Middlebury
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FYSE1081

Greek Phil., Tragedy, & Comedy

"The Ancient Quarrel": Greek Philosophy, Tragedy, and Comedy*
In Plato's day there was a “quarrel” between philosophy and poetry, a rivalry for the ethical education of citizens. How do the tragedies of Aeschylus and Sophocles communicate ethical dilemmas? Does Aristophanes in The Clouds suggest a serious critique within his comic satire of Socrates? Why does Plato banish the poets from his ideal city in The Republic, but develop his own philosophical poetry? Why does Aristotle in the Poetics emphasize the catharsis of the tragic emotions? Finally, we will consider Nietzsche's interpretation in The Birth of Tragedy: Socratic rationalism deals the fatal blow to tragedy, yet Plato transforms Socrates into a tragic figure. 3 hrs. sem.
Subject:
First Year Seminar
Department:
First-Year Seminar Program
Division:
Interdisciplinary
Requirements Fulfilled:
CW EUR PHL

Sections

Fall 2014

FYSE1081A-F14 Seminar (Woodruff)

Fall 2011

FYSE1081A-F11 Seminar (Woodruff)

Fall 2008

FYSE1081A-F08 Seminar (Woodruff)

Fall 2004

FYSE1081A-F04 Seminar (Woodruff)