as part of their minor. One course may be satisfied through advanced placement (AP) credit in combination with a departmental placement test. Students who receive AP credit start their minor on the 0300-level.
     Credit for Advanced Placement is given for scores of 4 or 5, a high score on the departmental placement test, and a placement conference with the student. In addition, the student must successfully complete at least one course above the 0200-level in the department, taught in German, to qualify for AP credit.
     Germany: The Middlebury School in Germany has sites located in Berlin and Mainz.

GRMN 0101 Beginning German (Fall 2018)

Geared toward quick and early proficiency in comprehension and free expression. Grammatical structures are practiced through group activities and situational exercises (e.g., role-playing games and partner interviews). Active class participation by students is required and will be counted toward the final grade. Since this is an integrated approach, there will be laboratory assignments but no special drill sections. Classes meet five times a week. Students take GRMN 0102 as their winter term course. 5 hrs. sem. LNG (F. Feiereisen, M. Hofmann)

GRMN 0103 Beginning German Continued (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of GRMN 0101 and 0102. Increased emphasis on communicative competence through short oral presentations and the use of authentic German language materials (videos, songs, slides). Introduction to short prose writings and other documents relating to contemporary German culture. Five class meetings per week. (GRMN 0101 plus winter term GRMN 0102, or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect. LNG

GRMN 0111 Accelerated Beginning German (Spring 2019)

This class is aimed at students who wish to begin the study of German on the fast lane. In one semester, we will cover a year's material, the equivalent of GRMN 0101, 0102, and 0103. We will develop all four skills in an intensive, immersion-style environment, allowing students to continue German in the regular second-year classes in the fall. Classes meet five times per week, including two 75-minute meetings on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and an additional drill session. Students are expected to fully participate in all departmental activities. No prerequisites. 6 hr lect./disc./1 hr. drill LNG

GRMN 0201 Intermediate German (Fall 2018)

GRMN 0201/0202 is a culture-based intermediate language sequence that focuses students' attention on intercultural aspects of language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, reading and writing strategies, and a review of grammar. It moves from a focus on issues of individual identity and personal experiences to a discussion of Germany today (GRMN 0201), explores national identity in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and supplies an overview of cultural history, literary achievements, and philosophical traditions in the German-speaking world (GRMN 0103 or equivalent) 4 hrs. sem. EUR, LNG (B. Matthias, R. Graf)

GRMN 0202 Intermediate German Continued (Spring 2019)

GRMN 0201/0202 is a culture-based intermediate language sequence that focuses students' attention on intercultural aspects of language acquisition, vocabulary expansion, reading and writing strategies, and a review of grammar. It moves from a focus on issues of individual identity and personal experiences to a discussion of Germany today (GRMN 0201), explores national identity in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and supplies an overview of cultural history, literary achievements, and philosophical traditions in the German-speaking world (GRMN 0201) 4 hrs. sem. EUR, LNG

GRMN 0350 Advanced Writing Workshop (Fall 2018)

The goal of this course is to train students to present their thoughts, ideas, and arguments in correct, coherent, and effective writing. Students will practice writing several text forms that are required in higher education and, during study abroad. Students will also learn about format requirements for writing a longer term paper in German. Some class time will be used for creative, structured, or contemplative writing practice. Students will expand their active vocabulary and aim for a consistently high level of grammatical accuracy. Grammar topics will be covered within the context of writing, through targeted teaching of linguistic structures and peer-editing/peer-teaching sessions. (Formerly GRMN 0304) 3 hrs. sem. CW (10 seats), LNG (B. Matthias)

GRMN 0360 German in Its Cultural Contexts (Fall 2018)

The course invites students to explore social and cultural developments in Germany from 1871 to the present day from a historical perspective. We begin by examining Germany’s birth as a nation state and end by looking at recent events in today’s reunified Federal Republic. The course aims to lay the foundation for a critical understanding of German culture in its contemporary global context. Writing the biographies of fictional Germans throughout the semester, students will follow the radical changes in German society during the (long) twentieth century and gain an understanding how ‘ordinary’ people in Germany might have lived. A montage of written and visual materials will expose students to elite, mainstream, and marginal cultures alike. Taught in German. (Formerly GRMN 0310) 3 hrs. lect. CW (5 seats), EUR, HIS, LNG (F. Feiereisen)

GRMN 0410 Austrian Horror Film (Fall 2018)

While horror movies are often looked down upon as a genre full of stereotypical characters and plot lines, they also allow important insights into cultural phenomena, psychological processes, and societal structures. In this course we will focus on horror movies from Austria, taking them as a point of departure for a discussion of the genre and its subgenres beyond Hollywood. It will also serve as an introduction to film analysis, genre theory, and affect theory, as well as cultural comparisons between Austria and the US. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CMP, EUR, LNG (M. Hofmann)

GRMN 0490 Unreliable Narration in German Literature, Film, and Media (Spring 2019)

Unreliable narration has been employed as a literary strategy for centuries, with one of its most prominent examples from literary history being the 1816 novel Der Sandmann by E.T.A. Hoffmann. Yet, unreliable narration has become a more prevalent phenomenon in recent years, both in fiction as well as nonfiction. In this course we will examine and theorize how it has become such a trend; analyze examples from German literature, film, and media; and learn about narratological concepts that allow an adequate discussion of these works. 3 hrs. sem EUR, LIT, LNG

GRMN 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval only)

GRMN 0700 Honors Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval only)
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Global Health Minor

The purpose of the Global Health minor is to encourage students to take an interdisciplinary perspective when thinking about global health problems. The minor in Global Health is more flexible than many other majors and minors on campus. Students design a course of study within the minor that fits their own educational goals. Choosing courses therefore requires substantial thought and planning on the part of the student.

The minor in Global Health is available to students who complete the courses listed below. No course for the minor may also count towards a student’s major. No more than two courses taken from the same department may count towards the minor.

All students must take a total of five courses for the minor:

(1) the core course:

SOAN 0267 Global Health or INTD 0257 Global Health

(2) One of the following methods courses (if the methods requirement is met through coursework for a major, students may substitute an additional elective in place of a methods class):

BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis
ECON 0210 Economic Statistics
GEOG 0120 Human Geography with GIS
GEOG 0150 ENV Geography with GIS
MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science
PSCI 1130 Statistics for Social Sciences
PSYC 0201 Psychological Statistics
SOAN 0302 The Research Process: Ethnography and Qualitative Methods
AP credit for Statistics

(3) Three elective courses; no more than one course may be a 0100-level course. Classes that count as electives are listed on the “Courses” tab.

Many other appropriate courses exist on campus, depending on the educational goals of a particular student. Courses may be substituted for the methods or elective courses with the approval of the program director.  Approval requires submission of a petition form found here.  Approval of a course for minor credit requires the student to show that they made connections between the course material and their study of Global Health, for example by writing a final paper on a public health topic. Students must turn in this paper or other approved course material for review for credit.

To declare the minor, submit the following to the Program Director: (1) a minor declaration form (http://www.middlebury.edu/offices/academic/records/Forms/stuforms) and (2) a 200-500 word statement explaining how the classes you chose fit together and further your educational goals within the field of Global Health. To declare the minor, these materials must be submitted at least one week before the end of the add period of your seventh semester at Middlebury.

In addition, students minoring in Global Health are strongly encouraged to take advantage of Middlebury’s resources by studying abroad, preferably in a program with health-related courses, and by becoming proficient in a foreign language.

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Hebrew Minor

Middlebury offers courses in both Classical and Modern Hebrew, and students may focus on one or the other in the Minor in Hebrew.  (Knowledge of one stage in the history of Hebrew may complement the other; students may therefore combine the study of Classical and Modern Hebrew, within the guidelines below.)  Courses taken in the summer at the Brandeis University-Middlebury School of Hebrew will be granted credit toward the minor.  Courses taken elsewhere may be granted credit with the permission of the Hebrew faculty.

Students should plan the minor with following limitations in mind:

a.        Beginning Modern Hebrew is offered every fall term. 

b.       Beginning Classical Hebrew is normally offered in alternate years with the next sequence beginning in the 2012-2013 academic year.

Requirements for the Minor

Modern Track:
(I) Four semesters of Modern Hebrew starting at the level of HEBM 0102 or higher; plus (II) a fifth course in Modern Hebrew, or a course taken abroad in Hebrew, or a course on Hebrew literature in translation (e.g. HEBR 0220), or a course in Classical Hebrew beyond the introductory level (HEBR 0102 or higher).  When appropriate, students may also register for independent study (HEBM 0500) to fulfill requirements for a course in Modern Hebrew.

Classical Track:
(I) Three semesters of Classical Hebrew (HEBR 0101-0102-0201 or higher); (II) either CLAS/RELI 0262 The Formation of Judaism in Antiquity or RELI 0280 Hebrew Bible/Old Testament; plus (III) either a fourth semester of Classical Hebrew (HEBR 0301 or higher) or a course in Modern Hebrew beyond the introductory level (HEBM 0102 or higher).

HEBR 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018)

Approval required.

HEBM 0101 Introductory Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2018)

In this course students will become acquainted with the basic grammatical and formal concepts necessary for the comprehension of the Modern Hebrew language. We will focus on the fundamentals of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with a particular emphasis placed on the acquisition of conversational ability. We will also make use of audiovisual, situational, and cultural exercises, and give attention to the elements of Classical form and style that provided a foundation for Modern Hebrew, which was revived as a vernacular in the late 19th century. No previous knowledge of Hebrew is required. 6 hrs. LNG (F. Alasiri)

HEBM 0103 Introductory Modern Hebrew III (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of Modern Hebrew 0102 which will be offered during winter term. Students will further develop their skills in written and oral communication, and will expand their knowledge of the cultures of modern Israel through both audio and visual media. (HEBM 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect. LNG

HEBM 0201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2018)

This course is a continuation of HEBM 0103. Using authentic audio and visual materials, we will place emphasis on developing the skills required for intermediate-level written and communicative competence. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the forms and style of Classical Hebrew, both of which are necessary for formal composition, interaction, and reading comprehension in Modern Hebrew. (HEBM 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc LNG (O. Aloni)

HEBM 0202 Intermediate Modern Hebrew II (Spring 2019)

This is the fifth in the sequence of Modern Hebrew courses that focus on the acquisition of reading, listening, writing, and speaking skills. This course will further increase the students' fluency in spoken Hebrew, as well as their facility in reading authentic texts dealing with both secular and religious Jewish cultures, the literature of modern-day Israel, Israeli history, and current events. By the end of the semester, students should attain the level of educated, non-native speakers of Modern Hebrew, in terms of knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, composition, and communicative competence. (HEBM 0201 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc. AAL, LNG, MDE

HEBM 0234 State and Society in Contemporary Israel (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine Israeli society and politics in a period of rapid and profound transformation. We will begin with an introductory unit on Zionism, Palestinian nationalism, and the history of the state. Subsequent units will examine the social, cultural, and political characteristics of Israel’s main population sectors and religious groupings. The final units will examine ongoing political struggles, including struggles over the role of religion in public life; civil rights and democracy; and West Bank settlements and the Palestinian-Israeli peace process. Most readings assignments will be social scientific in nature but will also include journalism and literature. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, MDE, SOC
Cross-listed as: SOAN 0234

HEBM 0254 Rites and Rituals: Israel and its Neighbors (Fall 2018)

In this course we will use theory and case studies, from Israel and its neighbors, to explore a wide range of rituals. We will examine national goals achieved with the assistance of ceremonies, and society’s imprint on its members through life-cycle rituals. We will address similarities and differences in the ways specific rituals are performed, and the diverse meanings they may hold for groups and individuals in geographically proximate yet culturally distinct countries, and in the heterogeneous Israeli society. Our aim is to analyze cultural repertoires and social relations, as are represented, reproduced, and contested in ritualistic activities. 3 hrs. lect CMP, SOC (Z. Gazit)
Cross-listed as: SOAN 0254

HEBM 0261 The Sleeping Beauty: Themes in the Cultural and Linguistic History of the Hebrew Language (Spring 2019)

The Hebrew Language has been awakened. In this course we will explore when, where, why, and by whom was this Sleeping Beauty revived; how both its awakening and hibernation has been connected to linguistic, cultural, and societal transformation over 25 centuries. We will examine poetry, liturgy, Midrash, and other writing by philosophers, poets, linguists, and religious leaders. We will discuss the connection of the revival of the language to the Zionist movement. Throughout the course we will try to answer questions such as: Why do we regard Hebrew as one and the same language after three millennia of constant linguistic change? Was the revival of Hebrew a miracle or a failure? How did Hebrew influence Jewish practices of exegesis? This course counts towards the Jewish Studies minor (JWTS). 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW, SOC
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0261

HEBM 0263 Representation in Modern Hebrew Literature: Nation and Identities (Fall 2018)

Modern Hebrew literature, in its relatively short history, presents exceptional richness. In this course we will explore the theme of nation and identity in modern Hebrew literature: we will visit the personal lyricism of Bialik and his circle, the encyclopedic prose of Agnon, the troubled stream of consciousness of Gnessin, the stark realism of Brenner, the symbolism of Alterman, and the deliberately thin post-modern prose of Keret. We will meet modern Hebrew literature’s remarkable achievements as well as its points of crisis. We will also explore its deep historical roots which make modern Hebrew literature so unique. All readings in the course will be in English. 3 hrs. lect./disc AAL, CMP, LIT, MDE (O. Aloni)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0263

HEBM 0301 Advanced Intermediate Hebrew (Fall 2018)

This course will reinforce the acquired skills of speaking, listening comprehension,reading, and writing at the intermediate to mid/high level. We will focus primarily on contemporary cultural aspects, conversational Hebrew, reading of selections from Modern Literature: prose and poetry, skits, and newspaper articles. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LNG, MDE (O. Aloni)

HEBM 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)
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Department of History

All students declaring a History major or joint major in the Fall of 2018 or later will adopt the following requirements.  Students who declared their major prior to Fall 2018 may choose to adopt these requirements or follow the old requirements.

Required for the Major in History: Students must take 11 history courses before graduation including: (1) at least one but no more than three 0100-level courses; (2) three courses, 0200-level or above, in three of the following six areas: Americas; Europe; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; South and Southeast Asia, including the Pacific; North Asia including China, Korea, Japan, and the Asian Steppes; (3) two 0400-level reading seminars in two different geographical regions, one of which may be trans-regional for those not writing a thesis OR one 0400-level reading seminar for those writing a thesis; (4) HIST 0600.

Of the eleven courses required for the major, one must be trans-regional or comparative and two must deal primarily with the period before 1800. Courses which qualify as comparative or for the pre-1800 requirement are identified in the course descriptions and a list is available from the department. In addition to winter term senior thesis study, one other winter term history course may be counted toward the eleven courses necessary for a major in history. Students planning to spend all or part of the junior year abroad should consult with the department before the second semester of their sophomore year. Students planning to go abroad or away for a full year may request to have a maximum of three courses count towards the major. Students planning to go abroad for one semester may request to have a maximum of two courses count towards the major. Upon their return to Middlebury, students must fill out the transfer of credit form from the Registrar’s office  and have it signed by the chair as soon as possible. 400 seminars must be taken in the history department at Middlebury. Cognates or other departmental seminars will not be accepted.

Honors Thesis: Students who have earned a minimum 3.5 GPA in at least 5 history department courses (including up to two courses taken abroad) and at least a B+ in HIST 0600, are eligible to write a two-term honors thesis (HIST 0700). See information below.

 Advanced Placement: Up to two AP history courses, with a grade of 4 or 5, can count toward the major requirement of 11 history courses, but cannot be used to fulfill any specific requirements listed above. Students counting AP European History may not count HIST 0103 or 0104 toward the major, and those counting AP U.S. History may not count HIST 0203 or 0204 toward the major.

 Joint Major Requirements: Students must take a total of at least eight courses in history, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. Cognates are not allowed. A student must take: (1) at least one course in two of the following six areas: Americas; Europe; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; South, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific; North Asia including China, Korea, Japan, and the Asian Steppes and one course that is trans-regional or comparative. The choice of courses should depend upon the need to achieve an intellectual coherence and integrity in the student's program; (2) two 0400-level reading seminars, one of which must be taken in the senior year and enable students to combine work from both disciplines, or one 0400-level reading seminar for those writing a thesis.  (3) HIST 0600. 400 seminars must be taken in the history department at Middlebury. Cognates or other departmental seminars will not be accepted.

 Joint Major Honors Thesis: Students who have earned a minimum 3.5 GPA in at least 5 History department courses (including up to two courses taken abroad) and at least a B+ in HIST 0600 may choose to write a two-term honors thesis (HIST 0700).  Joint majors choosing to write a thesis must combine the skills of both major disciplines in their thesis.

 Minor Requirements: Students must take at least five courses, including one 0100-level course, one 0200-level course and one 0400-level course. Students are strongly encouraged to take HIST 0600 as one of the elective courses. No more than two courses may be taken abroad or at another undergraduate institution. Cognate courses cannot be counted towards the joint major. AP and IB credit cannot be counted towards a minor in history.

 HIST 0100-Level Courses
These courses deal with events and processes that affect human societies over long periods of time and across broad geographical areas not confined to national boundaries. Courses include components that act as introductions to the field of history.

HIST 0200-Level Courses
These are lecture courses that deal with a single cultural or national entity, or a clearly related group of such entities, over a substantial period of time (usually a century or more).

HIST 0300-Level Courses
These courses, for the most part, are topically focused courses. Many of them are lecture courses and some are taught in a seminar format. These are not, however, seminars that fulfill the reading seminar requirement.

HIST 0400–Level Reading Seminars
These topically based seminars, which usually meet once a week involve reading and analyzing texts, discussions, student presentations, historiography and writing or producing a final project. The history department offers many types of seminars: seminars on a topic within a given country or region; transnational or global seminars, digital humanities seminars and public history seminars.  Seminars are open to all students except those designated for seniors and juniors. See course description for requirements. A list of seminars is available from the department.

HIST 0600: Writing History
In this course students discuss historical methods and writing strategies to create convincing historical narratives.  With the approval and guidance of the professor, students complete a 20-25-page research paper based on primary and secondary sources. Students take this course in their junior year or if they are away for the entire junior year in the fall of their senior year.

HIST 0700 Senior Honors Thesis
If students have earned a minimum 3.5 GPA in at least 5 History department courses (including up to two courses taken abroad) and at least a B+ in HIST 0600, they may choose to write a two-term honors thesis (HIST 0700). Writing a thesis is a prerequisite for departmental honors. Students must submit a thesis proposal to the department chair and coordinator one week prior to course registration for the term in which the thesis is to be started. Students opting to write a thesis must also take at least one 0400-level reading seminar prior to graduation, but preferably before their last semester at Middlebury. Students may not write a thesis in the same semester that they are taking HIST 0600. If students submit a request to write a senior thesis in the semester in which they are taking HIST 0600, they may receive conditional approval pending the completion and grade in HIST 0600.

Approved students will write a two-term thesis under an advisor in the area of their choosing. The department strongly encourages students to write their theses during the fall and winter terms. Winter/Spring theses are also acceptable with the permission of the chair and the theses advisor. On rare occasions and for compelling reasons, a student may initiate a thesis in the spring of an academic year and finish in the fall of the following year with the approval of the department. All students beginning their thesis in a given academic year must attend the Thesis Writers' Workshops held in the fall and winter of that year. Further information about the thesis is available from the department.

Overall History Honors: To receive departmental honors, high honors*, or highest honors** students must have completed an honors thesis (HIST0700) with a grade of B+, A-*, or A** and must have achieved an overall average of at least 3.5, 3.67*, or 3.75** in all departmental courses.

 Students who declared prior to Fall 2018 may follow the old requirements:

Required for the Major in History: For students who entered prior to Fall 2017, each major must take 11 history courses before graduation, including: (1) at least one but no more than three 0100-level courses; (2) at least one course in European history (which may include Russia/Soviet Union); (3) at least one course in United States history; (4) and at least one course in the history of Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, or Russia/Soviet Union, all to be taken at the 0200-level or higher.  (A course in Russia/Soviet Union may not be used for more than one geographical area);  (5) a 0400-level reading seminar; (6) HIST 0600; (7) a two-term senior thesis, which counts as two of the required 11 courses.

Two of the courses required for the major must deal primarily with the period before 1800. Courses which qualify for the pre-1800 requirement are identified in the course descriptions and a list is available from the department. In addition to winter term senior thesis study, one other winter term history course may be counted toward the eleven courses necessary for a major in history. Under extenuating circumstances, and with the written permission of the chair, one cognate course in historical aspects of other disciplines may count toward a major in history. Students planning to spend all or part of the junior year abroad should consult with the department before the second semester of the sophomore year.  Students planning to go abroad or away for a full year may request to have a maximum of three courses count towards the major. Students planning to go abroad for one semester may request to have a maximum of two courses count towards the major. Upon their return to Middlebury, students must fill out the transfer of credit form from the Registrar’s office  and have it signed by the chair as soon as possible.

Students entering in Fall 2017 or later must take 11 history courses before graduation, including: (1) at least one but no more than three 0100-level courses; (2) three courses, 0200-level or above, in three of the following six areas: Americas; Europe; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; South, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific; North Asia including China, Korea, Japan, and the Asian Steppes; (3) a 0400-level reading seminar; (4) HIST 0600; (5) a two-term senior thesis, which counts as two of the required 11 courses.

Students must also follow the pre-1800, winter term, and cognate requirements listed in the paragraph above.

Advanced Placement: Up to two AP history courses, with a grade of 4 or 5, can count toward the major requirement of 11 history courses, but cannot be used to fulfill any specific requirements listed above. Students counting AP European History may not count HIST 0103 or 0104 toward the major, and those counting AP U.S. History may not count HIST 0203 or 0204 toward the major.

Joint Major: For students who entered prior to Fall 2017, a student who is a joint major in history and another department must take a total of at least eight courses in history, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. Cognates are not allowed. A student must take at least one course in two of three sub-fields: Europe, North America, and AAL (Asia, Africa, Latin America, Middle East, Russia/Soviet Union), and one course in the period before 1800. The choice of courses should depend upon the need to achieve an intellectual coherence and integrity in the student's program. Joint majors must take a 0400-level reading seminar, HIST 0600, and must write a two-term thesis combining the skills of both major disciplines.

Students entering in Fall 2017 or later must take a total of at least eight courses in history, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. Cognates are not allowed. A student must take at least one course in two of the following six areas: Americas; Europe; Middle East and North Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa; South, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific; North Asia including China, Korea, Japan, and the Asian Steppes. The choice of courses should depend upon the need to achieve an intellectual coherence and integrity in the student's program. Joint majors must take a 0400-level reading seminar, HIST 0600, and must write a two-term thesis combining the skills of both major disciplines.

Minors in History: Students must take a total of five courses, including one 0100-level course, one 0200-level course and one 0400-level course. No more than two courses may be taken abroad or at another undergraduate institution. Cognate courses from other disciplines will not normally be permitted.
AP and IB credit cannot be counted towards a minor in history.

Honors: To earn departmental honors, high honors*, or highest honors** a student must have at least a 3.4, 3.5*, or 3.67** average or above in history department courses other than the senior thesis, have an oral examination on the senior thesis, and receive a grade of at least B+, A-*, or A** on the thesis (HIST 0700).

HIST 0100-Level Courses
The 0100-level courses (0100-0199) deal with events and processes that affect human societies over long periods of time and across broad geographical areas not confined to national boundaries. These courses include components that act as introductions to the field of history.

HIST 0200-Level Courses
These are lecture courses that deal with a single cultural or national entity, or a clearly related group of such entities, over a substantial period of time (usually a century or more).

HIST 0300-Level Courses
These courses, for the most part, are topically focused courses. Many of them are lecture courses and some are taught in a seminar format. These are not, however, seminars that fulfill the reading seminar requirement.

HIST 0400–Level Reading Seminars
Unlike the courses below the 0400 level, which are primarily lecture courses, these courses are reading seminars on particular periods or topics. They are open to all students, although in cases of overcrowding, history majors will be given priority. First-year students are admitted only by waiver.

HIST 0600 Research Seminar
All history majors are required to take HIST 0600 their junior fall or, if abroad at that time, their senior fall semester. In this course students will conceive, research, and write a work of history based on primary source material. After reading and discussion on historical methods and research strategies, students will pursue a paper topic as approved by the course professors.

International and Global Studies Seminars
These seminars are "capstone" courses required for the International and Global Studies major. They are thematic, interdisciplinary, cross-regional, and team-taught. Students who are not International and Global Studies majors may take these courses for departmental credit, but they will not normally fulfill the History Department major requirement of a 0400-level seminar.

HIST 0700 Senior Independent Study
All senior history majors will write a two-term thesis under an advisor in the area of their choosing. The department encourages students to do their theses during the fall and winter terms. Fall/spring theses are also acceptable and, with permission of the chair, winter/spring. On rare occasions, with departmental approval given for compelling reasons, a thesis may be initiated in the spring of an academic year and finished in the fall of the following year. All students beginning their thesis in a given academic year must attend the Thesis Writers' Workshops held in the fall and winter of that year. Further information about the thesis is available from the department.

 

HIST 0105 The Atlantic World, 1492-1900 (Fall 2018)

Linking the Americas with Europe and Africa, the Atlantic has been a major conduit for the movement of peoples, goods, diseases, and cultures. This course will explore specific examples of transatlantic interchange, from imperialism and slave trade to religious movements, consumerism, and the rise of national consciousness. It will adopt a broad comparative perspective, ranging across regional, national ,and ethnic boundaries. We will consider the varied experiences of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans as they struggled to establish their own identities within a rapidly changing Atlantic world. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. CMP, HIS, SOC (W. Hart)

HIST 0109 History of Islam and the Middle East, Since 1453 (Fall 2018)

This course is an introduction to the major institutions that evolved under the aegis of what we might call Islamic civilization since the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453. The principal geographic areas covered are the Middle East and North Africa. Major topics include the rise of the Ottoman and Safavid Empires, Western intervention and colonialism, nationalism and state formation, and the challenges of and responses to modernization. Pre-1800. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AAL, HIS, MDE (F. Armanios)

HIST 0110 Modern South Asia (Fall 2018)

This course is an introduction to the history of South Asia. We will examine such events as the remarkable rise and fall of the Mughal empire (1526-1700s), the transformation of the once-humble English East India Company into a formidable colonial state (1700s-1858), the emergence of nationalist and anti-imperialist movements led by people such as Mahatma Gandhi and M.A. Jinnah (1858-1947), and the establishment and recent histories of the new nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Readings will include primary sources, history textbooks, historical novels, and newspaper articles. We will also watch at least one historical film. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, SOA (I. Barrow)

HIST 0112 Modern East Asia (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine East Asian history from 1800 to the present. We will study the “Chinese World Order,” the patterns of European imperialism that led to this order’s demise, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, and 20th century wars and revolutions. We will concentrate on the emergence of Japan, China, and Korea as distinct national entities and on the socio-historical forces that have bound them together and pried them apart. We will seek a broader understanding of imperialism, patterns of nationalism and revolution, and Cold War configurations of power in East Asia. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. AAL, CMP, HIS, NOA, SOC (M. Clinton)

HIST 0117 Diasporas in History (Fall 2018)

Disruptions, disasters, and dreams have led to migrations and diasporas for millennia. In this course we explore the global flow of people across political boundaries throughout history. We will use specific case studies from (but not limited to) the African, Jewish, Latin American, and Asian diasporas to challenge the idea of the unified nation-state, meanings of race and assimilation, and ideas of belonging to more than one place. We will analyze how nationalists divide “natives” and “migrants” and utilize Adichie’s idea of “the danger of the single story” to study intersectional alliances within and across diaspora groups. Students will choose a research topic on a diaspora community of their interest and be required to make direct contact with the communities we study. 3 hrs. sem. CMP, CW (5 seats), HIS, SOC (D. Davis)

HIST 0132 History of Rome (Fall 2018)

This course is an introductory survey of Roman history, from the emergence of the Republic to the influence of Rome on the western world. In the first half of the course we will study the origins of Rome's rise to dominance, the conquest of the Mediterranean and its effect on Roman society, and the crumbling of political structures under the weight of imperial expansion. In the second half, we will study the empire more broadly, starting with the emperors and moving out to the daily lives of people around the Mediterranean. The course will end with the importance of Rome for the Founding Fathers. We will read from authors including Polybius, Plutarch, Appian, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus, Juvenal, and Pliny. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS, LIT (J. Chaplin)
Cross-listed as: CLAS 0132 *

HIST 0216 History of the American West (Fall 2018)

This is a survey of the history of the trans-Mississippi West from colonial contact through the 1980s. It explores how that region became known and understood as the West, and its role and meaning in United States history as a whole. The central themes of this course are conquest and its legacy, especially with regard to the role of the U.S. federal government in the West; human interactions with and perceptions of landscape and environment; social contests among different groups for a right to western resources and over the meanings of western identity; and the role of the West in American popular culture. (formerly HIST/AMST 0374) 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (K. Morse)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0216

HIST 0231 Imperial China (Spring 2019)

China’s is the world’s oldest continuous civilization, and we will survey the history of the Chinese empire from its cultural beginnings until the conflicts with the West in the 1840s and the internal unrest of the 1850s and 1860s. Our study of China’s political progression through successive dynasties will reveal archetypal patterns of historical disruption amidst continuity. We will also examine those perennial social, institutional, and intellectual forces — such as the stratification of the classes, the absolutist tendencies of monarchy, and the civilly-focused yet competitive atmosphere fostered by a state-sponsored examination culture — that proved determinative in shaping China’s traditional development. AAL, HIS, NOA, SOC

HIST 0232 Modern China (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine the history of China from the early 19th century through the end of the Maoist period. Readings, lectures, and discussions will familiarize students with the cultural and social structures of the late Qing Empire, patterns of semi-colonialism, the rise of nationalist, feminist, and Marxist movements, and key events in the People’s Republic of China. Students will emerge from the class with a broader understanding of forms of empire and imperialism, anti-colonial nationalism, non-Western Marxism, and the tendencies of a post-socialist state. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. AAL, HIS, NOA, SOC

HIST 0235 History of Pre-Modern Japan (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the social, cultural, and institutional history of Japan from the eighth century up through the rise of the Tokugawa shogunate in the 17th century. The course is organized thematically to illuminate the different periods of Japanese history, including the imperial origin myth and Heian culture, the frontier and the rise of samurai government, localism and the warring states period, and finally the Tokugawa settlement and the paradoxes of centralized feudalism. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect/disc. AAL, CW (10 seats), HIS, NOA, SOC (M. Ward)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0235

HIST 0237 Chinese Philosophy (Fall 2018)

A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, NOA, PHL (D. Wyatt)
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0237

HIST 0244 Society and Culture in Early Modern Europe (Spring 2019)

War, famine, and disease marked the terrible "iron century" of European history, from 1550 to 1660. Out of this frightful crucible, modern society was created. We will trace this troubled genesis from the aftershocks of the Reformation to the first rumblings of the French Revolution, stressing the conflicts that gave rise to the modern world: monarchy vs. "liberty," religion vs. "enlightenment," elite vs. popular culture. Topics such as the family, witchcraft, warfare, and fashion will be given special attention. Instructor: Paul Monod. 3 hr lect/disc. EUR, HIS, SOC

HIST 0246 History of Modern Europe: 1900-1989 (Spring 2019)

Revolution in Eastern Europe and unification in Western Europe have reshaped the contours of the 20th century. This course will move from turn-of-the-century developments in mass culture and politics through World War I and II, the rise and fall of fascism, and on into the postwar era. This century has seen a series of radically new ideas, catastrophes, and then renewed searches for stability. But we will also investigate century-long movements, including de-colonization, the creation of sophisticated consumer cultures, and the battles among ideas of nationalism, ethnicity, and international interdependency. 2 hrs. lect. 1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS, SOC

HIST 0247 Russia: Tsars, Tsarinas, and Terrorists (Spring 2019)

In this course we will follow Russia’s development, expansion and transformation from its earliest beginnings to the revolutionary cataclysms of the early 20th century. How and why did Russia come to dominate a vast Eurasian space? How did Russia’s Tsars and Tsarinas exert control over diverse cultures, languages, religions and peoples? What impact did this have on the lives of their subjects? How was Russian identity defined within the context of a multi-ethnic, multi-confessional empire? Central themes will include political governance, imperial expansion, ethnic relations, religious identity, social upheaval, and the emergence of the radical intelligentsia. 3 hrs lect./disc. AAL, CMP, CW, HIS

HIST 0249 Blood and Iron: 19th-Century Germany (Fall 2018)

This chronologically-organized course will examine Germany's development over the long nineteenth century. Pivotal moments in the formation of Germany will be explored, including but not limited to the following topics: the impact of French revolutionary ideas and the Napoleonic Wars on political organization, the revolutions of 1848-9, the industrial revolution, the wars of unification and 1871, the Kulturkampf, and the efforts at colonization in Africa. Beyond politics and economics, however, this course will also attempt to view the developments in high culture and daily life that were intimately tied up with the larger events. This will include themes like the "Catholic ghetto," urban culture, and Marxist philosophy. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, HIS (R. Bennette)

HIST 0253 British History: 1603-1815 (Fall 2018)

The medieval pattern of English and Scottish society began to implode in the seventeenth century. The unity of the Church, the relationship between Crown and Parliament, even the social hierarchy, were shaken to their foundations. After generations of civil war, revolution, and party strife, the eighteenth century saw the establishment of a flexible, oligarchic order, able to fight off the challenges of radicalism and the American and French revolutions. By 1815 Britain, at the peak of its power in Europe, was already beginning to experience the tensions incumbent on becoming the first industrial nation. Instructor: Paul Monod. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. EUR, HIS (P. Monod)

HIST 0254 British History 1815-Present (Spring 2019)

The spectacular rise and dramatic decline of Britain’s imperial and industrial power is the central theme of this course. The century after 1815 brought political and social reform and the apogee of middle class culture, but in 1914 the crucial problems of women's rights, labor against capital, and Irish nationalism remained unsolved. War, economic depression and the loss of empire followed. The Labour Party envisaged a welfare state and social contract for post-war Britain; the conservative response was free-market Thatcherism. Today, Britain continues to exemplify the promise and perils of what can be called modernity. 3 hrs. lect/disc. EUR, HIS

HIST 0257 The Holocaust (Fall 2018)

Why did the Holocaust happen? How could the Holocaust happen? In this course we will consider several aspects of the Holocaust, including the long-term conditions and events leading up to it, the measures employed in undertaking it, and the aftermath of the atrocities. Beyond a general survey, this course introduces students to the many varying interpretations and historical arguments scholars of the Holocaust have proposed and invites them to discuss and debate these issues in class. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, HIS (R. Bennette)
Cross-listed as: JWST 0257

HIST 0262 History of the Modern Middle East (Spring 2019)

This course investigates the history of social and political change in the Middle East from 1798 to the present. Within a general political framework, the course will cover the main social, economic, and intellectual currents. Emphasizing political, economic, social and cultural history, the course seeks to examine the impact of outside powers on the region, the responses of the region's peoples to this challenge, colonization, nationalism and identity, religious and ideological trends, gender issues, major "crises" (including the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese civil war, and the Iranian Revolution), and efforts to reassert Islamic identity in an era of globalization. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, MDE, SOC

HIST 0289 History of Cuba and Puerto Rico: 1868-Present (Spring 2019)

The year 1868 marked the start of the independence movement of Cuba and Puerto Rico. By the beginning of the twentieth century Cuba had secured independence while Puerto Rico had become an American colony. In this class we will examine the similarities and differences in the political, socioeconomic, and cultural development of these two island nations from the founding of the independence movement to hurricane Maria. We will pay attention to the development of the concept of nationhood, the role of intellectuals and artists in creating community, and how each nation navigated its relationship to the US government, its migrant communities, and other Caribbean states. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, AMR, HIS, SOC

HIST 0303 Oil, Opium, and Oligarchs: Modern Asian Empires (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine dynamics and legacies of imperialism in East and Southeast Asia from the nineteenth century through the present. We will consider the role of opium in securing British influence, the rise of Japan as an imperialist power, struggles to control regional markets and natural resources, and China’s expansionist efforts past and present. By engaging with novels, films, treaties, and historical scholarship, class participants will gain a broad understanding of empires and imperialism, and how this heritage continues to inform Pacific-regional relations. Not open to students who have taken IGST/HIST 0475. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, NOA (M. Clinton)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0475

HIST 0305 Confucius and Confucianism (Spring 2019)

Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CW (5 seats), HIS, NOA, PHL
Cross-listed as: PHIL 0305

HIST 0316 Stalinsim (Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore the formation and functioning of Joseph Stalin’s dictatorial regime in the USSR, as well as historical debates on its structure and significance. What was Stalinism as a political, economic and cultural system? What role did coercion (both physical and psychological) play in establishing and maintaining the system? How did ordinary citizens navigate, adapt, survive or even prosper within this repressive state? Was Stalinism a corruption of the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution or its natural outcome? What are the continuing legacies of Stalinism today, both in the former Soviet Union and in world politics? 3 hrs. sem. EUR, HIS

HIST 0317 South Africa in the World (Spring 2019)

Despite the unique trajectory of the rise and fall of apartheid in South Africa, scholars have increasingly moved away from viewing the country’s past as exceptional or isolated from broader world historical developments. Taking up this challenge, our course will explore some of the significant global and transnational dimensions of the making of modern South Africa over the past few centuries. Some of the major topics will include: the expansion of different strands of European colonialism and missionary work; Africans’ engagement with transnational imperial networks; the wider international influences behind the state’s creation and implementation of apartheid; and popular resistance against apartheid and how it intersected with global activist movements. 3 hrs. lect./disc AAL, HIS, SAF, SOC

HIST 0326 Histories of U.S. Radicalism, 1917-2017 (Fall 2018)

From communism to libertarianism, Black Nationalism to radical feminism, this seminar examines the many facets of radical social movements in the United States during the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. In particular, we will draw on individual and collective biographies of radicals to explore chronological linkages and social connections between apparently discrete political tendencies. We will also consider the political, social, cultural, and economic contexts that catalyzed these movements, the various forms of backlash and repression they faced, and the changing political uses to which these historical movements have been put. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (L. Povitz)

HIST 0332 Roman Law (Spring 2019)

The Romans' codification of civil law is often considered their greatest intellectual achievement and most original and influential contribution to the world. This course treats the four main divisions of Roman law (persons, property, obligations, and succession). Great emphasis is placed on the role of law in Roman society. How did the law influence the lives of Roman citizens living under it? How did ordinary Roman citizens shape the law? Students will come to understand the principles of Roman law through actual cases. Designed for students with some background in Roman history and/or literature. 2 hrs. lect./1 disc. EUR, HIS
Cross-listed as: CLAS 0332 *

HIST 0339 Christians in the Modern Middle East (Spring 2019)

In the Middle East, Christians have faced fast-paced political, economic, and religious transformations. Focusing on indigenous communities such as Copts, Greek Orthodox, Armenians, Assyrians, and Maronites, we will explore Christianity’s place in the region, from the nineteenth century up to the present. Against the backdrop of a waning Ottoman Empire, mounting European colonialism, and the rise of nationalism and Islamism, we will investigate Christians’ status as minorities, who have at times been privileged and at other times been marginalized, exiled, and shunned. We will also pay attention to the ways in which Western governments and Christian missionaries have transformed the lives of Middle Eastern Christians in their quest for evangelism, apocalypticism, and regional domination. Class sources will include memoirs, novels, and films. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, MDE, SOC
Cross-listed as: RELI 0339

HIST 0362 Revolutionary America: 1763-1800 (Spring 2019)

A study of the origins, progress, and significance of the American Revolution. In this course we examine the diverse economies, cultures, and sociologies of the American Colonies on the eve of the Revolution; the disruption of the balance of empire in the Atlantic; the ideology which guided colonists in rebellion; the changes wrought by revolution; and the first decades of nationhood under the Constitution. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, HIS, NOR

HIST 0369 The East India Company (Spring 2019)

In this course you will be introduced to the English East India Company, from the 17th-century until its dissolution in 1858. Much of our focus will be on the Company’s presence in India, and we will pay particular attention to its transformation from a maritime trading company into a territorial colonial state. We will read a number of controversial texts from the period, immerse ourselves in the worlds of Company and Indian politics, and do guided research using holdings in Middlebury’s Special Collections. Topics will include the rise of the Company as a trading concern, its aggressive competition with other European trading monopolies and South Asian kingdoms, and the importance of opium in its dealings with China. We will end with a discussion of the Indian rebellion of 1857. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1308 or HIST 1009) AAL, HIS, SOA

HIST 0373 History of American Women: 1869-1999 (Fall 2018)

This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in American society from 1869 through the late 20th century. We will explore the shifting ideological basis for gender roles, as well as the effects of race, class, ethnicity, and region on women's lives. Topics covered will include: women's political identity, women's work, sexuality, access to education, the limits of "sisterhood" across racial and economic boundaries, and the opportunities women used to expand their sphere of influence. 3 hrs lect./disc. AMR, CMP, HIS, NOR (L. Povitz)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0373

HIST 0407 Readings in American History: Cultures in Contact (Fall 2018)

The course will examine the dimensions of cultural contact among Native Americans, Europeans, African Americans, and Euro Americans in the eastern half of the United States, from early encounters at Roanoke, to Cherokee removal to Oklahoma. Themes of investigation include: encounter vs. invasion; Indian depopulation by men, microbes, and munitions; religious conversion; cultural persistence, change, and revitalization; slavery by and of Indians; and the changeable image of the Indian. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, HIS, NOR (W. Hart)

HIST 0437 Modernity and its Critique: A Global Survey (Fall 2018)

What do we mean when we refer to “modernity”? What are the defining processes and institutions of modernity? Is modernity universally experienced? And is modernity itself historical? In this seminar we will explore how a variety of thinkers from different regions and time-periods sought to understand the foundational institutions and processes associated with modernity, including the nation-state, colonialism, and ideology. Our exploration will follow two interrelated trajectories. First, we will interrogate key concepts associated with the modern experience; second, we will pay attention to how thinkers formulated these concepts to answer the pressing questions of their contemporary moment. 3 hrs. sem. CMP, HIS, SOC (M. Ward)

HIST 0443 Readings in African History: Women and Gender in Africa (Spring 2019)

This course takes up the challenge of understanding women's experiences and the role of gender in Africa's past. We will read from a wide variety of disciplinary perspectives and literary forms, including ethnographies, life histories, and fiction, in order to explore different methodological and interpretive approaches to these subjects. Themes will include: changes in the structure of patriarchy and women's status in the pre-colonial period, the gendered impact of colonial rule on African economies and ecologies, historical identities of masculinity and femininity, and gendered experience of postcolonial "development." Prior experience in African history is not required. 3 hrs. seminar AAL, HIS, SAF

HIST 0445 Vermont Life’s Vermont: A Collaborative Web Project (Fall 2018)

Students in this course will work collaboratively to build an online history project aimed at a wide audience. Since 1946, Vermont Life magazine has created particular images of the landscape, culture, and recreational possibilities in the state. Our goal will be to construct a website that examines the evolution of these images and the meaning of the state over time, paying particular attention to consumerism, the environment, tourism, urban-rural contrasts, local food movements, and the ways that race, class, and gender influence all of these. The course is open to all students and requires collaborative work but not any pre-existing technological expertise. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, HIS, NOR (K. Morse, M. Newbury)
Cross-listed as: AMST 0445

HIST 0447 Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Reporting Genocide (Spring 2019)

While reports of atrocities and genocides have appeared frequently in the news, little has helped to effectively stop these acts. Even the basic facts are often poorly understood by the wider public. We will focus on a variety of atrocities and genocides, considering them from multiple angles and with a particular emphasis on prevention and resolution. Using our knowledge, we will craft short pieces of public writing, such as op-eds, reviews, and briefings intended to inform and/or influence a general audience. (Open to junior/senior History majors or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, HIS

HIST 0475 Imperialism and Anti-Imperialism in Asia (Spring 2019)

What was, or is, imperialism? In this seminar we will examine the dynamics and violence of imperialism in East and Southeast Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus on ways in which scholars and historical actors have made sense of imperialism, the social changes that it brought about, and how people have sought liberation from it. With particular attention to the trajectories of China, Japan, Vietnam, and Indonesia, students will gain a broad understanding of how imperialism has been challenged and defended, as well as the ways in which its legacies continue to shape our present. (Not open to students who have taken HIST 0303). 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, HIS, SOC
Cross-listed as: HIST 0303 *

HIST 0500 Special Research Projects (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Special research projects may only be taken during the Junior or Senior year, preferable after taking HIST 0600. Approval of department chair and project advisor is required.

HIST 0600 Writing History (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course students discuss historical methods and writing strategies to create convincing historical narratives. With the approval and guidance of the professor, students complete a 20-25-page research paper based on primary and secondary sources. Students take this course in their junior year or if they are away for the entire junior year in the fall of their senior year. 3 hr. sem CW (Fall 2018)

HIST 0700 Senior Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

The History Senior Thesis is required of all majors. It is written over two terms, with the final grade applying to both terms. The project is generally begun in the fall and completed during winter or spring. Approval is required to begin the thesis in winter or spring, and such students must still attend the Thesis Writer's Workshops that take place in fall and winter.
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Department of History of Art & Architectural Studies

Required for the Major, History of Art Track (11 courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; one course in studio art or HARC 0120 (DesignLab) or HARC 0130 (Intro to Architectural Design); HARC 0301 (Ways of Seeing; sophomore or junior year; prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711); at least five additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions, with at least one being at the 0300-level or above; HARC 0710 (Senior Thesis Research Seminar, fall of senior year); HARC 0711 (Senior Thesis, winter term senior year). Advisory: Graduate programs in the history of art and classical archaeology require students to pass reading examinations in at least two foreign languages. Students can improve job prospects by acquiring practical experience, such as internships or participation in the Museum Assistants Program (MAP).
     Joint Major, History of Art Track (eight courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art ); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0301 (Ways of Seeing; sophomore or junior year; prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711); three additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions, one of which should be at the 0300-level or above; HARC 0710 (Senior Thesis Research Seminar, fall of senior year); HARC 0711 (Senior Thesis, winter term of senior year). A proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken, must be submitted to the department for approval before registering as a joint major.
     Minor, History of Art Track (six courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; four additional courses in the history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions.

     Requirements for the Major, Museum Studies Track (11 courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0248; HARC 0301; HARC 0540 (MAP Participation for credit), or a pre-approved internship, or a pre-approved independent project (HARC 0510) if a suitable faculty member is available to supervise it; HARC 0710; HARC 0761; four additional courses in history of art or architecture distributed among several historical periods or traditions, with at least one being at the 0300-level or above.
     Joint Major, Museum Studies Track (eight courses): HARC 0100 or HARC 0102; HARC 0248; HARC0 0301; HARC 0540, or an approved internship, or a pre-approved independent project (HARC 0510); HARC 0710; HARC 0761; Two electives in HARC to be selected in consultation with the advisor.
     Minor, Museum Studies Track (six courses): HARC 0100 or HARC 0102; HARC 0248; HARC 0540 (MAP Participation for credit) or a pre-approved independent project (HARC 0510) if a suitable faculty member is available to supervise it; Three HARC electives to be selected in consultation with the advisor.

      Honors: Honors are awarded to students with a GPA** of 3.5 and a thesis grade of B+ or higher; high honors to students with a GPA of 3.7 and a thesis grade of A- or A; and highest honors to students with a GPA of 3.8 and a thesis grade of A.
** The History of Art + Architecture  GPA is calculated on the basis of those courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major.  Only courses taken on the Middlebury College campus and applied towards the major will be used in the calculation of GPA for purposes of determining honors.  Study abroad and transfer courses will not be used.
     Please note: Courses offered by other departments and programs may, by prior departmental approval, be used to satisfy elective requirements.

Architectural Studies Program
Required for the Major, Architectural Studies Track (11 courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0120 (DesignLab) or another approved course in studio art, theatre set or lighting design, or dance; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture); HARC 0330 (Intermediate Architectural Design), or a pre-approved substitute taken off-campus; three additional courses that deal with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; and HARC 0731 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research) and HARC 0732 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design), open only to HARC majors and joint majors, to be taken sequentially. Advisory: This major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.
Joint Major, Architectural Studies Track (eight courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture); HARC 0330 (Intermediate Architectural Design), or a pre-approved substitute taken off-campus; one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; and HARC 0731 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research) and HARC 0732 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design), open only to HARC majors and joint majors, to be taken sequentially. A proposed program of study, including educational rationale and specific courses to be taken, must be submitted to the department for approval before registering as a joint major. Advisory: This joint major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.
Joint Major, Architectural Studies/ Environmental Studies "Architecture and the Environment" (15 courses): ENVS 0112, ENVS 0211, ENVS 0215, and GEOG 0120, all to be taken before the end of junior year; two ES Cognate Courses (both science courses with labs, listed under Environmental Studies); HARC 0100; HARC 0130; HARC 0230; HARC 0231; HARC 0330 or a pre-approved substitute to be taken off-campus; one additional course that deals with architectural history, urbanism, or contemporary visual culture; ENVS 0401; and HARC 0731 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research) and HARC 0732 (Thesis in Architectural Studies: Design), open only to HARC majors and joint majors, to be taken sequentially. Advisory: This joint major track does not result in a professional degree in architecture. Many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken a survey of modern architecture as well as college-level courses in calculus and physics.
Minor, Architectural Studies (five courses): HARC 0100 (Monuments and Ideas in Western Art); HARC 0102 (Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art) or another course in non-Western art and architecture; HARC 0130 (Introduction to Architectural Design); HARC 0230 (Modern Architecture); and HARC 330 (Intermediate Architectural Design) or a pre-approved substitute taken off-campus. Advisory: many graduate architecture schools expect applicants to have taken calculus, physics, and a survey of modern architecture.
Honors: Honors in all tracks are awarded to students with a GPA** of 3.5 and a thesis grade of B+ or higher; high honors to students with a GPA of 3.7 and a thesis grade of A- or A; and highest honors to students with a GPA of 3.8 and a thesis grade of A.
** The History of Art + Architecture GPA is calculated on the basis of those courses that satisfy or could potentially satisfy the requirements for the major.

HARC 0100 Monuments and Ideas in Western Art (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is an introduction to the study of Western art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. The course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture of the western world. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Western art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, groups, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority will be given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. ART, EUR, HIS (Fall 2018: K. Hoving)

HARC 0102 Monuments and Ideas/Asian Art (Spring 2019)

Monuments and Ideas in Asian Art*
This course is an introduction to the study of Asian art history through an investigation of selected art works, considered individually and in broader contexts. This course chronicles the evolution in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and other media of Asia. It is designed for those who wish to build a broad acquaintance with the major works and ideas of Asian art in their historical settings and to develop tools for understanding these works of art as aesthetic objects and bearers of meaning for the societies, group, or individuals that produced them. Registration priority given to first and second year students. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc..
AAL, ART, CMP, HIS, NOA

HARC 0130 Introduction to Architectural Design (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Are you fascinated by buildings and interested in trying your hand at architectural design? This course will introduce you to principles of architecture and teach you the skills architects use to explore and communicate design ideas. We will consider urban and rural settings, sustainability, energy efficiency, functionality, comfort, and the role architecture plays in shaping community. Classroom instruction by a practicing architect will provide hands-on drawing, model-making, and materials research as well as field trips to see innovation in the works, including house tours (both in construction and finished). Students will work in teams and individually to analyze existing buildings and design their own. Students seeking to improve their understanding of the built environment are encouraged to take this course. No prior experience is needed. ART (Fall 2018: B. Allred)

HARC 0201 Italian Renaissance Art: 1350-1550 (Spring 2019)

This course will focus on the art produced in Italy during the late fourteenth through the early sixteenth centuries. In addition to studying the chronological development of painting, sculpture, and architecture, we will consider such issues as artistic training, patronage, domestic life, and the literary achievements of this period of "rebirth." Focusing on urban environments such as Florence, Siena, Padua, Venice, Rome, and Urbino, we will give special attention to the manner in which artistic production was shaped by place. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS

HARC 0204 Approaches to Islamic Art (Fall 2018)

A survey of major expressions of Islamic art from the inception of Islam to the present, from all parts of the Islamic world. This is not a traditional survey; rather, it focuses on key monuments and important examples of portable and decorative arts: mosques, tombs, palaces, manuscript illumination, calligraphy, metalwork, textiles, ceramics, etc. We will consider their meanings and functions in their respective socio-historical contexts, and we will also analyze the impact of patronage and region. We will try to understand what general principles unify the richness and diversity of Islamic art: what is Islamic about Islamic art? Finally, we will address the issue of contemporary Islamic art. (No prerequisites). 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, MDE (C. Packert)

HARC 0214 Northern Renaissance Art: The Rhetoric of the Real (Fall 2018)

This course will provide students with an overview of art objects created in a variety of media in Northern Europe between the 15th and 16th centuries. We will analyze the changing uses of art in cultures where people defined themselves and the depths of their piety in relation to their material wealth and social standing. During the last few weeks of the semester, the class will look at the emergence of genre painting and the representation of peasant life. We will consider how these phenomena were tied to the histories and careers of individual artists and their workshops. General questions will include: How does the convincing representation of "reality" make for a persuasive image? What are the benefits of fusing secular and religious subject matter? Is it valid to speak of a new artistic self-awareness? 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Garrison)

HARC 0219 Understanding Early Medieval and Romanesque Art: Seeing Ste. Foy (Spring 2019)

This course is an introduction to key artworks and architectural monuments made and built in Europe during the eighth through twelfth centuries. We will study such structures as Charlemagne's Palace Chapel and the reliquary statue of Ste. Foy at Conques to explore how these monuments were products of independent cultures that valued the creation of a visual fusion between the Judeo-Christian God and humankind. Likely lines of inquiry include: the persistence of a Classical ideal and its myriad adaptations; the coordination of art objects to specific locations; and, not least, the self-conscious staging of political and ecclesiastical power. 3 hrs lect. ART, EUR, HIS

HARC 0230 Modern Architecture (Spring 2019)

Rotating skyscrapers, green roofs, and avant-garde museums: how did we arrive in the architectural world of the early 21st century? In this course we will survey the major stylistic developments, new building types, and new technologies that have shaped European and American architecture since the late 18th century. Students will learn about the work of major architects as well as key architectural theories and debates. Special emphasis will be placed on the cultural and political contexts in which buildings are designed. 2 hrs. Lect./1 hr. disc. ART, HIS

HARC 0231 Architecture and the Environment (Spring 2019)

Architecture has a dynamic relationship with the natural and cultural environments in which it operates. As a cultural phenomenon it impacts the physical landscape and uses natural resources while it also frames human interaction, harbors community, and organizes much of public life. We will investigate those relationships and explore strategies to optimize them, in order to seek out environmentally responsive architectural solutions. Topics to be covered include: analysis of a building's site as both natural and cultural contexts, passive and active energy systems, principles of sustainable construction, and environmental impact. Our lab will allow us to study on site, "off-the-grid" dwellings, hay-bale houses, passive solar constructions and alternative communities, meet with "green" designers, architects, and builders, and do hands-on projects. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART

HARC 0234 Ancient Roman City: Pompeii and Beyond (Fall 2018)

The ancient Classical city reached its highest expression during the Roman Empire, when monumental public and private buildings created an elaborate stage for the enactment of civic life. In this course we will study the layout and architecture of Roman cities, 200 BCE - 500 CE, including the form and function of numerous building types. We will discuss political, religious, commercial, and private institutions, and analyze their influence on the built environment. We will focus on influential emperors such as Augustus, Hadrian, and Constantine, and on links between ancient and modern urbanism. Sites of study will include Pompeii, Rome, Ostia, Leptis Magna, Antioch, and Constantinople. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (I. Sutherland)
Cross-listed as: CLAS 0234 *

HARC 0238 Japanese Art (Spring 2019)

In this introductory survey we will explore the arts of Japan from the Neolithic Jomon period to the post-war era of the 20th century. Using assigned readings in conjunction with objects in our own museum collection, we will investigate how these artworks and monuments reflect the agendas, religious beliefs, and aesthetic tastes of the artists and patrons who created them. We will also explore themes such as advances in media and technology, the role of nationalism in art production, and indigenous versus imported artistic developments. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, NOA

HARC 0241 Art and Religion of Ancient Egypt (Fall 2018)

With its pyramids and mummies, the civilization of Ancient Egypt and its obsession with the afterlife loom large in the contemporary imagination. In this introductory course we explore Egyptian art and religion and study the driving forces for Egypt’s cultural continuity and change between c. 3200 BCE and 30 BCE. We also consider the impact of Ancient Egypt on later civilizations; its rediscovery during the 19th and early 20th centuries; and the reception of Ancient Egypt as a factor in the formation of modern Egypt. 3 hrs. Lect. AAL, MDE (P. Broucke, S. Goldman)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0241

HARC 0247 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine the Impressionist and Post-Impressionist movements that evolved in France during the second half of the 19th century. Looking at artists such as Manet, Degas, Cassatt, and Monet, as well as Cézanne, Van Gogh, Seurat, and Gauguin, we will place their work in social and historical contexts that include the rise of the city, new opportunities for leisure, demographic change, and the breakdown of artistic establishments. When appropriate we will compare visual artistic production to parallel developments in literature and music. 3 hrs. lect. ART, EUR, HIS (K. Hoving)

HARC 0248 Gold, Sex, and Death at the Museum (Fall 2018)

Most visitors to museums notice the architecture, carefully chosen collections, and meticulously curated special exhibitions. However, behind this façade is a busy network of museum professionals coordinating every aspect of the institution’s life. Through readings and guest lectures, we will explore how directors, curators, and staff navigate the challenges facing the modern museum, such as establishing acquisitions policies in an increasingly uncertain art market, defining ethical standards for conservation, and addressing audiences with ever-changing needs. Speakers such as a curator, art critic, and conservator will contribute to our discussion, and attendance at a series of public talks is required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, NOR (S. Laursen)

HARC 0301 Ways of Seeing (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will focus on the various methods and theories that can enrich and deepen our understanding of art, architecture, and visual culture. Students will hone their analytical skills, both verbal and written, often with recourse to objects from the College Museum and the campus at large. In general, this seminar will develop students’ awareness of objects of culture broadly construed, and sharpen their understanding of the scope and intellectual history of the field. To be taken during the sophomore or junior year as a prerequisite for HARC 0710 and HARC 0711. 3 hrs. sem. ART, CW (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: E. Vazquez)

HARC 0330 Intermediate Architectural Design (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This studio course emphasizes the thought and method of architectural design. Members of this studio will be involved in developing their insights towards cultural value systems and their expression in the environments they create. Participants work primarily in the studio space and rely heavily on individual instruction and group review of their work. The course provides a foundation for more advanced study in the areas of architecture, landscape architecture, and other fields related to the design of the built environment, and an opportunity to work with the Cameron Visiting Architect. (HARC 0130) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab ART (Fall 2018: J. Nelson)

HARC 0338 Gender and the Making of Space (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will investigate the complex relationship between gender and architecture, examining how the design of the built environment (buildings, urban spaces, etc.) can reinforce or undermine ideas about the respective roles of women and men in society, from the creation of masculine and feminine spaces to the gendered nature of the architectural profession. By looking at both visual evidence and textual sources we will also uncover how the social construction of gender roles and gendered spaces are, and continue to be, inflected by race, class, and sexuality. Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1407. 3 hrs. sem. ART (Fall 2018), CMP (Fall 2018), HIS (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: E. Sassin)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0338

HARC 0339 Home: The Why Behind the Way We Live (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine the development of numerous housing types in America (with references to Europe). The prevalence of the single-family home today and its importance as the symbol of the “American dream” was never a forgone conclusion. In fact, the American home has been the focus of and battleground for cooperative movements, feminism, municipal socialism, benevolent capitalism, and government interventions on a national scale. 3 hrs. sem. AMR, ART, HIS, NOR

HARC 0353 Medieval Bodies (Fall 2018)

In this seminar we will examine how medieval European thinkers and artists theorized and visualized the body in ways that are vastly different from the ways in which the body is conceptualized today. Indeed, the “medieval body” was not a monolithic entity, but rather a shifting constellation of ideas and practices that waxed, waned, and coexisted throughout the Middle Ages. A body could be understood as an earthly body — sexed, fleshly, corruptible — as well as a heavenly and divine body, including Christ’s own. Our considerations will further contextualize representations of gendered, racialized, clerical, monstrous, animal, virginal, non-Christian, heretical, resurrected, and uncircumscribable bodies. Readings of the secondary literature will broaden readings of primary source materials, and our discussions will remain cognizant of gender-, sexuality-, race-, and performance-critical methods. There are no prerequisites for this course, but students will find it helpful to have some familiarity with either the history of art or with medieval history. 3hrs sem. ART, EUR, HIS (E. Garrison)

HARC 0354 The Rhetoric of Public Memory (Spring 2019)

This course focuses on public memory and the various statues, memorials, sites, and spaces that construct public memory in contemporary U.S. society. In this course, we will study local Middlebury and Vermont public memories, Civil War and Confederate memories, and spaces of contention and controversy, while visiting nearby memorials and museums. Students in this class will compose analyses on these public memories and create arguments on the viability of memories in different shapes and forms. Overall, students will leave this class with a stronger understanding of not only public memory rhetoric but the various components that keep these memories alive. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CW, HIS, NOR, SOC
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0354

HARC 0355 Digital Methodologies for Art Historians: Ancient Chinese Gold (Fall 2018)

In this seminar we will learn new technologies and study old gold in preparation for an upcoming exhibition of ancient Chinese gold at the Middlebury Museum of Art. Gold objects produced in China during the nearly one thousand years from second century BCE to the mid-eighth century CE bear witness to China’s military expansion and the interconnectedness of the Eurasian continent at the height of the Silk Road. The distribution of these luxury items across the ancient world is mirrored in the modern period by the global trade in Chinese antiquities in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which brought gold ornaments, horse trappings, and vessels into North American Museum collections. We will explore these captivating objects through readings about Chinese archaeology, goldsmithing, and the history of collecting, while at the same time learning about the latest digital tools for data management, analysis, mapping, and imaging used by curators and art historians. No prior experience with Asian art necessary. 3 hrs. sem AAL, ART, NOA (S. Laursen)

HARC 0356 Awe (Spring 2019)

What is the place of awe in contemporary experience? In our fractious and turbo-charged world, what are the objects and experiences that still have the power to bring us up short, leaving us slack-jawed and spellbound? This seminar will engage these questions in preparation for a cross-disciplinary exhibit at the Middlebury College Museum of Art scheduled for 2020. Grounding our conversation in early literary and artistic explorations of the sublime, we will also consider awe through the lenses of religion, scientific discovery, creativity, and the natural world. Definitions of awe almost invariably include references to fear, dread, even terror, so readings and class discussions will move well beyond the celebratory and reverential. There are no prerequisites for this course, and students from a wide range of majors and fields of interest are encouraged to enroll. Projects and written assignments will allow students to make direct contributions to the exhibition. 3 hrs. sem. ART

HARC 0360 Art’s Worlds: Topics in Contemporary Art (Spring 2019)

The word contemporary is relational; to be con-temporary means to exist with others in time. In this seminar we will explore themes in very recent art, paying particular attention to how various practices draw attention to the constitutive relation of “with” through form. Topics may include artistic responses to social conflict, technological change, expanding global art centers, among others. Specific topics will vary, in part, based on student interests and current debates. Readings will be drawn from critical texts, recent scholarship and artists’ writings. Prior exposure to post-1945 art is helpful, but not required. 3 hrs. sem. ART

HARC 0371 AS/Habitat: Plan and Design (Spring 2019)

AS/Habitat for Humanity Housing Unit: Research, Planning, and Schematic Design Architectural Studies at Middlebury partners with Habitat for Humanity of Addison County for the design and realization of high-quality, energy-efficient, affordable housing. The objective of this studio is to research, plan, and begin the architectural design for a housing unit with a specific program and location. Students will work primarily in the studio space and rely heavily on internal and external review of their work. The course provides a foundation for more advanced study in architecture, landscape architecture, and other fields related to the design of the built environment, and provides opportunities to work with professionals and Cameron Visiting Architects. Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time. (HARC 0130) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. ART

HARC 0510 Advanced Studies (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Supervised independent work in art history, museum studies, or architectural studies. (Approval Required) (Fall 2018: P. Broucke, R. Saunders, S. Laursen, C. Packert, K. Hoving, E. Vazquez; Spring 2019: P. Broucke, S. Laursen, R. Saunders, C. Anderson, C. Packert, K. Hoving, E. Vazquez)

HARC 0530 Independent Architect. Design (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Supervised independent work in architectural analysis and design. (Approval Required) (Fall 2018: P. Broucke, J. McLeod, M. Lopez Barrera; Spring 2019: E. Sassin, P. Broucke)

HARC 0540 Supervised Independent Work in Museum Studies (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This practicum builds upon the Museum Assistants Program (MAP), the hands-on museum education program at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. In MAP, the Curator of Education trains students to conduct tours of the Museum’s permanent collection and of special exhibitions for audiences of peers, school groups, and the general public. Combining service learning with the opportunity to both support and learn more about the arts, students gain expertise in public speaking, art history, and public programming. HARC 0540 should be taken concurrently with the second semester of MAP. The class will culminate with a public presentation on a museum-related topic evaluated by a faculty member of the Department of History of Art & Architecture. (Approval required) (Fall 2018: P. Broucke, J. Vrooman, S. Laursen, C. Packert, K. Hoving, E. Vazquez; Spring 2019: R. Saunders)

HARC 0710 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (Fall 2018)

In this course students will conceive, undertake research, and plan the organization of their senior thesis in art history or senior museum studies projects. Seminar discussions and workshops will focus on research strategies, conventions in art historical writing, project design, and public presentation skills. (HARC 0301; Approval Required) 3 hr. sem. (E. Sassin)

HARC 0731 Thesis in Architectural Studies: Research (Fall 2018)

This studio course constitutes the first part of the two-term senior design project in Architectural Studies. Pre-design research includes precedent study, programming, site analysis, and formulation of a thesis to be investigated through the design process. Preliminary design work begins with conceptual studies, and culminates in a coherent schematic design, to be developed further in Senior Architectural Design, Part II. Students present their work in graphic, oral, and written formats. (HARC 0330 or equivalent) 6 hrs. sem. (J. McLeod)
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Independent Scholar Program

The Independent Scholar Program is designed to meet the needs of outstanding students who have clearly defined educational goals that cannot be fulfilled within the framework of a normal departmental or interdisciplinary major. Independent Scholars plan their own curricular programs with the assistance of a faculty adviser. Independent Scholars cannot propose two majors, but can pursue an independent scholar major and one minor. For the 2018-19 academic year, application materials are due to the Curriculum Committee by Monday, October 1, 2018, for fall review; and Monday, February 11, 2019, for spring review.

Eligibility: For an application to be considered, a student must be in the sophomore year and have a GPA of 3.5 or higher. If approved, students must fulfill all requirements for the degree using their approved Independent Scholar plan as their major course of study. Independent Scholar proposals will be evaluated in light of feasibility, academic disciplinary integrity, and demonstrated ability of the student. A successful proposal must articulate a fully developed program of study, must include a methods course, and must demonstrate compellingly that the student’s academic goals cannot be met through existing majors.

Application process: To be designated an Independent Scholar, a student must undergo a rigorous approval process overseen by the Curriculum Committee. The process begins with an interview with the dean of curriculum. The student must subsequently prepare and submit a well-defined program to the Curriculum Committee, covering a description of the aim of the program, the independent work, and the courses he or she proposes to comprise the major. The proposal must be accompanied by a written endorsement of a faculty member who is willing and qualified to supervise the student, as well as a statement of support from an alternate faculty member. The Curriculum Committee will review all submitted materials, and if warranted, convene a meeting with the candidate and advisers. Final approval rests with the Curriculum Committee. An applicant whose proposal is denied is entitled to meet with the dean of curriculum or the Curriculum Committee.

Oversight: The Curriculum Committee will solicit updates from each Independent Scholar twice a year. Changes to the program must also be submitted to the Curriculum Committee, and the faculty supervisor will cosign all registration materials. The Major Declaration Form and Degree Audit Forms will be signed by both the faculty adviser and dean of curriculum. Students who elect to withdraw from the Independent Scholar Program, or who have their independent scholar status withdrawn, may be allowed, at the discretion of the committee, to graduate in general studies, without a formal major in any department.

Senior work: The INDE 0800 is a culminating experience for this program of study. This project brings together the course work the student has completed and incorporates all aspects of the study into one final project. Students applying to be independent scholars are asked to provide an indication of possible INDE 0800 projects at the time that they submit their proposals. Students are able, however, to change the topic of their INDE 0800 project in order to respond to new interests and information acquired during the course of their study.

The INDE 0800 project is undertaken for one or two terms. Students who wish to be considered for honors must work with a thesis committee. Thesis work most typically follows the procedures for the department most closely related to the project. Others may choose to work with an individual faculty member, usually the student's adviser. The choice of senior project is flexible. For example, with permission from the adviser, a student in the performing arts might want to incorporate a dance performance, musical composition, or some other feature as part of his or her course of study.

Honors: In order to be considered for honors, independent scholars normally must meet two criteria: a minimum average of B+ in courses taken towards the major and a minimum grade of B+ on the senior work component. The Dean of Curriculum oversees the first requirement and will inform the adviser of the student's eligibility. The senior work component must be evaluated by a committee of three faculty members (one of whom, at the adviser's request, may be a faculty member on the Curriculum Committee). Minimum thesis grades for each level of honors are B+ (Honors), A- (High Honors), and A (Highest Honors), but the determination of the appropriate level will be made by the thesis committee.

For more information about this program, contact Suzanne Gurland, Dean of Curriculum.
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Interdepartmental Courses

INTD 0116 Accounting, Budgeting, and the Liberal Arts (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Accounting is the lingua franca of commercial and financial activity, and applies equally to corporations, non-profits, and governments. In this course we will learn the basic concepts and standards underlying the accounting language including: revenue recognition, inventory, long-lived assets, present value, long-term liabilities, and financial statements. We then turn to the application and use of accounting information in forecasting, operating, and measuring an enterprise. These managerial accounting concepts are used to develop budgets and evaluate results. Our understanding of accounting and financial statements is needed to understand how business interrelates with society, and to answer a range of economic questions such as new product profitability, how to measure and motivate staff and predicting whether Chicago will follow Detroit into bankruptcy. The major course project will be developing an Excel financial model; no prior Excel experience required. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab (not open to students who have taken INTD 0316). (Fall 2018: A. Magri)

INTD 0120 Introduction to Business and Enterprise (Fall 2018)

This course provides students who have little to no background in business with a broad overview of business and enterprise in the economy. Students will learn about types of enterprises and a functional framework for understanding a business, including strategy, finance, production, and marketing. This framework will be used to analyze various businesses and non-profits, exploring the advantages and disadvantages of various structures. The course will give overviews of accounting and entrepreneurship, and explore policy and philosophical debates about the morality of for-profit business and the need for corporate responsibility. 3 hrs. lect. SOC (A. Biswas, D. Colander)

INTD 0210 Sophomore Seminar in the Liberal Arts (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is designed for sophomores who are interested in exploring the meaning and the purpose of a liberal arts education. To frame this investigation, we will use the question "What is the good life and how shall I live it?" Through an interdisciplinary and multicultural array of readings and films we will engage our course question through intellectual discussion, written reflection, and personal practice. There will be significant opportunities for public speaking and oral presentation, as well as regular writing assignments, including a formal poster presentation. Readings will include reflections on a liberal arts education in the U.S. (Emerson, Brann, Nussbaum, Oakeshott, Ladsen-Billings, bell hooks); on "the good life" (excerpts from Aristotle, sacred texts of different traditions); on social science analyses of contemporary life; texts on the neuroscience of happiness; as well as literary and cinematic representations of lives well-lived. CMP, CW (Fall 2018: 47 seats; Spring 2019: 31 seats) (Fall 2018: J. Miller-Lane, T. Lilburn, R. Schine)
Cross-listed as: EDST 0210

INTD 0211 Public Health of Disasters (Spring 2019)

Both natural and man-made disasters, including the release of weapons of mass destruction, reveal a community’s preexisting vulnerabilities. The emergency response, and the nature of the disaster itself, combine to affect the short- and long-term health of the disaster-struck community. We will examine public health components of disasters, including emergency preparedness and response, relief efforts, health surveillance, and the ethical considerations of these activities. With case studies and readings, we will employ a public health perspective to understand the community impact of natural and man-made disasters in both developed and developing countries. 3 hrs. lect. SOC

INTD 0215 3D Computer Animation (Fall 2018)

3D computer animation has revolutionized animation, graphics, and special effects. In this course students will explore basic 3D modeling techniques, virtual material and texture creation, digital lighting, rendering, and animation. Every workshop will be hands on and fully immersed in this rapidly evolving technology. Students will leave with a strong conceptual understanding of the 3D graphics pipeline, a fundamental 3D skill set, options for further study, and an independent final animation project. 3 hrs. workshop ART (D. Houghton)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0215

INTD 0216 3D Environment Design (Spring 2019)

From the grounds of an ancient ruin to the inside of a biological cell to the stage of a theatrical production to the corridors of the international space station, in this course we will use digital 3d modeling, texturing, and lighting tools to visualize locations into beautifully rendered, three dimensional, interactive virtual environments. We will ask critical questions about how every design choice affects the audience’s understanding of the space. No prior experience is necessary for this hands-on introductory course. 3 hrs. lect/lab. ART
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0216

INTD 0217 Introduction to Finance (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this introductory survey course we will cover the role of finance in society, the basic workings of the financial system, how funds are allocated within the economy, and how institutions raise money. We will cover a range of topics, including: interest rates and the time value of money; uncertainty and the trade-off between risk and return; security market efficiency; stocks, bonds and optimal capital structure; financing decisions and capital budgeting; sovereign risk; foreign currencies; derivatives markets; and concerns about the role of finance in society. The course will include discussions of current news events in global markets. Recommended: INTD 0116 (formally INTD 0316). Students who have not taken INTD 116 (or INTD 0316) will be required to take a short online course in Accounting or Finance. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. lab (Fall 2018: F. Van Gansbeke)

INTD 0220 Management, Enterprise, and Business (Fall 2018)

Social enterprises, schools, governments, and businesses all need to be managed; indeed “manager” is today's most common job, yet most managers would struggle to explain what management is. In this course we will review different types of organizations, their common functions, and what it means to manage them. In the class wWe will review the history and development of management theory, functions, roles, skills, organization, structure, and behavior. In the lab students will work in small groups to understand, articulate, and address management issues faced by a real enterprise. Students will learn practical management techniques and skills including problem solving, teamwork, and communications. Professor David Colander will be assisting with the class, giving occasional lectures, and connecting the class to broad liberal arts themes. 3 hrs. lect. (A. Biswas)

INTD 0254 Innovation in Action: Design Thinking (Fall 2018)

In this interdisciplinary course we will learn the methods and practices of Design Thinking to tackle what are called “wicked problems,” those that are difficult to solve because of incomplete or changing requirements. Working in teams, we will collaborate using a human-centered process, and participate in activities that help us tap into the cognitive activities used while designing. At the end of the class students will present innovative solutions to one or more of Middlebury College’s academic technology challenges. This year we will be looking at the new realities (virtual, augmented, and mixed), and their impact on digital equity. Professor Jessica Holmes will be assisting with the class and giving occasional lectures. (J. Antonioli)

INTD 0255 Reporting and Writing the News (Fall 2018)

Students in this introductory journalism class will learn how to conceive, report, write, edit, and publish a variety of stories, including hard news, features, and op-eds. They will develop story ideas, conduct interviews, and write balanced, engaging articles on deadline for our class blog, which will cover the campus and local community. Like professional journalists, they will practice crafting clear, accurate, and fair stories. They will follow the news daily, and read a wide range of exemplary pieces. We will also explore the evolution of digital and social media, and discuss the key ethical and legal issues facing reporters today (Not open to students who have taken CRWR 1002) 3 hrs. lect. CW (S. Greenberg)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0255

INTD 0257 Global Health (Fall 2018)

This course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in contemporary global public health, demonstrating the inextricability of public health problems from the social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental issues that exist in an era of globalization. Examining these connections will enable us to critically evaluate the goals and strategies of public health interventions, and discuss factors impacting their success or failure. To do this, we must also examine the lens through which the West views public health problems as they relate to our cultural beliefs, biomedical views of health, sense of justice, and strategic interests. (Not open to students who have taken SOAN 0267) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CMP, SOC (P. Berenbaum)

INTD 0273 AS/Habitat for Humanity Housing Unit: From Design Development to Bidding (Fall 2018)

Architectural Studies at Middlebury partners with Habitat for Humanity of Addison County for the design and realization of high-quality, energy-efficient, affordable housing. The objective of this interdisciplinary studio course is to develop the design of the housing unit from a conceptual level to the point that it can be bid upon competitively by contractors. This intensive process will be driven by a schedule of deliverables conceived to allow for construction to start in the following spring. Studio components include materials selection; energy analysis; code review, construction detailing; permitting; physical and digital modeling; engineering coordination; and construction specifications.
This studio will continue into INTD 0274: AS/Habitat for Humanity: Design Production. Students should expect a substantial amount of work outside of class time. Contact Prof. McLeod prior to registration. (Approval Required) 3 hrs. lect./3hrs lab
(J. McLeod)

INTD 0280 Middlebury's Foodprint: Introduction to Food Systems Issues (Fall 2018)

Food systems encompass all activities, people and institutions determining movement of food from input supply and production (on land and water) through waste management. The dominant U.S. food system is responsible at least in part for some of the nation’s most troubling environmental and health challenges. What do we eat at Middlebury? What difference does it make? How do we know? We'll read Chase & Grubinger's Food, Farms, and Community: Exploring Food Systems (2015), then dive into examining impacts of how Middlebury sources and consumes its food, and disposes of food waste. (BIOL 0140 recommended) 3 hrs. lect./disc. SOC (M. Anderson)

INTD 0281 Food, Power, & Justice (Spring 2019)

Students in this course will learn to analyze power and justice in relation to the food system. We will explore cases in which groups of people are experiencing injustice in opportunities to make a living through food production or other food system activities, inequitable access to food and resources, inequitable health outcomes related to diet (e.g., diabetes, obesity), and silencing or lack of political participation. Students will investigate organizations of their choice that are working to remedy inequitable power relations in the food system, and will present their findings to the rest of the class. SOC

INTD 0286 Digital Research Methods: Digitizing Folk Music History (Spring 2019)

Like Bob Dylan "going electric" in 1965, we pivot between technology and tradition in this course as we use tactics of digital analysis to investigate the U.S. folk music revival, from its nineteenth-century origins, to the 1960s "Great Folk Scare,” to more recent folk revivalism. In this course we will acquire digital skills and fluencies as we think more deeply about music, culture, politics, economics, race, gender, class, and history itself. We will read primary and secondary sources, listen to Dylan, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez, Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, and others, and we will watch documentary and fictional films. No prior digital, musical, or historical training required. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC

INTD 0310 Agroecology (Fall 2018)

In this course students will learn about agroecology as a set of practices, a philosophy, and a social movement, with an emphasis on the first two perspectives. Agroecology takes advantage of natural processes to the greatest extent possible, using biological inputs rather than purchased pesticides and fertilizers. In addition to having major benefits for poor farmers in developing countries, it is attracting increased attention as an alternative to industrialized agriculture in wealthy countries. The course will include field trips to farms, lab exercises, and discussion of readings. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (M. Anderson)

INTD 0311 Fixing Food Systems (Spring 2019)

This course addresses the innovation in food systems and how it is changing the ways that we eat; how we produce, process, and distribute food; how we manage food system inputs and waste; and how we imagine food alternatives. We will unpack what is meant by "innovation" and why technological innovation frequently gets more attention than social, cultural, and political innovations at scales from the community to the international. We will explore how to assess the risks and value of innovations and their implications for social justice and participation of emerging streams of innovation. (INTD 0280 or INTD 0310). 3 hrs. sem.

INTD 0320 Capital Markets (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course surveys and analyzes the instruments traded in modern asset markets, the mechanisms that facilitate their trading and issuance, as well as, the motivations of issuers and investors across different asset classes. The course will balance functional and institutional perspectives by highlighting the problems market participants are seeking to solve, as well as the existing asset markets that have arisen to accomplish these goals. We will consider the nature of structure of asset markets, and the design, issuance, and pricing of financial instruments, focusing on how arbitrage strategies keep their prices in-line with one another. Recommended: INTD 0116 (formally INTD 316), and INTD 0217, (formally INTD 31)7. Students who have not takenINTD 0116 (INTD 316) and INTD 0217 (INTD 317) will be required to demonstrate basic proficiency in accounting and introductory finance. 3 hrs. lect./disc (Fall 2018: F. Van Gansbeke)

INTD 0403 Settling the Mind in Wilderness (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine writing about nature and place in four genres—poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and film. Our main focus will be on two moments of great achievement in nature writing: the turn of the twenty-first century in North America and the seventh and eight centuries in T’ang Dynasty China. We will explore why these two periods, together with the Upper Paleolithic and the Industrial Revolution in England, were moments of intense human artistic interest in the natural world. We will pay particular attention in the course to lyric poetry and the personal essay, exploring the ways in which these forms of writing are most attuned to the wild in the ancient Asian and recent North American traditions, and asking why this might be the case. 3 hrs. sem. CMP (T. Lilburn)

INTD 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Fall 2018

Sections A, D, G, H
Independent Study
Approval Required
Section C
Animation Studio
Animation Studio is a real-world production studio in which students collaborate on the key roles in the animation production process. Under the guidance of the studio director and a faculty member, students will contribute to the creation of short films, scientific illustrations, historical recreations, and other projects. All work is done in the studio and students commit to nine hours per week. (Approval Required)
(D. Houghton)

Spring 2019

Sections A, D
Independent Study
Approval Required
Section C
Animation Studio
Animation Studio is a real-world production studio in which students collaborate on the key roles in the animation production process. Under the guidance of the studio director and a faculty member, students will contribute to the creation of short films, scientific illustrations, historical recreations, and other projects. All work is done in the studio and students commit to nine hours per week. (Approval Required)
(D. Houghton)
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Program in International & Global Studies

International and Global Studies Requirements

General Requirements: A major must specialize in one of the following nine tracks: African Studies, East Asian Studies, European Studies, Latin American Studies, Middle East and Maghreb Studies, Russian and East European Studies, South Asian Studies, Global Gender and Sexuality Studies, or Global Security Studies. IGS majors may not double-count any course, including required language courses, towards their regional or thematic specialization.

Regardless of their track, all majors must complete: IGST 0101, five regional or thematic courses, three global courses for the regional tracks (from an existing list) or three regional courses for the thematic tracks (from an existing list). Students must also study one of the non-English languages taught at Middlebury; study abroad for at least one semester; complete at least one advanced level language course upon return from abroad; and take a 0400 level IGST senior seminar.  With the preapproval of the IGS director, a student may take a thematic global seminar in a department.

Minors: There is no IGS minor. However, IGS majors are strongly encouraged to minor in any department or program that offers a minor and can accommodate them, so long as they do not double-count any course. Students wishing to minor in the department that teaches the IGS language of their focus should discuss their minor with the IGS director.

Specific Requirements: All IGS majors are required to take IGST 0101, and are expected to do so before studying abroad. IGST 0101 is not open to seniors except for those who declared the major as sophomores and spent the fall semester of their junior year abroad. Students who declare their major as a sophomore but have not taken IGST 0101, and plan to study abroad for only one semester must take it in the fall of their junior year prior to going abroad.

Language Study: Students must become proficient in one of the languages that Middlebury College teaches. Individual language departments determine what level of study constitutes proficiency, and students are expected to do advanced work in their target language. All majors must take at least one advanced course in the language of study upon returning from abroad and are encouraged to take more than one. The only exception to this language requirement is South Asian Studies majors or students who major in a thematic track but study abroad in India: these students must study a language when abroad, but are not expected to achieve language proficiency or complete an advanced language course once they return. Instead, these majors must take one additional regional or global course in their senior year.

Language Study for East Asian Studies
: Students who already have native proficiency in Chinese must fulfill the language requirements for Japanese. Students who already have native proficiency in Japanese must fulfill the language requirements for Chinese. The Chairs of the Chinese and Japanese Studies departments or their designees determine what constitutes native proficiency by evaluating students individually through interviews or tests.

Note: for EAS majors whose language is Chinese, the language requirement is: (1) CHNS 0101-CHNS 0202 (strongly encouraged to attend Middlebury Chinese Summer School, or take CHNS 0301/0302); (2) one semester at one of the three Middlebury CV Starr Schools Abroad in China; and (3) any two of the following: CHNS 0411, 0412, 0425, 0426, OR 0475 upon return from study abroad in China.

Language Study for Latin American Studies: Students who place into Spanish 0220 or above must take at least two semesters of Portuguese (0210 and above) to fulfill the language requirement. Students who place into Portuguese 0215 or above must take at least two semesters of Spanish (0105 and above) to fulfill the language requirement.

Regional Specialization: IGS majors must take five courses that correspond to their regional track, in at least three departments and at least two divisions (students must consult with their advisors about the divisional requirement). At least three regional courses must be taken at Middlebury. For East Asian Studies majors, at least three of the regional courses should be exclusively or primarily on the country that is the focus of language study, and at least one should be on East Asia as a region or the East Asian country that is not the focus of language study.

Thematic Specialization: IGS majors must take five courses that are specific to their track, in at least three departments and at least two divisions.  At least three thematic courses must be taken at Middlebury.

Global Courses: Students with regional specialization are required to take three global courses (from an existing list); only one can be at the 0100 level and none at the 0400 level. These global courses are thematic, trans-regional, emphasize connectivity of places and the circulation of ideas and phenomena. Except for students who study abroad an entire year (see below), these courses must be taken on the Middlebury College campus.

Regional Courses for Thematic Tracks: Students with thematic specialization are required to take three regional courses that correspond to their language of specialization (from an existing list); none at the 0400 level.  Except for students who study abroad an entire year, these courses must be taken on the Middlebury College campus.

Study Abroad: Students must study abroad for at least one semester (and preferably two) on a Middlebury-approved study abroad program in their region of focus. Study abroad must be in the language of study at Middlebury. Students who study abroad for one semester and those who go abroad for the whole year but spend only one semester in their region of concentration may count one regional or thematic course, pending approval of the track director. Students who study abroad for a year in the same country or in the same region, may count up to two regional or thematic courses, pending approval of the track director.  They may also count one global course (for regional concentrations) and one regional course (for thematic concentrations), pending approval of the IGS director. Students should share the syllabi and all written work for all courses they wish to count with the track or program director respectively.

Advanced Placement
: Advanced Placement credit will not count toward the major.

Senior Program: The senior program consists of: (1) a senior IGST seminar at 400-level or with permission of IGS director, a thematic senior seminar in a department  and (2) an upper-level course, preferably two, in the language of emphasis after returning from abroad. South Asian Studies majors or students who major in the thematic track but would like to study in India do not take an upper-level language course, but rather, one additional regional or global course. The language departments will determine which courses fulfill this requirement, in consultation with the program director.

Honors: Students who seek to graduate with Honors may elect to write a two-term senior honors thesis. Students are eligible to write an honors thesis if they have a 3.5 GPA or better in all courses that count for the major. These include all language courses, all regional courses, all global courses, all courses taken abroad, and all courses with an IGST designation. Thesis grades do not count in the calculation of the GPA for honors. Thesis guidelines and procedures can be found atgo/igsthesis.

Honors are awarded to students with a GPA of 3.5 and a thesis grade of B+; high honors to students with a GPA of 3.7 and a thesis grade of A- or A; and highest honors to students with a GPA of 3.8 and a thesis grade of A.

Seniors wishing to pursue a one semester independent research project should register for IGST 0700.

Winter Term Course: Students may count no more than one winter term course taken at Middlebury towards IGS requirements, pending approval of the track director. Students wishing to count a winter term course must provide the track director with a copy of the course syllabus.

Area Specializations

African Studies
Language/Culture: Language competency in French or Swahili; satisfactory completion of at least one advanced French course or one independent study in Swahili upon students return from abroad. If French is the language of emphasis, students must study an appropriate indigenous African language to a level of reasonable competence while abroad. The French Department will specify which courses fulfill the French requirement. The African Studies director will specify which courses fulfill the Swahili requirement.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

East Asian Studies
Language/Culture: Satisfactory completion of advanced work in either Chinese or Japanese. The Chinese and Japanese departments will specify which courses fulfill this requirement. Students who already have native or near-native proficiency in Japanese must fulfill the language requirements for Chinese, while students who already have native or near-native proficiency in Chinese must fulfill the language requirements for Japanese.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

European Studies
Language/Culture: Satisfactory completion of at least one advanced course taught in the language of emphasis (French, German, Italian, or Spanish). Individual departments will specify which courses fulfill these requirements.

Regional Specialization
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Latin American Studies
Language/Culture
: Satisfactory completion of advanced work in either Portuguese or Spanish. Students who place into Spanish 0220 or above must take at least two semesters of Portuguese (0210 and above) to fulfill the language requirement. Students who place into Portuguese 0215 or above must take at least two semesters of Spanish (0105 and above) to fulfill the language requirement.

Regional Specialization
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Middle East and Maghreb Studies
Language/Culture: Successful completion of three years of Arabic or Modern Hebrew (or the equivalent as determined by the Arabic or Hebrew program). Students who choose Modern Hebrew must be willing to pursue language study beyond Middlebury, if the Colleges Hebrew program is unable to offer a full range of advanced courses.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

Russian and East European Studies
Language/Culture: Satisfactory completion of at least second- and preferably third-level Russian or the Russian School equivalent.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program
: See Courses and Requirements above.

South Asian Studies
Language/Culture: Students must pursue a formal course of study of a South Asian language while abroad.

Regional Specialization: See Courses and Requirements above.

Study Abroad: See Courses and Requirements above.

Senior Program: See Courses and Requirements above. Note: because Middlebury does not currently offer a South Asian language, students are not required to take an additional language course on their return from South Asia; instead, they must take one additional regional or global course.

Global Gender and Sexuality Studies
Concerns pertaining to gender and sexuality, as well as how feminism is articulated around the world, have become central to the interdisciplinary project of international and global studies. The thematic cluster will be comprised of five courses, through which students can gain the knowledge and tools to bring feminist epistemologies to bear on their analyses of international and global issues. Scholars in feminist and queer studies—and in the subfields of postcolonial feminism and transnational queer studies, for example—have centralized the construction of space and place in ways that will be useful to IGS students. The cluster reflects the rigor of feminist and queer analyses of the global and international and is flexible enough to permit choices among students. The core GSFS courses will offer students the theory and methods needed for an engagement with global concerns, while the courses in the breadth requirements will enable an analysis of specific national/transnational courses. Since GSFS is an interdisciplinary program, the track reflects an interdisciplinary approach to questions of gender and sexuality

Language/Culture: See Language Study above. 

Track Requirements: Students must take 5 thematic courses from the list of approved courses.  They must take one introductory course (GSFS 0191, 0200, or 0289); Feminist Theory (GSFS 0320); one critical race studies course; and two transnational/national feminism courses, one of which should be taken during the study abroad semester.

Study Abroad:  See Study Abroad above. At least one study abroad course should transfer as a GSFS elective that meets the national/transnational feminism breadth requirement. In the semester prior to studying abroad, the student should consult with the GSFS director to confirm the proposed course would transfer appropriately.

Senior Requirements: See Senior Program above.

Global Security Studies
Security concerns are generated by a constellation of economic, political, historical, and environmental forces and are experienced at different scales—from the local to the global, and from the individual to the state. By drawing on courses from various departments, this track exposes students to security issues along three dimensions: global, international, and societal. The track highlights strategic concerns and issues of injustice, as well as the causes of insecurity over time and how it is experienced cross-culturally.

Language/Culture: See Language Study above.

Track Requirements: Students must take 5 thematic courses, in at least three departments and across two divisions, from the list of approved courses.  They must take one introductory course, two courses on international security issues, one course on societal security issues, and one course on global security issues. 

Study Abroad:  Security Studies majors must learn a foreign language and study abroad for at least one semester in the region corresponding to that language. Because security issues transcend countries and regions, majors may learn any language taught at Middlebury. Students who wish to study security issues abroad in an English language environment may do so, provided that they also study at least one semester in the region corresponding to their language.

Senior Requirements: See Senior Program above.

IGST 0101 Introduction to International and Global Studies (Fall 2018)

This is the core course of the International and Global Studies major. It is an introduction to key international issues and problems that will likely feature prominently in their courses at Middlebury and study abroad. Issues covered will differ from year to year, but they may include war, globalization, immigration, racism, imperialism, nationalism, world organizations, non-governmental organizations, the European Union, the rise of East Asia, politics and society in Latin America, and anti-Americanism. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP (G. Herb, K. Fuentes-George)

IGST 0411 The Racial Life of Power: (Trans)national Experiences of Race (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the emergence of race as a category of classification, social construct, and real experience in conjunction with the consolidation of different forms of power including colonialism, slavery, nationhood and globalization. We will take a global and interdisciplinary approach to our study by examining how race operates in national, transnational, and transcontinental power dynamics and imaginaries. Our interrogation of race will consider its central intersections with class, gender, and sexuality in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, and North America at different moments in history. Course materials will include visual media, literary texts, primary historical sources, critical theory, and music. (Taught in English) 3 hrs. sem. AAL, CMP, SOC (D. Silva)
Cross-listed as: PGSE 0411

IGST 0412 The “We”: Representing Collectives (Spring 2019)

“Who are we?” This may be the fundamental question underlying any community. Rather than propose a particular answer to this question, in this course we will attempt to develop a historical poetics of social formations: how are communities (“we”) maintained and represented under different political paradigms, how do communities appear, and how do they disintegrate? Readings will include foundational texts of modern Western political philosophy, with responses from beyond Europe (Russia, the Global South, and the Americas), and case studies from literature, cinema, protest, and mass media. Students taking this class for a Russian requirement meet one extra hour per week to discuss selected texts in Russian. 3 hrs. sem PHL, SOC
Cross-listed as: RUSS 0412 *

IGST 0433 Democracy, Deliberation, and Global Citizenship (Fall 2018)

Around the world, democratic self-governance is celebrated as a political ideal, but the fundamentals of informed and engaged citizens are difficult to achieve. Power, institutions, information, and culture can each facilitate or impede political dialogue and civic action. In this seminar, we will explore local and global conceptions of democracy and citizenship, and employ practical approaches to facilitating deliberation and action in our various communities. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (S. Stroup)
Cross-listed as: PSCI 0433

IGST 0452 Ecocriticism and Global Environmental Justice (Spring 2019)

Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/
Cross-listed as: PSCI 0452 *

IGST 0500 East Asian Studies Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0501 Latin American Studies Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0502 Middle East Studies Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0503 African Studies Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required) (Fall 2018: M. Sheridan, E. Gebarowski-Shafer)

IGST 0504 South Asian Studies Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0505 European Studies Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0506 REES Independent Project (Spring 2019)

(K. Moss)

IGST 0700 Senior Work (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0701 Russian and East European Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0702 European Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0703 Latin American Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0704 East Asian Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0705 African Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0706 Middle East Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IGST 0707 South Asian Studies Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)
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Program in International Politics and Economics

(1) Courses in Political Science: PSCI 0103, PSCI 0109, PSCI 0304 and three electives in comparative politics or international relations. At least one elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar in comparative politics or international relations.  See IP&E website for a list of eligible electives. PSCI 0304 must be taken at Middlebury College. Majors are encouraged to take ECON 0240 prior to PSCI 0304.
(2) Courses in Economics:  ECON 0150, ECON 0155, ECON 0210, ECON 0240 and two electives with an international orientation. One elective should be a 0400-level senior seminar. See IP&E website for a list of eligible electives. Majors must take a minimum of five courses in economics, regardless of credits earned at the secondary level (see the Advanced Placement policy for detailed information); at least four economics courses meeting the major requirements must be taken at Middlebury College, including the 0400-level seminar. Majors are encouraged to take ECON 0240 prior to PSCI 0304. Majors are strongly encouraged to take ECON 210 prior to any 400-level seminars.
(3) Language Study: Majors must achieve the language department's standard of linguistic competence before going abroad or must demonstrate equivalent competence in a language taught at Middlebury College through a language placement exam. Foreign language study while at Middlebury College is strongly encouraged. 
(4) Term or Year Abroad: Under normal circumstances, this will be completed at one of the Middlebury schools abroad. Majors should complete PSCI 0103, PSCI 0109, ECON 0150, ECON 0155, and ECON 0210 before going abroad. Majors are encouraged, but not required, to take ECON 0240 and PS 0304 before studying abroad.

Advanced Placement:
Students must take a minimum of 5 courses in each discipline. See the Advanced Placement policy for detailed information.
Winter Term CoursesWinter Term courses count towards the major only if they are listed on the IPEC Courses web page prior to winter term registration. No more than one Winter Term elective in economics and no more than one Winter Term elective in political science may count toward the major.

Double Majors and Minors: Because of the complex and interdisciplinary nature of the International Politics & Economics major, IPEC students are strongly advised not to pursue an additional major. In addition, IPEC majors may not minor in either economics or political science and may not major or minor in their primary language of focus.

Declaring a Major: To declare a major, students need to fill out both a major declaration form and an advising wizard form. Discuss your plan for completing the major (outlined on the advising wizard form) with your advisor who can be from either the political science or economics department. Have both your advisor and the Director of International Politics & Economics sign the major declaration form. Turn in one copy of both forms to the coordinator of International Politics & Economics. Turn in one copy of the major declaration form to the Registrar's Office.
First semester of senior year:
Early in the first semester of your senior year, fill out both a degree audit sheet and an advising wizard form. Print out a copy of your unofficial transcript and evidence that any courses from abroad have been approved for IPEC major credit (such as an email approval from a chair or director, or information from the programs abroad office). Bring these items to the Director of International Politics & Economics no later than a week before registration for classes for your final semester. Once signed, turn in one copy of the advising wizard form and the degree audit sheet to the coordinator of International Politics & Economics. Turn in one copy of the degree audit sheet to the Registrar's Office.
Honors: 
In addition to their 12 required courses, qualifying students can choose to write a senior thesis. To launch a thesis project, students must obtain a thesis advisor in both political science and economics, and submit to their advisors a thesis prospectus for formal approval. To identify suitable thesis topics, it is highly recommended that IPEC thesis candidates begin consulting with the potential advisors during their junior year. For details, deadlines, and a timetable, see the Honors Thesis page.
Honors Thesis RequirementsThe determination of honors, high honors, and highest honors is based on (1) the level of the grade achieved on the thesis; and (2) the level of the average grade received in all Middlebury College courses that count toward the IPEC major. Honors candidates must have an IPEC course average of 3.3 and a thesis grade of B+ to attain honors; an IPEC course average of at least 3.5 and a thesis grade of A- to attain high honors; and an IPEC course average of at least 3.7 and a thesis grade of A to attain highest honors. Note: Thesis grades do not count in the calculation of the GPA for honors, and a thesis cannot be pursued as a fifth course during any term.

IPEC 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

IPEC 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required) (J. Cason, O. Eglene, E. Bleich, T. Byker, D. Horlacher, O. Porteous, O. Lewis, W. Pyle, J. Maluccio, S. Stroup, A. Stanger, M. Williams, A. Yuen)
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Department of Italian

Our programs offer students the opportunity to achieve high competence in written and spoken Italian, in understanding Italian literature and culture, and in applying this linguistic, literary, and cultural knowledge to the study of other disciplines. During the academic year our program emphasizes the study of literature and culture in the context of language acquisition. The other integral components of Italian at Middlebury are the Italian School (summer on the Middlebury College campus or at our satellite campus at Mills College, in Oakland, California), and the C. V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Italy (junior year or semester), where students can take courses in our magnificent Sede in Florence (in the Renaissance Palazzo Giugni), or can direct-enroll in our programs at the University of Firenze, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome, La Sapienza. These rich programs encourage students to deepen and broaden their study of Italian literature, cinema, history, art history, political science, and many other disciplines. During the academic year in Middlebury, all four levels of courses in Italian are available every semester, and — for qualified students — faculty members are also available to direct independent research projects (ITAL 0550).
     Major in Italian:
For a full or double major in Italian, students must complete nine credits beyond ITAL 0103, including senior work: two courses at the 0400 level, but only one 0400 course for students who spend a whole year in Italy (Please note: ITAL 0101, 0102, and 0103 do not count for the major). Majors are normally expected to study at least one semester at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Italy (Florence), or at the Universities of Firenze, Ferrara or Rome, and upon their return from Italy they must normally take an Italian course each semester. A student can complete a major with courses at the Italian School in the summer. No more than three credits per semester from Study Abroad in Italy are applicable to the major. One credit towards the Major can be fulfilled by successfully taking a course in English with an approved section in Italian (History of the Italian Language; Italian Cinema; Italy Through Sicily).
     Joint Major in Italian: For the joint major in Italian, students must complete seven credits beginning with ITAL 0251, including one course at the 0400 level. Students must also complete a joint project credited in either of the two disciplines, as well as fulfill the requirements in the second discipline. Students are normally expected to complete one semester at either the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Florence, the University of Firenze, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome, La Sapienza. No more than three credits per semester from coursework in Italy are applicable to the Italian part of the major.
     International and Global Studies Major with Italian (European Studies Track):
Along with other required courses and senior work as described in the International and Global Studies major section, the Italian language component of an International and Global Studies major requires completion of the following: 1) Italian courses required for study in Italy (see below); 2) one semester, and preferably a full year, at the C.V. Starr-Middlebury College School in Florence, the University of Ferrara, or the University of Rome; 3) at least one 0400-level course in Italian upon return from Italy. Regional specialization requirements for the International and Global Studies major may include ITAL 0290-level courses (in English) as well as 0300-level courses taught at Middlebury or in Italy.
     Minor in Italian: The Italian minor consists of six courses: ITAL 0251, ITAL 0252 (or two courses counted from ITAL 3251-3252-3253 in the Italian Summer School) and four courses at the 0300-level or higher. Students entering the program with a standing beyond the ITAL 0252-level are required to take at least one 0400-level course as part of the Italian minor. All courses at the 0300-level can be completed during the academic year at Middlebury, at the Italian School, or at one of the affiliated Middlebury programs in Italy (Florence, Ferrara, or Rome).
     Senior Work:Students who major in Italian are required to complete a senior project (ITAL 0755).
     Honors
: To earn departmental honors, high honors*, or highest honors** a student must have at least a 3.6, 3.7*, or 3.8** average or above in Italian courses other than the senior project, have a project defense, and receive a grade of at least B+, A-*, or A** on the thesis (ITAL 0755).
     Fulfilling The Middlebury College Writing Requirement: All Italian majors, joint majors, minors, and International and Global Studies majors with literature and culture focus in Italian are strongly encouraged to fulfill their college writing requirement by enrolling in CMLT 0101 Introduction to World Literature.
     Requirements for Junior Year/Semester Abroad: The Italian language proficiency requirements for participation in study abroad in Italy can be completed with any combination of courses at the Middlebury campus (summer or academic year) that culminates with the successful completion of ITAL 0252 during the academic year or ITAL 3253 at the Summer School. Students must also have an overall academic average of at least B-, an average of B in Italian (or additional course work), and be enrolled in an Italian course the semester before departure. Because of the demanding and intensive nature of our programs in Middlebury, and because of the difficulty of finding equivalent programs in the United States or in Italy, we do not accept alternative programs for the fulfillment of study abroad requirements.
     C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Italy-Florence:
Students may study for a semester or for a full year in Italy. Fall and spring term students enroll for language, literature, and civilization courses in September and January. For examples of recent courses, please refer to the course database: http://www.middlebury.edu/international/sa/cid.  Students studying in Florence are also expected to enroll in at least two elective courses at the Università degli Studi di Firenze. Subject areas generally offered there include archeology, philology, Italian literature, linguistics, international relations, political science, comparative politics, sociology, history, art history, and history of economics.
     C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Italy-Ferrara/Rome: Students who apply to the programs at the University of Ferrara or the University of Rome must contact the department chair to discuss their plans. Important: All students studying at the University of Ferrara or the University of Rome must take a literature course, in consultation with the department chair. Subject areas often offered include Italian literature, comparative literature, history, linguistics, philosophy, geography, art history, architecture, theater history, sociology, and international economics as well as other disciplines.

ITAL 0101 Beginning Italian (Fall 2018)

This course is an introduction to the Italian language that provides a foundation in both spoken and written Italian. Focus on the spoken language encourages rapid mastery of the basic structures and vocabulary of contemporary Italian. The exclusive use of Italian in dialogue situations and vocabulary building encourages the student to develop skills in a personalized context. Conversation and drill are stimulated and fostered through active reference to popular Italian music, authentic props, and slides of Italian everyday life and culture. Students are required to participate in the Italian table. 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen LNG (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, S. Mula, S. Carletti)

ITAL 0103 Beginning Italian III (Spring 2019)

This course emphasizes increased control and proficiency in the language through audiovisual, conversational, and drill methods. Italian life and culture continue to be revealed through the use of realia. Short reading selections on contemporary Italy and discussions enlarge the student's view of Italian life and culture. Students continue to participate in the Italian table. (ITAL 0102 or equivalent) 6 hrs. disc./perf.; 2 hrs. screen. LNG

ITAL 0251 An Introduction to Contemporary Italy (Fall 2018)

Intended for students at the intermediate level, this course will afford the opportunity to expand conversation, writing, and reading skills while consolidating knowledge of the more difficult points of grammar. The contextual focus of the course is contemporary Italian culture, including contemporary history and politics, the economy, the division between North and South, immigration from developing countries, environmental issues, and popular music, among others. Italian films, music, and articles from newspapers and news magazines will enhance and complete the learning experience. (ITAL 0250, waiver, or equivalent) EUR, LNG, SOC (I. Brancoli Busdraghi, S. Carletti)

ITAL 0252 Italian Culture II: From the Sixties to the Present Day (Spring 2019)

To deepen the historical knowledge gained in ITAL 0251, we will discuss and analyze modern and contemporary Italian literature of various genres, as well as essays, art, and film. In the context of reading, critical viewing, textual analysis, and discussion, we will continue to develop both historical and linguistic competence. Discussion and the writing process, along with selected exercises, will continue to refine grammatical competence. (ITAL 0251) 3 hrs. lect./disc. LIT, LNG

ITAL 0299 Literary Feasts: Representations of Food in Modern Narrative (in English) (Spring 2019)

This course will consider food and eating practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. We will analyze realistic, symbolic, religious, erotic, and political functions surrounding the preparation and consumption of food. Readings will be drawn from several national traditions, with a focus on Europe. Authors will include, among others, I. Dinesen, L. Esquivel, J. Harris, E. Hemingway, T. Lampedusa, P. Levi, C. Petrini, M. Pollan, E. Vittorini, and B. Yoshimoto. Viewing of several films where food and eating play an important role will supplement class discussion. EUR, LIT
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0299

ITAL 0353 Literature of Migration in Italy (Spring 2019)

How is Italy changing due to immigration and emigration? Why do immigrants to Italy choose to leave their home countries, and why, on the other hand, do some Italians choose to emigrate from Italy? In this course we will examine contemporary Italy through the lens of migration. Students will read and discuss critical essays and literary texts such as Jhumpa Lahiri’s In altre parole and Igiaba Scego’s Adua, watch movies such as Lamerica, and discuss the cultural, economic, and literary aspects of migration in Italy. (In Italian; ITAL 0252 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. EUR, LIT

ITAL 0380 Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Italy and Migrants (Fall 2018)

International migration is a major contemporary phenomenon for many countries, including Italy. We will read, analyze, and write effectively about migrants' stories, struggles, related issues for host countries, and how migrants' lives are portrayed in various media. The goals of this Calderwood Seminar are to learn about migration through the lenses of Italy, and to improve student writing. We will pay particular attention to writing effectively and for a general audience, through peer-writing sessions and group discussions. Class meetings are once a week, but students will be required to interact regularly outside of class, providing in-depth feedback to each other's essays. (ITAL 0252 or by approval) 3 hrs. sem. CW, EUR, LNG (S. Mula)

ITAL 0492 Mediterranean Decameron (Spring 2019)

The Decameron, Florence’s “mercantile epic”, embraces a wide cosmopolitanism through stories of trade, travel, politics, and piracy within the pan-Mediterranean network, extending from Marseilles to Alexandria of Egypt. While certainly a theater of political and cultural conflict, the Mediterranean also emerges as a mobile and hybrid space of positive exchange, including wit, humor, sex, love, knowledge, religion, and wisdom. Through discussion and research, in this course we will focus on how and why ideas and beliefs of the Eastern Mediterranean are represented, and whether travel across the Mediterranean transforms protagonists and communities, proposing new values and prospects for the Italian and Western European audience. (ITAL0355 or equivalent) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, EUR, LIT, LNG

ITAL 0550 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Italian faculty as a group will consider and approve requests by qualified juniors and seniors to engage in independent work. Students must submit a prospectus that includes a bibliography of no less than five sources. Interested students should contact members of the Italian faculty before the end of the preceding term to discuss their project and to see if they are available to direct the Independent Study. Students must submit a prospectus with the department chair by the end of the first week of classesfor fall and spring term approvals, by the end the last week of fall semesterfor winter term approvals. Prior to submission, sufficient advance consultation with project directors is required.Junior students are strongly encouraged to consider independent study as preparation for senior honors thesis work. (Fall 2018: S. Carletti, P. Zupan, S. Mula, I. Brancoli Busdraghi; Spring 2019: S. Carletti, S. Mula, M. Van Order, I. Brancoli Busdraghi)

ITAL 0755 Senior Honors (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students majoring in Italian must complete an independent senior project. Italian faculty as a group will consider and approve the proposals, which should be submitted before the last week of the preceding semester. The senior project will be advised by one member of the Italian department, but will be presented to the whole department. Italian honors will be awarded to eligible students depending on the final grade. (Staff)
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Department of Japanese Studies

Required for the Major: The major requires students to achieve proficiency in Japanese language (four years or equivalent) and culture (four courses), to study abroad for at least one semester, and to complete a 0400-level seminar in the Japanese Studies department.
     To meet the language proficiency requirement of four years of study (or equivalent), students are strongly encouraged to begin the study of Japanese in their first academic year. Students who begin study of Japanese in the sophomore year must attend the summer Japanese School before study abroad in Japan.
     Courses fulfilling the four-course culture requirement are: JAPN 0110, JAPN 0175, JAPN 0198, JAPN 0210, JAPN 0212, JAPN 0215, JAPN 0217, JAPN 0230, JAPN 0237, JAPN 0245, JAPN 0250, JAPN 0260, JAPN 0262, and JAPN 0290 and JAPN 0330. At least two culture courses from this list must be taken before approval for study in Japan. 
     Studying in Japan for one semester (Fall or Spring) is required, but studying in Japan for the full junior year is strongly encouraged. Elective courses taken in Japan, in addition to language courses, are strongly encouraged but will not substitute for the four required culture courses to be taken at Middlebury. 
     Seniors are required to take at least one seminar in the Japanese Studies department at the 0400 level: JAPN 0435, JAPN 0450, JAPN 0451, or JAPN 0475.
      Students are strongly encouraged to take courses on Japan offered abroad and on the Middlebury campus in History, Religion, History of Art and Architecture, or other departments. These additional courses allow students the opportunity to enhance Japanese language and culture study according to individual interests, but do not count towards the major.
    
Honors: Successful completion of one advanced language course and JAPN 0700 Senior Thesis with a grade of B+ or above are required for graduation with departmental honors. Departmental honors will be awarded according to the grade point average of courses taken in the department, in the summer Middlebury Japanese School, and in Japan. A grade point average of 3.3 in these courses is required for graduation with honors. A grade point average of 3.75 and a grade of A on the thesis are required for High Honors.
     Required for the Minor: 
Courses required for the minor in Japanese are completion of language courses to the level of JAPN 0202, or the equivalent, and two additional courses offered by the Japanese Studies department in culture, literature, linguistics, or film. Courses fulfilling the two-course culture requirement are: JAPN 0110, JAPN 0175, JAPN 0198, JAPN 0210, JAPN 0212, JAPN 0215, JAPN 0217, JAPN 0230, JAPN 0237, JAPN 0245, JAPN 0250, JAPN 0260, JAPN 0262, and JAPN 0290 and JAPN 0330.

     Middlebury's Summer Language School: Intensive language courses are available each summer at Middlebury's Japanese School. During the eight-week session, students and faculty live in the same Japanese language dormitory, take their meals together, and communicate exclusively in Japanese, whether in the classroom or outside of class. For all students pursuing the study of Japanese language and culture, and especially prior to study abroad in Japan, a summer of concentrated study at the second-, third,- or fourth-year level in Middlebury's intensive Japanese School is strongly recommended. Students who are unable to begin the study of Japanese in their first year at Middlebury are strongly encouraged to begin or accelerate their study by taking a course in the intensive summer program.
     Study in Japan: Majors in Japanese Studies are required to spend at least one semester studying abroad in Japan. The C.V. Starr-Middlebury School in Japan, located in Tokyo, offers intensive language courses and topics courses in Japanese. Students have residential options in dormitories or in home-stays arranged by the program.
     
Language Technology and Resources:
Japanese courses incorporate a variety of computer-driven teaching and learning strategies. Video and audio materials for first- and second-year levels are available on any computer, so that students can view and listen to authentic materials at any time in their dorm rooms or in labs. Japanese films, scripts, and anime in advanced-language courses are also available on the Web to students enrolled in those courses. Many Japanese literature and culture offerings are Web-based multimedia courses. Instructors often make use of conferencing and other electronic tools to extend learning beyond regular class hours. The Middlebury College Library contains an extensive collection of works in English on most aspects of Japan; in addition, there are 1,700 works in Japanese, with special strengths in literature and linguistics.

JAPN 0101 First-Year Japanese (Fall 2018)

This course is an introduction to the modern Japanese language aimed at acquisition of the four basic skills speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. The emphasis is on thorough mastery of the basic structures of Japanese through intensive oral-aural practice and extensive use of audiovisual materials. The two kana syllabaries and kanji (characters) will be introduced toward the goals of developing reading skills and reinforcing grammar and vocabulary acquisition. 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (O. Milutin)

JAPN 0103 First-Year Japanese (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of the fall and winter terms with the introduction of more advanced grammatical structures, vocabulary, and characters. The continuing emphasis of the beginning Japanese course will be upon acquisition of well-balanced language skills based on an understanding of the actual use of the language in the Japanese sociocultural context. (JAPN 0101, JAPN 0102) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG

JAPN 0175 Anime: Masterworks of Japanese Animation (Fall 2018)

How did anime emerge as a distinctive national genre in global popular culture at the turn of the 21st century? What social conditions in Japan promoted adaptations of manga (graphic novels) into feature-length films for adult audiences? In this course students will address these questions by analyzing the forms and contexts of ten masterworks by the most prominent directors of Japanese animation. We will study the relation of anime to classic Disney films, live-action Hollywood cinema, and Japanese aesthetic traditions. Students will probe the political and ethical questions anime raises about the atomic bombings of World War II, individual identity, consciousness and the body, and the human impact on the natural environment. We will study several directors and give special attention to Miyazaki as an anime auteur. Films include Grave of the Fireflies, Akira, Ghost in the Shell, Perfect Blue, My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away, and The Wind Rises. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, NOA (C. Cavanaugh)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0175

JAPN 0201 Second-Year Japanese (Fall 2018)

The goals of the intermediate course are to develop the ability to understand conversational Japanese at natural speed, to express oneself accurately and smoothly in various situations, to read nontechnical materials at reasonable speed with the use of the dictionary, and to express oneself in writing with relative ease. Understanding of Japanese culture will be broadened and deepened through mastery of the course materials. (JAPN 0103 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (K. Davis)

JAPN 0202 Second-Year Japanese (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of JAPN 0201. (JAPN 0201 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG

JAPN 0210 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (in English) (Fall 2018)

This course will provide an introduction to linguistics theories as applied to the study of Japanese. Through the exploration of a language that is very different from Indo-European languages, students will gain a better understanding of how human languages work and are structured. The relationship of language to culture will be a central theme in the course. Topics covered will include key concepts in linguistics, Japanese linguistics, culture, and pedagogy. This course will be taught in English; no Japanese language or linguistics knowledge required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, NOA (S. Abe)
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0210

JAPN 0215 Modern Japanese Fiction (in English) (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine the development of Japanese literature from the Meiji restoration (1868) through WWII. During this period of rapid and often tumultuous modernization, fiction played a crucial role in the creation of the nation-state and in the formation of the individual's sense of self. We will read works by writers who participated actively in the imagination of modernity and those who resisted it, including Kunikida Doppo, Higuchi Ichiyo, Natsume Soseki, and Mori Ogai. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, NOA

JAPN 0228 Japanese Religions (Spring 2019)

We will begin our study of Japanese religions with the ancient mythology that forms the basis of Shinto (the way of the kami, or gods). We will then consider the introduction of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism to Japan and examine how these traditions were accepted, absorbed, and adapted. We will also investigate Japanese reactions to Christianity in the 16th century and the appearance of "new" Japanese religions starting in the 19th century. Throughout, we will ask how and why Japanese have both adhered to tradition and been open to new religions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, NOA, PHL
Cross-listed as: RELI 0228 *

JAPN 0235 History of Pre-Modern Japan (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the social, cultural, and institutional history of Japan from the eighth century up through the rise of the Tokugawa shogunate in the 17th century. The course is organized thematically to illuminate the different periods of Japanese history, including the imperial origin myth and Heian culture, the frontier and the rise of samurai government, localism and the warring states period, and finally the Tokugawa settlement and the paradoxes of centralized feudalism. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect/disc. AAL, CW (10 seats), HIS, NOA, SOC (M. Ward)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0235 *

JAPN 0240 Guns and Swords: Violence and Masculinity in Japanese and American Films (Fall 2018)

Cowboys, samurai, gangsters, and yakuza are fabled figures embodying national myths of honor and resistance in American and Japanese films. Swordfight and gunfight genres grapple with the issue of lethal weapons in the hands of individuals when the power of the state is absent, corrupt, or ineffectual. Familiar motifs, archetypal characters, and straightforward plots uphold traditional aspirations threatened by the forces of modernity. Japanese and American directors have exploited these conventions to create cinematic masterpieces about questions of violence, righteousness, and masculinity. In this course we will explore cross-cultural influences between swordfight and gunfight genres as we compare their heroes, antiheroes, conflicts, and codes. Films for study include Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, The Tale of Zatoichi, The Searchers, High Noon, Unforgiven, Pale Flower, Tokyo Drifter, Branded to Kill, White Heat, The Godfather, and Goodfellas. 3hrs. lect/disc. AAL, ART, CMP, NOA (C. Cavanaugh)
Cross-listed as: FMMC 0240

JAPN 0250 Gender in Japan (in English) (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine changing ideas about gender and sexuality in Japan in the 10th through 20th centuries, with special attention to the modern period. Sources will include literary texts, films, and social/historical studies. We will discuss topics, including women's writing in classical Japan; the commercialization of sexuality in the 18th century; ideas of "homosexuality" in late-medieval and modern times; and women's social roles and political struggles in the 20th century. 3 hr. lect./disc. AAL, LIT, NOA (O. Milutin)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0250

JAPN 0301 Third-Year Japanese (Fall 2018)

This advanced course aims to increase the student's proficiency in modern standard Japanese, both spoken and written. A variety of written and audiovisual materials will be used to consolidate and expand mastery of more advanced grammatical points and vocabulary. Oral presentation, discussion, and composition in Japanese are also important components of the course. (JAPN 0202 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG (S. Abe)

JAPN 0302 Third-Year Japanese (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of JAPN 0301. (JAPN 0301 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. drill LNG

JAPN 0401 Advanced Japanese (Fall 2018)

In this course we will read, analyze, and discuss advanced Japanese materials from a variety of modern and contemporary sources. (JAPN 0302 or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (K. Davis)

JAPN 0402 Advanced Japanese (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of JAPN 0401. 3 hrs. lect./disc.

JAPN 0435 Workshop in Literary Translation (Spring 2019)

Literary translation is a valuable but often neglected skill for advanced language learners. In this workshop we will consider the basic theoretical arguments in translation studies influencing translation styles and then practice translation in a variety of literary genres. Sessions will include discussions of translation strategies and active peer critique of sample translations. Each student will produce a substantial translation as the semester project. Topics covered will include: text selection, translation ethics, practical methodologies, and publishing industry standards. (JAPN 0402 concurrent or prior) AAL, LIT, LNG, NOA

JAPN 0475 Advanced Reading in Japanese Studies (Fall 2018)

In this course students will read original materials in a variety of disciplines and develop skills to analyze and discuss them in Japanese. Advanced listening practice, oral presentation and academic writing will also be emphasized. (Approval only) 3 hrs. disc. (K. Davis)

JAPN 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Qualified students may be permitted to undertake a special project in reading and research under the direction of a member of the department. Students should seek an advisor and submit a proposal to the department well in advance of registration for the term in which the work is to be undertaken.

JAPN 0700 Honors Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students write a thesis in English with a synopsis in Japanese on literature, film, or culture. The topic for the thesis is chosen in consultation with the instructor. (JAPN 0475)
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Jewish Studies Minor

What is Jewish Studies?

Jewish Studies ranges over the study of Jews and Judaism from the Biblical period to the present.  It takes Judaism not only as a "religion," but as a civilization and culture encompassing a rich textual tradition, literature in several languages, philosophy and theology, customs and ritual, art, music and film.  Jewish Studies is by its nature interdisciplinary and can be approached, for example, from within the disciplines of history, religion, sociology and anthropology, or literary study.  The program also sponsors a wide array of lectures and other events, including the annual Hannah A. Quint Lecture in Jewish Studies.

A distinguishing aspect of Middlebury's program is the depth of study possible in Hebrew.  Middlebury also offers a Hebrew Minor, with courses in both Modern and Classical Hebrew.  Introductory Modern Hebrew is offered every year, and Introductory Classical Hebrew in alternate years, usually in Winter Term. (For Hebrew course descriptions, click on the link to “Courses,” upper left.)

Participating Faculty:

Professors: Robert S. Schine (Religion/Classics),  Theodore Sasson, (Jewish Studies); O. Larry Yarbrough (Religion); Tamar Mayer (Geography; Robert Cohen (English and American Literatures). Associate Professors: Rebecca Bennette (History) and Director of the Jewish Studies program; Oz Aloni (Hebrew). Program Coordinator: Vijaya L. Wunnava

JWST 0160 Jewish Traditions (Fall 2018)

“Traditions” are not static, but a constant interplay between continuity and creativity. What do classical Jewish texts (Bible, Rabbinic literature) tell us about Judaism’s origins? How have the core concepts and practices of Judaism morphed into a cluster of traditions that has endured over two millennia? With these questions in mind, we will study central ideas in Jewish thought, rituals, and their transformations, culminating in individual projects involving the investigation a contemporary movement, congregation or trend in contemporary Jewish life, e.g. Reform, Reconstructionism, mystical (neo-Kabbalistic) revivals, or “secular” Judaism. 3 hrs. lect./disc. HIS, PHL (R. Schine)
Cross-listed as: RELI 0160 *

JWST 0257 The Holocaust (Fall 2018)

Why did the Holocaust happen? How could the Holocaust happen? In this course we will consider several aspects of the Holocaust, including the long-term conditions and events leading up to it, the measures employed in undertaking it, and the aftermath of the atrocities. Beyond a general survey, this course introduces students to the many varying interpretations and historical arguments scholars of the Holocaust have proposed and invites them to discuss and debate these issues in class. 3 hrs. lect./disc. EUR, HIS (R. Bennette)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0257 *

JWST 0280 Studies in Hebrew Bible/Old Testament WT (Spring 2019)

Studies in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament is an introductory course that focuses on a major religious text in the Western tradition. We will closely read diverse selections from the Pentateuch, the Prophets, and the Writings in English translation; no familiarity with the Bible or background is presumed. Special attention will be paid to matters of genre and methods of modern biblical scholarship, as well as Jewish and Christian traditions of interpretation. 2 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. HIS, PHL
Cross-listed as: RELI 0280 *

HEBM 0101 Introductory Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2018)

In this course students will become acquainted with the basic grammatical and formal concepts necessary for the comprehension of the Modern Hebrew language. We will focus on the fundamentals of reading, writing, listening, and speaking, with a particular emphasis placed on the acquisition of conversational ability. We will also make use of audiovisual, situational, and cultural exercises, and give attention to the elements of Classical form and style that provided a foundation for Modern Hebrew, which was revived as a vernacular in the late 19th century. No previous knowledge of Hebrew is required. 6 hrs. LNG (F. Alasiri)

HEBM 0103 Introductory Modern Hebrew III (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of Modern Hebrew 0102 which will be offered during winter term. Students will further develop their skills in written and oral communication, and will expand their knowledge of the cultures of modern Israel through both audio and visual media. (HEBM 0102 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect. LNG

HEBM 0201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew I (Fall 2018)

This course is a continuation of HEBM 0103. Using authentic audio and visual materials, we will place emphasis on developing the skills required for intermediate-level written and communicative competence. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the forms and style of Classical Hebrew, both of which are necessary for formal composition, interaction, and reading comprehension in Modern Hebrew. (HEBM 0103 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc LNG (O. Aloni)

HEBM 0202 Intermediate Modern Hebrew II (Spring 2019)

This is the fifth in the sequence of Modern Hebrew courses that focus on the acquisition of reading, listening, writing, and speaking skills. This course will further increase the students' fluency in spoken Hebrew, as well as their facility in reading authentic texts dealing with both secular and religious Jewish cultures, the literature of modern-day Israel, Israeli history, and current events. By the end of the semester, students should attain the level of educated, non-native speakers of Modern Hebrew, in terms of knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, composition, and communicative competence. (HEBM 0201 or equivalent) 5 hrs. lect/disc. AAL, LNG, MDE

HEBM 0234 State and Society in Contemporary Israel (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine Israeli society and politics in a period of rapid and profound transformation. We will begin with an introductory unit on Zionism, Palestinian nationalism, and the history of the state. Subsequent units will examine the social, cultural, and political characteristics of Israel’s main population sectors and religious groupings. The final units will examine ongoing political struggles, including struggles over the role of religion in public life; civil rights and democracy; and West Bank settlements and the Palestinian-Israeli peace process. Most readings assignments will be social scientific in nature but will also include journalism and literature. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, MDE, SOC
Cross-listed as: SOAN 0234

HEBM 0254 Rites and Rituals: Israel and its Neighbors (Fall 2018)

In this course we will use theory and case studies, from Israel and its neighbors, to explore a wide range of rituals. We will examine national goals achieved with the assistance of ceremonies, and society’s imprint on its members through life-cycle rituals. We will address similarities and differences in the ways specific rituals are performed, and the diverse meanings they may hold for groups and individuals in geographically proximate yet culturally distinct countries, and in the heterogeneous Israeli society. Our aim is to analyze cultural repertoires and social relations, as are represented, reproduced, and contested in ritualistic activities. 3 hrs. lect CMP, SOC (Z. Gazit)
Cross-listed as: SOAN 0254

HEBM 0261 The Sleeping Beauty: Themes in the Cultural and Linguistic History of the Hebrew Language (Spring 2019)

The Hebrew Language has been awakened. In this course we will explore when, where, why, and by whom was this Sleeping Beauty revived; how both its awakening and hibernation has been connected to linguistic, cultural, and societal transformation over 25 centuries. We will examine poetry, liturgy, Midrash, and other writing by philosophers, poets, linguists, and religious leaders. We will discuss the connection of the revival of the language to the Zionist movement. Throughout the course we will try to answer questions such as: Why do we regard Hebrew as one and the same language after three millennia of constant linguistic change? Was the revival of Hebrew a miracle or a failure? How did Hebrew influence Jewish practices of exegesis? This course counts towards the Jewish Studies minor (JWTS). 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW, SOC
Cross-listed as: LNGT 0261

HEBM 0263 Representation in Modern Hebrew Literature: Nation and Identities (Fall 2018)

Modern Hebrew literature, in its relatively short history, presents exceptional richness. In this course we will explore the theme of nation and identity in modern Hebrew literature: we will visit the personal lyricism of Bialik and his circle, the encyclopedic prose of Agnon, the troubled stream of consciousness of Gnessin, the stark realism of Brenner, the symbolism of Alterman, and the deliberately thin post-modern prose of Keret. We will meet modern Hebrew literature’s remarkable achievements as well as its points of crisis. We will also explore its deep historical roots which make modern Hebrew literature so unique. All readings in the course will be in English. 3 hrs. lect./disc AAL, CMP, LIT, MDE (O. Aloni)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0263

HEBM 0301 Advanced Intermediate Hebrew (Fall 2018)

This course will reinforce the acquired skills of speaking, listening comprehension,reading, and writing at the intermediate to mid/high level. We will focus primarily on contemporary cultural aspects, conversational Hebrew, reading of selections from Modern Literature: prose and poetry, skits, and newspaper articles. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, LNG, MDE (O. Aloni)

HEBM 0500 Independent Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

HEBR 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018)

Approval required.
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Linguistics Minor

The linguistics minor consists of a minimum of five courses: two required introductory level courses and three electives.

Required courses for the minor are as follows:
LNGT 0101 Introduction to Linguistics
LNGT 0102 Introduction to Sociolinguistics or LNGT/SOAN 0109 Language, Culture, Society

Electives include the following:
LNGT 0226 Phonetics and Phonology
LNGT 0250 Morphology and Syntax
LNGT 0280 Formal Semantics
LNGT/WRPR 0110 English Grammar: Concepts & Controversies
LNGT/EDST 0205 Second Language Acquisition and Educational Technology
LNGT/JAPN 0210 Japanese Linguistics
LNGT/ARBC 0225 Arabic Linguistics
LNGT/ARBC 0227 Arabic Sociolinguistics
LNGT/RUSS 0232 Nature and Origin of Language
LNGT/CHNS 0270 Chinese Sociolinguistics
LNGT/SPAN 0303 Introduction to Spanish Phonetics/Pronunciation (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/SPAN 0317Spanish Pronunciation (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/SPAN 0322 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/PHIL 0354 Philosophy of Language
LNGT/GRMN 0370 German Linguistics (taught in German)
LNGT/SPAN 0390 Linguistic Variation (taught in Spanish)
LNGT/SOAN 0395 Environmental Communication
LNGT/ARBC 0421 Arabic Linguistic Variation (taught in Arabic)
LNGT/ARBC 0435 Arabic Diglossia (taught in Arabic)
LNGT/SOAN 0459 Language and Power
LNGT 1001 Introduction to Translation Studies
LNGT/EDST 1003 Introduction to TESOL  

Please Note: Students are advised to check with the director for a complete list of courses that count as electives. All electives are taught in English, unless otherwise indicated.

LNGT 0101 Introduction to Linguistics (Fall 2018)

In this course we will discuss the major issues and findings in the study of human language within theories of modern linguistics. The main topics include the nature of human language as opposed to other communication systems; sound patterns (phonology); word-formation (morphology); sentence structure (syntax); meaning (semantics); language and the brain; language acquisition; geographical and social dialects; and historical development of language and language change. 3 hrs. lect./disc. SOC (T. Cook)

LNGT 0102 Introduction to Sociolinguistics (Fall 2018)

In this course, we will explore the ways that language creates and reflects social identities. We will look at the contextual factors-social, cultural, geographical, political, etc.-that impact language use and variation. Themes for this course will include linguistic variation, language and identity, language policy, and language in the media. We will consider questions such as: What distinguishes a language from a dialect? How and why do some language varieties become privileged? How do notions of politeness and respect vary across linguistic contexts? In essence, we will learn how language shapes our world, and how we shape language itself. SOC (S. Shapiro)

LNGT 0109 Language, Culture and Society (Spring 2019)

In this course students will be introduced to the comparative, ethnographic study of language in relation to socio-cultural context. Our readings will be drawn from diverse global settings and will focus upon language as the means by which people shape and are shaped by the social worlds in which they live. We will examine contrasts in ways of speaking across different communities, personal identities, and institutions. We will explore the consequences of communicative difference across a range of contact situations, including everyday conversation among peers, service encounters, political elections, and global connections or disconnections made possible through new media. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ CMP, SOC
Cross-listed as: SOAN 0109 *

LNGT 0110 English Grammar: Concepts and Controversies (Spring 2019)

In this course we will study the structure of the English language, learning key terms and strategies for analyzing English syntax. We will explore English grammar from both prescriptive and descriptive perspectives and examine its relevance to language policy, linguistic prejudice, and English education. Readings will be drawn from a variety of texts, including Rhetorical Grammar (2009), Eats, Shoots & Leaves (2006), Language Myths (1999), and Origins of the Specious (2010). This course is relevant to students wanting to increase their own knowledge of the English language, as well as to those seeking tools for English teaching and/or research. SOC
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0110 *

LNGT 0206 Narratives in News Media (Spring 2019)

In this course we will consider questions such as: What linguistic strategies do the news media use to craft compelling stories? What are the dominant narratives at play about national and global social issues, and how are some journalists working to counter those narratives? We will employ Critical Discourse Analysis as a central framework, reading theoretical and empirical work by linguists such as Teun van Dijk, as well as from sociologists and political scientists. We will engage with “On the Media” and other podcasts, TED talks, documentaries such as Outfoxed (2004), and online magazines. Students will write for a variety of audiences. 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW, SOC
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0206 *

LNGT 0208 Cultural Rhetorics (Fall 2018)

In this course we will focus on the budding field of cultural rhetorics—a set of practices and methodologies that help us understand the way different groups of people make meaning and interact. We will study Latinx, Black, Asian, Native, feminist, LGBTQ+, and public memory rhetorics, focusing on the language and persuasion practices these groups use in their discourses. In this class students will write comparative analyses of cultural rhetorics, compose their own cultural literacy narratives, construct arguments about culture, and build multimodal projects. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the various cultural practices of rhetoric in the United States. 3 hrs. lect. AMR, CMP, CW, NOR, SOC (J. Sanchez)
Cross-listed as: WRPR 0208 *

LNGT 0210 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (in English) (Fall 2018)

This course will provide an introduction to linguistics theories as applied to the study of Japanese. Through the exploration of a language that is very different from Indo-European languages, students will gain a better understanding of how human languages work and are structured. The relationship of language to culture will be a central theme in the course. Topics covered will include key concepts in linguistics, Japanese linguistics, culture, and pedagogy. This course will be taught in English; no Japanese language or linguistics knowledge required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, NOA (S. Abe)
Cross-listed as: JAPN 0210 *

LNGT 0226 The Sounds of Language: Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology (Spring 2019)

In this course we will study the description and analysis of speech: how the sounds of language are physiologically produced, acoustically represented, and psychologically perceived and categorized. Through acoustic and phonological analysis, students will develop the skills to distinguish and produce the sounds of the world’s languages, as well as explore the sound systems of different languages, in order to determine which patterns differ and which patterns are common to all. Students will hone their analytical and technical skills by solving phonological problem sets as well as by using computer software (Praat) to analyze the acoustics of speech. 3 hrs. lect./disc. SCI

LNGT 0227 Arabic Sociolinguistics (taught in English) (Spring 2019)

In this course we will focus on the inter-relationships between the way Arabic is used by native speakers and the various social contexts affecting that usage. In particular, we will discuss the phenomenon of diglossia in Arabic speech communities (that is, the co-existence of Modern Standard Arabic with the vernacular Arabic dialects of today); aspects of linguistic variation and change in the Arab world; the relation between register and language; as well as the relation between language and such sociological variables as education, social status, political discourse, and gender. Readings are primarily drawn from sociolinguists' studies in the Arab world. (ARBC 0101 or instructor's approval) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, MDE, SOC
Cross-listed as: ARBC 0227 *

LNGT 0232 The Nature and Origin of Language (Fall 2018)

This course will provide students with the basic principles and tools needed to study and explore languages. Relying on philology and contemporary linguistics, we will examine both the history of human language, along with recent efforts to explain its origin and development. This course will encourage individual effort and learning by incorporating independent readings, research, and weekly written and oral presentations. (T. Beyer)
Cross-listed as: RUSS 0232 *

LNGT 0243 How Languages are Learned: Theories and Implications (Spring 2019)

In this course we will develop a nuanced understanding of the cognitive, social, and educational factors that enable humans to acquire second languages. What is the difference between first and second language acquisition? How can instruction and curriculum be optimized to help learners? How are languages acquired in naturalistic settings? What is the impact of technology on language education? How do ideologies impact bilingual education in the United States and beyond? 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, SOC
Cross-listed as: EDST 0243

LNGT 0261 The Sleeping Beauty: Themes in the Cultural and Linguistic History of the Hebrew Language (Spring 2019)

The Hebrew Language has been awakened. In this course we will explore when, where, why, and by whom was this Sleeping Beauty was revived; how both its awakening and hibernation has been connected to linguistic, cultural, and societal transformation over 25 centuries. We will examine poetry, liturgy, Midrash, and other writing by philosophers, poets, linguists, and religious leaders. We will discuss the connection of the revival of the language to the Zionist movement. Throughout the course we will try to answer questions such as: Why do we regard Hebrew as one and the same language after three millennia of constant linguistic change? Was the revival of Hebrew a miracle or a failure? How did Hebrew influence Jewish practices of exegesis? 3 hrs. lect./disc. CW, SOC
Cross-listed as: HEBM 0261 *

LNGT 0270 Chinese Sociolinguistics (taught in English) (Spring 2019)

Sociolinguistics is mainly concerned with the interaction of language and society. The language situation in China is unique both in the modern world and in human history. We will gain a good understanding of sociolinguistics as a scientific field of inquiry through exploring the Chinese situation in this course. Some of the questions we will ask are: What is Mandarin (Modern Standard) Chinese? Who are "native speakers" of Mandarin? Are most Chinese people monolingual (speaking only one language) or bilingual (speaking two languages) or even multilingual? How many "dialects" are there in China? What is the difference between a "language" and a "dialect"? Are Chinese characters "ideographs", i.e., "pictures" that directly represent meaning and have nothing to do with sound? Why has the pinyin romanization system officially adopted in the 1950s never supplanted the Chinese characters? Why are there traditional and simplified characters? We will also explore topics such as power, register, verbal courtesy, gender and language use. Students are encouraged to compare the Chinese situation with societies that they are familiar with. (One semester of Chinese language study or by waiver) AAL, NOA, SOC
Cross-listed as: CHNS 0270 *

LNGT 0322 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (Fall 2018)

This course is an introduction to the theory and methodology of linguistics as applied to the study of Spanish. The course’s goals are to understand the basic characteristics of human language (and of Spanish in particular), and to learn the techniques used to describe and explain linguistic phenomena. We will study the sound system (phonetics/phonology), the structure of words (morphology), the construction of sentences (syntax), as well as the history and sociolinguistic variation of the Spanish language, as spoken in communities in Europe, Latin America, and Northern America. We will examine texts, speech samples, and songs, illustrating these linguistic phenomena. (SPAN 0220 or placement) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP, LNG, SOC (M. Rohena-Madrazo)
Cross-listed as: SPAN 0322 *

LNGT 0390 Linguistic Variation (Spring 2019)

In this course we will study linguistic variation in the Spanish-speaking world. The focus will be on the linguistic aspects of the varieties of Spanish spoken in Spain, Latin America, Asia, and the United States. Topics will include lexical variation, phonological variation, morphosyntactic variation, and geographic and social factors in linguistic variation. Special attention will be paid to Spanish in contact with other languages, e.g. with indigenous languages in Latin America, and with Basque and Catalan in Spain. The discussion will also include creole languages (e.g. Papiamentu). We will study texts, speech samples, and songs that illustrate specific cases of variation. (At least two Spanish courses at the 0300 level or above, or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. CMP
Cross-listed as: SPAN 0390 *

LNGT 0495 Language and the Environment (Spring 2019)

Do languages simply put different labels on the environment, from rocks to trees to carbon, or are what we see and what we value shaped by the ways that we talk about it? Drawing upon ethnography, linguistics, and critical discourse analysis, we will explore how environmental perceptions and modes of action are formed in and through language. We will bring an appreciation of language differences to the analysis of ongoing environmental controversies, where the various stakeholders draw contrasting boundaries between nature and culture and define human involvement with nature in different ways. (SOAN 0103 and a 0100-level LNGT or ENVS course) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Anthropology)/ CMP, SOC
Cross-listed as: SOAN 0495 *

LNGT 0500 Independent Work (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)
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Program in Literary Studies

Required for the Major:

The overall design of the program is simple, and its expectations are clearly defined. This is a program of study designed for students who by the time of their graduation from Middlebury wish to secure a comprehensive background in a full range of major achievements of world literature, as well as an ability to read and appreciate works of literature in at least one language other than English. To accomplish those ends, each Literary Studies major is required to take a total of 15 courses in literature over the course of four years. No more than six of these courses may be taken within a single department, and the individual courses may be selected from the literature of any language and of any period. They can be wide-ranging surveys or courses devoted to the study of single authors. The specific selection of courses is entirely up to the student, but in order to fulfill the requirements for the major, he or she will be expected to take: (a) two courses—one historical, one generally theoretical in orientation—selected from the list specified below under the "Summary of Major Requirements"; (b) one literature course in a foreign language (including Greek and Latin)—normally 0300-level (though FREN 0210 and the FREN 0200-series will usually qualify); and (c) a Colloquium for majors to be taken during the fall semester of the senior year. In addition, in conjunction with an independent reading course taken during the fall semester of the senior year, the student will arrange to take a one-hour oral examination in an area of specialization (as described below) that he or she has defined. This oral examination takes place at the end of the fall semester, and it is followed by a five-hour written comprehensive examination at the end of winter term. 
The written examination will require the student to demonstrate a knowledge of a range of major works by the authors listed below. For reasons of practicality, the number of authors from this list whose works students will actually have an opportunity to discuss on the comprehensive examination in any given year will be limited to 12.
 The following current list will give the student a clear sense of the particular range of major authors it is presumed that he or she will be familiar with by senior year:

Homer
Aeschylus
Sophocles
Vergil
Ovid
Lucretius
Dante
Boccaccio
Pirandello
Cervantes
Tirso de Molina
Calderón
Lope de Vega
Borges
Moliere
Baudelaire
Proust
Goethe
Kafka
Mann
Wang Wei
Cáo Xuegin
Lu-Xùn
Gogol
Dostoevsky
Tolstoy
Shakespeare
Milton
Wordsworth
Joyce
Emerson
Melville
Faulkner
Murasaki Shikibu
Chikamatsu Monzaemon
Natsume Soseki

In addition to works by authors whose names appear on this primary list, Literary Studies majors will be urged to deepen their general cultural background by becoming acquainted with the Old and New Testaments (especially Genesis, Psalms, Job, Song of Songs, Matthew, John, Revelation, and the Epistle to the Romans), as well as principal works of Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Darwin, Marx, and Freud. A full list of the specific works by these authors included on the current Literary Studies comprehensive reading list is available on the Literary Studies Program website, or from Professor Donadio, the director of the program.

Beyond the two historical and theoretical courses required for the program (both of which are counted toward the major), the 0300-level foreign language literature course, the senior year colloquium (LITS 0705) and independent reading course (LITS 0701), and the total of 15 courses, the general, defining requirement for the Literary Studies major is the winter term comprehensive examination (LITS 0700), the overall range of which is specified in the comprehensive reading list. In the process of working toward this general literary education, the student will also be expected to use the independent reading course (LITS 0701) to focus on a group of works chosen to represent an individual specialization in the literature of a particular culture (e.g., German, English, American, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, etc.), or period (e.g., the eighteenth century, the twentieth century, etc.), or genre (e.g., the novel, the drama, lyric poetry, etc.). The specific authors and the 10 to 12 texts selected by the student for this specialization will be approved by the director in conjunction with two faculty examiners with relevant expertise in the fields represented. This oral examination is the culmination of the independent reading course (LITS 0701) in the fall semester. At the end of the following winter term, there is a five-hour written winter term comprehensive examination based on the reading list. Students qualifying for honors (a B+ average in the major, including the comprehensive examination) will complete a Senior Honors Essay (LITS 0710) in their final semester.

After completing all the specified requirements, the student will be graduated from Middlebury College as a Literary Studies major with a particular area of interest: for example, epic poetry, European drama, Japanese literature, the literature of the nineteenth century, etc. Should the student wish to pursue graduate study, depending on the nature of his or her interests and preparation, the student would be in a good position to do so in such fields as English or American literature, comparative literature, or the literature of a specific foreign language; in addition, he or she would have a secure background for further studies in such fields as law, political philosophy, religion, journalism, publishing, medicine, and cultural and intellectual history.
 Literary Studies majors have gone on to do work in all these areas.

As indicated above, students will be eligible for departmental honors in Literary Studies if in their combined performance in literature courses and on the two parts of the comprehensive examination they have achieved an average grade of B+ or higher. Honors will be awarded on the basis of the overall grade average in the major, performance on the comprehensive examination, and a senior honors essay of 30-40 pages to be completed during the spring semester of the senior year (this project counts as one course). A one-hour oral examination on the content and implications of this honors essay is also required, and this examination will be conducted by two faculty members with particular expertise in the fields represented.

Summary of Major Requirements:

Total of 15 courses (no more than six in any one department).

(1) Two courses selected from the historical and theoretical courses listed below, one from each category, as currently offered. (With the permission of the director, alternative courses may be substituted for those specified here.)

Historical:

CLAS 0150 Greek and Roman Epic

CLAS 0152 Greek Tragedy

RELI 0180 Introduction to Biblical Literature

PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Science

Theoretical:

ENAM 0205 Contemporary Literary Theory

CHNS/LITS 0360 Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

(2) One course in literature in a foreign language (normally 0300 level, but FREN 0201 and FREN 0220 series would usually qualify).

(3) At least four literature courses, but no more than six, to be taken within a single department. (Courses in language instruction may not be counted toward this requirement.)

(4) Independent Reading Course (LITS 0701) in Area of Specialization (by genre, period, theme, or national literature), an area of particular interest  defined by the student in consultation with the director. A one-hour oral examination, to be taken in the fall semester before the winter term written comprehensive examination in the senior year, is devoted to this area of special interest. The 10 to12 texts required for this examination will be chosen by the student in conjunction with the director and two faculty examiners with appropriate backgrounds in the fields represented.

(5) Senior Colloquium for majors (LITS 0705, open to non-majors if space is available), focused on a range of works on the comprehensive reading list.

(6) Senior Comprehensive Examination (LITS 0700) in preparation for the written comprehensive examination. Students engaged in such preparation arrange  to meet with one another over the course of winter term, and often solicit faculty participation in discussions of individual texts they have chosen to work on as a group.

(7) Written Comprehensive Examination (LITS 0700) (on works that appear on the Literary Studies comprehensive reading list), taken at the end of winter term of the senior year. As indicated, this five-hour written examination represents the second part of the comprehensive requirement, the oral specialization examination in LITS 0701 being the first.

(8) Students achieving an average grade of B+ or higher in the program will be eligible for honors. Honors will be awarded on the basis of the overall grade average in courses in the major, performance on the comprehensive examination, and a senior honors essay of 30-40 pages, to be completed (for one course credit) during the spring semester of the senior year; a one-hour oral examination on the content of this essay is administered by two faculty examiners with expertise in the field of investigation represented.

Please Note: Any literature course in the Middlebury College curriculum (and in approved programs abroad or at other U.S. institutions) may be used to fulfill the requirements in the Program in Literary Studies. Hence, in addition to the specific LITS course descriptions indicated below, students majoring in Literary Studies as well as non-majors with an interest in literature are urged to read through the entire literature offering by various departments (including language departments) to secure a full sense of the range of courses available in any academic year.

LITS 0500 Independent Research Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required) (Staff)

LITS 0510 Independent Essay Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required) (J. Bertolini, S. Donadio)

LITS 0701 Independent Reading Course (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Intended for majors in literary studies preparing for the senior comprehensive examinations. At the conclusion of this course, students will take a one-hour oral examination (part of the senior comprehensive examination) in a specialization of their choice. (Approval Required) (Staff)

LITS 0705 Senior Colloquium in Literary Studies (Fall 2018)

Although it is required of all Literary Studies senior majors, this course is intended for students working in any discipline who seek a close encounter with some of the greatest achievements of the literary imagination. In addition to being understood as distinctive artistic and philosophical accomplishments, the six major works which constitute the reading list will also be seen as engaged in a vital, overarching cultural conversation across temporal and geographical boundaries that might otherwise seem insurmountable. The texts for this semester are: Homer, The Odyssey; Gogol, Dead Souls; Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishmen/t; Kafka, /The Trial; Pirandello, Six Characters in Search of an Author and Henry IV/; Borges, Ficciones. (Open to non-majors with the approval of the instructor.) 3 hrs., seminar. (M. Katz)
Cross-listed as: ENAM 0705

LITS 0710 Senior Honors Essay (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required) (J. Bertolini)
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Department of Mathematics

Required for the Major in Mathematics: (Eleven courses total, at least six of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont):
I. Core courses: MATH 0122, MATH 0200, MATH 0223, MATH 0302, and MATH 0323 (at least one of the latter two to be completed by the end of the junior year);
II. Electives: five MATH electives at the 0200-level or above;
III. Senior thesis work: A 0700-level MATH seminar in the senior year.

Note: Students are strongly encouraged to include a proof-based course such as MATH 0241 or MATH 0247 early in their programs. This is especially helpful prior to taking MATH 0302 or MATH 0323. 
 
Required for the Mathematical Sciences Option in the Mathematics Major: (Eleven courses total, at least six of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont)
I. Core courses: MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and MATH 0223;
II. Computing-intensive course: CSCI 0150 or MATH 0216 or MATH 0228;
III. Electives. Six courses from categories A and B. At least four of the six courses must have the MATH designation, and at least two must be from category B, and at least one of those two must be MATH 0302 or MATH 0323, to be completed by the end of the junior year. Non-MATH courses must all have the same designation (ECON or PHYS or CSCI)
A. Courses in applied specialization: MATH 0218, MATH 0225, MATH 0310, MATH 0315, MATH 0318, ECON 0280, PHYS 0212, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0463; 
B. Advanced electives: MATH 0302, MATH 0311, MATH 0323, MATH 0325, MATH 0410, CSCI 0302, ECON 0390, ECON 0411, MATH 0500 (with prerequisite: at least one course from categories A or B);
IV. Senior work: A 0700-level MATH seminar in the senior year.

Note: Students should consult the mathematics department for examples of course sequences in the mathematical sciences option recommended for emphases in Mathematical Economics, Computer Science, or Physical Sciences/Engineering. For students completing double majors, electives used towards a major in another department cannot also be counted as electives in the mathematical sciences option.

Students planning a "3-2" engineering program who wish to major in Mathematics will complete the 700-level MATH course in their sixth semester at Middlebury. These students should normally choose the Mathematical Sciences Option in the major.
 
Honors Program: A student who wishes to be considered for departmental honors in mathematics must submit a proposed plan of study during his or her junior year. Candidates for departmental honors should include one additional elective in their programs (12 courses total). For the mathematical sciences option, an honors program must include an elective sequence such as MATH 0310-0410 or MATH 0310-0311. Students should consult their advisors as they develop proposals for honors study.
 
Required for the Minor in Mathematics (six courses total at least half of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont): MATH 0121, MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and three courses at the 0200-level or above.
 
Joint Majors: The Department of Mathematics does not offer a joint major.
 
Advanced Placement: Advanced placement in the department is offered to first-year students whose secondary training indicates they can commonly bypass one or more of the beginning courses in mathematics. Majors typically begin their study of mathematics in MATH 0122 or MATH 0200. Mathematics majors who need to begin the study of calculus with MATH 0121 may arrange with their advisors to use this course as one of the required electives. Credits for MATH 0121 and 0122 may be earned through the College Board AP exams or international exams such as the A-Levels or IB. At the discretion of the chair, additional courses may be waived in recognition of exceptional secondary school preparation. However, in all cases the major must include at least 7 Middlebury College or approved transfer courses, and the minor must include at least 4. Students who have earned grades on advanced placement calculus exams that are eligible for credit may not register for the equivalent course at Middlebury College. Thus students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB exam or a 3 on the Calculus BC exam may not register for MATH 0121, students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC exam may not register for MATH 0121 or MATH 0122.  This policy applies irrespective of whether students choose to use their AP credits toward meeting Middlebury's graduation requirements. The following international credentials carry the same credit as a 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC Exam: A-level exam with a mathematics grade of A, B, or C; or IB Higher Level Mathematics with a grade of 6 or 7.
 
Other Credits: 
Because of the wide variation in course offerings at other institutions, students wishing to substitute a course from another college for any course in mathematics must seek approval from the department before registering for the course. In addition, students seeking MATH 0121 credit for a summer course taken elsewhere must pass a written examination given by the department in the fall. Check with the department early in the first week of classes for details.

Requirements Prior to Fall 2016
Required for the Major in Mathematics
: (Ten courses total at least half of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont):
I. Core courses: MATH 0122, MATH 0200, MATH 0223, MATH 0302, and MATH 0323;
II. Electives: four MATH electives at the 0200-level or above;
III. Senior thesis: MATH 0704 in the senior year.

Note: Students are strongly encouraged to include a proof-based course such as MATH 0241, or MATH 0247 early in their programs. This is especially helpful prior to taking MATH 0302 or MATH 0323.

Required for the Mathematical Sciences Option in the Mathematics Major: (Ten courses total at least half of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont)
I. Core courses: MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and MATH 0223;
II. Electives. Six courses from categories A and B. At least four of the six courses must have the MATH designation, and at least two must be from category B.
A. Courses in applied specialization: MATH 0225, MATH 0310, MATH 0315, MATH 0318, ECON 0380, PHYS 0212, CSCI 0201, CSCI 0463;
B. Advanced electives: MATH 0302, MATH 0311, MATH 0323, MATH 0325, MATH 0410, CSCI 0302, ECON 0390, ECON 0411, MATH 0500 (with prerequisite: at least one course from categories A or B);
III. Senior thesis: MATH 0704 in the senior year.

Note: Students should consult the mathematics department for examples of course sequences in the mathematical sciences option recommended for emphases in Mathematical Economics, Computer Science, or Physical Sciences/Engineering. For students completing double majors, electives used towards a major in another department cannot also be counted as electives in the mathematical sciences option.

Students planning a "3-2" engineering program who wish to major in Mathematics will complete the thesis course MATH 0704 in their sixth semester at Middlebury. These students should normally choose the Mathematical Sciences Option in the major.

Honors Program: A student who wishes to be considered for departmental honors in mathematics must submit a proposed plan of study during his or her junior year. Candidates for departmental honors should include two additional electives in their programs (12 courses total). For the mathematical sciences option, an honors program must include one of MATH 0302/0323 and an elective sequence such as MATH 0310-0410 or MATH 0310-0311. Students should consult their advisors as they develop proposals for honors study.

Required for the Minor in Mathematics (six courses total at least half of which must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont): MATH 0121, MATH 0122, MATH 0200, and three courses at the 0200-level or above.

Joint Majors: The Department of Mathematics does not offer a joint major.

Advanced Placement: Advanced placement in the department is offered to first-year students whose secondary training indicates they can commonly bypass one or more of the beginning courses in mathematics. Majors typically begin their study of mathematics in MATH 0122 or MATH 0200. Mathematics majors who need to begin the study of calculus with MATH 0121 may arrange with their advisors to use this course as one of the required electives. Credits for MATH 0121 and 0122 may be earned through the College Board AP exams or international exams such as the A-Levels or IB. At the discretion of the chair, additional courses may be waived in recognition of exceptional secondary school preparation. However, in all cases the major must include at least 7 Middlebury College or approved transfer courses, and the minor must include at least 4. Students who have earned grades on advanced placement calculus exams that are eligible for credit may not register for the equivalent course at Middlebury College. Thus students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB exam or a 3 on the Calculus BC exam may not register for MATH 0121, and students who have earned 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC exam may not register for MATH 0121 or MATH 0122. This policy applies irrespective of whether students choose to use their AP credits toward meeting Middlebury's graduation requirements. The following international credentials carry the same credit as a 4 or 5 on the Calculus BC Exam: A-level exam with a mathematics grade of A, B, or C; or IB Higher Level Mathematics with a grade of 6 or 7.

Other Credits:
Because of the wide variation in course offerings at other institutions, students wishing to substitute a course from another college for any course in mathematics must seek approval from the department before registering for the course. In addition, students seeking MATH 0121 credit for a summer course taken elsewhere must pass a written examination given by the department in the fall. Check with the department early in the first week of classes for details.

 

MATH 0100 A World of Mathematics (Fall 2018)

How long will oil last? What is the fairest voting system? How can we harvest food and other resources sustainably? To explore such real-world questions we will study a variety of mathematical ideas and methods, including modeling, logical analysis, discrete dynamical systems, and elementary statistics. This is an alternative first mathematics course for students not pursuing the calculus sequence in their first semester. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring contemporary issues using the mathematics that lies within those issues. (Approval required; This course is not open to students who have had a prior course in calculus or statistics.) 3 hrs lect./disc. DED (J. Albert)

MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A practical introduction to statistical methods and the examination of data sets. Computer software will play a central role in analyzing a variety of real data sets from the natural and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, elementary distributions for data, hypothesis tests, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, contingency tables, and analysis of variance. The course has no formal mathematics prerequisite, and is especially suited to students in the physical, social, environmental, and life sciences who seek an applied orientation to data analysis. (Credit is not given for MATH 0116 if the student has taken ECON 0210 or PSYC 0201 previously or concurrently.) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. computer lab. DED (Fall 2018: A. Lyford)

MATH 0121 Calculus I (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Introductory analytic geometry and calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, differential calculus of algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications to curve sketching, optimization problems and related rates, the indefinite and definite integral, area under a curve, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Inverse functions and the logarithmic and exponential functions are also introduced along with applications to exponential growth and decay. 4 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2018: E. Proctor, S. Abbott)

MATH 0122 Calculus II (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A continuation of MATH 0121, may be elected by first-year students who have had an introduction to analytic geometry and calculus in secondary school. Topics include a brief review of natural logarithm and exponential functions, calculus of the elementary transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications of integrals including problems of finding volumes, infinite series and Taylor's theorem, polar coordinates, ordinary differential equations. (MATH 0121 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2018: M. Kubacki, P. Schumer)

MATH 0200 Linear Algebra (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Matrices and systems of linear equations, the Euclidean space of three dimensions and other real vector spaces, independence and dimensions, scalar products and orthogonality, linear transformations and matrix representations, eigenvalues and similarity, determinants, the inverse of a matrix and Cramer's rule. (MATH 0121 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2018: W. Peterson, F. Swenton)

MATH 0214 Research Design and Analysis (Fall 2018)

This course will be a survey of statistical methods needed for scientific research, including planning data collection and data analyses that provide evidence about a research hypothesis. The course will include factorial, block, and split-plot/repeated-measures designs and analyses of variance, interactions, contrasts, multiple comparisons, and graphical methods for displaying data. Special attention will be given to analysis of data from student projects such as theses and independent studies. The R statistical software will be used for data analysis. (MATH 0116, PSYC 0201, ECON 0210 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. DED

MATH 0216 Introduction to Data Science (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course students will gain exposure to the entire data science pipeline: forming a statistical question, collecting and cleaning data sets, performing exploratory data analyses, identifying appropriate statistical techniques, and communicating the results, all the while leaning heavily on open source computational tools, in particular the R statistical software language. We will focus on analyzing real, messy, and large data sets, requiring the use of advanced data manipulation/wrangling and data visualization packages. Students will be required to bring their own laptops as many lectures will involve in-class computational activities. (MATH 0116; or ECON 0210 or PSYC 0201 and experience with R) 3 hrs lect./disc. CW, DED (Fall 2018: A. Lyford)

MATH 0223 Multivariable Calculus (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

The calculus of functions of more than one variable. Introductory vector analysis, analytic geometry of three dimensions, partial differentiation, multiple integration, line integrals, elementary vector field theory, and applications. (MATH 0122 and MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2018: J. Schmitt)

MATH 0225 Topics in Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Topics may include diagonalization of matrices, quadratic forms, inner product spaces, canonical forms, the spectral theorem, positive matrices, the Cayley-Hamilton theorem, ordinary differential equations of arbitrary order, systems of first-order differential equations, power series, and eigenvalue methods of solution, applications. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2018: M. Olinick)

MATH 0230 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries (Spring 2019)

In roughly 300 BCE, Euclid set down his axioms of geometry which subsequently became the standard by which people understood the mathematics of the world around them. In the first half of the 19th century, mathematicians realized, however, that they could remove one of Euclid’s axioms, the one known as the “parallel postulate,” and still produce logically consistent examples of geometries. These new geometries displayed behaviors that were wildly different from Euclidean geometry. In this course we will study examples of these revolutionary non-Euclidean geometries, with a focus on Klein's Erlangen Program, which is a modern way of understanding them. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect. DED

MATH 0241 Elementary Number Theory (Fall 2018)

Divisibility and prime factorization. Congruences; the theorems of Lagrange, Fermat, Wilson, and Euler; residue theory; quadratic reciprocity. Diophantine equations. Arithmetic functions and Mobius inversion. Representation as a sum of squares. (MATH 0122 or by waiver) DED (D. Dorman)

MATH 0302 Abstract Algebra (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Groups, subgroups, Lagrange's theorem, homomorphisms, normal subgroups and quotient groups, rings and ideals, integral domains and fields, the field of quotients of a domain, the ring of polynomials over a domain, Euclidean domains, principal ideal domains, unique factorization, factorization in a polynomial ring. (MATH 0200 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: E. Proctor)

MATH 0310 Probability (Fall 2018)

An introduction to the concepts of probability and their applications, covering both discrete and continuous random variables. Probability spaces, elementary combinatorial analysis, densities and distributions, conditional probabilities, independence, expectation, variance, weak law of large numbers, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. (concurrent or prior MATH 0223 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (W. Peterson)

MATH 0315 Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences (Fall 2018)

An introduction to the role of mathematics as a modeling tool and an examination of some mathematical models of proven usefulness in problems arising in the social and life sciences. Topics will be selected from the following: axiom systems as used in model building, optimization techniques, linear and integer programming, theory of games, systems of differential equations, computer simulation, stochastic process. Specific models in political science, ecology, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and economics will be explored. (MATH 0200 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (M. Olinick)

MATH 0323 Real Analysis (Fall 2018)

An axiomatic treatment of the topology of the real line, real analysis, and calculus. Topics include neighborhoods, compactness, limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, and uniform convergence. (MATH 0223) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED (S. Abbott)

MATH 0325 Complex Analysis (Spring 2019)

An introduction to functions of a complex variable. Mappings of the complex plane, analytic functions, Cauchy Integral Theorem and related topics. (MATH 0223 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED

MATH 0328 Numerical Linear Algebra (Spring 2019)

Numerical linear algebra is the study of algorithms for solving problems such as finding solutions of linear systems and eigenvalues of matrices. Many real-life applications simplify to these scenarios and often involve millions of variables. We will analyze shortcomings of direct methods such as Gaussian Elimination, which theoretically produces the true solution but fails in practical applications. In contrast, iterative methods are often more practical and precise, and continually evolve with changing technology and our understanding of mathematics. Our study will include the First Order Richardson, Steepest Descent, and Conjugate Gradient algorithms for linear systems, and the power method for eigenvalue problems. (MATH 0200) 3 hrs. lect. DED

MATH 0410 Stochastic Processes (Spring 2019)

Stochastic processes are mathematical models for random phenomena evolving in time or space. This course will introduce important examples of such models, including random walk, branching processes, the Poisson process and Brownian motion. The theory of Markov chains in discrete and continuous time will be developed as a unifying theme. Depending on time available and interests of the class, applications will be selected from the following areas: queuing systems, mathematical finance (Black-Scholes options pricing), probabilistic algorithms, and Monte Carlo simulation. (MATH 0310) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED

MATH 0432 Elementary Topology (Spring 2019)

An introduction to the concepts of topology. Theory of sets, general topological spaces, topology of the real line, continuous functions and homomorphisms, compactness, connectedness, metric spaces, selected topics from the topology of Euclidean spaces including the Jordan curve theorem. (MATH 0122 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. DED

MATH 0500 Advanced Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Individual study for qualified students in more advanced topics in algebra, number theory, real or complex analysis, topology. Particularly suited for those who enter with advanced standing. (Approval required) 3 hrs. lect./disc.

MATH 0702 Advanced Algebra and Number Theory Seminar (Fall 2018)

This course is a tutorial in Advanced Abstract Algebra and Number Theory for students who have completed work in either subject. Starting from elementary results in linear algebra, we will explore the fundamental mathematical ideas underlying field extensions, constructability, unique factorization, Euclidean fields, and Galois theory. Working independently and in small groups, students will gain experience reading advanced sources and communicating their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. This course fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (MATH 0241 or MATH 0302; Approval required) 3 hrs. sem.

MATH 0710 Advanced Probability Seminar (Spring 2019)

This course is a tutorial in Probability Theory for students who have completed work in Probability and Real Analysis. Starting from elementary results about random walks, we will explore the fundamental mathematical ideas underlying measure theoretic probability, martingales, the Weiner process, and the Itô stochastic calculus. Working independently and in small groups, students will gain experience reading advanced sources and communicating their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. This course fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (MATH 0310, MATH 0323, and by approval). 3 hrs. sem.

MATH 0723 Topics in Analysis Seminar (Spring 2019)

The foundation in analysis covered in MATH 0323 provides the tools necessary to engage a range of important and fascinating topics of both a pure and applied nature. In the first part of this seminar we will collectively work our way through the theory of Lebesgue measure and integration, studying the classical Banach spaces of integrable functions. After this common introduction, students will each choose a project from a range of options that includes topics in functional analysis (e.g., the open mapping theorem, the Hahn-Banach theorem) or more classical real analysis (e.g., Fourier series, orthogonal polynomials, the gamma function). Working independently and in small groups, students will gain experience reading advanced sources and communicating their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. This course fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (MATH 0323 or by approval). 3 hrs. sem.

MATH 0745 The Polynomial Method (Fall 2018)

A tutorial in the Polynomial Method for students who have completed work in Abstract Algebra and at least one of Combinatorics, Graph Theory, and Number Theory. We will study Noga Alon’s Combinatorial Nullstellensatz and related theorems, along with their applications to combinatorics, graph theory, number theory, and incidence geometry. Working independently and in small groups, students will gain experience reading advanced sources and communicating their insights in expository writing and oral presentations. Fulfills the capstone senior work requirement for the mathematics major. (Approval required; MATH 0302 and one of the following: MATH 0241, MATH 0247, or MATH 0345). (J. Schmitt)
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Molecular Biology & Biochemistry

Students matriculating Fall 2018 or later must follow these requirements.  Students matriculated prior to Fall 2018 will need to follow the previous requirements, which can be found on the MBBC webpage.

Required for the Major: The requirements for the major in molecular biology and biochemistry provide a multidisciplinary yet integrated approach to examining life at the macromolecular, cellular, and organismal levels. The major is composed of 15 required courses including foundation courses, advanced courses, and four electives selected among three thematic suites. Required foundation courses in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology establish a strong, broad understanding of the science necessary for advanced study. Required advanced courses in the core areas of molecular biology and biological chemistry build on this foundation. Finally, elective courses offer advanced opportunities to explore a wide variety of specific topics including neurobiology, developmental biology, computational biology, data science, molecular genetics, and biochemical mechanisms. Students may engage in mentored independent research in these areas.
      Placement Exams and Transfer Credit:
Students may be able to bypass introductory courses in chemistry, mathematics, or physics on the basis of AP credit or proficiency exams. Those who bypass CHEM 0103 may begin with CHEM 0104 (fall or spring) or CHEM 0107 (fall only). AP Statistics will not satisfy the statistics requirement (BIOL 0211 or MATH 0116). Those students with AP Statistics credit will be required to enroll in BIOL 0211. Those students interested in the health professions or graduate study may wish to take a full two semesters of calculus and physics in order to meet professional school entrance requirements. Students considering taking summer courses or courses abroad must get approval in advance from the program director. Students should consult with their adviser for assistance with the process of transferring credit from another institution.

Required Background Courses:
MATH 0121 Calculus I
PHYS 0109 Newtonian Physics
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution
BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis or MATH 116 Introduction to Statistical Science
CHEM 0103 or CHEM 0107 General Chemistry I or Adv. General Chemistry
CHEM 0104 or CHEM 0107 General Chemistry II or Adv. General Chemistry
CHEM 0203 Organic Chemistry I: Structure and Reactivity
CHEM 0204 Organic Chemistry II: Synthesis and Spectroscopy

Required Advanced Courses:
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics
CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules

Required Elective Suite Courses:

A list of appropriate electives is provided within each suite.  However, not all listed courses are offered every year.  Also, as other appropriate courses may become available on campus, there may be additional course options within each suite.  Majors will be kept informed of currently available courses that fit within each of the three elective suites. 

Students may not count a single course in more than one elective category requirement.

1. Quantitative Suite (students must take 1 class in this suite)
        CHEM 0355 Thermodynamics and Kinetics*
        CSCI 0201 Data Structures*
        CSCI 0321 Bioinformatics Algorithms*
        MATH 0200 Linear Algebra
        MATH 0223 Multivariable Calculus*
        MATH 0216 Introduction to Data Science
        MATH 0217 Elements of Mathematical Biology and Ecology
        MATH 0315 Mathematical Models in the Social and Life Sciences*

2. Advanced Laboratory Suite- Lecture and Independent Research (students must take 1 class in this suite)
        BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology
        BIOL 0310 Microbiology
        BIOL 0324 Genomics
        BIOL 0331 The Genetics of Cancer
        BIOL 0365 Molecular Microbial Ecology

3.  Advanced Non-Laboratory Suite (students must take 2 classes in this suite)
        BIOL 0330 Mechanisms of Microbial Pathogenesis
        BIOL 0350 Endocrinology
        BIOL 0380 Immunology (formally BIOL 0280)
        BIOL 0420 Neurogenetics
        BIOL 0425 Human Genetics
        BIOL 0449 Extremophiles: conquering Earth's Extreme Environments
        BIOL 0450 Topics in Reproductive Medicine
        BIOL 0475 Neuroplasticity*
        CHEM 0355 Thermodynamics and Kinetics*
        CHEM 0425 Biochemistry of Metabolism
        CSCI 0321 Bioinformatics Algorithms*
        PHYS 0241 Biomedical Imaging*

*Courses with pre-requisites other than courses already required of the MBBC major (or by waiver for some).
 

Note: Independent Study courses (CHEM/BIOL/MBBC 0500/0700/0701) cannot be used to fulfill elective credit.
    
There is no minor in molecular biology and biochemistry.

The recommended progression through the required courses of the MBBC major is shown below. While there can be some deviation to this schedule, it is highly recommended that the students complete their introductory chemistry requirements (CHEM0103 and CHEM 0104 or, with advanced placement, CHEM 0107/CHEM 0104) by the end of the first year and their introductory biology requirements (BIOL 0140 and BIOL 0145) by the end of their third semester. The decision to start the introductory biology sequence in the first semester along with introductory chemistry and calculus should be made with consultation with the students FYSE advisor and/or the MBBC Program Director. CHEM 0204 may be taken either concurrently with CHEM 0322, or afterwards. All mathematics, physics, introductory chemistry and biology, and organic chemistry courses should be completed by the end of the second year. A college writing (CW) course should be completed by the end of the third year. BIOL 0331 or BIOL 0310 are appropriate courses which have sections that fulfill the CW requirement.

First Year Fall
CHEM 0103 General Chemistry I OR (if satisfied) CHEM 0104 General Chemistry II OR (if satisfied) CHEM 0107 Advanced General Chemistry
MATH 0121 Calculus I
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (for students who have taken or placed out of CHEM 0103)

First Year Spring
CHEM 104 General Chemistry II (if not taken previously)
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (for students who have taken or placed out of CHEM 0103)

Second Year Fall
CHEM 0203 Organic Structure and Reactivity
PHYS 0109 Newtonian Physics OR BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis OR MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science
BIOL 0140 Ecology and Evolution OR BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics (for students who have taken or placed out of CHEM 0103)- (if not taken previously)

Second Year Winter Term
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis (if BIOL 0211 or MATH 0116 not taken previously) OR Elective

Second Year Spring
CHEM 0204 Organic Synthesis and Spectroscopy or CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules
BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Data Analysis OR MATH 0116 Introduction to Statistical Science (if not taken previously)
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics

Third Year
CHEM 0322 Biochemistry of Macromolecules or CHEM 0204 Organic Synthesis and Spectroscopy (if not taken previoulsy)
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics (if not taken previously)
Electives

Fourth Year
Electives
BIOL 0314 Molecular Genetics (if not taken previously)
Senior Thesis Research

Molecular Biology & Biochemistry Research: Research is an important component of a well-rounded academic pursuit; it contributes to the development of independence and creativity, as well as to the depth of knowledge needed to become an active contributor to the scientific community. Majors may undertake independent research with a faculty mentor in MBBC or in other Departments and Programs, provided the research falls within the mission of the major. Any major is eligible to perform an independent study research project (BIOL 0500, CHEM 0400, NSCI 0500, or BIOL/CHEM/NSCI/MBBC 0700) with the consent of a mentor.
     Requirements for HonorsSenior thesis research may be initiated by any junior with the consent of a mentor. Students considering senior thesis research are urged to begin conversations with faculty early in their junior year (certainly by winter term) because many thesis projects begin during the summer preceding the senior year. Those eligible for high honors or honors in molecular biology and biochemistry will: (1) complete at least two semesters of research, which may include winter term; (2) enroll in MBBC 0701 for their final semester of research; (3) graduate with a minimum GPA of 3.3 for all courses counting towards the major; (4) present a public seminar describing the significance, methodology, results, and conclusions of their research; (5) successfully defend their thesis before a committee of three faculty, two of whom must be affiliated with the MBBC program; and (6) earn a grade of at least B+ for MBBC 0701, as determined by the members of the MBBC program, with the grade based on their research performance, their written thesis, their thesis presentation and their thesis defense.


MBBC 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Seniors conducting independent study in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry should register for MBBC 0700 unless they are completing a thesis project in which case they should register for MBBC 0701. (Approval required).

MBBC 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students conducting independent thesis research in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry must register for MBBC 0701 while completing research projects initiated in BIOL 0500, MBBC 0700, or CHEM 0400. Students will organize and lead regular discussions of their research and research methods, and attend weekly meetings with their designated laboratory group to foster understanding of their special area, and practice the stylistic and technical aspects of scientific writing needed to write their thesis. (CHEM 0400 or BIOL 0500 or MBBC 0700) (Approval required).
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Department of Music

Required for the Major:  Majors are required to take MUSC 0101; MUSC 0209; MUSC 0260-0261; MUSC 0333; MUSC 0334; a performance elective such as MUSC 0240, 0243, 0244, or 0500; two 0200-level or above elective music courses; and MUSC 0400 senior seminar.

Demonstrated proficiencies:  Music majors will be required to demonstrate basic piano and sight singing proficiencies in the semester when the major is declared. If preparation is needed, students are encouraged to take a semester of piano lessons focused on theory skills, arranged through the music office.

In addition to the curricular requirements, majors are required to participate for three semesters in at least one departmentally-approved ensemble: Middlebury College Orchestra, Middlebury College Choir, Middlebury College Community Chorus, the Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble, African Music and Dance Ensemble, or Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble.

Required for the Joint Major:  Joint Majors are required to take MUSC 0101; MUSC 0260-0261; MUSC 333; MUSC 334; two 0200-level or above elective music courses; and MUSC 0704 (senior work that combines both majors and is agreed upon by the advisers and department or program chairs)

Required for the Minor:  Students who pursue the minor in music are required to complete five music courses, two of which may be general introductory courses (0100 level) and three other courses at the 0200-0400 levels.

Music Theory Placement Exam:  Students may test into MUSC 0209 (Music I) and MUSC 0260 (Music Theory II) by taking a placement exam rather than taking the pre-requisite MUSC 0160 (Theory I). Incoming students must take the placement exam before classes begin and only at the designated time at orientation. Current students must send an email to Professor Matthew Taylor at matthewt@middlebury.edu to schedule the exam. Note: Placement tests should be arranged by November 1, and April 1, for the following semesters.

Departmental Honors:  Departmental honors in music reflect a student's overall achievement in and contribution to the department, as well as demonstrated excellence in MUSC 0704 (Senior Work). To take MUSC 0704, students must have at least B+ grade average in music courses; and must submit a proposal for senior work (of one or two semesters in length) by April 1 of the junior year. Of note: MUSC 0704 (Senior Work) does not count as a course toward fulfillment of the music major. Grade averages of B+ in senior work and B+ in departmental courses will be eligible for honors; A- in senior work and A- in departmental courses will be eligible for high honors; A in senior work and A in departmental courses will be eligible for highest honors.

Ensembles: 

Middlebury College Orchestra auditions for instrumentalists at the beginning of the semester. Twice-weekly rehearsals take place in the Robison concert hall in preparation for performances featuring music from all periods. See course listing for MUSC 0205. (E. Bennett).

Middlebury College Choir performs concerts each fall and spring, participates in Baccalaureate and other College functions, and tours or engages in other projects annually. Audition required, with attention to sight-reading, listening skills, and vocal production. Intent to participate full year/multiple semesters strongly encouraged. Open to all students without prerequisite. See course listing of MUSC 0205. (J. Buettner).

College Community Chorus performs concerts each fall and spring, usually including a major choral work for chorus and organ or orchestra. Open to all without audition; rehearsals focus on developing choral musicianship. See course listing of MUSC 0205. (J. Rehbach).

The Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble uses traditional big-band instrumentation, playing the best of contemporary jazz arrangements as well as classic charts from the 75 years of swing and jazz band history. The Ensemble also features student compositions and arrangements when available. An active performance schedule is typical. See course listing of MUSC 0205 (D. Forman).

The African Music and Dance Ensemble is the core of MUSC 0244, for which enrolled students earn one (1) credit. The Ensemble gives students (with or without a musical background) a rich, hands-on experience with numerous East African (Ugandan) music and dance cultures through regular rehearsals and fall/spring end-of-semester concerts. See course listing of MUSC 0244 (D. Kafumbe).

Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble is an off-campus community ensemble that students are invited to join that features woodwind, brass, and percussion; no auditions necessary. There are two performances each semester. Rehearsals take place at Middlebury Union High School. (M. McHugh).

Other Chamber Ensembles: String quartets, woodwind and brass ensembles can be formed and coached for interested students. Independent projects (MUSC 0500) can be arranged for these groups.

Private Music Lessons: Musical instrument and voice lessons are available through the department. Register online at go/musiclessons during the first week of fall and spring terms (winter term lessons registration takes place the last week of classes in the fall term). Academic credit is not given for lessons, and an additional fee is applied to the student’s college bill. There are ten 45-minute music lessons per semester (four during winter term). Students will sign contracts at the first lesson and are binding. No rebate is allowed for lessons missed except in the case of injury or continued illness. Members of music department ensembles are entitled to half-price lessons for the instruments they play in the ensemble (or voice for choir and community chorus). The fee is waived for students who are music majors and music joint majors, (limit two lesson series per semester), or are enrolled in performance-related courses, MUSC 0240, 243, 244, and MUSC 0500 or MUSC 0704 projects. Contact the department at extension 5221 for information.

 

MUSC 0101 Introduction to Western Music (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will develop critical listening skills through guided study of selected works created by the men and women of the Western world. The course will examine how music uses basic sound materials—such as rhythm, melody, timbre, texture, and harmony—to create meaning and expression, how those uses have changed over time from the Middle Ages to the present, and how music relates to its social and historical context and to the other arts. Previous musical training is not required. 3 hrs. lect. ART, CMP, EUR, HIS (Fall 2018: L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 0130 Topics in Music (Spring 2019)

Topic is determined by the instructor - refer to section for the course description. ART

MUSC 0134 What in the World is Music? (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore global musical cultures in order to better understand both those musical cultures and our own in relation to one another. The course has two goals: to introduce students to unfamiliar ways of listening to and thinking about different elements of music (including – but not limited to – rhythm, melody, timbre, texture, harmony, and form); and to develop skills for appreciating cultural significances of these elements. We will achieve these goals through readings, lectures, discussions, film screenings, listening sessions, workshops, concerts, and hands-on activities. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, CMP

MUSC 0160 Music Theory I: Fundamentals (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is an introduction to the basic elements and theoretical concepts of Western music. We will focus on such topics as basic keyboard skills, sight singing, musical notation, rhythm, and harmony and form. Theoretical work and drills will be combined with compositional and performance projects. The goal of the course is to expand students’ musical intuition and skill and to provide the technical basis for further music study. No prior musical experience is required. (Students who wish to take upper-level composition or music theory courses must either complete this course or pass a theory and musicianship test administered by the department to demonstrate equivalent experience.) (Formerly MUSC 0109). 2.5 hrs. lect. ART (Fall 2018: S. Tan)

MUSC 0205 Performance Lab (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Credit can be conferred for performance in faculty-supervised ensembles: Middlebury College Orchestra, Middlebury College Choir and the Middlebury College Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble (see "Ensembles" above), one unit of such credit to accrue over two semesters (spring and fall only). The appropriate supervising faculty will give grades, based on attendance and quality of performance. A student should inform the ensemble director of intent to sign up for this course before starting, and should actually register for MUSC 0205 only the SECOND of the two terms by adding it as a fifth course. MUSC 0205 does not fulfill any major course requirements and may not be taken more than once. (Approval required) ART (Fall 2018: E. Bennett, J. Buettner, J. Rehbach, J. Forman)

MUSC 0209 Music I (Fall 2018)

Music I focuses on the materials and grammar of music through compositional exercises. As part of these explorations, we will examine the elements of harmony (scales, triads and seventh chords), notation, rhythm, polyrhythm, binary and ternary forms, two-voice counterpoint, variation, transposition, as well as skills in conducting, analysis, ear-training, and sight-singing. Students will write short pieces for a variety of instruments and ensembles, notate their pieces, and rehearse and perform them, thereby learning about music through discovery and observation. The assignments are designed for students with or without compositional experience. (Ability to play an instrument or sing; MUSC 0160, or passing score on the MUSC 0160 placement exam) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. ART (S. Tan)

MUSC 0210 Music II (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of MUSC 0209. While using the same format, including composing and labs, as in MUSC 0209, the course covers elements of modality (western and non-western), functional harmony, heterophony, fugal processes, strophic forms, melodic analysis, serial processes, and extensions of tonality and atonality. (MUSC 0209 or by permission) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab. ART

MUSC 0212 History, Theory, and Practice of Electronic Music (Spring 2019)

This course will provide a historical look at the development of electronic music from the earliest analog techniques to present-day computer technology. Students will learn about the theory of digital and analog sound, acoustics, and MIDI. Creative projects will guide the class through a range of techniques. Much of the focus will be on how the electronic medium enables composers to work with sound and musical forms in non-traditional ways. 2 hrs. lect./1 hr. lab ART

MUSC 0213 The Digital Musician (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the potential of smartphones, tablets, interactive computer apps, and virtual reality environments for musical experimentation, creation, and performance. Projects will include the creation of original works and live performances using these tools. Students should have a laptop that they can bring to class. There is no prerequisite other than a willingness and interest in working directly with computer code (especially Max, HTML5, JavaScript, and Unity). 3 hrs. lect. ART (P. Hamlin)

MUSC 0232 Music in the United States (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine folk, classical, and popular music in the United States from the 17th century to the present. We will use historical and analytical approaches to gain insight into the music, the musicians, and the social and cultural forces that have shaped them. Students will explore music’s relation to historical events, other artistic movements, technological changes, and questions of national identity and ethnicity. Topics will include music in the British colonies, minstrelsy, American opera and orchestras, jazz, popular music, and the experimentalist composers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Music reading skills are useful but not required. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AMR, ART, NOR
Cross-listed as: AMST 0232

MUSC 0236 African Soundscapes (Fall 2018)

This course will introduce students to musical cultures and practices from the African continent with a focus on particular regional styles. Through readings, lectures, discussions, film screenings, listening sessions, concerts, and hands-on activities, we will develop skills for analyzing and appreciating the diversity of African musical practices and their social, economic, and political value in traditional and contemporary contexts. Some background in music may be necessary. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, SAF

MUSC 0245 Collaborative Improvisation: All-Arts Ensemble (Fall 2018)

In this course/ensemble we will open dialogues of performance, improvisation, and social interaction across disciplines in the arts. How do the various disciplines relate to each other in a performance environment? It may be easy to see points of commonality between music and dance or writing and theater, but what about the act of painting and the process of musical improvisation? Through the work of Ornette Coleman, Del Close, John Cage, Pauline Oliveros, and others, students will explore improvisation in music, theater, dance, and visual art. The class will culminate in a performance. All students are welcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (M. Taylor)

MUSC 0246 A Cappella Ensemble Performance (Spring 2019)

Unaccompanied vocal music is rich in cultural expression and artistic beauty. Singing in an unaccompanied vocal ensemble enhances creativity, musicianship, and communication skills. This course affords an opportunity to develop analytical and ensemble skills that contribute to creative and informed performance. Through study of scores and source readings, students will explore vocal technique, performance, and cultural context in European art music, North American folk songs, and styles of improvisation. This course will conclude with a public performance and may include additional performances off campus. Music reading is required, prior singing experience is not. A preview of the reading requirement is available at go/Ensemble246. ART, CMP

MUSC 0250 Performance Art (Spring 2019)

When different arts merge in unusual and provocative ways, performance art is created. This seminar will engage in discussions, research, and creative projects regarding performance art—how it comes about, its place in our culture, and its aesthetic. Our focus and explorations will center on musical components. We will delve into the roots of performance art in the early nineteenth-century in writing and music, including work from Berlioz, Cage, Kagel, the Talking Heads, Laurie Anderson, Reich, and Glass concluding with the music/performance art of today. In addition, we will discuss the processes behind performance art, and create some of our own, culminating in a ‘concert’ of work. (A knowledge of an instrument or voice is desirable, though not required) 3 hrs. lect ART

MUSC 0260 Music Theory II: Diatonic Theory (Fall 2018)

This course is an in-depth technical study of the materials of music, a study which expands one’s ability to analyze and create music and to understand different musical styles. We will cover harmonic materials, introduce musical form, and work with traditional compositional skills. These techniques are applied to the analysis of classical music, jazz and popular music. (MUSC 0160 or passing score on the MUSC 0160 placement exam.) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART (M. Taylor)

MUSC 0261 Music Theory III: Chromatic Theory (Spring 2019)

This course is a continuation of MUSC 0260. Students will study more advanced harmonic devices including modulation and chromaticism, jazz harmony, and post-tonal techniques. In-depth analysis of classical music, jazz, and popular music supports a more advanced study of musical form. (MUSC 0260) 3 hrs. lect./disc. ART

MUSC 0309 Advanced Composition (Fall 2018)

In this course we will focus on writing for string quartet, brass quintet, a cappella singing, piano, or performance art and involve issues of technique, style, and practical considerations, as well as study of selected elements of the literature. The course will culminate with a reading of student works by a professional ensemble or solo performer. This semester we focus on composing for the string quartet. We will discuss a variety of string techniques as well as issues of form and orchestration. We will listen to important works for that medium and discuss the styles from the Classical period to this century. Students will compose exercises, leading to a substantial string quartet to be "read" by the Jupiter String Quartet. (MUSC 0209 and 0210 or approval of instructor). 3 hrs. lect./disc. (S. Tan)

MUSC 0333 Music in Western Cultures (Fall 2018)

In this course we will develop skills for assessing music’s social, economic, and political importance in Western societies. Through a series of units focusing on various aspects of music (such as composition, performance, dissemination, and reception) and on various eras from ancient Greece to the present, students will engage with the principal questions and methods of historical musicology. (MUSC 0101) 3 hrs. lect. ART, CMP, HIS (L. Hamberlin)

MUSC 0334 Music in World Cultures (Spring 2019)

In this course students will develop skills for analyzing a wide range of music styles and appreciating their social, economic, and political importance. We will explore selected case studies through readings, lectures, discussions, film screenings, listening sessions, workshops, concerts, and hands-on activities. (MUSC 0209 or MUSC 0261) 3 hrs. lect. AAL, ART, CMP

MUSC 0400 Senior Seminar (Fall 2018)

Topic is determined by the instructor - refer to section for the course description. ART (J. Buettner)

MUSC 0500 Independent Study (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Admission by approval. Please consult published departmental guidelines and paragraph below.

MUSC 0704 Senior Work (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Senior work is not required of all music majors and joint majors. However, students interested in and eligible for departmental honors (see guideline above, in "Departmental Honors" section) may propose one or two-semester Senior Work projects. Projects may be in history, composition, theory, ethnomusicology, performance, or electronic music, and should culminate in a written presentation, a public performance, or a combination of the two. MUSC0704 does not count as a course toward fulfillment of the music major.

Project and budget proposals for Independent Study and Senior Work should be submitted by the previous April 1 for fall and winter term projects, and the previous October 15 for spring term projects. Budget proposals will not be considered after those dates. Project proposals will be considered after the deadline but are more likely not to be approved due to previous commitments of faculty advisors or other scheduling reasons.
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Program in Neuroscience

Required for the major: The major includes required background and foundations courses, electives, and senior work. Required background courses in biology, psychology, and chemistry, establish a foundation in science necessary for upper-level study. Foundation courses teach students to approach neuroscience from three intellectually different, but related directions. Elective courses offer opportunities to explore a wide variety of neuroscience related areas. Senior work requires all majors to integrate their specific training through research or a senior seminar.  Students may be exempt from some introductory courses through placement or bypass exams. For more information on placing out of a specific course, contact the chairperson of the relevant department.

Required Background Courses:
PSYC 0105 Introduction to Psychology
BIOL 0145 Cell Biology and Genetics
CHEM 0103 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1
Either PSYC 0201 Psychological Statistics or BIOL 0211 Experimental Design and Statistical Analysis (if available)

NOTE: PSYC 0105 & BIOL 0145 are pre-requisite to NSCI 0251 and should be taken in the first year.

We strongly recommend CHEM 0103 & either PSYC 0201 or BIOL 0211 be taken by the end of the second year.

Foundations Courses: (all three are required)
NSCI 0251 Fundamentals of Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience(Not open to juniors or seniors) 

NSCI 0252 Fundamentals of Behavioral Neuroscience (Currently only open to NSCI Majors with the prerequisite of NSCI 0251)

Fundamentals of Philosophical Neuroscience—Students must take one of the following:   
PHIL 0252 Philosophy of Mind
PHIL 0358 Rationality and Cognition
PHIL 0360 Consciousness

Electives:
Majors must take three electives chosen from within or across the Biological, Psychological, or Philosophical groupings below:

Biological Studies of Neuroscience
BIOL 0216 Animal Behavior
BIOL 0235 Sexual Selection
BIOL 0270 Neural Disorders
BIOL 0305 Developmental Biology
BIOL 0350 Endocrinology
BIOL 0370 Animal Physiology
NSCI 0225 Brain Evolution

Psychological Studies of Neuroscience
PSYC 0202 Research Methods
PSYC/NSCI 0227 Cognitive Psychology
PSYC/NSCI 0302 Conditioning and Learning
PSYC/NSCI 0303 Sensation and Perception
PSYC/NSCI 0309 Psychopharmacology
PSYC/NSCI 0317 Biobehavioral Addiction
PSYC/GSFS 0330 Psychology of Gender
RELI/PSYC 0304 Mindfulness and Psychology
LNGT 0226 Phonetics & Phonology

Philosophical Studies of Neuroscience
PHIL 0214 Science and Society
PHIL 0216 Science and the Quest for Truth
PHIL 0220 Knowledge and Reality
*PHIL 0252 Philosophy of Mind
PHIL 0280 Logic & Formal Semantics
PHIL 0310 Moral Psychology
PHIL/LNGT 0354 Philosophy of Language
*PHIL 0358 Rationality and Cognition
*PHIL 0360 Consciousness
RELI/PHIL 0320 Yogacara Depth Psychology and Philosophy of Mind 

* If not taken already to satisfy the Fundamentals of Philosophical Neuroscience requirement

Senior Work: A senior seminar in a neuroscience area, approved by the program. Offerings vary year by year, but possible courses include: 

BIOL/NSCI 0420 Neurogenetics
BIOL 0475 Neuroplasticity
BIOL/NSCI 0480 Neurobiology
NSCI 0410 Neural Coding
NSCI 0425 Methods in Neuroscience
PSYC 0408 Family in Psychology
PSYC/NSCI 0414 Rhythms of the Brain
PSYC/NSCI 0430 Memory: A User's Guide
PSYC/NSCI 0434 Genes, Brain and Behavior
PSYC/NSCI 0437 Social/Emotional Brain
PSYC/NSCI 0438 Lenses on Sex and Gender
or a NSCI relevan BIOL, PSYC or PHIL 0400 level course approved in advance by the NSCI Program) OR senior research (NSCI 0500, NSCI 0700 and NSCI 0701).

During winter term and as course offerings change there may be others that are available for NSCI seminar credit.  Seniors can do research with any faculty in the program, or with certain faculty in other departments provided the research project is approved by the neuroscience faculty and the project is related to understanding the nervous system and the mind.
Independent Research and Program Honors: Majors are encouraged to undertake independent research (NSCI 0500, NSCI 0700, NSCI 0701) with any faculty member in the program. Students considering any senior research should begin conversations with faculty early in their junior year. Those eligible for high honors in neuroscience must (1) complete at least two semesters of thesis-related research (one term of NSCI 0500 or NSCI 0700 and one term of NSCI 0701); (2) have a minimum GPA of 3.3 in major courses (excluding NSCI 0500/0700/0701); (3) present a public seminar describing the background, methodology, results, and greater significance of their research; (4) submit a written thesis and (5) successfully defend their thesis before a committee comprised of at least two Neuroscience faculty members, plus others as needed who may recommend High Honors after considering these five components of a thesis.
Study Abroad: Study abroad can be a valuable experience that is encouraged, though majors must consult with the Office of Off-Campus Study and their advisor about the advisability of specific programs. Because the requirements for the NSCI major are complex, we recommend that students study abroad for a single term rather than an entire year. It is expected that the required courses listed for the major specifically by number (i.e. PSYC 0105, BIOL 0145, PSYC 0201 or BIOL 0211, NSCI 0251, NSCI 0252, and PHIL 0252, PHIL 0360, or PHIL 0358) would be completed at Middlebury. However, NSCI electives may be taken abroad if they are determined to satisfy program requirements and are approved by the advisor and program director. Students generally receive major credit for a maximum of two courses taken abroad. The NSCI program does not grant major credit for Independent Study projects completed abroad.
Advanced Placement:
Psychology AP Exam and IB: Students with a score of 4 or 5 on the Psychology AP Exam, or a score of 6 or 7 on the IB (International Baccalaureate) Higher Level psychology exam, may bypass PSYC 0105Students matriculating Fall 2016 or later will need to take an additional elective to fulfill their Neuroscience Requirements.  Students matriculating prior to Fall 2016 do not need an additional course for the major.
Psychology Department placement exam: Students who receive a passing score on the Psychology Department placement exam may bypass PSYC 0105, however they will need to take an additional elective to fulfill their Neuroscience Requirements.  (More details can be found on the Psychology Requirements page.)
Statistics AP Exam:  Students matriculating Fall 2016 or later may not use the Statistics AP Examination in place of taking PSYC 0201 (Psychological Statistics) or BIOL 0211 (Biostats).  Credit for PSYC 0201 is given to students matriculating prior to Fall 2016 who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Statistics AP Examination.  These students do not need to take an additional course for the major.  
Chemistry AP and Placement ExamStudents with a score of 4 or 5 on the Chemistry AP Exam, or who pass the Chemistry Department Placement Exam, may bypass CHEM 0103 and do not need an additional course for the major.

 

 

NSCI 0225 Evolution and Development of the Brain (Fall 2018)

Our brains are complex in both structure and function. But why? Why did we evolve to have a nervous system? What cellular and molecular events during development produce this complexity? Students will gain a deep understanding of the structures of the brain, selection factors during evolution, and how the nervous system develops. Through introductory lectures, readings, and discussions, students will discover the fascinating evolutionary history of the human brain. (PSYC 0105 and BIOL 0145 or BIOL 0140) (not open to students who have taken NSCI 0325) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (A. Crocker)

NSCI 0227 Cognitive Psychology (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 0305) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2018: J. Arndt)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0227 *

NSCI 0251 Fundamentals of Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Neurons are the building blocks of complex circuits that underlie perception and behavior. In this course we will examine the molecular and cellular basis of neuron structure and function. The topics include the molecular and cellular basis of action potential propagation, the molecular biology of synaptic transmission, the molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, and the molecular mechanisms of sensory transduction. Laboratory exercises will train students in commonly used neurobiology techniques and engage students in novel investigations. (BIOL 0145 or CHEM 0103 and PSYC 0105; Open to neuroscience majors, nonmajors by waiver; Not open to juniors or seniors). 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2018: G. Ernstrom)

NSCI 0252 Fundamentals of Behavioral Neuroscience (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Behavioral neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field that combines approaches and knowledge from psychology, biology, and chemistry to further our understanding of human and non-human animal behavior. In this course, you will study the interrelationships among elements of the nervous systems, co-functioning bodily systems, and behavioral output such as emotions, sex, memory, consciousness, sleep, and language. You will be given an opportunity to apply your knowledge from NSCI 0251 of the nervous system at the micro and macro levels and will revisit the basic concepts of behavioral genetics and psychopharmacology. This cumulative knowledge base will serve as your foundation for advanced study of neural systems and their relative roles in progressively more complex behaviors such as basic reflexes, motivation, rational thought, neural disorders, and therapeutic efficacy. (NSCI 0251; open to NSCI majors only, others by approval) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2018: C. Cave)

NSCI 0317 Biobehavioral Addiction (Fall 2018)

Addiction is a pervasive disorder affecting society on a global scale. To understand this complex disorder, addictions are studied from the basic neural mechanisms, such as how neurons respond to addictive substances, to psychological factors and how they protect or increase risk. In this course we will examine the principles of substance addictions, emerging behavioral addictions (internet/gaming, problem-gambling), and underlying mechanisms that drive addiction. Topics include neural pathways of addictive substances, brain functional and structural changes, theories of motivation, neuropsychological risk factors, and modern prevention and treatment. Psychology and neuroscience students will bring their relative expertise to the class for thoughtful review of the literature.(PSYC 0105) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (Z. Zhai)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0317 *

NSCI 0410 Neural Coding: Visualizing How the Brain Computes (Fall 2018)

How does the brain go from an electrical signal to recognizing friends? In this course we will learn to use MATLAB to explore visually how the brain uses electrical signals to compute information. By using MATLAB as the frame for the class, students will gain skills in using a fundamental tool in neuroscience. In addition, through the use of introductory lectures, readings, in class programming activities, and discussion, students will deepen their understanding of how sensory information is encoded and then decoded. No experience using MATLAB necessary. (PSYC 0301, NSCI 0100, or NSCI 0251; open to junior and senior neuroscience majors; others by waiver). SCI (A. Crocker)

NSCI 0425 Methods in Systems Neuroscience (Spring 2019)

Our brains are series of connected neurons forming circuits. The properties of these neurons and circuits dictate their role in our behavior. This interaction is the foundation of systems neuroscience. In this course students will deepen their understanding of the fundamental properties of these neural circuits. Students will gain knowledge of the current methods of studying these circuits, including their promise for future research directions as well as their flaws. We will focus on learning the principles of neural circuitry and discussing primary literature. (NSCI 0251 or NSCI 0252; open to junior and senior neuroscience majors; others by waiver). SCI

NSCI 0430 Memory: A User's Guide (Fall 2018)

How can I remember names better? How can I best study for an exam? How accurate are our memories? A deep understanding of how people remember will allow us to answer these and many other questions. Topics covered in this course include working memory, the nature of encoding and retrieval, applied aspects of remembering, and neuroscientific approaches to understanding memory. Readings will be a mixture of textbook and journal articles. The class will have a seminar format, with emphasis on student-led discussions and contributions. Additionally, student research groups will design and execute a research study examining human memory. Evaluations will be based on the research project, student-led discussions, and reaction papers. (PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210 or MATH 0116 or BIOL 0211; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem. (J. Arndt)
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0430 *

NSCI 0437 The Social and Emotional Brain (Spring 2019)

Social relationships profoundly impact our emotional and physical well-being. For instance, healthy relationships bring joy, but difficult relationships bring pain. Social/affective (emotional) neuroscience collectively utilizes social psychology, emotions research, and neuroscience to inform our understanding of social interactions. It addresses questions like: How does the brain process social/emotional information? How do emotions help us discern other’s intentions? How are relationships shaped by emotion? Topics for discussion will include the interconnectedness of the social/emotional brain, self-concepts, theory of mind, empathy, and disorders of social/emotional function. Psychology and neuroscience students will bring their relative expertise to the class content for thoughtful discourse. (PSYC 0105; Open to junior and senior neuroscience and psychology majors only, others by waiver) 3 hrs. Sem.
Cross-listed as: PSYC 0437 *

NSCI 0500 Independent Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students enrolled in NSCI 0500 complete individual research projects involving laboratory or extensive library study on a topic chosen by the student and approved in advance by a NSCI faculty advisor. This course is not open to seniors; seniors should enroll in NSCI 0700. (Approval required)

NSCI 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course is for senior NSCI majors who plan to conduct one or more semesters of independent research, or who plan to complete preparatory work toward a senior thesis, such as researching and writing a thesis proposal as well as, if appropriate, collecting data that will form the basis for a senior thesis. Senior NSCI majors who plan to complete a senior thesis should register initially for NSCI 0700. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (Approval required, open to seniors only)

NSCI 0701 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Senior NSCI majors who have completed one or more terms of NSCI 0700, who have a GPA of 3.3 in their major courses, and who plan to complete a senior thesis should register for NSCI 0701 for the final semester of the senior thesis process. Students enrolled in NSCI 0701 write a thesis, give a public presentation of their research, and present an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of at least two Neuroscience faculty members. Faculty may recommend High honors in Neuroscience after considering the quality of these components of a student’s thesis and the student’s GPA in major courses. Additional requirements may include participation in weekly meetings with advisors and/or lab groups and attending neuroscience seminars. (NSCI 0700, Approval required)
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Department of Philosophy

A.  Requirements for students who entered the College prior to Fall 2015

Required for the Major: Majors must complete no fewer than 10 courses in the department, to include:
1. Logic Requirement: PHIL 0180
2. History Requirement:
    a) PHIL 0201 or CLAS/PHIL 0275
    b) PHIL 0250
3. Distribution Requirement:
    a) one course in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy (ESP)
    b) one course in Epistemology, Language, Metaphysics, Mind and Science (ELMMS)
4. Seminar Requirement: two 0400-level seminars (see below)
5. Electives: three courses
 
Additionally, it is highly recommended that students take either PHIL 0150 or PHIL 0151, preferably early in the program. PHIL 0180 must be completed by the end of the sophomore year. For students going abroad in their junior year, the history requirement should be completed prior to departure. Cognate courses may be substituted for no more than two departmental electives, but will not satisfy the departmental distribution requirement; such substitutions require the prior approval of a major's departmental adviser, and must be at the 0200-level or above. No more than one term of thesis work may count towards the 10 course requirement.
 
Seminar Requirement: Majors must take two department seminars (0400-level courses on advanced topics in philosophy). Junior majors should take the seminar currently offered in the spring term; seniors should take the seminar currently offered in the fall term. Students who are abroad during the spring of the junior year must take both seminars in their senior year. This requirement will not be waived for students doing departmental honors. These seminars will not normally satisfy the departmental distribution requirement, but may in exceptional cases by permission of the Chair.
 
Departmental Honors: Majors with at least a B+ average in philosophy courses may apply to the Chair to become candidates for departmental honors. To apply, a student must find a faculty member willing to supervise the project and then submit a proposal to that faculty member in writing. If (and only if) the proposal is accepted, the student should then register for two successive terms of PHIL 0700 (normally during the winter and spring terms of their senior year). To receive honors, students must complete a two-term project resulting in a thesis or a set of thematically related papers, give an oral defense (according to departmental regulations), and receive for their work a minimum grade of B+. In addition, they must maintain their B+ average in courses in the department.
 
Required for the Joint Major: For the philosophy component of a joint major, students must (1) take eight philosophy courses, including (a) PHIL 0180, to be taken by the end of the sophomore year; (b) one 0400-level seminar to be taken in the last three semesters; (c) One course from the history requirement; and (d) one course from the distribution requirement (ESP or ELMMS). Either PHIL 0150 or PHIL 0151 is also highly recommended, and, like PHIL 0180, should be taken early in the program whenever possible. In addition, students must (2) give evidence of having used the training in both major fields, usually in an independent project or thesis, but sometimes in a seminar paper. Joint majors are eligible for department honors, if they do a two-term thesis.
 
Required for the Minor: A total of six courses in philosophy, including PHIL 0180 and at least one course at the 0300 or 0400 level. Minors wishing to take a 0400-level seminar must have completed three other philosophy courses first. Enrollment priority in 0400-level seminars will be given to majors. Students electing the philosophy minor should arrange to have an adviser in the philosophy department.

B.  Requirements for students entering the College in Fall 2015 or after

Required for the Major: Majors must complete no fewer than eleven courses in the department, to include:

  1. Logic Requirement: PHIL 0180 (to be taken by the end of the sophomore year)
  2. History Requirement (to be taken by the end of the junior year; students going abroad in their junior year should complete the History Requirement prior to departure):
    a. PHIL 0201 or CLAS/PHIL 0275 and
    b. PHIL 0250
  3. Distribution Requirement:
    a. one course in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy (ESP); and
    b. one course in Epistemology, Language, Metaphysics, Mind and Science (ELMMS).
  4. Upper-level Course Requirement:  Three courses at the 0300 or 0400 level, at least one of which must be a 0400-level course. (Students may count only one cross-listed 300-level course taught by faculty outside the Philosophy Department towards their upper-level course requirement. 0400-level courses will not normally satisfy the distribution requirement. Courses taken while abroad will not generally be allowed to substitute for the required 0400-level course.)
  5. Senior Independent Research Requirement
  6. At least two other philosophy courses, in order to fulfill the eleven-course requirement. 

Cognate courses may be substituted for no more than two departmental electives, but will not satisfy the departmental distribution requirement; such substitutions require the prior approval of a major's departmental adviser, and must be at the 0200-level or above.

Senior Independent Research Requirement: Majors must complete a one-semester independent research project (PHIL 0710) in the spring of their senior year. Topics and advisers will be decided through consultation with members of the department. PHIL 0710 includes participation in the senior project workshop held for all students completing their independent work.

Departmental Honors:  Students will be awarded departmental honors if and only if they receive a) at least an A- average in courses counted toward the major, and b) an A- on their senior project.  Students will be awarded high honors if and only if they receive a) at least an A- average in courses counted toward the major, and b) an A on their senior project. 
 
Required for the Joint Major:  For the philosophy component of a joint major, students must take nine philosophy courses, including

1.   PHIL 0180, to be taken by the end of the sophomore year;
2.   One 0400-level seminar to be taken in the last three semesters;
3.   Three of the following:

a.  PHIL 0201 or CLAS/PHIL 0275
b.  PHIL 0250
c.  one course in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy (ESP) and
d.  one course in Epistemology, Language, Metaphysics, Mind and Science (ELMMS)

4.  A course in which the student completes a senior independent project that shows evidence of having integrated the training of both major fields.  (Normally this course will be PHIL 0710, though other models may be appropriate.)  The topic and scope of the independent project is to be determined in consultation with both major advisers. 
5.  At least three other philosophy courses, in order to fulfill the nine-course requirement. 

Required for the Minor: A total of six courses in philosophy, including PHIL 0180 and at least one course at the 0300 or 0400 level. Minors wishing to take a 0400-level seminar must have completed three other philosophy courses first. Enrollment priority in 0400-level seminars will be given to majors. Students electing the philosophy minor are encouraged to consult with faculty members in the Philosophy Department about course planning.

PHIL 0150 Introduction to the Western Philosophical Tradition (Spring 2019)

This course will introduce students to fundamental philosophical issues concerning the nature of reality (metaphysics), the possibility of knowledge (epistemology), and the nature of value (ethical theory) through a reading of a number of important primary texts of thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Mill, Nietzsche, and Freud. Cannot be taken by students with credit for PHIL 0151. 3 hrs. lect., 1 hr. disc. EUR, PHL

PHIL 0156 Contemporary Moral Issues (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

We will examine a selection of pressing moral problems of our day, seeking to understand the substance of the issues and learning how moral arguments work. We will focus on developing our analytical skills, which we can then use to present and criticize arguments on difficult moral issues. Selected topics may include world poverty, animal rights, abortion, euthanasia, human rights, just and unjust wars, capital punishment, and racial and gender issues. You will be encouraged to question your own beliefs on these issues, and in the process to explore the limit and extent to which ethical theory can play a role in everyday ethical decision making. 2 hrs.lect./1 hr. disc. (formally PHIL 0206) PHL (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: L. Besser)

PHIL 0170 Introduction to World Philosophy (Fall 2018)

This course will offer a comparative introduction to a number of world philosophical traditions, including those of Europe and America, India, China, and Africa. We will consider central debates within these traditions, including: How should we live? What is the ultimate nature of reality, and how can we come to know it? What is the nature of the self, and how does it relate to society? We will also investigate the broader question of whether truth and morality are relative to culture. Central readings will include works by Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Lao Tzu, Confucius, and contemporary African philosophers, as well as Hindu and Buddhist texts. 2 hrs. lect,1 hr. disc. CMP, PHL (J. Spackman)

PHIL 0180 Introduction to Modern Logic (Spring 2019)

Logic is concerned with good reasoning; as such, it stands at the core of the liberal arts. In this course we will develop our reasoning skills by identifying and analyzing arguments found in philosophical, legal, and other texts, and also by formulating our own arguments. We will use the formal techniques of modern propositional and predicate logic to codify and test various reasoning strategies and specific arguments. No prior knowledge of logic, formal mathematics, or computer science is presupposed in this course, which does not count towards the PHL distribution requirement but instead towards the deductive reasoning requirement. 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. DED

PHIL 0201 Ancient Greek Philosophy (Fall 2018)

This class introduces students to the range and power of Greek thought, which initiated the Western philosophical tradition. We will begin by exploring the origins of philosophy as found in myth (primarily Hesiod) and in the highly original speculation of the Pre-Socratic thinkers (such as Heraclitus and Parmenides). We will then focus on Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, examining their transformations of these earlier traditions and their own divergent approaches to ethics and education. We will also consider the influences of Greek philosophy on later thought. 3 hrs. lect. EUR, HIS, PHL (M. Woodruff)

PHIL 0209 Philosophy of Law (Fall 2018)

In this course, we shall consider a number of questions concerning law and its institution in human society. What is the origin and authority of law? What is legal obligation? What is the connection between law and coercion, between law and morality, and law and rights? Are laws merely conventions or is there a law of nature? What is the role of law in judicial decisions and the effect of these on the law? We shall also consider and evaluate various theories of law: natural law theories, utilitarian theories, analytical philosophy of law, critical legal studies, feminist theories. 3 hrs. lect. PHL (S. Viner)

PHIL 0216 Science and the Quest for Truth (Spring 2019)

On a fairly conventional view, science exemplifies humankind's rational inquiry into the true structure of the world. But what exactly is science? In what sense is it rational? Are scientific claims true or merely useful in predicting and controlling our environment? To answer these questions, we will examine scientific activities such as theory construction, explanation, confirmation, and experimentation, and their role in debates concerning the role of rationality and truth in scientific knowledge. (This course presupposes no prior knowledge of philosophy or science.) PHL

PHIL 0237 Chinese Philosophy (Fall 2018)

A survey of the dominant philosophies of China, beginning with the establishment of the earliest intellectual orientations, moving to the emergence of the competing schools of the fifth century B.C., and concluding with the modern adoption and adaptation of Marxist thought. Early native alternatives to Confucian philosophy (such as Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism) and later foreign ones (such as Buddhism and Marxism) will be stressed. We will scrutinize individual thinkers with reference to their philosophical contributions and assess the implications of their ideas with reference to their historical contexts and comparative significance. Pre-1800. 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, HIS, NOA, PHL (D. Wyatt)
Cross-listed as: HIST 0237 *

PHIL 0250 Early Modern Philosophy (Spring 2019)

This course offers an introduction to some of the most influential European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. We will consider and critically examine the responses these thinkers gave to various questions in metaphysics and epistemology, including the following: What is the relationship between reality and our perception of reality? What is the nature of the mind and how is it related to the body? What is the nature of physical reality? Which of our beliefs, if any, do we have good reason to maintain in the face of radical skepticism? 3 hrs lect. EUR, HIS, PHL

PHIL 0252 Philosophy of Mind (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

What is the nature of the mind, and how does it relate to the body and the physical world? Could computers ever think? Do animals have mental and emotional lives? This course will explore several of the major recent philosophical conceptions of the mind. A central focus will be on evaluating various attempts to explain the mind in purely physical terms, including the project of artificial intelligence (AI). Can these theories give us a complete understanding of the mind? Other key questions will include: What is the nature of thought, and how is it capable of representing the world? What is consciousness, and can it be explained physically? 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. PHL (Fall 2018: J. Spackman)

PHIL 0276 Roman Philosophy (Fall 2018)

In this course we will seek to answer the question of what is Roman philosophy - philosophia togata. Is it simply Greek philosophy in Roman dress? Or, while based in its Greek origins, does it grow to have a distinctive and rigorous character of its own, designed and developed to focus on uniquely "Roman" questions and problems, in particular, ethical, social, and political questions? We will investigate how some of the main schools of Hellenistic Greek thought came to be developed in Latin: Epicureanism (Lucretius), Academic Skepticism (Cicero), and Stoicism (Seneca). As we read we will investigate how each school offers different answers to crucial questions such as what is the goal of life? What is the highest good? Should one take part in politics or not? What is the nature of the soul? What is the nature of Nature itself? Is there an afterlife? Can we ever have a certain answer to any of these questions? 3hrs. lect. EUR, PHL (C. Star)
Cross-listed as: CLAS 0276 *

PHIL 0286 Philosophy and Literature (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the border both separating and joining philosophy and literature. How does literature evoke philosophical problems, and how do philosophers interpret such works? How does fiction create meaning? Beginning with Greek tragedy, we investigate Plato’s “quarrel” with, and Aristotle’s defense of, poetry. Then we will turn to modern works, mostly European, on topics such as: tragedy and ethics; style and rhetoric; author and reader; time and temporality; mood and emotion; existence and mortality. Literary readings after Sophocles will be selected from Borges, Calvino, Camus, Kafka, Tolstoy, and Woolf. Philosophical readings after Plato and Aristotle will be selected from Bergson, Danto, Freud, Murdoch, Ricoeur, and Nussbaum. Not open to students who have taken PHIL/CMLT 1014 or FYSE 1081. CW, EUR, LIT, PHL (M. Woodruff)
Cross-listed as: CMLT 0286

PHIL 0303 Philosophy of Aristotle (Spring 2019)

In this class we will explore both the original breadth and the contemporary relevance of Aristotle's thought. We will read a diverse selection of his writings, beginning with ethical and political works, continuing to works on art and poetry, the soul, and nature, and concluding with logical and ontological works. We will ask why Aristotelian virtue ethics in particular has enjoyed a recent renaissance and generated special interest in Aristotle's ideas about the ethical role of friendship, the perceptive power of the emotions, and the different kinds of intelligence. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver.) 3 hrs. sem. CW, EUR, PHL

PHIL 0305 Confucius and Confucianism (Spring 2019)

Perhaps no individual has left his mark more completely and enduringly upon an entire civilization than Confucius (551-479 B.C.) has upon that of China. Moreover, the influence of Confucius has spread well beyond China to become entrenched in the cultural traditions of neighboring Japan and Korea and elsewhere. This course examines who Confucius was, what he originally intended, and how the more important of his disciples have continued to reinterpret his original vision and direct it toward different ends. Pre-1800. (formerly HIST/PHIL 0273) 3 hrs. lect./disc. AAL, CW, HIS, NOA, PHL
Cross-listed as: HIST 0305 *

PHIL 0310 Moral Psychology (Spring 2019)

Moral psychology is the study of human behavior in the context of morality. How do we think about morality? How do we make moral judgments? How do we behave in moral situations? Answering these questions forces us to think deeply about the nature of our actions and the way we do and should evaluate them. In this course we will explore these questions and more. Specific topics covered may include altruism and egoism, moral judgment, moral responsibility, practical deliberation, intentional action, virtue and vice, character, and moral development. Readings will be drawn from both philosophy and psychology. 3 hrs sem CW, PHL, SOC

PHIL 0316 Philosophy of Science (Fall 2018)

Science raises several philosophical issues. These include epistemological issues about scientific practices such as theory construction, explanation, confirmation, experimentation, modeling, and measurement. They also include metaphysical issues about causation, laws of nature, reductionism, dispositions, chance, space, and time. Finally, specific sciences—from fundamental physics to the social sciences—raise unique philosophical puzzles. We will examine a small subset of these topics in depth. (Previous course in philosophy or waiver) 3 hrs lect. CW, PHL (K. Khalifa)

PHIL 0360 Consciousness (Spring 2019)

In this course we will focus on recent philosophical issues in the study of consciousness: What is the nature of our conscious subjective experience? What is the function of conscious states? Can we find neural correlates of consciousness, and if so, can consciousness simply be reduced to them? If not, how does consciousness relate to the physical? Is there something irreducible about the qualitative features of consciousness (qualia)? Could computers ever be conscious? Are animals conscious? We will consider such questions through the writings of contemporary philosophers and neuroscientists such as Dennett, Chalmers, Churchland, Nagel, Damasio, and Searle. (PHIL 0352 is strongly recommended but not required). 3 hrs. lect. PHL

PHIL 0500 Research in Philosophy (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Supervised independent research in philosophy. (Approval required).

PHIL 0700 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval Required)

PHIL 0710 Senior Independent Research (Fall 2018)

In this course senior philosophy majors will complete an independent research project. The course has two components: (1) a group workshop in which students refine their research skills and develop parts of their projects, and (2) individual meetings with an adviser who is knowledgeable about the student's research topic. Students will engage in research activities such as tutorials and peer reviews. Before the course begins, students’ research topics and advisers will be decided in consultation with members of the department. (Senior majors.) 3 hrs. sem.
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Physical Education

Physical education is a degree requirement. The physical education program concentrates on lifetime sports, so that all students leave Middlebury College with exposure to sports or recreational activities in which they have developed a degree of skill and interest, which will be an asset to them in later years. Each course carries one unit of physical education credit.

Before graduation, students must complete two different activities to receive the required two credits. Students are encouraged to complete the credits by the end of their fourth academic semester at Middlebury (excluding winter term). In the case of transfer students, students are encouraged to complete the requirement by the end of their second semester at Middlebury. Students who have not completed their requirement by the second semester of their senior year will not be eligible to graduate.

Students may use participation on varsity and junior varsity intercollegiate teams as a way of satisfying the physical education requirement. No more than one of the two physical education credits may be earned from participation in a single sport. Two-sport athletes may satisfy both physical education credits through participation on varsity and junior varsity intercollegiate teams.

The Physical Education Department also recognizes participation in five club sports. The five club sports that can receive a physical education credit are rugby, crew, water polo, aikido, and cricket, which have a coach on site for practices and games. In order to receive a physical education credit, students must participate in one full season of crew, rugby, water polo, or cricket. Students in aikido must attend 20 classes per semester. Each of these club sports will equal one physical education credit.

Students who wish to elect additional courses beyond those required for graduation may register with the department for the appropriate season and be scheduled for classes on a space-available basis. Some of the courses and activities follow:

Certification Courses (textbook and related fee applicable): Lifeguard Training, and First Aid/CPR.

Fee Classes: alpine skiing, kickboxing, martial arts, massage, meditation, horseback riding, scuba, nordic skiing, spinning, and yoga. Instructors outside of the College generally teach these courses. The fees and times are available during Banner web registration.

Equipment Sports (students provide equipment): tennis.

More Equipment Sports (department provides equipment): archery, badminton, fencing, golf, and squash.

Conditioning Courses: Resistance training, strength training, and swim for conditioning.

Dance Courses (as available): varying levels of ballet, jazz, and modern dance (DANC 0160, DANC 0161, DANC 0162, DANC 0260, DANC 0261, DANC 0276, DANC 0360, DANC 0361, DANC 0380, DANC 0381).

The department schedules two seasons of instructional courses in the fall and spring terms and one season in the winter term. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis and is open to students electing courses on a space-available basis. Students unaware of their physical education record should check with the Registrar's Offfice to ensure completion of their program prior to graduation. Applications for transfer credit must be made in advance, following college procedure for academic credit transfer. The Registrar's Office processes credits from transcripts for students transferring to Middlebury.

All requests for medical waivers must come from the student's physician. Injuries and illnesses suffered on campus will be considered as exceptions to the previous statement and will be handled by the College health center.

Upcoming Academic Year Dates (2016-2017)
Fall I: September 19 - October 21
Fall II: October 31 - December 9
Winter Term: January 9 – February 3
Spring I: February 20 - March 24
Spring II: April 3 - May 5

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Department of Physics

Physics is the fundamental science; it leads to our most basic understanding of the natural world and of human technological achievements. The physics program at Middlebury is designed to integrate physics into the liberal arts curriculum, as well as to provide challenging courses and research opportunities for students majoring in physics. Courses and student research activities in astronomy are also part of the physics program.

Courses designed especially for nonscience students are PHYS 0155 (Introduction to the Universe), PHYS 0101 (Physical Reality and Human Thought), PHYS 0104 (Chaos, Complexity, and Self-Organization), PHYS 0106 (Physics for Educated Citizens), and first-year seminars. Students majoring in the sciences in premedical and other professional programs, and others who desire a more analytical approach to physics, usually select courses from the introductory physics sequence PHYS 0109,PHYS 0110, and PHYS 0111. In addition, they may elect more advanced courses at the 0200-level or above.

For those majoring in physics, we offer a broad range of courses that emphasize a variety of topics in physics while building both theoretical understanding and experimental skills. Middlebury physics majors apply their education in a wide variety of careers. Some pursue graduate work in physics and related fields; others find their physics degrees valuable in engineering, medicine, business, law, teaching, government service, and other pursuits. The physics program is designed to serve the needs of both those intending advanced study in physics and those for whom formal work in physics will end with the Middlebury degree.

The physics department encourages its majors to study abroad to gain experience at international research facilities, learn different national styles of scientific practice, improve language proficiency, and pursue academic interests outside of physics. One upper-level physics course taken abroad may be eligible for physics course credit upon approval of the department chair; students are strongly encouraged to obtain this approval before going abroad.

Physics majors interested in obtaining high school physics teaching certification should notify the education studies program preferably no later than the middle of their sophomore year.

Required for the Major in Physics: The major program consists of eight required physics courses: PHYS 0109, PHYS 0110, PHYS 0111, PHYS 0201, PHYS 0202, PHYS 0212, PHYS 0301, and PHYS 0321; a minimum of three PHYS electives; and a one-term senior project (PHYS 0704). To be eligible for departmental honors, a student must also complete either a semester of senior thesis (PHYS 0705) or one additional elective beyond those required.

Electives must be chosen from physics courses at the 0200, 0300, or 0400 level, except that an upper-level physics course taken off campus or an advanced cognate course from another department at Middlebury may be used to satisfy one of the elective requirements. Acceptable cognate courses are CHEM 0351, CHEM 0355, CSCI 0202, and MATH 0335. For students completing double majors, courses counted towards another major cannot also be counted as electives toward the physics major. Mathematics at least through the level of MATH 0122 is also required; this requirement may be satisfied either at Middlebury or through appropriate pre-college courses in calculus. Independent study courses such as PHYS 0500 may not be used for elective credit. In addition to the courses listed below, PHYS courses that satisfy the elective requirement are occasionally offered during the winter term.

Prospective majors must begin the physics sequence no later than the sophomore year. Starting in the first year allows more flexibility in the choice of courses and senior work. Students planning graduate work in physics or a related subject should elect as many as possible of,  PHYS 0302 (Electromagnetic Waves), PHYS 0330 (Analytical Mechanics), PHYS 0350 (Statistical Mechanics), and PHYS 0401 (Quantum Mechanics). In addition, MATH 0200 (Linear Algebra), MATH 0223 (Multivariable Calculus), and MATH 0225 (Topics in Linear Algebra and Differential Equations) are strongly recommended for those anticipating graduate study. Most physics majors will find computer programming skills through the level of CSCI 0201 extremely valuable.

Senior Program: The senior project (PHYS 0704) involves a significant piece of experimental or theoretical research to be completed in the final year at Middlebury. Topics in recent years have included work in astrophysics, atomic and optical physics, biophysics, condensed matter physics, cosmology, environmental applications, laser spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, plasma physics, and quantum computing.  Outstanding performance in PHYS 0704 may, with the permission of the advisor, allow continuation of the senior project as a senior thesis (PHYS 0705).

The Physics Department does not offer a minor

Departmental Honors: A minimum grade average of B in physics courses is required of all honors candidates. To be eligible for departmental honors, a student must also complete either a semester of senior thesis (PHYS 0705) or one additional elective beyond the number required. Honors in physics are awarded on the basis of excellent senior work combined with depth and excellence of coursework in physics. A student's overall accomplishments in the department, including teaching assistantships and leadership, are also considered in the awarding of honors.

Pre-Engineering: Some students study physics with the intent of eventually doing engineering, either through a dual degree or in graduate school. Students who pursue a physics major en route to a 3-2 engineering degree (in which the Middlebury component is completed by the end of the junior year) take the same eight-course sequence outlined above, with one elective chosen from physics courses at the 0200, 0300, or 0400 level; they also must complete a one-unit senior project (PHYS 0704). Four-year pre-engineering students (those who return to Middlebury for the senior year) take the normal physics major and choose electives in consultation with the pre-engineering advisor.   

Advanced Placement:Advanced Placement: Students who seek advanced placement in physics should take the College Board AP examinations. Credit for PHYS 0109 is given to students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Physics C: Mechanics examination.

PHYS 0104 Chaos, Complexity, and Self-Organization (Spring 2019)

A paradigm shift has occurred throughout the natural sciences in recent years. Our understanding of the strict determinism of the Newtonian world-view has been revised in surprising and fruitful new ways, providing an outlook that emphasizes the fundamental significance of open, evolving systems. This course explores recent work on chaos, fractals, complexity, and self-organization. Ideas from these fields suggest new ways of thinking about life and mind, and how they arise as emergent phenomena from a physical world of dead and mindless fundamental particles interacting through aimless fundamental forces. We will also explore the influence of these basic ideas on the humanities and the social sciences. Although the course is largely nonmathematical, students should be willing to use elementary high school algebra. 3 hrs. lect. DED, SCI

PHYS 0109 Newtonian Physics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This calculus-based course examines motion as it occurs throughout the universe. Topics covered include inertia, force, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy, linear momentum, collisions, gravitation, rotational motion, torque, angular momentum, and oscillatory motion. Emphasis is on practical applications in physics, engineering, the life sciences, and everyday life. Laboratory work and lecture demonstrations illustrate basic physical principles. (MATH 0121 or MATH 0122 concurrent or prior; students who have taken high school calculus or other college calculus courses should consult with the instructor prior to registration) 3 hrs. lect/3 hrs. lab. DED, SCI (Fall 2018: A. Goodsell)

PHYS 0110 Electricity and Magnetism (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

The physical principles of electricity and magnetism are developed with calculus and applied to the electrical structure of matter and the electromagnetic nature of light. Practical topics from electricity and magnetism include voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, inductance, and AC and DC circuits. Laboratory work includes an introduction to electronics and to important instruments such as the oscilloscope. (PHYS 0109; MATH 0122 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SCI (Fall 2018: S. Watson)

PHYS 0111 Thermodynamics, Fluids, Wave Motion, and Optics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This calculus-based lecture and laboratory course covers concepts from classical physics that are not included in PHYS 0109 and PHYS 0110, and that serve as a bridge between those two courses. Topics include thermal properties of matter, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, wave motion, sound, and geometrical and physical optics. This course is strongly recommended for all students otherwise required to take PHYS 0109 and PHYS 0110 as part of a major or a premedical program, and is required for physics majors. (PHYS 0109, MATH 0121, or equivalent) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SCI (Fall 2018: S. Ratcliff)

PHYS 0155 An Introduction to the Universe (Fall 2018)

Our universe comprises billions of galaxies in a rapidly expanding fabric. How did it begin? Will it expand forever, or how may it end? How do the stars that compose the galaxies evolve from their births in clouds of gas, through the tranquility of middle age, to their often violent deaths? How can scientists even hope to answer such cosmic questions from our vantage point on a small planet, orbiting a very ordinary star? Are there other planets, orbiting other stars, where intelligent beings may be pondering similar issues? This introductory astronomy course, designed for nonscience majors, will explore these and other questions. Students will also become familiar with the night sky, both as part of our natural environment and as a scientific resource, through independent observations and sessions at the College Observatory. The approach requires no college-level mathematics, but students should expect to do quantitative calculations using scientific notation and occasionally to use elementary high-school algebra. (Students may not receive credit for both PHYS 0155 and PHYS 0165.) 3 hrs. lect./ hrs. lab./disc. DED, SCI (E. Glikman)

PHYS 0201 Relativity and Quantum Physics (Fall 2018)

This course probes a number of areas for which classical physics has provided no adequate explanations. Topics covered include Einstein's special relativity, quantization of atomic energy levels and photons, the atomic models of Rutherford and Bohr, and wave-particle duality. (PHYS 0109, PHYS 0110, MATH 0122) 3 hrs. lect. DED, SCI (S. Ratcliff)

PHYS 0202 Quantum Physics and Applications (Spring 2019)

This course introduces quantum theory and statistical mechanics, and explores the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, the Schrödinger wave equation, and wave mechanics. These techniques are then applied to atomic, molecular, nuclear, and elementary particle systems. (PHYS 0201; PHYS 0212 concurrent or prior) 3 hrs. lect. DED, SCI

PHYS 0212 Applied Mathematics for the Physical Sciences (Spring 2019)

This course concentrates on the methods of applied mathematics used for treating the partial differential equations that commonly arise in physics, chemistry, and engineering. Topics include differential vector calculus, Fourier series, and other orthogonal function sets. Emphasis will be given to physical applications of the mathematics. This course is a prerequisite for all 0300- and 0400-level physics courses. (MATH 0122; PHYS 0110 concurrent or prior) 4.5 hrs. lect. DED

PHYS 0221 Electronics for Scientists (Spring 2019)

An introduction to modern electronic circuits and devices, emphasizing both physical operation and practical use. Transistors and integrated circuits are considered in both analog and digital applications. Examples and laboratory experiments stress measurement and control applications in the physical and biological sciences. Students will gain hands-on familiarity with the design, use, and troubleshooting of electronic instrumentation. (PHYS 0110) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. DED, SCI

PHYS 0301 Intermediate Electromagnetism (Fall 2018)

The unified description of electricity and magnetism is one of the greatest triumphs of physics. This course provides a thorough grounding in the nature of electric and magnetic fields and their interaction with matter. Mathematical techniques appropriate to the solution of problems in electromagnetism are also introduced. The primary emphasis is on static fields, with the full time-dependent Maxwell equations and electromagnetic waves introduced in the final part of the course. (PHYS 0110, PHYS 0201, PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect. (P. Hess)

PHYS 0321 Experimental Techniques in Physics (Fall 2018)

This course will cover the design and execution of experiments, and the analysis and presentation of data, at an advanced level. Laboratory experiments will be chosen to illustrate the use of electronic, mechanical, and optical instruments to investigate fundamental physical phenomena, such as the properties of atoms and nuclei and the nature of radiation. Skills in computer-based data analysis and presentation will be developed and emphasized. This course satisfies the College writing requirement. (PHYS 0201 and PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212; MATH 0200 recommended) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. (Approval required) CW (A. Goodsell)

PHYS 0330 Analytical Mechanics (Fall 2018)

An intermediate-level course in the kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid body motion. The topics will include: analysis and application of Newton's law of mechanics; the concepts of work, energy, and power; energy conservation; momentum and momentum conservation; torque, angular momentum, and angular momentum conservation; oscillatory motion; and central-force motion. Lagrange's and Hamilton's formulations of classical mechanics will be introduced with emphasis placed on developing problem-solving strategies and techniques. (PHYS 0109 and PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect. (J. Dunham)

PHYS 0340 Introduction to Solid State Physics (Fall 2018)

In this course, the properties of solids are shown to arise naturally from their atomic composition and their structure. Elementary quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, and statistical mechanics are invoked to explore fundamental properties of crystalline solids, including their classification as metals, insulators, semiconductors, and semimetals. Topics covered include crystal structure and diffraction; crystal vibrations; electrical and thermal conduction; and the response of solids to external electric and magnetic fields. (PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect. (S. Watson)

PHYS 0370 Cosmology (Spring 2019)

Cosmology is the study of the Universe as a whole entity, including the origin, evolution, and ultimate fate of the entire Universe. In this course we will study the Big Bang, inflation, primordial nucleosynthesis, the cosmic microwave background, the formation of galaxies, and large-scale structure. The course will link observations to theory in order to address some of the current open questions in cosmology such as: what are the forms of matter and energy distributed in the Universe? What is the expansion rate of the Universe and how has it changed with time? What is the age of the Universe? What is the shape of the Universe? (PHYS 0201, PHYS 0202, and PHYS 0212) 3 hrs. lect. DED, SCI

PHYS 0401 Quantum Mechanics (Spring 2019)

A fundamental course in quantum mechanics aimed at understanding the mathematical structure of the theory and its application to physical phenomena at the atomic and nuclear levels. Topics include the basic postulates of quantum mechanics, operator formalism, Schrödinger equation, one-dimensional and central potentials, angular momentum and spin, perturbation theory, and systems of identical particles. (PHYS 0202 and PHYS 0212; MATH 0200 recommended) 3 hrs. lect.

PHYS 0500 Independent Study and Special Topics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required)

PHYS 0704 Senior Project (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Independent research project culminating in both written and oral presentations. (Fall 2018: P. Hess; Spring 2019: A. Goodsell)

PHYS 0705 Senior Research and Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Independent research in the fall, winter, and spring terms culminating in a written thesis (two units total). (Approval required) (J. Dunham, S. Ratcliff)
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Department of Political Science

Required for the Major in Political Science: A major must take ten regular political science courses. One of these ten must be an introductory course in the political theory subfield (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107). Two additional courses must be introductory courses in two of the three other subfields: American politics (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104); comparative politics (PSCI 0103); and international relations (PSCI 0109). These three required introductory courses should normally be completed before the end of the sophomore year. Among the ten total courses required for the major, the student must also fulfill the field distribution requirement, and complete the 0400-level seminar. At least seven of these ten courses, including the 0400-level seminar, must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont. Students may count a maximum of one political science winter term course as one of the ten required courses for the major. Winter term courses may be used to fulfill the field distribution requirement.

The Field Distribution Requirement: All regular fall and spring term political science courses are classified in one of the following four fields: Political Theory, American Politics, Comparative Politics, and International Relations and Foreign Policy. Students must take at least two courses in any three of these fields and one course in the fourth field.

Senior Program: The senior program consists of a seminar of the major's choice. Each seminar includes advanced work appropriate to the field in which the seminar is offered. The seminars are the 0400-level courses offered by the department. Seminars are open to juniors and seniors. Normally, the senior program requirement must be completed by taking a seminar offered by a member of the Middlebury faculty. Work done in programs abroad, at other North American colleges and universities, or in the Washington Semester program will not count as the equivalent of a Middlebury seminar. IGST seminars co-taught by PSCI faculty cannot substitute for 0400-level PSCI seminars but will count as an elective towards the 10 required courses in PSCI.

Departmental HonorsStudents who elect to seek departmental honors write a thesis in the senior year. All students who plan to write a thesis are strongly encouraged to enroll in PSCI 0368 before their senior year (and students writing a political theory thesis are encouraged to take a 0300-level theory course). Honors candidates should initiate the process by contacting their prospective faculty advisor during their junior year (including students who are abroad during their junior year). Candidates must submit an honors thesis proposal to their advisor prior to the term(s) in which the thesis is to be written. If the proposal is approved, the student may register for PSCI 0500 (independent project) in the first term of the thesis, followed by PSCI 0700 for the second and third terms. After an oral examination of the completed thesis, honors are conferred or denied on the basis of (1) the level of the grade achieved on the thesis; and (2) the level of the average grade received in other fall and spring courses taken at Middlebury. Courses taken abroad do not count toward the grade point determination. Honors theses candidates will have a political science course average of at least 3.33 and a thesis grade of B+ or higher to attain honors; a political science course average of at least 3.50 and a thesis grade of A- or higher to attain high honors; and a political science course average of at least 3.67 and a thesis grade of A to attain highest honors. (For a full description of regulations, pick up a copy of Honors Theses Procedures and Regulations in Munroe 213 or check the PSCI web page at www.middlebury.edu/academics/ps/requirements)/thesesproceduresandschedule.

Independent Study: Students with demonstrated preparation and proficiency in the field may elect independent study projects (PSCI 0500). These projects are prepared under the supervision of a member or members of the department. The PSCI 0500 projects may not be substituted for the seminar requirement. The PSCI 0500 projects are reading and research courses; the department will not award PSCI 0500 credit for political experience such as congressional internships.

Joint Majors: Students wishing to do a joint major in political science and another department or program of studies must take eight regular political science courses. One of these eight must be an introductory course in the political theory subfield (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107). Two additional courses must be introductory courses in two of the three other subfields: American politics (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104); comparative politics (PSCI 0103); and international relations (PSCI 0109). These three required introductory courses should normally be completed before the end of the sophomore year. Among the eight total courses required for the major, the student must also take at least two courses in any two of the four fields of political science and one course in the third and fourth fields and complete a 0400-level seminar. Students must also give evidence of having used the training in both majors, usually in a seminar paper, but sometimes in an independent project or thesis. At least five courses including the 0400-level seminar must be taken at Middlebury College in Vermont. Students may count a maximum of one political science winter term course as one of the eight required courses for the joint major. Winter term courses may be used to fulfill the field distribution requirement. Joint majors do not qualify for honors in political science. (Double majors are eligible.)

International Politics and Economics Major: The IP&E major allows students to combine the study of politics, economics, and languages, linking these disciplines with an appropriate experience abroad. Students wishing to pursue this major should refer to International Politics and Economics in both the General Catalog and the on-line catalog.

International and Global Studies Major: IGS seminars co-taught by PSCI faculty cannot substitute for 0400-level PSCI seminars, In addition, it is highly recommended that IGS thesis candidates enroll in PSCI 0368 before their senior year.

Minors in Political Science: The minor in political science will consist of five regular fall or spring term courses taken at Middlebury College, which must come from at least two of the four fields in the department. At least one of the courses must be at the 0300-level or above. The five course requirement will not be reduced by AP credits.

Advanced Placement: A score of 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in American politics will entitle the student to exemption from PSCI 0104; such a score may satisfy the requirement of one course in the American politics field. A score of 4 to 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in comparative politics will entitle the student to exemption from PSCI 0103; such a score may satisfy the requirement of one course in the comparative politics field. While supplying two college credits, advanced placement in both American politics and comparative politics will only count as one of the ten courses required for the political science major. Students will also receive only one distribution credit for AP courses, and notwithstanding the distribution credit, all students must take at least one course in each subfield.

PSCI 0101 Introduction to Political Philosophy (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is the good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory) EUR, PHL, SOC (Fall 2018: J. Harpham)

PSCI 0102 The American Political Regime (Spring 2019)

This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, is the problem of freedom. The first half covers the American founding up through the Civil War and the "refounding." This includes de Tocqueville, Madison's Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include a novel, de Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions (Brown, Frontiero, Roe, Casey, Grutter, Lawrence). 4 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/ AMR, NOR, SOC

PSCI 0103 Introduction to Comparative Politics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems and to the logic of comparative inquiry. How are different political systems created and organized? How and why do they change? Why are some democratic and others authoritarian? Why are some rich and others poor? Other topics covered in this course include nationalism and political ideologies, forms of representation, the relationship between state institutions and civil society, and globalization. The goal in this course is to use comparative methods to analyze questions of state institutions -- how they arise, change, and generate different economic, social, and political outcome. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics) CMP, SOC (Fall 2018: J. Teets, K. Aha)

PSCI 0104 Introduction to American Politics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course introduces the institutions and practices of American government and politics. The aim is to give students a firm understanding of the workings of and the balance of power among the American Congress, President, bureaucracy, and court system. We begin with the Constitution, which provides the set of founding principles upon which the American government is based. We then look at how American citizens make decisions about politics. Finally, we examine how political institutions, interest groups, parties, elections, and legislative bodies and rules aggregate diverse, often conflicting preferences and how they resolve or exacerbate problems. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/ AMR, NOR, SOC (Fall 2018: M. Dickinson)

PSCI 0109 International Politics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

What causes conflict or cooperation among states? What can states and other international entities do to preserve global peace? These are among the issues addressed by the study of international politics. This course examines the forces that shape relations among states, and between states and international regimes. Key concepts include: the international system, power and the balance of power, international institutions, foreign policy, diplomacy, deterrence, war, and global economic issues. Both the fall and spring sections of this course emphasize rigorous analysis and set theoretical concepts against historical and contemporary case studies. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ CMP, SOC (Fall 2018: A. Yuen, G. Winslett)

PSCI 0202 African Politics (Spring 2019)

This course surveys the challenges and possibilities that Sub-Saharan Africa presents in our era of globalization. We will look at the process of state formation to appreciate the relationships between historical legacies and political and economic development. Themes include state formation, democratic governance, sustainable development, and Africa in world affairs. Topics such as colonial rule and national responses, authoritarian rule, ethnic politics, the debt burden, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and natural resource politics will be discussed. Case studies from English-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking Africa will be used to illuminate such relationships. 3 hrs lect/disc. (Comparative Politics)/ AAL, SAF, SOC

PSCI 0211 Conservation and Environmental Policy (Fall 2018)

This course examines conservation and environmental policy in the United States. In order to better understand the current nature of the conservation and environmental policy process, we will begin by tracing the development of past ideas, institutions, and policies related to this policy arena. We will then focus on contemporary conservation and environmental politics and policy making—gridlock in Congress, interest group pressure, the role of the courts and the president, and a move away from national policy making—toward the states, collaboration, and civil society. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/ AMR, NOR, SOC (C. Klyza)
Cross-listed as: ENVS 0211 *

PSCI 0214 International Environmental Politics (Fall 2018)

What happens when the global economy outgrows the earth's ecosystem? This course surveys the consequences of the collision between the expanding world economy and the earth's natural limits: shrinking forests, falling water tables, eroding soils, collapsing fisheries, rising temperatures, and disappearing species. We will examine how countries with different circumstances and priorities attempt to work together to stop global environmental pollution and resource depletion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ CMP, SOC (K. Fuentes-George)

PSCI 0215 Federalism, State and Local Politics (Spring 2019)

What are the unique political opportunities and constraints facing state and local governments? How have these changed over time? In this course we examine the relationships between different levels of government in the U.S. federal system, considering the particular tasks and dilemmas facing states and cities, and scrutinizing the complex interactions between governments that characterize federalism in the United States. Topics include local political culture, intergovernmental grants, state parties, and state political economy. Vermont, New York, and California will receive special scrutiny. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/ AMR, NOR, SOC

PSCI 0219 What Can I Say? Free Speech v. Racist Speech in the United States and Europe (Fall 2018)

In this course we will delve into the politics and law surrounding issues of racist speech in the United States and Europe. We will look at the development of speech doctrines in the post-World War Two era, drawing on well-known case studies from American constitutional history, as well as European examples such as the Danish Cartoon Controversy and Holocaust denial cases. Through comparison across time and countries, we will debate the appropriate limits on racist speech in different contexts. (Not open to students who have taken FYSE 1510 or PSCI 1023) 3 hrs. lect./disc CMP, CW, SOC (E. Bleich)

PSCI 0221 Contemporary Chinese Politics (Spring 2019)

This introductory course provides students with a background in how the party-state political system functions, and then investigates the major political issues in China today. We will focus first on economic reform issues, such as income inequality, the floating population, and changes in the socialist welfare model, and then on political reform issues, such as the liberalization of news media, NGO and civil society activity, protest and social movements, environmental protection, and legal reform. China is a quickly changing country, so students will focus on analyzing current events but also have an opportunity to explore a topic of interest in more detail. 3 hrs. lect./disc. Comparative Politics AAL, NOA, SOC

PSCI 0223 Populism and Democracy (Spring 2019)

Democracy may be government of the people, by the people, for the people. But at times throughout American history, the people (or some segment of them) have believed that their government was not for them. Today we call them populists. They have been at once rooted in the ideals of democracy and critical, even contemptuous, of democratic politics. In this course we will read what populists wrote to see who they were: Antifederalists, Tocqueville, proponents of Jacksonian Democracy, the great Agrarians at the turn of the twentieth century, Jane Addams and Huey P. Long and John Steinbeck, and—inevitably—Trump. (Political Theory) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC

PSCI 0228 Central and East European Politics (Fall 2018)

This introductory course surveys the key stages in the political development of East and Central Europe in the 20th century, including the imposition of communist rule, crises of de-Stalinization, the revolutions of 1989, the politics of post-communist transitions, the Balkan wars, and democratization. It focuses on those factors that either promote or impede the development of stable democratic regimes and assesses East Europe's prospects in the context of EU enlargement and NATO expansion. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/ EUR, HIS, SOC (K. Aha)

PSCI 0233 Globalization: Change and Continuity (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine globalization and the extent to which it is causing change, yet perpetuating some patterns in the international system. We will delve into the different views of globalization, distinguishing it from liberalization, Westernization and Americanization. We will explore cultural identities and distinctiveness, national sovereignty, transnational institutions, and power. We will also discuss widening global inequality and impoverishment, as well as how different genders are affected. We will approach these topics from individual, local and global perspectives. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ CMP, HIS, SOC (Fall 2018: F. Grey)

PSCI 0234 Religion & Politics: Ancient & Modern (Fall 2018)

What role should religion play in politics? And what is the proper role of the state in regulating religion? Is religious conviction a precondition of or threat to healthy civic life? Why should regimes prefer religious toleration to religious uniformity? In this course we will examine these and other questions at the intersection of religion and politics in the western political tradition, affording special attention to early modern debates over the separation of church and state, toleration, and civil religion. Authors will include Plato, Emperor Julian, Augustine, Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Bayle, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Lessing, and Tocqueville. (Political Theory)/ EUR, PHL, SOC (K. Callanan)

PSCI 0237 PSCI 0237 International Law (Spring 2019)

In this course we will analyze how legal principles operate at the international level and how those principles intersect with national laws. We will examine a variety of legal issues and concepts including but not limited to sovereignty, human rights, trade and investment law, use of force, and environmental treaties. Throughout the class, we will pair those issues and concepts with real-world cases. 3 hrs lect. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ SOC

PSCI 0241 Putinism and Contemporary Russian Culture (Fall 2018)

The 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union was hailed in the West as a triumph of democracy over totalitarianism; for some observers the event even signaled “the end of history.” Today however it seems history is “back,” with Russia under Putin once again assuming its former role as enemy and the “other” of the West. In this course we will seek a better understanding of this apparent reversal of vectors from within Russian culture, while situating it within larger illiberal trends in world politics, by analyzing literary works, popular cinema, political theory, journalism, social media, and other forms of cultural production. 3 hrs. lect. AAL, NOA, SOC (M. Walker)
Cross-listed as: RUSS 0241 *

PSCI 0251 Identity and Conflict in South Asia (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine political development and conflict in South Asia through the concept of identity. South Asians take on a variety of identities -- ethnic, religious, linguistic, caste, national, etc. These identities often form the basis of political mobilization and both inter- and intrastate conflict. We will study the general concept of identity, including how identities are constructed and used, and then specific manifestations in South Asia. We will also examine the question of whether these identities were constructed during colonial or post-colonial times, or have an earlier basis. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ AAL, SOA, SOC

PSCI 0258 The Politics of International Humanitarian Action (Spring 2019)

Humanitarian intervention has emerged as a new moral imperative that challenges traditional concepts and practices in international relations. In this course we will consider how a range of actors--international organizations, states, NGOs--understand the concept of humanitarian intervention and engage (or not) in humanitarian actions. We will examine a variety of policy choices, including aid and military intervention, through case studies, including Somalia, Kosovo, and Rwanda. The goal of the course is to enable students to assess critically the benefits and challenges of a humanitarian approach to global politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ AAL, CMP, SOC

PSCI 0262 Might and Right Among Nations (Spring 2019)

What role does justice play in international politics? What role should it play? Does it pay to act justly in the conduct of foreign affairs? In this course, we will examine the place of ethical considerations in international politics. Drawing upon major works of political theory, we will pay special attention to the relationship between justice and necessity, the ethics of war and deception, and plans for perpetual peace. Authors will include Thucydides, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Kant, Weber, Woodrow Wilson, and Michael Walzer. 3 hrs. lect. (Political Theory) EUR, PHL

PSCI 0286 Authoritarian Politics (Fall 2018)

The purpose of this course is to examine the characteristics and dynamics of non-democratic regimes. First, we will define autocracy and consider different forms of authoritarianism and how their leaders come into power. Next, we will investigate why some authoritarian regimes are able to sustain their rule while others collapse. Finally, we will explore how citizens of these regimes bolster, comply with, or revolt against their governments. Throughout the course, adopting a comparative standpoint, we will draw on various country cases. (Comparative Politics)/ CMP, CW, SOC (J. Teets)

PSCI 0304 International Political Economy (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course examines the politics of global economic relations, focusing principally on the advanced industrial states. How do governments and firms deal with the forces of globalization and interdependence? And what are the causes and consequences of their actions for the international system in turn? The course exposes students to both classic and contemporary thinking on free trade and protectionism, exchange rates and monetary systems, foreign direct investment and capital movements, regional integration, and the role of international institutions like the WTO. Readings will be drawn mainly from political science, as well as law and economics. (PSCI 0109) 3 hrs. lect./disc.
(International Relations and Foreign Policy)/
SOC (Fall 2018: F. Grey)

PSCI 0306 American Constitutional Law: The First Amendment (Fall 2018)

This course focuses on the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the first amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion. After starting with the philosophic foundations of these first amendment freedoms (Mill, Locke), students will read the major Supreme Court decisions concerning these rights. Class assignments in the form of oral arguments and briefs and/or options will enable students to take the part of lawyers and judges. (Sophomores, juniors and seniors with PSCI 0102 or 0104 or 0205 or 0206 or 0305 or waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics)/ AMR, NOR, PHL (M. Dry)

PSCI 0308 U. S. National Elections (Fall 2018)

In this course we will analyze national elections in the United States. Topics covered will include party systems, electoral realignment, voting behavior and turnout, candidate strategy, the nomination process, the legal framework for elections, the Electoral College, gender, race and ethnicity, the media, the Internet, and U.S. elections in comparative perspective. Although the focus will be on the upcoming congressional and presidential contests, earlier elections will be studied for insight into continuity and change in American electoral politics. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (American Politics) AMR, NOR, SOC (M. Dickinson)

PSCI 0311 American Foreign Policy (Spring 2019)

Does America exercise its power in the world in a distinctive way? If yes, has it always done so? In this course we will examine the evolution of American foreign policy from the time of the founding to the present. As we make our way from the height of the Cold War to the 21st century, we will assess how leaders, institutions, domestic politics, and the actions and inactions of other countries have shaped American international behavior. Topics considered include terrorism, nuclear proliferation, globalization, democracy promotion, whether the rich US has an obligation to help the less fortunate, how much power the Pentagon should have, what role the private sector can and should play in advancing American interests, and the Bush revolution in foreign policy. A central aim of the course is to map competing perspectives so that the student can draw his or her own political conclusions. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ AMR, NOR, SOC

PSCI 0317 Ancient and Medieval Political Philosophy (Fall 2018)

We will study some classic works in ancient and medieval political philosophy: Plato (Laws, RepublicApology, Republic, Gorgias, Protagoras, Meno); Aristotle (Ethics, Politics, Rhetoric); Cicero (Republic, Laws), Maimonides (Guide to the Perplexed), Aquinas (Summa Theologica, Summa Contra Gentiles), Alfarabi (The Political Regime). (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or by waiver) 4 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/ PHL, SOC (M. Dry)

PSCI 0318 Modern Political Philosophy (Spring 2019)

In this course. we will study: Machiavelli (Prince, Discourses); Bacon
(Advancement of Learning); Hobbes (Leviathan); Locke (Second Treatise);
Spinoza (Theological-Political Treatise); Montesquieu (Spirit of the Laws);
Rousseau (Social Contract); Burke (Reflections); Kant (Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Perpetual Peace); Hegel (Introduction to Philosophy of History); Marx (Communist Manifesto, German Ideology, Capital); Nietzsche
(Beyond Good and Evil); Heidegger (Question Concerning Technology).
We will examine modernity's rejection of ancient thought, its later replacement of nature by history as the standard for right, and its subsequent rejection of any standard of right. Other topics include religion, freedom ofspeech, and the separation of powers. (PSCI 0101 or PSCI 0107 or PSCI 0317, or PSCI 0333, or waiver) 4.5 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/
EUR, PHL, SOC

PSCI 0322 War and Peace (Spring 2019)

What causes conflicts between states and within countries? What factors facilitate or impede their resolution? In this course we will examine interstate and intrastate conflicts and the challenges faced in resolving them, from both practical and theoretical perspectives. Employing some of the most prominent theories on war, and more recent theories of bargaining, negotiation, and conflict, we will draw upon a range of case studies to illustrate and evaluate the theoretical dynamics of conflict and conflict resolution. (PSCI 0109 or PSCI 0201 or by waiver) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ SOC

PSCI 0326 The Media and Minorities (Spring 2019)

In this course we use techniques developed by Middlebury’s Media Portrayals of Minorities Project lab to examine how the media portray identifiable groups. These techniques enable quantitative and qualitative analysis of digital news to better understand how different types of groups--such as, for example, immigrants, refugees, Muslims, Jews, Latinos, Chinese, Africans, or others--have been portrayed in the US and international media. Students in this class will contribute to ongoing publication projects of the lab, and will have the opportunity to pursue their own research topics. Student projects will culminate in research papers that may form the basis for further independent work or for senior theses. 3hrs. seminar (Comparative Politics) (Approval Only) DED, SOC

PSCI 0330 Comparative Development Strategies (Spring 2019)

In this course we will explore the topic of development by first analyzing different understandings ranging from improvements in human welfare to economic growth, and then asking why some countries have developed more rapidly than others? Additionally, students will explore the role that governments play in development, such as corruption, patronage, and industrial policy. How can governments help or hinder development prospects? We will address these broad questions by comparatively analyzing the development experiences of Asian, Latin American, and African countries. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Comparative Politics)/ CMP, SOC

PSCI 0340 International Order and Organization: Theories and Practice (Fall 2018)

In this course we will study the organization of global politics in the 20th century and beyond. Using both "secondary" and "primary" perspectives, we will evaluate some of the key mechanisms by which international relations are supposed to have been ordered—international institutions (like the World Bank), international organizations (like the United Nations), and international norms (like human rights). Students will develop greater knowledge of the evolution of the international system and refine their tools for analyzing international organization. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (S. Stroup)

PSCI 0368 Frontiers in Political Science Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Nothing is more controversial among political scientists than the topic of how to study politics. In this course, we consider a variety of advanced techniques for studying political phenomena, including statistical methods, game theory, institutional analysis, case study techniques, experiments, and agent-based modeling. We will work with concrete examples (drawn from major political science journals) of how scholars have used these techniques, and consider the ongoing philosophical controversies associated with each approach. Students will have the opportunity to conduct original research using a method and subject of their choosing. (Two political science courses) 3 hrs. lect.disc. (Political Theory)/ DED (Fall 2018), SOC (Fall 2018) (Fall 2018: B. Johnson)

PSCI 0372 Gender and International Relations (Spring 2019)

Many issues facing international society affect, and are affected by, gender. Global poverty, for example, is gendered, since 70% of the world's population living below $1.25 per day is female. Women are far more vulnerable to rape in war and water scarcity, and they are moreover globally politically underrepresented. In this course we will use theories of international relations, including realism, neoliberalism, and feminism, to study how international society addresses (or fails to address) these challenges through bodies such as the UN and treaties such as the Elimination of Violence Against Women. 3 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) /(National/Transnational Feminisms)/ CMP, SOC
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0372

PSCI 0392 Insurgency and Security Policy (Spring 2019)

In the post-Cold War era insurgency is the predominant form of conflict and now tops the list of major security concerns. Understanding the origins and tactics of insurgency in cases around the world in comparative perspective allows students to develop nuanced analyses of how security strategy should be improved to combat emergent non-state threats. How have insurgent tactics evolved in response to changing military, political, technological, and geographical conditions? What are the implications for international intervention and homeland security policy? This course brings Middlebury and Monterey students together in pursuit of this broad policy objective. Note: To align the Middlebury and MIIS schedules, Middlebury students will need to begin their coursework prior to the end of Winter Term, and will need to be available to meet during the course’s non-standard time. 4 hrs. lect./disc. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/ CMP, SOC

PSCI 0393 Game Theory for Political Science (Fall 2018)

How do candidates for political office choose their platforms? Why do some conflicts lead to war while others do not? What legislation will legislators introduce? These and many other compelling questions of political behavior often use game theory as a tool to study strategic, or interdependent, decision-making. Students will learn basic concepts of game theory and how to apply them to a range of political phenomena. To succeed, students need only a solid background in algebra. (Any political science course) 3 hrs. lect./disc. (Political Theory)/ DED, SOC (A. Yuen)

PSCI 0406 Global Trade Politics (Fall 2018)

In this course we will analyze the politics of international trade through examinations of topics including labor standards, environmental rules, intellectual property, development, foreign policymaking, global power dynamics, multinational corporations, and the WTO. We will use a number of conceptual frameworks such as economic geography and sector/class based analyses. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) 3 hrs. sem. SOC (G. Winslett)

PSCI 0421 American Environmental Politics (Spring 2019)

In this seminar we will examine various aspects of environmental politics in the United States. Topics to be covered include how society seeks to influence environmental policy (through public opinion, voting and interest groups,) and how policy is made through Congress, the executive branch, the courts, collaboration, and through the states. Policy case studies will vary from year to year. Students will write a major research paper on an aspect of U.S. environmental politics. (PSCI/ENVS 0211; open to PSCI/ESEP majors, others by approval) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)

PSCI 0425 The American Presidency (Spring 2019)

In-depth examination of the exercise of presidential leadership from a normative and empirical perspective. What are the sources of presidential power, the constraints on its use, and the implications for the American political system? The focus is on the leadership strategies of the modern presidents (FDR through Obama). (PSCI 0102 or PSCI 0104 or PSCI 0206 or waiver) 3 hrs. sem. (American Politics)/

PSCI 0431 African Government (Fall 2018)

Sub-Saharan Africa has been described as being in a state of permanent crisis, a place where disorder and chaos reign and states are chronically weak. How do political systems form and thrive under such conditions? What accounts for their survival in the face of tremendous political, economic, and environmental challenges? We will investigate the distinctive characteristics of African political systems, the different governance models throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and the types of public goods or public ills these systems have produced. We will also have the opportunity to more deeply appreciate the real-life consequences for displaced Africans through a service-learning component. 3 hrs. sem. (Comparative Politics) AAL, SAF (N. Horning)

PSCI 0433 Democracy, Deliberation, and Global Citizenship (Fall 2018)

Around the world, democratic self-governance is celebrated as a political ideal, but the fundamentals of informed and engaged citizens are difficult to achieve. Power, institutions, information, and culture can each facilitate or impede political dialogue and civic action. In this seminar, we will explore local and global conceptions of democracy and citizenship, and employ practical approaches to facilitating deliberation and action in our various communities. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy) CMP, SOC (S. Stroup)
Cross-listed as: IGST 0433 *

PSCI 0446 American Slavery, American Freedom (Fall 2018)

In this course we will explore the antagonism and entanglement of slavery and freedom, the two most powerful ideas in American political thought, with a focus on the period from the Declaration of Independence to the Progressive Era. Readings will draw on a range of genres including, judicial decisions, imaginative literature, presidential addresses, canonical works of political theory. Special emphasis will be placed on the writings of African Americans and on the genre of autobiography, as one in which the classic American negotiation between slavery and freedom is often performed with particular poignancy in the course of an individual life. (Political Theory) (formally PSCI 0246) 3 hrs. lect. AMR, HIS, NOR, SOC (J. Harpham)

PSCI 0452 Ecocriticism and Global Environmental Justice (Spring 2019)

Many global environmental problems—climate change, biodiversity, deforestation, clean water, and transboundary waste movement—are ineffectively managed. In this course we will take a critical look at these failures and ask: do existing norms and attitudes make effective, sustainable environmental management more difficult? In doing so, we will examine institutions and phenomena such as the sovereign nation-state, free market capitalism, and the authority of scientific knowledge. We will ask whether sustainable management is compatible with these institutions and phenomena, or whether they contribute to environmental injustice, racism, political marginalization, and gender and class inequity by studying contemporary and historic examples. 3 hrs. sem. (International Relations and Foreign Policy)/
Cross-listed as: IGST 0452

PSCI 0483 The Rise of Asia and US Policy (Fall 2018)

In this course we will study what is arguably the most important strategic development of the 21st century: how the rise of Asia presents security challenges to the region and the United States. Drawing from international relations scholarship, the course will focus on foreign policy challenges and potential responses. These challenges include both traditional security and nontraditional areas such as water and the environment. We will integrate the analysis of these issues in South, East, and Southeast Asia with study of the policy process, in part through simulations and role-playing exercises. 3 hrs. sem.
(Comparative Politics)/
AAL, CMP, NOA, SOC (O. Lewis, J. Lunstead)

PSCI 0500 Independent Projects (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A program of independent work designed to meet the individual needs of advanced students. (Approval required)

PSCI 0700 Honors Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

(Approval required)
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Department of Psychology

Department of Psychology

The Department of Psychology at Middlebury College has a strong commitment to the scientific study of human mental processes, emotions, and behavior. In keeping with this philosophy, the department offers a broad range of courses that provides students with the opportunity to learn about basic research and its applications in a variety of areas, including social, cognitive, behavioral, cultural, clinical, environmental, educational, biological, and developmental psychology.

Requirements for the Major in Psychology: The psychology major consists of a minimum of 10 courses in five categories: (I) Foundation courses, (II) Core courses, (III) Labs, (IV) Advanced seminars, and (V) Electives.      

I. Foundation courses: The foundation courses provide students an overview of the field, the background, and the skills necessary to understand psychology as an empirical science. The required foundation courses are Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 0105) and the Statistics/Research Methods sequence (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202). Most students complete the Statistics/Research Methods sequence by the end of their sophomore year, but no later than the end of their junior year.

II. Core courses: All students must complete at least three core courses, one each from three of the five areas below.  Core courses ensure that students have a broad understanding of various subfields within the discipline. Students are strongly encouraged to complete core courses no later than the end of their junior year.

We offer core courses in the following areas:

  • Clinical:  Psychological Disorders (PSYC 0224)
  • Cognitive: Cognitive Psychology (PSYC 0227--formerly PSYC  0305) or Emotions (PSYC 0205)

  • Developmental: Adolescence (PSYC 0216) or Child Development (PSYC 0225)
  • Physiological: Physiological Psychology (PSYC 0226--formerly PSYC 0301)
  • Social/Personality:  Social Psychology (PSYC 0203) or Personality Psychology (PSYC 0204) or Cultural Psychology (PSYC 0220)

III. Labs: All students must take at least one course with a lab section in addition to Psychological Statistics and Research Methods in Psychology. The lab course may also fulfill another course requirement simultaneously (e.g., a core or an elective course). Lab courses are designated as such in the course descriptions. For 2017-18, these are PSYC 0226, PSYC 0227, and PSYC 0320.

IV. Advanced seminars: Each student must take one advanced seminar (0400-level course) in psychology.  Advanced seminars in psychology emphasize the synthesis and integration of theory; these may be taken during junior and/or senior years. 

V.
Electives: Finally, students must choose any three additional courses from the psychology curriculum, including winter term. In addition to regular content courses, PSYC 0350, PSYC 0500, PSYC 0700, or the PSYC 0701/0702/0703 sequence may be used to satisfy one of the elective requirements.

Requirements for the Minor in Psychology: To earn a minor in psychology students need to complete five psychology courses, including the following:

  • PSYC 0105
  • Two foundation/core courses from among PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, PSYC 0203 (or PSYC 0204), PSYC 0216 (or PSYC 0225), PSYC 0224, PSYC 0226 (formerly PSYC 0301), and PSYC 0227 (formerly PSYC 0305)
  • Two electives (any fall, spring, or winter term PSYC courses; one of which can be PSYC 0350, PSYC 0500, or PSYC 0700).

Research Opportunities: There are options for students who are interested in conducting research in psychology. Students need permission from a faculty member prior to enrollment in these courses.  

  • Sophomores and Juniors may take Directed Research (PSYC 0350) or Advanced Research (PSYC 0500) under the supervision of a faculty member.
  • Seniors may choose to pursue Senior Research (PSYC 0700) or a Senior Thesis (PSYC 0701/0702/0703).  Senior Research and Senior Theses offer students the opportunity to further synthesize and integrate psychology theory and data by conducting research in collaboration with a faculty mentor.

Students cannot take more than one psychology independent research course (PSYC 0350, PSYC 0500, or PSYC 0700) per semester.

Departmental Honors in Psychology: Students who meet the department requirements may apply to the department to complete a senior honors thesis in psychology.  A thesis requires students to apply their skills and knowledge to the completion of a year-long empirical research project. Students intending to complete honors work are expected to submit a Thesis Intent Form by the stated deadline (early to mid-March) of their junior year. Therefore, students should consult with a faculty member before that deadline to actively begin planning their research. The psychology thesis requires three semesters (including Winter Term) of independent research. During the fall term of their senior year, candidates will enroll in PSYC 0701. During the winter and spring terms, after meeting the special requirements listed in the course description and being accepted into honors candidacy, they will enroll in PSYC 0702 and PSYC 0703, respectively (adjustments to this schedule will be made for students entering in February). A minimum GPA of 3.5 in psychology department courses is required for admission to honors candidacy. 

Advanced Placement:
Students can bypass PSYC 0105 and move directly to a higher-level course if they earned a Psychology AP Examination score of 4 or 5, or earned a score of 6 or 7 on the IB (International Baccalaureate) Higher Level psychology exam, or achieved a passing grade on the PSYC Department Placement Exam. Students with lower AP/IB scores, or who took the IB standard Level psychology exam, or who have done previous psychology course work may choose to take the placement exam. A passing score on the department placement exam means that students may enroll in courses that list PSYC 0105 as a pre-requisite, but it does not provide course credit toward the major or minor, graduation, or other College requirements. Course credit for PSYC 0105 is given to students who achieve a score of 4 or 5 on the Psychology AP Examination. Beginning with students matriculating in the Fall of 2016, the department will not grant course credit for the Statistics AP Examination, towards the major, the minor, or as an equivalent for PSYC 0201 (Psychological Statistics).

Transfer Credits in Fulfillment of the Psychology Major and Minor:  Students may transfer no more than two psychology courses toward the major or minor while enrolled as a full time student at Middlebury. Students wishing to obtain approval to transfer more than two courses must petition the department in advance.

Major in Neuroscience: See the Neuroscience Program listing for a description of this major.

Major in Environmental Studies with a focus in Psychology:
See the Environmental Studies Program listing for a description of this major.

Education Studies Minor with a Psychology Major:
Up to two of the Psychology courses required for the Education Studies minor may also be counted towards the Psychology major.


PSYC 0105 Introduction to Psychology (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course will provide a general introduction to the field of psychology. The most central and important theories, concepts, findings, controversies, and applications in the following areas will be considered: biological bases of behavior, learning, perception, thinking, development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. (Open to Juniors and Seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs lect./1 hr. disc. SOC (Fall 2018: C. Parker, M. Seehuus, A. DiBianca Fasoli, I. Elisha)

PSYC 0201 Psychological Statistics (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course will examine statistical methods used in the behavioral and biological sciences. Students will learn the logic underlying statistical analysis, focusing primarily on inferential techniques. They also will become familiar with the application and interpretation of statistics in psychological empirical research, including the use of computer software for conducting and interpreting statistical analyses. (PSYC 0105; Fall: open to psychology and neuroscience majors and undeclared majors, others by waiver; Spring: open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken MATH 0116 or ECON 0210) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab DED (Fall 2018: C. Parker, Z. Zhai)

PSYC 0202 Research Methods in Psychology (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

This course will provide students with an understanding of the research methodology used by psychologists. Students will learn to read psychological studies and other related research as informed consumers. Students will collect, analyze, and interpret data during lab assignments. They will also design an empirical study, review the related literature, and write a formal APA-style research proposal. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0201 or MATH 0116 or ECON 0210; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hr. lab CW, DED (Fall 2018: B. Hofer)

PSYC 0203 Social Psychology (Fall 2018)

Social psychology is the study of how social situations affect the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals. This course will provide an overview of social psychological theory and research findings, as well as reviewing the ways in which these findings are applied to the study of issues such as aggression, close relationships, prejudice, and altruism. Students will also learn about the research methods that social psychologists use to test their theories. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (C. Velez)

PSYC 0205 Emotions (Fall 2018)

Emotions inform thoughtful decisions, but also prompt knee-jerk reactions that make us appear irrational at times. They inspire and dissuade us at both conscious and unconscious levels. They evolved to trigger self-protective responses, but their dark side fuels self-destructive behaviors as well. In this course we will discuss what emotions are, where they come from, how individual emotions differ, and whether or not everyone experiences emotions the same way. We will also explore how appreciating the complexities of emotions might improve emotion regulation and interpersonal dynamics. Topics to be considered will include biological, socio-cultural, clinical, and cognitive theories of emotion. (PSYC 105, open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (K. Cronise)

PSYC 0216 Adolescence (Spring 2019)

This course is designed to provide an overview of adolescent development, including the biological, cognitive, and social transitions of individuals during this period of life. Development also takes place in context, and we will pay particular attention to the role of family, peer group, school, work, and culture. Students will read research literature, as well as cases, in order to examine the central psychological issues of this developmental period, including identity, autonomy, intimacy, sexuality, and achievement. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC

PSYC 0220 Cultural Psychology (Spring 2019)

Historically, much psychological research has focused on the United States and has aimed to interpret human psychological processes without reference to their cultural contexts. Cultural psychology, by contrast, holds that culture is essential for human psychology as we know it. The goal of this course is to understand that premise. Drawing on new research insights from around the globe, we will explore cross-cultural variations in psychological functioning from emotions, cognitions, and perceptions, to development, personality, and mental health. We will analyze where cultural variations come from, how the mind becomes enculturated, and the sense in which human nature is cultural. (PSYC 0105 or by approval) 3 hrs lecture CMP, SOC

PSYC 0224 Psychological Disorders (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

What makes an individual “abnormal”? Under what circumstances do mental health professionals classify emotions, thoughts, or behaviors as “disordered”? In this course, we will explore these questions with attention to their historical, theoretical, ethical, and diagnostic implications. We will investigate various classes of disorders, like anxiety, mood, and psychotic disorders, with a focus on their causes and treatments. Throughout, we will aim to appreciate the complexities and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis, and to recognize and challenge common assumptions about psychological disorders. In addition to lecture, the course will include discussions of current and controversial topics, and occasional demonstrations, analysis of clinical case material, and/or role plays. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC (Fall 2018: M. Kimble)

PSYC 0225 Child Development (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

In this course, we will examine the nature of developmental change from the prenatal period through middle childhood. Our critical examination of developmental processes will invite us to consider various theoretical perspectives (e.g., learning, cognitive, biological, contextual) across various domains of development (i.e., physical, social-emotional, and cognitive). We will address major themes in developmental psychology, such as the interrelatedness of development across domains, the contributions of nature and nurture, and the relative continuity versus discontinuity of developmental change. Throughout, we will practice applying developmental principles to practical settings, policy issues, and topics of current interest. (PSYC 0105; open to seniors by waiver only) 3 hrs. lect. SOC (Fall 2018: I. Elisha)

PSYC 0226 Physiological Psychology (Spring 2019)

This course concerns the biological basis of human behavior. The course will consider the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological bases of processes such as language, sensation, emotion, aggression, sleep, learning, and memory. In the laboratory the student will conduct experiments using standard (surgical, anatomical, biochemical, behavioral) techniques to investigate central nervous system function. (PSYC 0105 or any biology course; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 0301) 3 hrs. lect./3 hrs. lab. SCI

PSYC 0227 Cognitive Psychology (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Questions about the nature of the mind, thinking, and knowledge have a long and rich history in the field of psychology. This course will examine the theoretical perspectives and empirically documented phenomena that inform our current understanding of cognition. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and experiments will form the basis for our explorations of cognition in this class. Topics to be considered include attention, perception, memory, knowledge, problem solving, and decision making. (PSYC 0105; PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202 recommended; not open to first-year students; open to psychology and neuroscience majors; others by waiver. Not open to students who have taken PSYC 0305) 3 hrs. lect./1.5 hrs. lab. SCI (Fall 2018: J. Arndt)
Cross-listed as: NSCI 0227

PSYC 0307 Human Sexuality (Fall 2018)

In this course we will discuss the biological, psychological, behavioral, and cultural aspects of human sexuality, starting with a review of anatomy, physiology and function. We will use current research findings to inform discussions of topics such as arousal and desire, relationships, sexual orientation, consent, pornography, and compulsive sexual behavior. We will look at how issues like contraception, sexuality, and sexually transmitted diseases have influenced and been influenced by their cultural context. (Two psychology courses; not open to first year students; open to Psychology and GSFS majors) 3 hrs. lect. (M. Seehuus)
Cross-listed as: GSFS 0307

PSYC 0317 Biobehavioral Addiction (Fall 2018)

Addiction is a pervasive disorder affecting society on a global scale. To understand this complex disorder, addictions are studied from the basic neural mechanisms, such as how neurons respond to addictive substances, to psychological factors and how they protect or increase risk. In this course we will examine the principles of substance addictions, emerging behavioral addictions (internet/gaming, problem-gambling), and underlying mechanisms that drive addiction. Topics include neural pathways of addictive substances, brain functional and structural changes, theories of motivation, neuropsychological risk factors, and modern prevention and treatment. Psychology and neuroscience students will bring their relative expertise to the class for thoughtful review of the literature.(PSYC 0105) 3 hrs. lect. SCI (Z. Zhai)
Cross-listed as: NSCI 0317

PSYC 0318 Race, Ethnicity, and Discrimination (Spring 2019)

In this course we will examine the impact of race, ethnicity, and discrimination on psychological development. We will consider how various aspects of human growth and well-being are shaped by racial/ethnic group membership, discrimination, social stratification, and intergroup dynamics. We will also explore major theories and research methodologies that challenge assumptions of universality. Topics addressed will include health, education, identity, and social development. (PSYC 0225; open to junior/senior psychology majors, others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. CMP, SOC

PSYC 0327 Educational Psychology (Fall 2018)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to a psychological understanding of teaching and learning through an overview of principles, issues, and related research in educational psychology. The course will examine theories of learning, complex cognitive processes, cognitive and emotional development, motivation, and the application of these constructs to effective instruction, the design of optimum learning environments, assessment of student learning, and teaching in diverse classrooms. (PSYC 0105 and PSYC 0216 or PSYC 0225; not open to first-year students; open to psychology majors, and to education studies majors) 3 hrs. lect./1 hr. disc. SOC (B. Hofer)

PSYC 0333 Environmental Psychology (Spring 2019)

This course will provide an introduction to environmental psychology. We will discuss the relevance of psychology to understanding and addressing environmental problems as well as the potential for the natural environment to serve as a protective factor in our own psychological health. In particular, we will focus on using psychological theory to encourage conservation behavior. We will strive to understand not only the relevant psychological theories and empirical findings, but also the practical implications of the research. (PSYC 0105 or by approval; or ENVS 0112, or ENVS 0211, or ENVS 0215; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. SOC

PSYC 0350 Directed Research in Psychology (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Directed research provides opportunities for advanced students to become familiar with and participate in ongoing research projects under the direction of a faculty member. The student will first read background literature on the content area to be investigated and experimental methodologies to be used. Procedures involved in conducting psychological research will then be learned through firsthand experience. Potential activities include the design of research and the defining of conceptual variables and the gathering, analyzing, and interpretation of data. Finally, students will learn how to write technical articles in psychology by preparing a paper describing the project, using APA style. (Approval required; not open to first-year students) 3 hrs. lect. (Fall 2018: J. Arndt, M. Collaer, K. Cronise, M. Seehuus, S. Gurland, B. Hofer, M. Kimble, C. Parker, M. McCauley, M. Dash, C. Velez, R. Moeller, A. DiBianca Fasoli; Spring 2019: J. Arndt, M. Collaer, K. Cronise, M. Seehuus, S. Gurland, B. Hofer, M. Kimble, A. DiBianca Fasoli, M. McCauley, M. Dash, C. Velez, R. Moeller, C. Parker, Z. Zhai)

PSYC 0405 The Psychology of Racial/Ethnic Minorities (Spring 2019)

This course will explore areas within the field of psychology that relate to the experiences of racial and ethnic groups currently living in the United States. The course is designed to examine psychological perspectives to provide a comprehensive understanding of the issues and problems confronted by members of various racial/ethnic minority groups today. We will examine issues related to stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, identity, self-concept, cognitive development, acculturation, assessment, mental health, and public policy as they pertain to U.S. minorities. (PSYC 0105; open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem.

PSYC 0409 Evolutionary Psychology: A Capstone Course (Spring 2019)

How has human evolution affected how we behave today? How have the historic pressures of natural and sexual selection shaped modern human behavior? Are all behavioral adaptions a solution to some ancestral challenge? In this course, we will explore the field of evolutionary psychology in order to better understand these questions as well as complex phenomena such as cooperation, mate selection, parenting, psychopathology, and moral behavior. This student-led course will cross traditional boundaries within the field of psychology to develop a greater depth of understanding for previously learned topics such as cognition, emotion, development, and social interactions. (open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by waiver) 3 hrs. sem. SOC

PSYC 0413 Approaches to Clinical Psychology: Theory and Practice (Spring 2019)

What are the major theoretical orientations of clinical psychology, and how does each view the domains of thinking, behavior, free will, psychopathology, and treatment? In this discussion-based course, we will explore cognitive behavioral, psychodynamic, behaviorist, existential, and other approaches to clinical psychology. Each has its own emphasis; some focus on symptoms, while others teach emotional tolerance or address unconscious drives. Using philosophy, theory, evidence, and case examples, we will explore similarities and differences among the major orientations and consider their consequences for researchers, therapists, and society at large. (PSYC 0224 recommended; open to junior/senior psychology majors; others by waiver.) 3 hrs. sem.

PSYC 0417 Cultural Nature of Child Development (Fall 2018)

In this course we will examine the cultural contexts and processes of child development. Our course will be organized by several core questions: What does childhood look like across diverse cultures? What do children typically do, what are their responsibilities, and how are they perceived? How are the sequences and endpoints of development culturally shaped, for example, in domains such as self, morality, memory, and reasoning? Our goal throughout will be to understand the dynamic interaction between culture and psychology; that is, how it is that culture “gets into” our minds and bodies, and how psychological processes create culture. (Open to junior and senior psychology majors, others by approval) (not open to students who have taken PSYC 0317) 3 hrs. sem (A. DiBianca Fasoli)

PSYC 0430 Memory: A User's Guide (Fall 2018)

How can I remember names better? How can I best study for an exam? How accurate are our memories? A deep understanding of how people remember will allow us to answer these and many other questions. Topics covered in this course include working memory, the nature of encoding and retrieval, applied aspects of remembering, and neuroscientific approaches to understanding memory. Readings will be a mixture of textbook and journal articles. The class will have a seminar format, with emphasis on student-led discussions and contributions. Additionally, student research groups will design and execute a research study examining human memory. Evaluations will be based on the research project, student-led discussions, and reaction papers. (PSYC 0201 or ECON 0210 or MATH 0116 or BIOL 0211; open to junior and senior psychology and neuroscience majors only) 3 hrs. sem. (J. Arndt)
Cross-listed as: NSCI 0430

PSYC 0437 The Social and Emotional Brain (Spring 2019)

Social relationships profoundly impact our emotional and physical well-being. For instance, healthy relationships bring joy, but difficult relationships bring pain. Social/affective (emotional) neuroscience collectively utilizes social psychology, emotions research, and neuroscience to inform our understanding of social interactions. It addresses questions like: How does the brain process social/emotional information? How do emotions help us discern other’s intentions? How are relationships shaped by emotion? Topics for discussion will include the interconnectedness of the social/emotional brain, self-concepts, theory of mind, empathy, and disorders of social/emotional function. Psychology and neuroscience students will bring their relative expertise to the class content for thoughtful discourse. (PSYC 0105; Open to junior and senior neuroscience and psychology majors only, others by waiver) 3 hrs. Sem.
Cross-listed as: NSCI 0437

PSYC 0500 Advanced Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students majoring in psychology. (Approval required)

PSYC 0700 Senior Research (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced senior majors in psychology. (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

PSYC 0701 Senior Thesis Proposal (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students hoping to be considered as candidates for departmental honors must enroll in PSYC 0701 under the sponsorship of a department faculty member and submit a formal, written research proposal to the department by 5 p.m. on the Wednesday during the final week of fall classes in their senior year. If the proposal is approved, the student will enroll in PSYC 0702 during the winter term and PSYC 0703 during the spring term of their senior year. (Feb graduates should consult with their advisors about the appropriate semester in which to begin a thesis.) (PSYC 0201 and PSYC 0202; Approval required)

PSYC 0702 Senior Thesis Second Semester (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Students whose honors thesis proposal (PSYC 0701) has been approved will collect, analyze, and interpret their data. This is the second semester of the 3-semester senior thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0701; Approval required)

PSYC 0703 Senior Thesis (Fall 2018, Spring 2019)

Senior Thesis*
This is the third and final semester of the senior thesis. Students will finish analyzing, and interpreting their data. This process culminates in a written thesis to be submitted by 4 p.m. on the Monday BEFORE the final week of spring classes, a presentation, and an oral defense. The decision about awarding departmental honors will be made after the student submits the thesis. (PSYC 0201, PSYC 0202, and PSYC 0702; Approval required)
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Department of Religion

Requirements for the major (11 courses): The Religion major allows students to concentrate in a variety of sub-fields within the larger field of the study of religion. These sub-fields can be based on traditions, geographical areas, or themes.

  • While the plausibility of concentrating on a given sub-field depends on the availability of expert faculty members therein, the department currently offers the following concentrations: traditions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Judaism.; geographical areas, such as, South Asia, East Asia, the Americas; and themes, such as mysticism, ethics, and sacred texts. Students are encouraged to consult with faculty members to explore other options or combinations thereof.

     The major will consist of at least eleven courses, including no more than one winter term course, distributed as follows:

  • A primary concentration of five courses: a four course concentration in a specific sub-field plus a senior project or thesis related to that sub-field. The courses must include a 0100 level course and a 0300 level seminar that focus in that tradition/area.
  • RELI 0400, Seminar on the Study of Religion
  • A distribution of five other courses elected by the student in close consultation with his/her adviser, subject to the following provisions:

(1) Majors must make sure that they have had exposure to a variety of different religious traditions (for example, Asian and Western) as well as a variety of methodological approaches to the study of religion (for example, historical, sociological, anthropological, or philos